Defining AIDS and AIDS defining illnesses | Infectious diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy

Defining AIDS and AIDS defining illnesses | Infectious diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy


– So we know that an
untreated HIV infection destroys your immune system and leads to essentially an immune less
state that we call AIDS, acquired immune deficiency syndrome. So how do we know when an HIV infection isn’t just HIV anymore? How do we know it’s progressed to AIDS? Well, in one or both of two ways. So here’s a graph I’ll use to explain. So here’s CD4 T cell count on this y-axis. And here’s a little timeline and we’ll say that 10 years is about here. Because in an untreated HIV infection it takes about 10 years
before your immune system is completely destroyed
and AIDS is developed. So when your CD4 cell count has dropped from its normal levels, right, of about 1,200 or so CD4 cells
per cubic millimeter of blood to less than or equal to about 200 cells per cubic
millimeter of blood, you’ve developed AIDS. That’s one of two ways to tell. The other possible way to
know if you’ve developed AIDS is if you have any of what are called the AIDS defining
opportunistic infections. Which are sicknesses that can
only take hold in your body if you have a failing immune system. So regardless of your CD4 count, if you have any of these
opportunistic infections and, of course, an HIV infection as well you will be diagnosed with AIDS. So let’s do some drawing here to look at what types of AIDS
defining illnesses can come on and when they might come on. Because it’s important
to be on the lookout for signs and symptoms
of these conditions. You know because they
can be really dangerous to your health. So generally speaking, people with CD4 counts
greater than 500 cells per cubic millimeter of blood are not at risk for
opportunistic infections. But if you’re hovering
right around 500ish, then sort of the daily ebb
and flow in your CD4 counts means that you might develop
some minor infections like thrush in your mouth. Or yeast infections in the vagina. So thrush symptoms to look out for would be white patches on
the gums or on the tongue. And you might also get
some pain in the mouth or in the throat and that would cause
some trouble swallowing. And yeast infections symptoms might include vaginal
irritation or itching and also a thick white discharge. And I should probably clarify, so all of these ranges
that we’re looking at, these aren’t set in stone. So you could get certain
opportunistic infections at slightly higher T cell
counts, or CD4 cell counts, or slightly lower CD4 T cell counts. These aren’t sort of fixed numbers. These are just sort of ranges. Good, so, if your CD4
levels continue to drop you could develop something
called Kaposi’s sarcoma which is a tumor, a set of tumors caused by human herpesvirus-8. Which can only really infect a person with a weakened immune system. So the classic signs that
you should look out for with Kaposi’s sarcoma are these
purple patches or nodules, growths almost, that appear
usually in the mouth, on the gums, or on your skin. If your CD4 count drops even further to between 100 and 200 cells
per cubic millimeter of blood, then you might develop some of the more severe
opportunistic infections. For example, Pneumocystis
jiroveci pneumonia. Also known as Pneumocystis
carinii pneumonia or PCP. So this is a fungal
infection of the lungs. And it causes a really,
really, severe chest infection. And in fact this is most
often the cause of death for someone with AIDS. Two other common fungal
infections that might take hold are Histoplasmosis and Coccidioidomycosis. It’s a bit of a mouthful,
Coccidioidomycosis. And these two are pretty severe because they infect many
different parts of your body, not just your lungs. So, you can look out for a PCP infection because it presents kind
of like a chest infection. So you’d have shortness of
breath, you’d have a cough, you’d have chest pain. And, you know, at this
point your immune system would still be able to mount a fever, so you’d have a fever. And these two fungal infections present in a similar way,
right, Histo and Coccidioido. But remember I said that
they’re systemic diseases so these can also cause some weight loss and just general fatigue. Those are systemic symptoms. Now if your CD4 levels continue to fall, to between 50 to a 100
cells per cubic millimeter, you can start to develop
opportunistic infections that affect your brain such as Toxoplasmosis and Cryptococcosis. So Toxoplasmosis is caused by a parasite and it can cause Encephalitis which is swelling of the brain. And because of this swelling
of the brain or Encephalitis a person might develop
neurological symptoms like a headache, or weakness
of their muscles, or seizures. These are all signs of a sick brain. And Cryptococcosis is yet
another fungal infection. And this one usually starts
as an infection in your lungs. And then it sort of moves up to your brain and causes Cryptococcal meningitis which can rapidly be fatal. So symptoms of Cryptococcal
meningitis would be sort of the classic meningitic symptoms, things like a headache, and
neck stiffness, and a fever. And while we’re in this
little bracket here, two other organisms that can
cause serious infections, right, between this 50 to a 100 bracket are Cryptosporidiosis
and CMV, Cytomegalovirus. So Cryptosporidiosis causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms. So you’d get this chronic,
longstanding, watery, diarrhea. Because your intestines
just aren’t absorbing food or water properly. You would get serious stomach cramps and you’d have severe weight loss. And CMV here, actually CMV
is present in most adults but it only really starts to cause trouble if something’s wrong
with your immune system. So in someone with really low CD4 levels, CMV can cause problems in
the digestive system as well. So the last one I’ll talk about happens if your CD4 cell count is less than 50 cells per
cubic millimeter of blood. And this one is called
Mycobacterium avium complex or MAC. And this bacteria sort of similar
to all the other bacteria, and viruses, and fungi that
I’ve talked about so far. They’re all present in
many different places soil, water, on trees, really many places in the environment. But again, they don’t cause
any problems in people with healthy immune systems,
we just fight them off. But MAC in a severely
immunocompromised person, like someone with AIDS, can cause a really, really
serious infection that spreads through the bloodstream to
many other parts of the body. And that will result in
things like high fevers, night sweats, diarrhea, all
sorts of systemic symptoms. And MAC can be rapidly fatal as well. Now everything I’ve talked about, all of these AIDS defining
opportunistic infections, they can be treated with
the right medications. So with access to treatment they don’t have to be life-threatening. You just have to get
medical help right away. And then once they’re treated the focus would then be on
raising your CD4 cell count with ARV treatment, like HAART. So that hopefully your
immune system gets stronger and none of these develop again.

Expert HOA Fumigators 🎪🚫🐜  No Hassle Execution of Termite Fumigation for HOAs

Expert HOA Fumigators 🎪🚫🐜 No Hassle Execution of Termite Fumigation for HOAs


Fumigating your HOA is one of the most, if
not the most, complex project you can undertake in your community. It comes with lots or reporting and disclosure
requirements to the Ag Department and Structural Pest Control Board of California as well as
other agencies that HOA board members and management professionals may not be aware
of. Fumigating your HOA requires 100% cooperation
from residents and 100% access to every unit. Not every termite control service provider
is equipped to offer the project management and customer service expertise to achieve
this. Today Accurate is the number one provider
of HOA fumigation services in Southern California because our fumigation project management
services and expertise remains unmatched in the industry. For every HOA fumigation project we undertake,
we guarantee 100% cooperation from residents, and 100% HOA compliance with local and state
regulations as long as we are allowed to manage the project internally from start to finish. We do more than send a crew to cover and fumigate
the buildings. From the beginning, an HOA fumigation project
manager is assigned to you. No other company has in-house staff whose
sole full-time job is to manage and successfully execute HOA fumigations. Your assigned project manager will provide
a template with the necessary verbiage to properly notice residents of the upcoming
fumigation and will advise your board of directors and community manager of the timeline in which
the notice should be distributed to remain Davis-Stirling compliant. A unique website is built just for your HOA
where residents can immediately go to for information including detailed literature,
and an instructional video with preparation instructions for your HOA fumigation–another
service that only Accurate offers. On your community’s webpage, residents will
be able to electronically sign their occupant’s notice and even interact with their project
management rep in a transparent Facebook-like wall where questions and answers regarding
the project can be posted publicly. In addition to the information available online,
we will schedule evening or weekend townhall meetings where our HOA fumigation project
managers present all pertinent information, field questions, and distribute nylofume bags
for each unit being fumigated. It’s unrealistic to expect that all units
will respond at the time of the scheduled townhall. Your fumigation project manager is prepared
to follow up on an individual basis with each outstanding unit that does not respond either
online or in person to the posted fumigation notice. Your project manager will help each of those
units on a case-by-case basis to get compliant with the necessary fumigation preparation
all while keeping the board of directors and management team in the loop. You can rest assured that while the actual
fumigation is taking place, your project manager continues to stay personally involved to ensure
a successful completion of the fumigation project. On the final day of fumigation, your assigned
project manager personally ensures that each unit is secured and aerated adequately for
your safe return home. If applicable, your project manager will also
assist in making sure the gas company has the necessary access to gas lines and units
to restore gas and relight pilot lights for every residence.

Termite Prevention Tips

Termite Prevention Tips


Termites can find creative ways to invade
your home. By following a few outdoor sanitation tips you can help keep them away from your
structure. Trim all shrubs, bushes and other dense greenery
away so that they do not touch your structure. Rakeback mulch at least 6 inches away from
the foundation. Don’t leave firewood near your home, as it
is a magnet for termites. If you do keep firewood outside your structure during the winter,
keep it raised off the ground and protected from water if at all possible. Remove all lumber, tree stumps and other kinds
of loose wood from the perimeter of your structure. Fix any leaky pipes and eliminate any standing
water near your structure. Subterranean termites cannot live on wood alone, they require moisture
as well. Keep gutters and downspouts free of accumulated
leaves and debris. Clogs and obstructions can attract termites. Seal as many cracks, crevices and holes in
your structures foundation, as they may provide a handy access point for termites. And it’s that easy with the expert help
from Do My Own Pest Control dot com! Subscribe to our channel for more DIY and
product videos!

Implementing TB Infection Control in Out-patient Settings

Implementing TB Infection Control in Out-patient Settings


As a healthcare professional, you have a vital role to play in tuberculosis infection
control in your clinic. If you see HIV positive patients
in your clinic, you know that they’re at
increased risk for getting TB because they’re very susceptible
to certain infections. In fact,
TB is the leading cause of death in people with HIV/AIDS. TB is different from other
opportunistic infections because it’s spread
by the respiratory route, and infected patients
can spread the disease to others in crowded clinics,
including you. This video is designed to
give you practical information to help you stop the spread
of TB in your clinic by improving
TB infection control practices. It’s based on the
World Health Organization Policy on TB Infection Control
in Health-Care Facilities, Congregate Settings
and Households. Use this video as a supplement to training
you’ve already received along with other
training materials, including the guidelines,
assessment and planning tools, posters and monitoring
and evaluation forms included with this video. Topics include how TB is spread,
who’s at most risk, and how to control TB. We’ll give you practical ideas
on how to make simple changes in your clinic set-up
and in your practices that can have a large impact
on your health and the health of your patients. TB is usually spread
when an infected person coughs and produces small droplets
which contain TB bacilli. The droplets remain suspended
in the air for hours. When someone
breathes in these droplets, he or she can become infected
with TB. There are several factors that can affect the likelihood
of TB transmission: The number of infected droplets
generated by a person with TB, the amount of time
a TB-infected person is in contact with others, the amount of ventilation in the area where the exposure
takes place, and the immune status
of the person exposed. TB is usually spread
by coughing patients who haven’t been recognized
as having TB and aren’t receiving treatment. So, it’s up to you
to notice coughing patients and get them diagnosed
and treated quickly. At the highest risk
of getting TB are those living with HIV/AIDS, people living in crowded,
poorly ventilated settings such as correctional facilities, military barracks
or refugee camps, patients with medical conditions such as diabetes,
cancer or renal failure, and those taking
immunosuppressive medications like steroids or chemotherapy and children
under the age of five. Who is most likely to interact
with all of these people? You are! Because of your job, you are very likely
to come into contact with many people who have TB and that puts YOU at high risk
of getting TB, too. To control TB there are four types
of infection control measures: Managerial Control Measures, Administrative Control Measures, Environmental Control Measures and Personal Protective
Equipment, or PPE. Remember, whatever your role
in the clinic, you are critical in carrying out these TB infection control
measures. Let’s take a closer look how. Facility administrators
and managers should provide leadership
by promoting a culture of safety and advocating
for necessary resources to conduct
infection control measures. This includes establishing
an infection control committee for the facility
that meets regularly, appointing someone to conduct
a facility assessment and developing an infection
control plan and policies. The basic building blocks
of infection control are the administrative
control measures and should be implemented
by all members of the team. These measures include prompt identification
of coughing patients, promoting cough etiquette, separating coughers
from other patients, and “fast-tracking” for prompt
diagnosis and treatment. They also include monitoring
the time it takes to get laboratory results back
(such as sputum smear results) and assuring the routine
evaluation of clinic personnel for TB. It is the undiagnosed
and untreated TB patient that presents the greatest risk
to others. It’s up to you to act
as early as possible to identify people coming into
the clinic who might have TB– and as you know, the most
visible sign is coughing. In a busy clinic, early identification
of coughing patients may be done
by the admissions clerk, a community health worker,
an educator or nurse. Work with your team to designate
the most appropriate staff for this critical task. Cough Etiquette
refers to the practice of covering all coughs
and sneezes to contain
respiratory secretions. All patients, visitors,
and clinic staff should be encouraged to cover
their coughs and sneezes with a handkerchief,
or a tissue. When a handkerchief or tissue
is not available coughing or sneezing
into the upper arm or elbow is the preferred technique for preventing the spread
of infection. This may seem strange, but infection control experts
recommend this technique as safer than coughing
or sneezing into the hands. Those who cough or sneeze
into their hands should wash them
with soap and water or use
an alcohol-based hand rub. If disposable surgical masks
are available, have coughing
or sneezing patients wear them to contain
respiratory secretions. Ask patients to dispose of masks
in the waste bin after use. A poster on cough etiquette
is included in the materials
accompanying this video. Promote cough etiquette every
chance you have in the clinic– at the entrance,
at registration, and every time you interact
with a patient or visitor. Remember you are a role model
for behavior in the clinic, so cover your own cough, too. A key method
for reducing TB transmission is to separate coughing patients
from non-coughing patients. A trained clerk, nurse or anyone that has contact with patients
as they enter the clinic can make
this initial separation. Ideally, coughing patients should wait in a separate,
outdoor area. This minimizes contact and takes advantage
of natural ventilation. You should explain to patients that no one will lose
their place in line and that this is
for their own protection. Once separated, coughing
patients should be fast-tracked or quickly examined
for additional symptoms to determine if TB
diagnostic tests are needed. Finally, as part of
administrative control measures, lab staff and the infection
control point person should monitor the time it takes
to get the lab results back, such as sputum smear results and assure there is routine
evaluation of clinic personnel for TB. Environmental Control Measures are the third major type
of infection control measures. They include the use of natural
and mechanical ventilation and ultraviolet
germicidal irradiation. These measures are used to reduce the number of
infectious droplets in the air. If your facility is planning a
renovation or new construction, it will be important to consider these environmental
infection control measures in the building design. Using natural ventilation in overcrowded waiting areas
and hallways is a relatively easy way to decrease the risk
of TB transmission. In warmer climates, building a covered outdoor
waiting area is an inexpensive and a good way
to maximize ventilation and reduce clinic congestion. Opening windows and doors
to maximize cross-ventilation reduces the number of infectious
TB droplets in the air. This works
in the home settings too, so instruct patients
to do this at home if a family member
is undergoing treatment for TB. In clinics, consulting rooms
should be arranged so airflow moves away
from the clinician toward the patient
to the outside. Electric fans can be used to assist in producing
this airflow pattern. Mechanical ventilation systems
designed for optimal airflow with the help of an engineer
can reduce TB transmission. But remember that ordinary
air-conditioning units do not reduce the risk
of TB transmission. Where available, ultraviolet
germicidal irradiation also known as UV lights or lamps placed in the upper parts
of a room help to clear the air
of infectious droplets. To be effective, UV lamps
need to be properly installed and regularly cleaned
and maintained. There are some environmental
control measures you can use to make sputum collection
less risky. Ideally, sputum collection
should be done outside in a designated location
away from other patients. When performed indoors, it should be done in
a well-ventilated room or booth designed to extract air
to the outside. Small,
poorly ventilated bathrooms should not be used
for sputum collection because they offer no safety to
other patients or staff members. The last TB infection control
measure we’ll discuss is Personal Protective Equipment
or PPE, which refers to the use
of particulate respirators and surgical masks. Particulate respirators
known as N-95’s or FFP2’s are worn by healthcare workers and are different
from surgical masks because they filter out
TB-infected droplets as you breathe in. If available, respirators
should be worn by staff when doing procedures
such as bronchoscopy and when caring for infectious
TB patients or suspects, especially when multi-drug
resistant TB is suspected. Surgical masks are not effective in preventing the inhalation
of TB droplets, but when worn by patients they can contain the majority
of droplets produced by coughs or sneezes, thus reducing the risk
of transmission. Staff and patients often have concerns about stigma
during triaging or when using particulate
respirators or surgical masks. It’s important for you
to be aware of these issues and discuss ways to approach
and communicate with patients to minimize stigma. In summary, we’ve covered the
basics of TB infection control including; how TB is spread,
who is at most risk for TB; and the managerial,
administrative, environmental and personal protective
equipment measures that can be used to control TB. You personally
are very important in preventing TB transmission — from one patient to another, from a patient to a visitor
in your clinic, and to yourself and your family. If you think
you may be infected, it’s important to get screened
and seek care immediately. Although tuberculosis
is a serious disease, it can be treated and cured. People coming into the clinic
look to you as a knowledgeable
health professional. You are in the best position to educate them about
TB infection control and to demonstrate
good infection control habits. You CAN make a difference
in TB infection control in your facility,
in your community, and in your country.

How to avoid infection during chemotherapy – Macmillan Cancer Support

How to avoid infection during chemotherapy – Macmillan Cancer Support


[Sound of television in background] During chemotherapy your risk of infection
is higher than normal. This is because chemotherapy reduces the number
of your white blood cells, the cells that help defend your body against
infection. When your white blood cells are low you’ll
need to take precautions to reduce your risk of infection.
Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of infection during your treatment.
Your doctor or nurse may have some specific advice for you as well.
Make sure you always wash your hands before preparing or eating food
and after you’ve been out, or you’ve used the toilet.
Use soap and warm water and don’t share your towel.
Cook your food thoroughly and don’t reheat it. Try to avoid foods that could carry an increased risk of infection,
such as takeaways, shellfish, soft cheeses, pâté and live yoghurts.
Eat as healthily as you can with plenty of fruit and vegetables
but remember to peel your fruit before eating it.
Keep away from people with colds or infections if you can
and always let your doctor know if you’ve been in touch with anyone who has chicken
pox. It’s fine to go out but it’s best to avoid
crowds. If you need to travel or pop to the shops,
try to do it at a time when you know it will be quiet.
Pets can be a great source of comfort, but be careful around them when you’re receiving
chemotherapy. Wash your hands after touching them and ask
someone else to change their litter trays or cages if you can.
Look out for any signs of infection, such as a cough, sore throat, feeling cold and
shivery or a temperature above 38 degrees Celsius.
If you have a high temperature or suddenly feel unwell get in touch with your hospital
straight away. When your white blood cells are low an infection
can be serious and you’ll need to be treated with antibiotics.
Once your chemotherapy has finished your white blood cells will get back to normal. [Announcer] For information, help, or if you just want to chat, call the Macmillan Support Line on 0808 808 00 00 or visit macmillan.org.uk

The Bugs That Lay Eggs In Your Face

The Bugs That Lay Eggs In Your Face


– [Narrator] There’s a creature scurrying across your face right now. Yes, you, and at some point, maybe
now, maybe in a few days, it’s going to find a nice
cozy pore in your skin and lay a single enormous egg. Meet the face mites.
They’re smaller than a grain of sand, are a kind of
arachnid like spiders, and they feast on the oil
and cells in your skin, particularly on your oily
nose, cheeks, and forehead. Scientists suspect
they’ve been living on us since the dawn of humanity
over 200,000 years ago, and today, studies suggest
practically every adult on the planet has thousands of them. Odds are you’ve been living
with them your whole life. Babies quickly get them from their parents a few days after birth,
and once those face mites are on you, the only
thing they enjoy as much as slurping oil and
nutrients from your pores is having sex all over your face. Afterwards, females burrow deep into your pores where they lay their eggs. The eggs end up in one of two places depending on the species of face mite. The first species, called
Demodex folliculorum, lays its eggs in your hair follicle, while the second prefers nesting
in your sebaceous glands. And in under two weeks, the babies hatch, mate, lay their own eggs and die, leaving behind a pile
of decomposing corpses. Now, you can wash some of this off, but you’ll never eradicate them completely because even if you treat
them with antibiotics, they’ll return in about six weeks, tops. You’ll pick them up from towels, pillows, and your loved ones. Well, that all sounds horrific, but usually face mites are harmless. They only become a
problem when they multiply out of control. This can happen in people with an impaired immune system. It’s also been seen in
people with a painful skin condition called rosacea. Normally, you’ll have
around one or two mites per square centimeter of skin, but one study found
that people with rosacea had 10 times the normal amount. Believe it or not, in some cases, face mites can be useful. Researchers can actually
study your face mites to learn about your ancestors. You see, most mites often
stay within a community. So over time, they’ve evolved
into distinct lineages in different geographic
regions, and by comparing their DNA, scientists can
trace how different groups of humans migrated across the world. For example, a study
found that European mites genetically diverged from East Asian mites around 40,000 years ago. That’s the same time European
and East Asian humans parted ways. Pretty handy. So when it comes down to
bugs crawling all over you, it could be a lot worse.

Insect Repellents : Picaridin Insect Repellents

Insect Repellents : Picaridin Insect Repellents


A relatively new product that’s been popular
in Europe for many years, new to the United States is picaridin. Picaridin is another
active ingredient that is pretty good. Up until recently picaridin has not been available
but in 7 and 16 percent strengths. There is a new product out now by Sowyer products,
which is a broad spectrum of picaridin products. It is 20 percent picaridin, which is going
to be a little bit stronger. You’re not going to have to apply it quite as frequently, and
it’s a very good product. Cutter has been making picaridin for quite some time. This
particular one is 15 percent, they also make a 7 percent product. One thing with insect
repellent that you want to always consider, that I haven’t brought up previously, is that
you never want to use an aerosol if you can possibly avoid it. An aerosol in order for
it to spray, it’s going to have alcohol in it. And if you think about what alcohol does
to the pores of your skin, alcohol dilutes the pores of your skin, and that’s going to
increase the absorption rate of the active ingredient in your repellent. And you don’t
want it to absorb in your skin, you want it to float on top of your skin. So if you ever
use a insect repellent along with a sunscreen, put the sunscreen on first, let it absorb
into your skin and then float your insect repellent on top of your skin.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Home Treatments and Natural Remedies

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Home Treatments and Natural Remedies


Urinary Tract Infection UTI Home Treatments
and Natural Remedies Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a very
common health problem. While both men and women get UTIs, women are
more prone to them. A UTI occurs when the bladder and its exit
tubes are infected by bacteria. Common symptoms include a frequent urge to
urinate, passing small quantities of urine, a burning sensation when urinating and change
in urine color. There are many natural remedies that can help
prevent and treat UTIs. 1. Water One of the first things to do when you have
a urinary tract infection is to drink plenty of water. Thatís because drinking water can help flush
away the bacteria that’s causing your infection. How much should you drink? Aim for half of your body weight in ounces
of water, up to 80 ounces (oz) a day. 2. Vitamin C Getting plenty of foods high in vitamin C
is important, because large amounts of vitamin C make urine more acidic. This inhibits the growth of bacteria in your
urinary tract. 3. Heat Inflammation and irritation from UTIs cause
burning, pressure, and pain around your pubic area. Applying a heating pad can help soothe the
area. Keep the heat setting low, donít apply it
directly to the skin, and limit your use to 15 minutes at a time to avoid burns. 4. Diet When you have a UTI, caffeine, alcohol, spicy
food, nicotine, carbonated drinks, and artificial sweeteners can irritate your bladder further. This makes it harder for your body to heal. Focus on healthy foods, such as high-fiber
carbohydrates, which are good for your digestive health. 5. Empty Your Bladder Every time you empty your bladder ó even
if itís just a small amount ó you rid it of some of the bacteria causing the infection. Even though it can be uncomfortable, going
to the bathroom every chance you get is a vital part of recovering. 6. Apple Cider Vinegar Apple cider vinegar is a rich source of enzymes,
potassium and other useful minerals that can prevent the bacteria that cause UTIs from
multiplying or growing. Those suffering from UTIs can use apple cider
vinegar as a natural antibiotic to treat the infection. Add two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
to a glass of water. You can also add lemon juice and sweeten with
honey. Mix it well. Drink this two times a day for a few days. 7. Blueberries Blueberries have bacteria-inhibiting properties
that can help in the treatment of UTIs. The antioxidants present in blueberries are
good for the immune system, and they prevent growth of bacteria that causes UTIs. Including fresh blueberries or juice in your
daily diet is a good way to prevent UTIs. If you like the video, give it a thumbs†up
and share it with your friends! If you want more recipes and tips, subscribe
to the channel!

What To Do If Termites Swarm Your Home

What To Do If Termites Swarm Your Home


Hi, everyone Isaac camacho here from
Accurate Termite and Pest Control on location at one of our large fumigation
projects. And, I’m going to talk to you today about what to do if you find a
termite infestation or a termite swarm in your home. There’s really three things
that you should do. The first is, don’t panic. The swarm itself is not going to put you
or your family at any risk or any danger. Termites do not bite or threaten humans
in any way. They also do not cause immediate damage to your home. It just
does not work that way. They will not produce any kind of significant damage
just because they’re there. The second thing you want to do is you
want to document as much of the evidence as you can. Whether it’s the termites
themselves, their droppings, sometimes you can find a pile of their
wings. Anything that you find document it. Take pictures of it, if possible. Take
video of it. All of that information will be very useful when your inspector
comes around. That will help him assess the infestation, see where it is, and
hopefully be able to find the source. The third, and the last thing you should do,
is you need to schedule two inspections. The first; you’re going to want to schedule
an immediate inspection of your home to see if there is an infestation somewhere
inside the home that produced that swarm. You want to see how bad it is. You want
to know where it is. You want to know if you have more than one. The second
inspection that you want to schedule is a follow-up
inspection. Because an infestation will not produce evidence immediately, you
won’t know if a new swarm today actually started a colony somewhere in your home
for perhaps a few months after that actually happens. So you definitely want
a follow-up inspection to your first. That follow-up inspection should be
scheduled somewhere around 12 months, so just around one year, from your first
inspection. If that swarm did produce a new colony you won’t necessarily know
perhaps for another 12 months. So ,you have to
schedule your immediate inspection (make sure that you find anything that’s
they’re currently), and then you do want to know 12 months from the first
inspection if that new swarm made it somewhere inside your house. So don’t
forget. First, don’t panic. You’re not in danger there’s no real threat right away. Second, document all of the evidence that
you found–that you see the termites swarms leaving. And third, scheduled two
inspections your immediate inspection as well as your one-year follow-up just to
make sure they did not make it into your house. Alright, thanks for watching everyone. Let
us know what you think–if this is helpful. Share this if you’ve heard of someone
finding a swarm in their house. It might be useful to them. Follow us here on
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And, if we can ever be of service you can find us at 1(844) GOT-ANTS.

How To Get An Ear Infection | 4 EAR-Resistible Ways!

How To Get An Ear Infection | 4 EAR-Resistible Ways!


Hello boys and girls. In this video, I’m gonna be telling you how
to get an ear infection, because winter, well, it just doesn’t suck enough already. Let’s eff-up your ears too. I mean it’s not like you listen to anyone
anyways. So what do you need your ears for? Queries of the Interweb. What’s going on? Joel here and I amusingly answer questions
that are searched for every single day on the interweb. Be sure to smash that subscribe button and
hit the notification bell so that you don’t miss anything. So let’s talk about how to get an ear infection
on purpose, like what normal people do. There’s nothing normal about you if you’re
watching this video. The first thing you’re gonna want to do is
you are going to want to be around sick people. If there’s sick people in your school, sick
people in your house, go near them, okay. If you have a friend who has a cold, get him
to cough in your ear. It might be a little bit of a weird favor
to ask but if they’re really your friend, they’ll do it and they won’t…they, they
won’t question it. They’ll just do it. I did make a video on how to give yourself
a cold. There’ll be links to that below. It’s probably a suggested video here too if
I’ve uh, if I’ve gotten a hold of Youtube’s next-up algorithms, huh. You know the videos that show up on the side
that show related videos of what you should watch next. I, have a feeling that I figured that out
now. Having a cold as well, also makes you very
susceptible to getting an ear infection. So give yourself a cold, be around a cold. Another way to get an ear infection is to
not clean your ears after swimming okay. If you go swimming in the ocean, or swimming
in a pool… you know frick’n Charlie peed in the pool. Don’t wash your ears afterwords. Don’t clean your ears. Just let the water soak in there. That ear is as good as infected. You go swimming with Charlie and you might
as well have a first responders team nearby. God knows all the crap that’s in the ocean. You know how they tell you to clean behind
your ears? You’re not gonna do that. Don’t clean behind your ears. Leave your ears alone okay. Let them be free spirits, all right. Your ears are just freelance workers in a
job market. They’re not really looking to climb the corporate
ladder. They just kind of want to do their own thing. Essentially they’re unemployed but because
they technically work for themselves, they still have a little bit of dignity. Leave your ears alone. Do not clean those things, your ear lobes. Leave em’ alone. You have any smokers in the family? Because another way to give yourself an ear
infection is to be around second hand smoke. Obviously second hand smoke is dangerous for
you, it’s bad for you but you know, here’s an idea. If you uh, hold you breath and go you know,
move your head around in some smoke and, and move out of it, just so your ears get exposure,
that’s a good way to give yourself an ear infection. Or if you have a really creepy old aunt who
smokes those long one hundred and one Dalmatian cigarettes, you could get them to shove that
in your ear or just blow… get someone with a hookah to just like… like right into your
ear. Hookah smoke… hookah, hookah. Another way to give yourself a ear infection
on purpose is to touch your face a lot. You know sir-laughs-a-lot? I don’t… I don’t know who that is. But you’re gonna become sir-touches-his-face-a-lot. Something to do with the germs on your face
and then they go into your nose and then you just start getting sick and then you’re ear
gets infected and then your eustachian tubes clog up. And that’s okay. Nobody’s gonna judge you. Just touch your face some more okay. Shove your finger in your ear. Get your friend Charlie to give you a wet
willy all right, a wet willy. You guys have any other great suggestions
for videos, go ahead and leave it in the comments. I’ll see you in the next video. Peace!