NC State: Wild Yeasts, Wasps and Beers

NC State: Wild Yeasts, Wasps and Beers


We have all different types of yeasts,
traditional ale and lager brewers yeast, and we also have this, our bumble bee yeast,
here as well.Historically just two kinds of basic yeasts have been used to produce
all beer, both of which come from nature. But, one of the really exciting things
that’s become clear recently, is if you look across beers, of the things that you
can vary to vary the taste, the yeast is actually what has the biggest impact on
the taste of the beer. We know that if we could vary the yeast, we could we could
alter the beer in all kinds of new ways. So, what we’re now trying to do is to go
to nature to find new kinds of yeast to alter the flavors of beers. There are yeasts on
trees, yeasts on insects. The interesting candidates for us or social insects. We
know that wasps consume lots of sugars they consume a lot of the raw stuff
that’s used in fermentation. A lot of people are hesitant to try it. Anything
wild can intimidate people, but I think they become surprised by how
fruity it is, and how much flavor it really has compared to the kind of beer
they normally taste, because the flavors from the yeast are sweeter and more
aromatic and are really easy to drink. This is really exciting because the
craft beer market it’s all about the unique flavors and tastes and attributes
of beers. What we’re now trying to do, not just in the context of beer, but more
generally, is figure out how do we build more and what can we learn from nature,
whether it’s in the context of beer, biofuels, or new stimulants, what’s the
next caffeine, or new antibiotics? We’re also working on that, because the truth
is every time you go outside you’re surrounded by species that could be a potential
benefit, but they’re only ever going to be a benefit if we somehow connect the
basic biology and the application. And I think NC State’s the perfect place to do
that.

From the wing of a wasp, scientists discover a new beer-making yeast

From the wing of a wasp, scientists discover a new beer-making yeast


WILLIAM BRANGHAM: On this Independence Day,
many Americans will no doubt be enjoying a beer or two. One of the essential ingredients in beer is
yeast. But, for 600 years, only two species of yeast,
ale yeast and lager yeast, have been used for traditional brewing. But now a lab in North Carolina may have found
a third species, and they found it in the strangest of places, on bees and wasps. “NewsHour” science producer Nsikan Akpan and
our “ScienceScope” team reveal what the buzz is all about. NSIKAN AKPAN: It feels like beer brewers will
do anything to spice up their booze. There’s pizza beer, banana split chocolate
stout, beer with squid ink, and, of course, Rocky Mountain oyster stout, which is flavored
with bull testicles. All this fuss seems silly, when the foundation
of alcohol’s flavor is plain old yeast. Yeast, these little microbes that take sugars
and ferment them into alcohol, define a beer’s character. Yet, for 10,000 years, beers have essentially
relied on two types of bland yeast that basically add no flavors. Now a lab in North Carolina has discovered
a new yeast species that produces an array of flavors without added ingredients. Where did they find it? On bees. The story of bumblebeer begins at North Carolina
State University, in the lab of Rob Dunn. Once a tropical forest ecologist, Dunn now
explores the jungle that surrounds us, the one filled with bugs and microbes. ROB DUNN, North Carolina State University:
At some point, my lab shifted to focusing more on people’s daily lives, and that includes
food, and it includes thinking about the biology of food. NSIKAN AKPAN: One day three years ago, a colleague
inquired if the lab knew of any microbes in the environment capable of making beer. Dunn and company instantly considered insect
pollinators, like bees and wasps. Here’s why. Yeast hang out in flower nectar, where the
microbes feast on the boatloads of sugar. They then produce or ferment sweet aromas,
which then attract the buzzing bugs. ROB DUNN: We actually think, based on some
work from colleagues in Italy, that it’s very likely that those first beers and breads were
relying on yeasts from insects, too. NSIKAN AKPAN: Back then, a bug carrying a
fermenting yeast may have fallen into some wet grain. And, boom, welcome to the booze cruise. In fact, some scientists argue human agriculture
started just to mass produce grains to make beer. The more beer we drink, the more yeast we
have to grow. ROB DUNN: Unambiguously, the most successful
organism in the world is yeast. And so if you think about all of the yeasts
we make everywhere for many of the products we make, they won. NSIKAN AKPAN: But, today, where would you
even start looking for a new beer-making yeast? ANNE MADDEN, North Carolina State University:
Part of this is science, and part of this feels more like an art that’s hard to describe. NSIKAN AKPAN: Meet Anne Madden, the Dunn lab’s
microbe wrangler. To search for unknown yeast, she started by
catching a wild bee and a wild wasp. She then transferred every microbe from their
bodies to a petri dish. Don’t fret. She didn’t commit mass bug-icide. ANNE MADDEN: To make bumblebeer and all of
the different bumblebeers that we have made since, we have killed two bugs. You have likely killed more bugs on your way
to a bar to get beer than we did in the process of making it. NSIKAN AKPAN: A couple days later, a forest
of microbes appear on the dish. Then, in four steps, Madden combines her senses
with technology. First, she looks to separate the yeast from
bacteria or fungi. ANNE MADDEN: It’s about understanding when
something glistens in a certain way. NSIKAN AKPAN: Next, she picks a handful of
yeast candidates, grows them on a new dish, and then follows her nose. ANNE MADDEN: You can smell the same smell
both on that plate and in that final beer. NSIKAN AKPAN: Her third task is running the
DNA from these candidates through a national database to ensure her picks don’t cause disease. ANNE MADDEN: It’s almost like a Google search
through all other species that exist that have been documented. NSIKAN AKPAN: The final step is a chemical
test, because despite the long history of brewing, the genes and enzymes responsible
for fermentation are largely unknown. The survivors of this gauntlet land with John
Sheppard at N.C. State’s research brew house. JOHN SHEPPARD, North Carolina State University:
In traditional beers that are lighter in character, like the traditional American lager, for example,
you don’t want to overwhelm your taste, and so what the yeast does is very important. A lot of wild yeasts, which are considered
contamination in a normal brewing process, the reason why they’re not wanted is because
they produce a lot of off-flavors that are not really desirable in the beer. So, to get a wild yeast that doesn’t produce
these off-flavors can be difficult. So, we did a little testing to see whether
or not the yeast strains would be able to make beer, and we selected one. It came from a wasp, because this special
yeast not only makes ethanol, but makes acid, and, as a result of that, we had a natural
sour beer. NSIKAN AKPAN: The bumblebeer yeast makes other
flavors too, like a sweet honey taste without the addition of actual honey. Craft sour beers often take months or years
to make. Bumblebeer yeast can do the same in a matter
of weeks. Local brewers have taken notice. The first suds made with bumblebeer yeast
rolled out earlier this year. Until next time, I’m Nsikan Akpan, and this
is “ScienceScope” from the “PBS NewsHour.” WILLIAM BRANGHAM: Nsikan tasted one of those
beers and said that it was quite delicious. You can read about how scientists are using
this discovery to find more beer-producing yeasts made in the wild. That’s on our Web site, PBS.org/NewsHour.

Can Bee Venom Or Cupping Be Good For Candida?

Can Bee Venom Or Cupping Be Good For Candida?


Dr. Eric Bakker, Naturopath from New Zealand
here. Thanks for coming back. Let’s talk about bee venom. I’ve got a question here from somebody, “Is
bee venom any good for candida?” And someone also is asking, “Is cupping any
good?”, which I’ll explain in a minute. So, let’s put them together. Can bee venom or cupping be any good for candida? All right, so that’s this video. So, as you may be aware, I’m a beekeeper,
so I’ve got about 10 beehives at the moment, so bee stings are not unfamiliar to me. I may have already shown you some of my jars
of honey. We had a good honey crop last summer, I think
we ended up with probably about 50 or 60 pounds of honey, so that’s not bad. That wasn’t out of 10 hives because I’ve doubled
my hive production recently, I’ve split hives and created new ones. So getting stung is an occupational hazard
with beekeeping, you’re going to get stung if you keep bees, that’s all there is to it. If you’ve got a dog you’re going to eventually
pick up stuff that you may not want to pick up, but you’re going to pick it up sooner
or later, if you know what I mean? And if you’ve got a bee, you can get whacked
every now and then. But, what I’ve discovered, very interesting,
in my own personal situation, now this is my eighth year of beekeeping, is I don’t really
notice the stings much anymore. I just posted this, actually, on a beekeeping
page, Facebook page. So, I just read, and understand now exactly
what’s going on and why this mystery occurs. What happens, and this is why I think bee
venom is actually not bad for the average person. So when you first get stung, your body produces
a lot of histamine, a chemical, which is going to act as an anti-inflammatory, it’s going
to counter that toxic response. Because, I think, Phospholipase A is the name
of the chemical. There are several toxins in the bee venom,
and when the little barb goes in there and it injects, the trick is to get it out instantly
with your fingernail, is to whip it out. If you can get that barb out really quick,
you’re not really going to feel much, just a tiny itch. So that venom that goes in there provokes
a histamine response and the histamine response creates the redness, the swelling, the itching,
and that ongoing pain in the butt sensation you get with a bee sting, where you’re itchy
and you want to scratch it, especially if it’s on your feet or somewhere like that. So, you’ve got a lot of lymphatic tissue in
that area, you’re going to get a lot of swelling, so the capillaries will leak fluid, it will
puff up, it will become swollen, red, hot, itchy, all the things that you associate with
a bee sting. However, a study in Switzerland found out
that when beekeepers get stung several times, early in the season, initially they get a
high histamine production. But eventually what happens is a part of their
white blood cell system, the T cells, develop these cells called regulatory T cells, and
that in turn will knock that back. So that will knock that response back. So I can get … in fact, I got stung only
about a week ago and I barely noticed any kind of sensation at all with the bee sting,
which is quite interesting. I think it has a good boosting effect on immunity. Some studies I’ve read, especially Chinese
studies, have shown that it’s very advantageous for people with inflammatory conditions, having
bee venom. So we call it Apitherapy, or Bee Therapy. You’ve probably heard of eating honey, eating
propolis, or having royal jelly, but Apitherapy is the toxic venom therapy. Rheumatoid arthritis patients for example,
seriously benefit from bee venom, especially if they’ve got problems with their hands. But for candida, I’m not sure, the jury is
still out on that one, but it’s not something I’d recommend for candida. But if you are a beekeeper and you get stung
don’t worry, it’s only two percent of the population that gets severe anaphylaxis and
can die from bee stings. Probably about, a little bit more than there
would be with peanut allergies. But you can be desensitized against this,
so you don’t have to suffer really bad, or die, from it. Now cupping. Cupping really is something that has being
used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years. It involves glass cups, or plastic cups that
they use now, I think. And I remember, I think I did my first year
in point location with acupuncture, I studied, and also I did a bit of cupping work there
on some students, which was quite interesting. We had these little glass, little balls and
I think we lit, I had a pair of tweezers with something on the end that I lit, and I put
the flame in the glass ball, and then drop it down onto someone’s back. And what would happen, it would create a vacuum,
which would suck up the skin and the tissue under it, it would go up higher. Now that will create a circulatory condition
for that person, it either increases, or decreases, circulation to that point. And when cupping is used on the traditional
acupuncture points, it can have quite a significant effect on pain. But whether it’s used for candida? I don’t think really it’s going to be useful
for candida at all, the cupping. But some studies have shown it’s beneficial
for neck pain, and other parts of the body, period pain for example. And I think it’s a lovely part of the acupuncture
system, is to have cupping as well. It’s quite pleasant, it’s different from hot
stone massage, but you’ll probably find it quite an enjoyable experience. So that’s my two takes on, the one on the
bee venom, and the one on the cupping. Thanks for tuning in. Click on the link below if you want my candida
report. Thank you.

Need a beer buzz? Ask a bee

Need a beer buzz? Ask a bee


It feels like beer brewers will
do anything to spice up their booze. There’s Pizza Beer… …Banana Split Chocolate Stout… …beer with squid ink… …and of course Rocky Mountain Oyster Stout,
which is flavored with bull testicles. All this fuss seems silly when the foundation of alcohol’s flavor is plain, old yeast. Yeast, these little microbes that take sugars and ferment them into alcohol,
define a beer’s character. Yet for 10,000 years, beers have essentially relied on two types of bland yeast that basically add no flavors. Now, a lab in North Carolina has discovered a new yeast species that produces an array of flavors without added ingredients. Where’d they find it? On bees. AKPAN: The story of bumblebeer begins at
North Carolina State University in the lab of Rob Dunn. Once a tropical forest ecologist, Dunn now explores the jungle that surrounds us: the one filled with bugs and microbes. DUNN: At some point my lab shifted to focusing more on people’s daily lives, and that includes food. It includes thinking about the biology of food. AKPAN: One day three years ago, a colleague inquired if the lab knew of any microbes in the environment capable of making beer. Dunn and company instantly
considered insect pollinators, like bees and wasps. Here’s why. Yeast hang out in flower nectar where the microbes feast
on the boatloads of sugar. They then produce — or ferment — sweet aromas, which then attract the buzzing bugs. Dunn: We actually think, based on
some work from colleagues in Italy, that it’s very likely those first beers and breads were relying on yeasts from insects, too. AKPAN: Back then, a bug carrying a fermenting yeast may have fallen into some wet grain and boom! Welcome to the booze cruise. In fact, some scientists
argue human agriculture started just to mass produce
grains to make beer. The more beer we drink,
the more yeast we have to grow. Dunn: Unambiguously, the most successful
organism in the world is yeast. If you think about all of the
yeasts we make everywhere for many of the products
we make, they won. But today, where would
you even start looking for a new beer-making yeast? Part of this is science, and part of this
feels more like an art. It’s hard to describe. AKPAN: Meet Anne Madden, the Dunn lab’s
microbe wrangler. To search for unknown yeast, she started by catching a wild bee and a wild wasp. She then transferred every microbe
from their bodies to a petri dish. Don’t fret. She didn’t commit mass “bug-icide.” To make bumble beer and all of the different bumblebeers
that we’ve made since, we’ve killed two bugs. You’ve likely killed more bugs on
your way to a bar to get beer than we did in the process of making it. A couple days later, a “forest” of
microbes appear on the dish , and then in four steps, Madden combines her senses with technology. First, she looks to separate the
yeast from bacteria or fungi. MADDEN: It’s about understanding when
something glistens in a certain way Akpan: Next, she picks a handful of yeast candidates, grows them on a new dish
and then follows her nose. MADDEN: You can smell the same smell,
both on that plate and in that final beer. AKPAN: Her third task is running
the DNA from these candidates through a national database to ensure her picks
don’t cause disease. It’s almost like a Google search through all other species that exist,
that have been documented. AKPAN: The final step is a chemical test, because despite the
long history of brewing, the genes and enzymes responsible for fermentation are largely unknown. The survivors of this gauntlet
land with John Sheppard in NC State’s research brewhouse. SHEPPARD: in traditional beers that are lighter in character, like the traditional American lager, for example, you don’t want to overwhelm your taste, and so what the yeast does is very important. A lot of wild yeasts, which are considered contamination in a normal brewing process, the reasons why they’re not wanted
is because they produce a lot of off flavors that are not really desirable in the beer. So to get a wild yeast that doesn’t produce
these off flavors can be difficult. We did a little testing to see whether or
not the yeast strains would be able to make beer. We selected one — it came from a
wasp — because this special yeast not only makes ethanol, but makes acid, and as a result of that
we had a natural sour beer. AKPAN: The bumblebeer yeast make other flavors too, like a sweet honey taste
without the addition of actual honey. Craft sour beers often take
months or years to make. Bumblebeer yeast can do the
same in a matter of weeks. Local brewers have taken notice. The first suds made with bumblebeer
yeast rolled out earlier this year. Until next time, I’m Nsikan Akpan and this is ScienceScope
from the PBS NewsHour.

Home Remedies For Yeast Infection That Work

Home Remedies For Yeast Infection That Work


Home remedies for yeast infection that work “I lived with the burning of a sever yeast infection for years because I was scared to use any over the counter products. Then I heard about your natural program and gave it a try. After just a few hours I started feeling that the burning was gradually going away – until it was completely gone.” “Thanks for the priceless information! My daughter and I had been suffering from yeast infections for over two month… and now we have no sign of it anymore. We are so happy that we did this the natural way.”

6 Weird Mushrooms (And Other Fungi)

6 Weird Mushrooms (And Other Fungi)


[♪ INTRO] There’s more to mushrooms than the cute
button varieties you find at your local grocery store. The word “fungus” describes a whole kingdom
of organisms that are neither plant nor animal. It includes chanterelles and shiitakes, but
also molds and yeasts. Mushrooms are the part of the fungus that
spreads its spores in order to reproduce. And there are some really strange examples
of fungi and their fruiting bodies out there. They’re not just interesting looking, either. Some have the power to trick animals into
caring for them, or even clean up radiation. So here are six weird mushrooms and other
fungi, and what sets them apart from regular garden
fare. The first fungus on our list has a pretty
clever survival technique. The genus Fibularhizoctonia, also known as
the cuckoo fungus, hides itself in piles of termite eggs by mimicking
their size and color. Its little round balls aren’t technically
mushrooms. They’re actually the fungus’s sclerotia
form. That’s a resting state that will eventually
sprout a new colony when conditions are right. By making itself look like termite eggs, the
fungus ensures it’s safe until it’s time to sprout. See, termites will pile all their eggs together
in one place and groom and lick them to protect them from dryness and infection. By hiding in the heap, the fungal termite
balls get the same protection. But it’s not just a matter of looking
like a termite egg. The cuckoo fungus smells like them too. To blend in, the fungi make an enzyme called
beta-glucosidase. This same enzyme is made by termite eggs to
help adults recognize them. And in an experiment from 2000, termites didn’t care for glass beads resembling
termite eggs unless they were coated in egg-recognition
chemicals. Researchers have found that multiple species
of fungus can all hide away in the same termite mound; all it takes is looking and smelling similar
enough. There’s just one catch to all this protection: the fungal balls can’t sprout with worker
termites around. Researchers think that maybe the termite’s
saliva keeps them from growing somehow. When the termites run out of food and relocate
to a new colony, they carry their own eggs,and the fungus,
with them. And then the fungus can sprout. It’s a handy way for the fungus to hitch
a ride and set up camp in a brand new location before
its competitors get there. This next fungus on the list sounds and looks
positively frightening. But it turns out, all its weirdness is just
a mushroom living its life. The bleeding tooth fungus gets its name in
part from the teeth-shaped structures on its underside. In fact, all members of the hydnoid family
of fungi have these structures, not just the bleeding tooth. Most mushrooms use gills or pores to release
their spores. You can easily spot the gills if you flip
over a portobello. But hydnoids use teeth instead.
And the bleeding part? That dark red liquid oozing from the mushroom’s
top is actually because of the fungus’s internal
transportation system. See, fungi transport nutrients and water up from
the soil through root-like structures called hyphae. Under the right conditions, pressure can build
up in the hyphae and push fluid up and out of the pores on
the mushroom’s surface. Although there haven’t been any studies
to figure out exactly why the fluid is red, one fungi expert we asked thinks the mushroom
might add red pigments to attract insects that help spread its spores; the same insects that are also attracted to
red flowers. Not creepy and bleeding at all! One of the other cool things about these fungi is how they get their nutrients in the first
place. Bleeding tooth fungi are mycorrhizal, meaning they form symbiotic relationships
with trees like pine or spruce. The fungi get carbohydrates from the trees
and, in return, they give the tree nitrogen and phosphorus. And you could say it’s quite an intimate
relationship. The fungus’s hyphae grow as a layer on the
outside of the tree’s root tips, actually growing in between the tree’s cells, so they can easily hand nutrients back and
forth with one another. I’m not sure I’d be comfortable with having
a gruesome-looking fungus latched on to me. But it seems to work out just fine for the
trees! When you think of a wild mushroom, chances
are you picture something like the Fly Agaric. And I know we’re supposed to be talking
about weird mushrooms, but stick with me. This iconic mushroom is depicted in everything
from Germanic Christmas decorations to Super Mario. But its recognizability has as much to do
with its chemistry as it does aesthetics. See, the Fly Agaric’s name may not actually
refer to insects. Instead, it may be related to an older usage
of the word ‘fly’, which could refer to madness or possession. That’s because the world’s prettiest, most stereotypical
mushroom has hallucinogenic properties. But they’re also kind of toxic, so just
in case we have to say it, don’t. There are accounts dating back to at least
the 18th century, and perhaps much earlier, of European and Asian peoples using the mushrooms
in religious rituals. If ingested, the mushrooms cause confusion,
dizziness, space distortion, unawareness of time and hallucinations, followed
by drowsiness and fatigue. The two main compounds responsible are muscimol
and ibotenic acid. They have a chemical structure that’s really
similar to the neurotransmitter GABA. And they act in kind of the same way to make neurons in the spinal cord and brain
less likely to fire. Which has kind of a calming effect. But they also explain the mushroom’s psychedelic
effects. Muscimol and ibotenic acid trigger the release
of additional neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, which give those happy
feelings. At least that’s what the mice studies have
shown. The funny thing is, these mushrooms are actually
trying not to be eaten. Their distinctive red and white color is a
warning to animals that, hey, I’m toxic! Seems one creature’s warning system is another’s
video game powerup. This next group of fungi have earned the nickname
‘Hulk bugs’. That’s because they seem to have the ability
to absorb radiation. These superhero fungi have been found in areas
with some seriously high levels of radiation, like inside the damaged nuclear reactor at
Chernobyl and even hanging out on the outsides of spacecraft. Some fungi on the outskirts of Chernobyl even
grow towards the source of radiation. Hence their name, radiotropic fungi; tropism being a term for when an organism
turns towards a particular stimulus. But radiation is nasty stuff for most living
things, given its ability to shred DNA. So how can these fungi tolerate it? Some fungi, like black yeast, can protect
themselves by using the radiation to activate particular genes related to DNA
repair and defense. These fungi seem to have a sensor for detecting
UV light, which can also cause DNA damage. And that sensor may be picking up radiation
and turning on DNA repair. And they don’t just absorb it and cope. The radiation actually helps some fungi grow
stronger. For example, when black yeast was exposed
to low doses of radiation over 24 hours in the lab, it grew 30 percent
more cells, and those cells were larger than the ones
that hadn’t been exposed to radiation. And the single-celled fungus Cryptococcus
neoformans grew faster when exposed to high levels of gamma radiation
in the lab. Scientists think this might have to do with
melanin in the fungi’s cell walls. Yes, the same pigment that gives our skin
its color. They think melanin might be acting in a similar
way to other biological pigments like chlorophyll to turn radiation into usable
energy. When researchers exposed fungi containing
melanin to gamma rays, they found an increase in cellular energy
production. But not all fungi found in radioactive areas
have melanin, so there may be something else going on that
we don’t understand yet. And it would be a good thing to investigate, since some radiotropic fungi may have the
ability to decompose and decontaminate radioactive material, meaning they could be used for environmental
cleanups. Two fungi are doing just that with the debris
at Chernobyl. But scientists don’t yet whether the fungi
retain the radioactive particles or spit them back out into the environment
somehow, which is to say, more research is needed to
see if they can truly decontaminate radiation. Still, maybe we should rename them Captain
Planet bugs? Speaking of names, you can learn a lot about
the fungi in this next group from both their scientific and common names. Their family name, Phallaceae, alludes to
these fungus’s distinctive shape. But that’s not the whole story. These mushrooms actually come in a wide variety
of forms, from geometric, to alien looking, to something
quite beautiful. Scientists aren’t exactly sure why these
fungi take so many different shapes, but some have speculated that it might increase
the mushrooms’ surface area to help spread their spores. That’s where this family’s other name
comes in: Stinkhorn fungi. They secrete a foul-smelling slime that reeks
of rotting flesh thanks to a chemical called dimethyl trisulfide. The same chemical is given off by necrotic
wounds. This attracts flies that gobble up the slime,
as well as a bunch of spores. The flies then spread those spores to another
location when they poop, helping the mushrooms reproduce. And it’s not just flies that are interested
in this mushroom as a snack. Despite its horrid odor, pickled stinkhorn
eggs are a delicacy in China and Europe. One species, the bridal veil stinkhorn, is
dried and eaten on special occasions in China. Once dried they apparently smell more earthy,
musty or almondy than putrid, and when cooked have a nice umami flavor. So, don’t judge a mushroom by its smell
I guess? Lion’s Mane sounds like something you might
add to a potion. And it kind of is. This fluffy, white mushroom is edible; it’s said to have a fleshy texture and seafood-like
taste. It’s been used in Chinese medicine for centuries
as an antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-aging supplement. Claims abound in support of the beneficial
properties of the various chemicals found within lion’s mane mushrooms. And there seems to be some evidence to support
these claims. One group of compounds, the hericerins, slows
the growth of cancer cells. Another, belonging to a class of chemicals
called polysaccharides, stimulates immune responses by activating
the body’s defensive cells. And in a double blind study from 2008, elderly people who took tablets containing
the dry mushroom powder scored better on a test of cognitive function after 16 weeks
than those who received a placebo. But before you start stockpiling Lion’s
Mane, you should know there are a few snags. For one, a lot of these studies were done
in vitro, that is, with a culture dish of cells rather
than an actual person. And others were done on rodents. There’s a big difference between rodents
and people, and between cells and full-blown human bodies, so the effects probably aren’t as staggering
as some people might have you believe. Still, if there’s a silver lining, it’s
that this mushroom still tastes pretty good. These magnificent mushrooms and fancy fungi
all stand out for different reasons, but it goes to show that there’s a lot more
going on than what’s in your backyard. Unless there’s stinkhorns in your backyard. Those things smell terrible. I’m so sorry. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow. If this list piqued your interest, there’s a whole episode of our spin-off podcast
SciShow Tangents about the fungus among us. And that’s just one of the lightly competitive,
science poem-filled topics on offer. It’s brought to you by the same super smart
people who make SciShow, as well as Complexly and WNYC Studios. Check it out wherever you find podcasts. [♪ OUTRO]

Yeast Infection No More Review – Holistic Cure Methods

Yeast Infection No More Review – Holistic Cure Methods


Hi, Praveenben here from www.natural-yeast-infection-cures.net
The symptoms of yeast infection are pretty nasty, although it is not deadly. Yeast infections, or Candida infections, are
one of the most uncomfortable things one can think of. Candida inflammation causes a great discomfort
and it can occur due to many reasons The itching and burning nearly drive you insane. 
  It was very painful and irritating to have
sex with your spouse, just to say the least. Suffering from yeast infection can bring so
much discomfort that sufferers want to find a quick solution to ease yeast infection symptoms. Some foods like cheese, milk and dairy products,
contain yeast which may lead to yeast infection. Yeast infection Can Cause Great Harm To Your
Body If Neglected. Lotions, Creams, and Ointments aimed at treating
yeast infections fail to address the root cause of infection. You must figure out the root cause of infection
before battling yeast infection. The only way to completely eliminate Candida
is addressing the root cause of the problem rather than treating the symptoms with antibiotics. It requires prevention of the foods causing
yeast and going for natural remedies to permanently cure the infection “Yeast Infection No More” e-book guide has
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Thank You

How Do I Know If I Have A Yeast Infection


Today I would like to answer a question that
I frequently get asked. How do I know if I have a yeast infection? Well, there are many ways I can answer this
question. One of the most intelligent ways to answer it is to say, let’s just see if
there are any particular causes which could have contributed to your yeast infection in
the first place. I think that’s quite a smart move. So let’s have a look. Have you taken an antibiotic in the past several
years or recurrent rounds of antibiotics? Have you been on the oral contraceptive pill
for any prolonged period of time? Do you have cravings for sugar? Have you had any other
medications? Have you been on any steroid based drugs like prednisone or cortisone for
a while or perhaps inhaled steroids for asthma? They’re called preventatives. These are all
quite pertinent questions. Do you feel worse in a damp surrounding? Perhaps you live in
a moldy sort of environment. Does it make you cough or wheeze? These are all important
questions to ask, you know, if you have a yeast infection. Look at the signs and symptoms of yeast infection.
Can you relate to any of these? Do you have any aches or pains in the body? Any digestive
problems? Fogginess in the head? Do you have any toenail fungus or jock itch or vaginal
thrush? That’s how you’re going to know if you’ve got a yeast infection. If you go to yeastinfection.org, you can see
a lot of the common signs and symptoms on one of my pages there. There’s a very comprehensive
page I’ve written about the signs and symptoms of yeast infection. But probably one of the
most intelligent things you can do is to go to my quiz on CandidaCrusher.com. Very, very
good quiz you will find online. In fact, it’s the world’s best online Candida quiz. So by
going there and you can just follow the 20 odd screens for man, woman or child and just
go through the screens and you’re going to find out whether there’s a low probability,
moderate or high probability that you’ve got a yeast infection. It took a long time for me to put this quiz
together and many, many thousands of people now have done this quiz. I’ve had some incredibly
good feedback, so that’s a very smart way to find out if you’ve got a yeast infection. One of the best anti-fungal products you’ll
find anywhere in the world is called Canxida. It took me six months to develop Canxida and
I’m very proud of it, and it’s now being taken up by quite a few people. We’ve had incredibly
good feedback from Canxida. It’s unlike any other product you’ll find of its kind on the
market. It’s sustained release and contains 11 of the best ingredients in it. So thank
you everybody for your exceptional feedback for Canxida. So don’t forget, if you really want to know
if you’ve got a yeast infection, go to CandidaCrusher.com and please complete my online quiz. That’s
how you’re going to find out if you’ve got Candida or not. Thank you for your attention.

Where Can You Get A Yeast Infection On Your Body?

Where Can You Get A Yeast Infection On Your Body?


Greetings! Eric Bakker, naturopath from New Zealand,
author of Candida Crusher, formulator of the CanXida range of supplements. Thank you again as usual for checking out
my video. A question I get asked regularly from people
is: “Where can you get a yeast infection on your body?” Many GP, medical doctor friends of mine think
this is all a load of crap. They only think that women get yeast infections. They don’t really believe much in the whole
Candida word, but you can get a yeast infection anywhere on your body, anywhere in fact. But, in saying that, Candida prefers the areas
where people often experience this the most. The private areas. The personal areas. The groin area. Vaginal area is very common. In fact, up to 75 percent of women during
their life will probably experience one yeast infection if not more. Up to 50 percent of men may experience a yeast
infection involving the inner thigh, the groin and around the penis area. The scrotum. It’s not that uncommon. Also, a huge amount of people will experience
during their lifetime a fungal nail yeast infection. These are all areas as you can see that tend
to be concealed. They tend to be warm. They tend to be dark. These are the perfect places for a yeast infection
to hide out. They find food there. They find shelter there. They find comfort and warmth there. They’re not going to find a lot of comfort
on your forehead, are they? You’re not going to get a yeast infection
right across here. You’re not going to get a yeast infection
on the tip of your nose. You could get ringworm, which is a type of
yeast infection, and that can happen on your arms, on your torso, on different parts of
the body. Depending on your susceptibility of course. So, yeasts can also be tiny little spots I’ve
seen with people who spend a bit of time at the beach when they go surfing for example. People who wear wetsuits a lot have wet damp
skin quite often. They can also get yeast infection on the skin,
the peripheral areas. Where can you get a yeast infection on your
body? We’ve already talked in plenty of other videos
where you can get it inside your body, particularly the digestive system. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that
you’ve got a systemic yeast infection, because if you did, you’d probably wouldn’t be looking
at this video now unless it was from a hospital bed. You’d be in intensive care or in the ER room
if you’ve got systemic yeast infection. If you think you’ve got an internal yeast
infection, it’s probably going to be in your digestive system, especially the small or
large intestine. But if you think you may have one on the exterior
of the body, and you’re a female, there’s a big change it may be a vaginal yeast infection. If you’re male, it could be a groin issue,
could be jock itch or something like that. It could be any age, and it could also be
a toenail problem in particular. Babies of course. Diaper rash is another form of a yeast infection
on the body. So I hope that answers the question about
where the yeast infection can be on the bod5y. Thanks for tuning in. Click on the link below if you haven’t got
my report, and please subscribe. Thank you for tuning in.