ANGEL OF DEATH: Why I Sent a Creature to Kill My Ants

ANGEL OF DEATH: Why I Sent a Creature to Kill My Ants


I’m left with no choice. I have to kill them, all the survivors within
this terrarium, called the Hacienda Del Dorado, need to be extinguished. If you watched our video last week, we performed
a very critical biological experiment, the results of which could possibly reveal answers
on how to save the Golden Empire, the name of our once powerful and massive supercolony
of yellow crazy ants, who have out of nowhere this year, have been nightmarishly reduced
to crippled numbers by an outbreak of vile, ant blood-sucking mites, which continue to
annihilate their population. So much relied on the results of this experiment
to save the colony, where we tested to see if predatory Hypoaspis mites collected from
one of our rhino beetles, would eat these bad mites on our ants. If they did, this could be the answer to save
our beloved Golden Empire, whom we’ve cared for and watched grow for years. Well, guys, this week, the results of the
experiment have come in, and you won’t believe what I found out, which ultimately lead me
to pursue one last and grim option, in order to save every single ant colony and creature
in the entire Ant Room. I even needed more help from Rhino Beetles,
who were now arriving more and more, preparing to partake in the up coming 2019 Rhino Beetle
Games. If you’re new here, and are confused by all
this, don’t worry. Hang tight because I’ll explain everything. You’re about to witness and partake in the
unfolding of a very intense and epic story. I did everything I could, studied all options,
and so today to save the Antiverse from peril, I had to make the toughest decision in the
history of the Ant Room: to release an Angel of Death in order to kill them all. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Big and bright neon orange eyes, will help
this fruit fly get all it needs from this, the Bowl of Life, which has become the talk
of the town among the fruit fly community, as the newest hotspot for delicious food,
and today at the Bowl of Life, they’re serving the ultimate fruit fly favourite, giant banana,
prepared soft, rotting, and brown just the way they like it. But not only does this giant banana offer
nourishment for the gregarious fruit flies, but it also functions as a place for romantic
hookups! A male fruit fly is hot in pursuit of this
female, and he’s determined to woo her, and hopefully make her the mother of his maggots. She fluffs her wings in his face, driving
him mad with fruit fly love and passion, and then she stops. His moment has come! He’s moving in… Ok, maybe not. Like a kid trying to hop in to double dutch,
he calculates the right time to make his advance, as she wing wafts pheromones in his face. He’s got to get the timing just right or he’ll
lose her. It’s his time now, his moment to fulfill his
ultimate destiny, and pass on his genetic legacy and… Oh! Wait! She’s gone, thanks to a boisterous gang that
came barging in on their moment. So is the life of a fruit fly in the Bowl
of Life. But beyond just being the coolest new millennial
fruit fly hang out, it’s also an important source of nourishment for some other hungry
individuals in the Antiverse, who are each waiting for their share from the Bowl of Life,
and no, it’s not just any of these rhino beetle Gladiators. Excuse me, fruit flies, I just need to borrow
some of these to feed a couple of new arrivals. So as you may or may not know, these chambers
contain rhino beetles who are about to compete in the 2019 Rhino Beetle Games, an Olympic
competition of sorts we’re having here in the Antiverse, but we aren’t able to start
until all the beetles, particularly the males have arrived. We’re all still waiting for the full fleet
of able-bodied Gladiators to emerge. So, so far we’ve been warming up Apollo, Dionysus,
and Poseidon while waiting for the others, and so many of you have chosen one of these
as your bets to win the Rhino Beetle Games. But for those of you’ve been patiently waiting
for your particular Gladiator to make their debut, I think you may be very pleased to
see who finally emerged above ground this week. And little did these unsuspecting Rhino Beetles
know, that aside from the Games, they were also about to fulfill a very monumental purpose
at preserving life in the entire Antiverse into which they were born. It’s night in the Antiverse, and our male
Gladiators are waiting to be fed. Poseidon, always the last to wake up, Dionysus,
waiting patiently in the corner, and Apollo. But upon watching these three boys over the
next few moments, I noticed something quite peculiar. Have a look! They seemed less interested in feeding on
this night. Something was distracting them. Dionysus, proud with his enormous horn, stood
still, half emerged from the soil, as one of his Hypoaspis mites patrolled his face,
making sure it was clean of all bad parasitic creatures. Not interested in eating tonight, Dionysus? What could you be waiting for? Even more peculiar was Apollo. Check him out! He was moving his abdomen, as if he was breathing
funny, or perhaps maybe trying to stridulate? Or OMG, wafting some pheromones into the air
perhaps? The beetles knew something, and you know what? AC Family, they most certainly did. The arrival of the maidens had finally come,
beautiful and smoothly-curved female rhino beetles, who’d spent their entire lives underground
were finally coming up to the surface on their own, to taste what life is like in the Overworld. But turns out, the ladies hated our lights
and dove right back into the soil. No worries, because like the other three beetles,
they’ll begin to learn that we mean no harm, and they’ll soon become accustomed to the
foreign brightness called light. As for their names, Aphrodite and Hera are
our two newest Rhino Beetle arrivals. The presence of the females clearly were driving
our Gladiators crazy, and funny enough, guys, check this out! It seems the feeling of attraction was mutual! The females had their fill of bananas and
were now totally OK with being in the light. I suspected, they could smell the males just
nearby and were wanting to check them out. Could it be that our dashing Dionysus, was
the apple of Aphrodite’s eye, or rather antennae? Team Dionysus, cheer on your boy! Aphrodite, seemed totally uninterested in
sleeping underground even at this morning hour. Hera, as well, was busy trying to find her
way to the males. This strong drive for the females to seek
males, who in the wild, would be sparring for the right to mate with them, helps these
females survive, because its the males who seek out and defend the best feeding grounds,
and its these champion males who will breed with them and ensure the best genes get passed
on to the next generation. That is essentially the premise of our upcoming
Rhino Beetle Games. The winner, wins unlimited food, protection
in our Antiverse, and gorgeous females to mate with. Now I know what you may be thinking: AntsCanada,
can we get to the results of our critical experiment already? We’ve waited all week, and what’s this crazy
talk of an Angel of Death? Alright AC Family, promise, that’s coming
up in just a bit, but first, there’s something else I need to show you. Aphrodite and Hera were not the only rhino
beetle arrivals this week. So many of you have waited for this one to
arrive, Team Ares, sound off in the comments for your Gladiator, who’s finally come to
join us. The lights as normal were bothering him, since
he was fresh-out-the-mulch, but check out that solid build and beautiful elytra, and
long solid horn. Ares was ready to take all! And a whole lot of you had also chosen this
Gladiator as your champion for the games, Team Zeus, sound off in the comments to cheer
the arrival of your Gladiator! He was extra quick at diving below ground
as soon as I entered the Ant Room. Exceptional digging skills! We’ll be seeing more of him later. As for the others, Team Hephaestus, it seems
your Gladiator still needs more time to solidify and charge. I expect he’ll be arriving very shortly, so
hang tight just a little bit more. Team Hades, all of you rooting for the underdog,
and youngest of the batch, I have some exciting news for you! Look who’s finally emerged from his pupa! Hades is out, a full adult male rhino beetle,
but like the other rhino beetles, he’ll need a couple weeks still to harden, get his blood
flowing properly, and appetite building. One last female, Athena is still on her way,
as well. But once Hephaestus and Hades finally arrive,
we’ll be able to begin the Rhino Beetle Games, which we’ve all anxiously been waiting for. Alright now that that update is out of the
way, the moment we’ve all been waiting for. The results of our experiment where we tested
to see if a pair of predatory Hypoaspis mites, collected from Apollo last week, could eradicate
the lethal, blood-sucking parasitic mites from our Golden Empire. Here we go, AC Family. So I made sure to check up on the ants every
day. At first, there was no change. All the ants with mites still had mites. But on the third day, something crazy had
happened within our test tubes. Here are both our test tubes, into which we
placed two mite-infected ants and one healthy ant into each. One of the test tubes contained a pair of
Hypoaspis mites. We hoped this Hypoaspis test tube would reveal
a disappearance of the parasitic mites, because if so, it meant we could use the Hypoaspis
mite as an effective biological weapon to save our Golden Empire from dying out at the
claws of the parasitic mites. So, are you guys ready to find out what happened? OK, I picked up and checked the control test
tube, first. This test tube contained just the two mite-infected
ants and one healthy ant. No Hypoaspis mites. Now check out what I saw, guys! To my surprise it contained one mite-infected
ant, OK, one mite-free ant, alright, and a dead ant. Hmmm… Upon closer inspection, this dead ant still
had a mite attached to it. Alright, it likely died from the mite. And now for the moment of truth. It was time to check our test test tube, and
see if the Hypoaspis mites had done what we’d hoped. My heart was racing checking up on the results. A dead ant, mite-free. I suppose the healthy, mite-free ant must
have died naturally? I checked the others. OMG, are you guys seeing what I’m seeing? Two mite-free ants! WOW! AC family, can you believe it? Our experiment worked. It seems the Hypoaspis mites had eaten the
parasitic mites on our ants! This was just incredible! I believe I shouted out for joy the moment
I saw this. There was actually hope for the Golden Empire. It was now time to move on to the next phase. It was time for Project Quarantine. Initially, given the results of the experiment
were favourable and the Hypoaspis mites ended up eating the bad parasitic mites, my plans
were to introduce as many Hypoaspis mites I could safely harvest from our beetles and
place them into the Hacienda Del Dorado. But after careful thought, I realized this
wasn’t the best course of action because the Hacienda Del Dorado was so big, and even if
I could collect say 10-20 Hypoaspis mites, how could I be sure they would eventually
make their way to the infected ant populations, who were away in hiding in who knows where
in these vast lands. For the experiment, the Hypoaspis mites were
forced to feed on the parasitic mites because they were in an enclosed space and simply
had no choice, but to eat the parasitic mites. But what was to stop the Hypoaspis mites from
feeding on the plethora of soil creatures that we saw, existed in excess within the
Hacienda Del Dorado? It would be a literal buffet for the Hypoaspis
mites, and meanwhile, time was not on our side, as our Golden Empire was dying at an
alarming rate. So, I came up with an even better idea. First, I filled up a dish with baby powder. You’re about to see how ant keepers make an
ant barrier. Next, I added some rubbing alcohol, and mixed
it all up using some cotton balls. Once the mixture reached a runny glue-like
substance, I then proceeded to cover this plastic lip with the barrier. The lip belongs to this AC Outworld, which
by the way, for those curious about our specially designed ant keeping products at AntsCanada.com
also comes with a full cover once ants are in, which we’ll be needing soon. Next, now back when I was tearing apart and
rearranging the Hacienda Del Dorado last week, I did notice that a lot of ants were entering
and exiting this area around one of the bromeliads. Well, upon further inspection, turns out there
were actually a tonne of ants inside. It was definitely one of their hideouts! You’ll be shocked at just how many were inside
in a second. Next, I needed some virgin soils, soils that
didn’t contain springtails, nor worms, nor isoppods. It needed to be as critter-free as possible,
so that any Hypoaspis mites would not be able to deviate from their parasitic mite diet
we’re hoping they’ll take on once introduced. This here is a bed of orchid compost, free
of little critters. Placing in a funnel, and check out all the
ants I managed to shake out of the bromeliad bag. Woahhh! Isn’t that insane?! Tonnes of brood and lots and lots of ants. It seems that bromeliad was where most of
them were living. A few ants escaped as they crawled up my hand
and all over the paper funnel, but I managed to get most of them in, and did my best to
brush them all inside, all while keeping as much dirt as possibly I could, from falling
into the setup, lest I introduce any micro soil creatures into this setup. I replaced the bromeliad. And now we had an AC Outworld full of our
surviving Golden Empire, some infected with mites, but from the looks of things, it seemed
many of them were still healthy. Now I wasn’t sure if I had managed to capture
a queen in this Golden Empire collection, but last week, a lot of you guys brought up
the idea of capturing the queen that appeared in last week’s video. She was mite-free, and could possibly help
found a new mite-free colony of her own. I was so happy with you who posted this suggestion,
because it seems great minds think alike! I did collect this Golden Empire queen, to
place in isolation, just for insurance. I captured her, along with a few workers. The only problem was some of these workers
were infected with mites! Look at this one. The poor girl had three mites feasting on
her blood! So I had to change her entourage, to make
sure she would be tended to by non-infected workers, and coincidentally, it just so happened
that I already had the perfect test tube and VIP entourage ready and waiting for her. When I placed the queen into our test test
tube from our experiment, she was greeted by our clean workers who were thrilled to
see their queen again, after being separated from the colony for three whole days while
under our experimentation, and look, one of the Hypoaspis mites even came to check out
our queen’s leg, just to make sure she was clean! I bet it could pick up ambient parasitic mite
scent from her body. Very cool! So I plan for this queen to remain in confinement
with her fully capable entourage, in the safety of this test tube, for the time being, just
in case, something goes wrong with her main colony which we’re trying to cleanse. Next, it was time for the Rhino Beetles to
contribute to the Golden Empire’s salvation. I created a test tube setup full of honey-water. I then went in to every chamber and took the
time to collect one Hypoaspis mite from each of our rhino beetle arrivals, except for Apollo
who donated two of his last week. It was nice to be able to get a close look
at all the rhino beetles this time. Have a look at Zeus’ colour! Wow! I took each mite and placed them carefully
into the honey-water test tube setup. I then attached this test tube, using an AC
Test Tube adapter into the AC Outworld to introduce the Hypoaspis mites to our Golden
Empire quarantine. As the ants came rushing in to visit the test
tube to drink and feed from the honey-water, the Hypoaspis mites could now inspect every
member passing by, and hopefully, feed on any parasitic mites on ants taking a drink. The Hypoaspis mites will be able to have free
roam within the AC Outworld to inspect each member of the colony and hopefully multiply. The Hypoaspis mites were the Golden Empire’s
last hope for survival. This population of ants was already big enough
to have a good restart, once they were clean. But now that Phase 2: Project Quarantine was
complete, AC Family, it’s now time to show you what I had planned for Phase 3, and I
think you guys may not find it pretty. Behold, the new Hacienda Del Dorado, still
beautiful as ever, changed but still beautiful. It’s quiet. The majority of the Golden Empire has been
removed and placed in quarantine, but there are still some survivors seen struggling to
move about. This worker is completely weakened from its
mite drinking all its blood. This ant, with a mite stuck firmly onto its
leg, struggles to scale this vertical dirt surface. It was hard to watch. I wondered what I was going to do with these
remaining ants. I considered adding these infected ants into
the quarantine, because in my books, every ant counts, but upon further thought, I felt
this might not be the best idea to save the Golden Empire. I still wasn’t sure if the Hypoaspis mites
would do their job effectively on time, and adding more parasitic mites into a colony
that already seemed hopeful, could spell the Golden Empire’s doom. I resolved at first to just let these surviving
ants die out, until there would be no ants left for the parasitic mites to feed on. But then, I realized, oh no! This was not a good idea. What if these parasitic mites, once finished
with their host ant, i.e. the ant dies, move on to find more ants. If there was already a parasitic mite population
in the Hacienda Del Dorado, what stops the mites then from picking up, crawling out of
the Hacienda Del Dorado and into the enclosures of my other ant colonies neighbouring these
lands. I also don’t actually know that these mites
only infect ants. What if they are also able to parasitize our
tarantula and feeder roaches? Suddenly, it was no longer just a matter of
life and death for the Golden Empire, but now it was a widespread biological hazard,
regarding every ant colony and creature in the Ant Room! When the implications came to me, I panicked. And that, AC Family, is how I came to a decision
that was hard for me to make. I’m left with no choice. I have to kill them. All the survivors within this terrarium, called
the Hacienda Del Dorado, need to be extinguished! AC Family, it was time for Phase 3: Project
Cloverfield. The release of an Angel of Death, to completely
kill all surviving ants within the Hacienda Del Dorado, before the mites decide to spread
to our other ant kingdoms. Excuse me, fruit fly milennials. I’ll be needing some of this, to prepare for
the arrival of our new Angel of Death, which lays inside here. Man, I hate to do this to you guys, but this
chain of events gets more and more intense as it unfolds! Are you guys as freaked out as I am? Things are getting crazier and crazier, but
I’ll be sure to let you know the progress of our recovering Golden Empire in quarantine,
and reveal all details of Phase 3: Project Cloverfield in next week’s episode. Can you guess what our Angel of Death creature
is, that we’re about to send in? Guys, be sure to smash that subscribe button
and bell icon now, so you get notified at every single upload and find out in next week’s
episode, and hit the like button every single time, including now. If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like clues as to what creature the Angel of Death we’re unleashing
into the Hacienda Del Dorado is. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why did I choose Apollo to
participate in our experiment? Congratulations to Matthew Brian Filisilda
who correctly answered: Apollo was chosen since his name is from
the Greek God of Medicine and Plagues. Congratulations, Matthew Brian, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why couldn’t we just let the remaining ants
within the Hacienda Del Dorado die out? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Ant Apocalypse Stopped by a Rhino Beetle

Ant Apocalypse Stopped by a Rhino Beetle


You’ll never believe what actually goes on
in the soil. We humans, as giants, completely miss all
the events, the plot twists, the drama, the miracles, the battles, triumphs, and defeats
that occur every day, deep within the the very earth, that sustains us and is teaming
with life. Take this micro-village of springtails for
instance, which you guys have named the Spring Cleaners, the cleanup crew of the microworld,
busy eating up all the organic bits left behind by other lifeforms of the land, or this baby
millipede which eats up decaying vegetable matter, but don’t get too close; he uses cyanide
as a weapon, and that baby earthworm, feeding on vegetation above ground, a solo detritivorous
mite perhaps searching a mate. For a moment, try to forget your big size
and throw all scale out the window, and imagine this terrestrial world, as a giant forest. It’s called the Hacienda Del Dorado, home
to countless communities of creatures and plants. Those gnats you see there, they’re the vultures
of the land perusing the tree tops. But AC Family, something terrible has happened
to the original rulers of this gorgeous territory. You’re about to see what in a moment. I was admiring this lush kingdom one day,
when my eyes caught focus of this. An ant, of the supercolony, we know on this
channel, as the Golden Empire. She’s alone, and oddly she carries a message
for us. Look! It appears she’s struggling to grapple with
something that is locked onto one of her legs, something red, and clearly causing her much
discomfort. She tries desperately to remove it from her
appendage, to no avail. Guys, turns out, this ant, is one of a few
remaining survivors of what I discovered was a mass holocaust. It’s every ant keeper’s nightmare. This week to my utter horror, I learned that
out of nowhere, an apocalypse has come for our cherished Golden Empire, and worse, there
was nothing I could do to stop it. But, it may surprise you, that there was one
unlikely hero in this entire story, who possibly could. AC Family, you will not believe how a humble
rhino beetle rose to the occasion this week, to become the possible saviour of an entire
Ant Empire, during this ant apocalypse. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel and hit the
BELL ICON. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy. AC Family, I was legit crying this week, when
I saw this. Imagine an ant colony who you watched grow
over the years, an OG supercolony on this channel, within our world of Ant Kingdoms
in the Antiverse, suddenly amidst a mass extinction event. If you’ve been following this channel for
awhile, you have followed the epicness that the Golden Empire, our multi-queen supercolony
of yellow crazy ants, has experienced. From surviving a mite plague, to outsmarting
carnivorous pitcher plants, to keeping an array of pet beast, to even being elected
as the lucky colony to inhabit a Youtube Gold Play Button, these ants were definitely a
triumphant empire and favourite in the Antiverse. But I’m afraid to announce, that the Golden
Empire is officially seeing their end of days. I’ll explain everything, but we need to start
from the beginning. A member of the Golden Empire is wandering
the premise, assumingly in search of some food. She waves her antennae around smelling her
surroundings and the air for the scent of any new roaches that may have dropped from
the skies. There are in fact, several roach carcasses
around her, but for some reason, they’re unfit for her tastes. I watched as she inspected each roach piece
and moved on. In fact, I’ve been placing roaches into the
lands as I always have for years, but I noticed more and more, the ants weren’t eating them. Of course, the Spring Cleaners were loving
this abundance of food, and so were the earthworms which were coming up to the surface to have
a nibble! It was great that the creatures of the soil
were benefiting from all this extra food, but while this abundance in food was great
news for the soil creatures, it pointed out to me that something was indeed very wrong
in this biological food chain. Little did I know something from the soils
were killing the most important creatures of this entire biological kingdom, and it
was killing them, one ant at a time. When I began to notice the ants weren’t eating
as much, and less and less ants were seen foraging above ground, I started to get very
suspicious that something was up. Now, if you saw our last video on this ant
colony, you’ll know they disappeared on us once before, but after watering their lands,
we discovered that they were all just esthivating underground keeping moist during a dry spell. But this seemed different now. The soils were moist, and usually the lands
would be covered in foraging ants at this hour in the night. I only could see one ant now up in the leaves. I decided to prod around and try to agitate
the vegetation and create vibrations in hopes to set the Gold Empire into defense protocol,
so they would come pouring out of their nest entrances to fight me with their formic acid
sprays. I finally decided to dig into the soil a little,
and finally got a small squadron of ants to come out, but AC Family, check out how few
of them there were that emerged. Something very strange was happening, and
I did not expect, what I was about to soon discover. The next morning, I placed food into the territories
as I usually do, but as has been the case these past few weeks, no ants came to feed. Only soil creatures. I tried watering the lands again, to try to
get the Golden Empire to surface like they did before, but again, only the soil creatures
came to surface rejoicing in the moisture. OK, it was time to pull out the checklist
of possibilities as to what in “Thanos: Infinity War” was going on here. AC Family, are you ready for this? I had to see if the ants had possibly escaped? Now as you may or may not know, the Hacienda
Del Droado, like many of my ant farms, is an open top terrarium, which means it lacks
a cover. Ant keepers do this to ensure the ant territories
get proper ventilation, to decrease mold-growth, and access the ant farm easily. A baby powder barrier is applied vertically
and horizontally upside down, to keep the ants inside. This design in particular was made to create
the illusion of a barrier-less ant setup, with its landmarks rising up out of the top
of the tank, but though it looks like there is lots of places the ants could escape and
crawl out, they actually technically can’t as nothing is touching a point of access to
the outside and the ants can’t jump very far. The only place, the ants might be able to
escape was through this chord which powers the water pump and filter, but even that is
covered in baby powder and secured with a baby-powdered stopper keeping the ants from
proceeding up the chord. Ants making it that far fall onto this powdered
platform which is also secured with powdered walls to keep them from climbing further. Ants on this platform end up jumping back
into the Hacienda Del Dorado below. But could they have possibly found a breech
in the barrier that was keeping them in and moved out of my window one night while I was
sleeping? With their sheer numbers and nomadic tendencies,
this was definitely a possibility! But then I noticed some movement below. Alright! It seems the rains had caused some ants to
emerge to feed from my roach. At last! There clearly wasn’t as much ants as there
used to be, but it was nice to see at least some ants coming out to eat. And AC Family, that’s when I saw it. Look! This ant carried a something on its leg and
it was impeding its movement. A mite. Back when this colony had mites before, it
never affected their movement and general life processes. The mites they dealt with before were likely
phoretic mites, harmless hitchhikers wanting delivery to greener pastures. In fact, the reason this whole Hacienda Del
Dorado terrarium was created was to help those phoretic mites fall off, and it worked in
the end. But this time, things were different. And if you look carefully, although the ants
are hanging around this roach, it doesn’t seem like they have that same healthy appetite
to dive in and feast like they usually do. These mites were definitely affecting our
ants in a very negative way. AC Family, I’m afraid to announce that the
Golden Empire has been struck for the very first time, with every ant-keeper’s fear – parasitic,
blood-sucking mites. Some of the ants appeared mite-free, but many
of them carried the mite killers. Now, this is bad because every ant keeper
knows that once you find these blood-sucking mites on your ants, it is a death sentence,
and the killings happen quick. My heart sank, when the reality of situation
began to sink in. We found our answer and there was nothing
we could do to stop it. What we were witnessing here, AC Family, was
the extermination and final days of the Golden Empire. As weird as it sounds, I began to cry for
the ants. It was time to say goodbye to the supercolony
we grew to love, over the years. My house keeper and I began to take apart
the Hacienda Del Dorado, starting with the Golden Springs, which ironically were installed
as a population regulator. As I began to clean up the lands, again, with
little to no ants in sight, I started to wonder what I was going to do with the Hacienda Del
Dorado. Was I going to just throw the entire terrarium
away? Based on 98,000 of you who voted in a community
tab poll, most of you felt the Jawbreakers, our booming colony of trap-jaw ants, deserved
to inherit the Hacienda Del Dorado seeing as they were doing so well in their little
kingdom, and were ready to expand. But after discovering the mites, I knew I
couldn’t do this, because that would be like throwing humans into a zombie pit. The parasitic mites would then go on to annihilate
the Jawbreakers. But as I was digging around, something pretty
incredible happened. Check this out! I hit a vein! A gold vein. I must have hit some chamber where a lot of
Golden Empire were hiding out. It seems a lot of the ants were still brooding
in hidden chambers within the soil. It was nice to see this many ants congregating
in a single place. Though some of the ants had mites attached
to them, it looked like many of the ants were still quite mobile, energetic, and otherwise
seemingly healthy. I moved the soil around and scanned the premises. I needed to see if I could locate any of the
8 queens. Do you see any? I continued to move more soil around and sure
enough, a queen! There she is sprinting away! I continued looking, and to my delight, guys,
look! Another queen dashing away! I stopped for a moment to take a look at this
queen. Thankfully, she was mite-free. Amazing to think that her eggs helped fuel
the Golden Empire, along with her other 7 fellow queens, for years. Her workers each only lived for a couple months,
but queens like her can live as long as a few decades, and it was her steadfast role
as egg-layer over time, that lead to the Golden Empire being one of the most successful and
glorious ant colonies I’ve ever owned in my life. It was heart-warming to see one of her workers
coming to her side to tend to her. Soon another worker came to join the royal
entourage. And then a third. The sight was so moving for me, and suddenly
made me realize why I had fallen in love with the world of ants in the first place. These worker ants, who’d been through a lot,
were comforting their queen amidst crisis befalling their empire. It looked like these worker ants were among
the clean, mite-free group of the survivors, but although their days were numbered, their
home torn up, and hope for survival minimal, they weren’t going to give up. They were the Golden Empire, conqueror of
challenges. Now it was recently discovered that an entire
ant colony harbours collective memories that its individual members can’t possibly store
in their individual brains. I bet now, the colony was tapping into their
history to find ways to survive this mite plague. These ants were determined to fight for life
until the very end, like gladiators championing their Empire’s legacy… And that, AC Family, is when it hit me. Gladiators. OMG! About what I said earlier about there being
nothing we could do to stop the death of the Golden Empire at the hands of the mites…
well, that isn’t entirely true. For those of you who are new to the channel,
meet our rhino beetles. Three males of a fleet of 7 rhino beetle gladiators,
who are slated to compete in an Olympic tournament called the Rhino Beetle Games. Their names are Apollo, Dionysus, and Poseidon. Now upon welcoming them to the world as fully
formed adult beetles, we did notice they carried on their bodies, small gangs of mites. At first, I thought these were maybe bad mites,
but turns out, one of you guys pointed out that they are actually Hypoaspis mites, which
are predatory mites which live in symbiosis on the beetles, feeding on small soil creatures
and more importantly, bad parasitic mites that may want to feed on the beetles’ blood! In fact, Hypoaspis mites are often used by
gardeners to eat undesirable pest insects. So, AC Family, know where I’m going with this? So call me crazy, but what if we could somehow
collect a few of these Hypoaspis mites from our rhino beetles, propagate them, and then
release them into the Hacienda Del Dorado, where the Golden Empire are congregating,
to eat the parasitic mites that are feeding from the blood of our Golden Empire! The idea was insane, but by principle, it
could work right? AC Family, it was time for an important experiment. First, I prepared a water test tube. This test tube was a standard ant test tube
setup with cotton creating a water reservoir which would provide humidity. This setup was going to house a few of our
test subjects for a little while. Now it was time to go into the Hacienda Del
Dorado to collect our subjects. With our test tube, I went in, and collected
three ants. Two of the ants were infected with parasitic
mites and one was mite-free. I’ll explain why the third ant had to be mite-free
in a second. I also went in to collect three more ants
placed in a second test tube setup, again two infected ants and 1 non-infected ant,
so that we had a control group. Hello, Gr. 9 lesson on the scientific method! If this all works out, these six worker ants
were going to be heroes in the history of the Golden Empire. Alright, so now that we had our test subjects,
we now needed the help of one of our beetles, and I knew just who I was going to choose
to partake in this critical experiment. If you look to the left, you’ll see the living
chamber of Apollo, who is buried somewhere in here. Of the three available beetles, I chose Apollo,
because fittingly, he was named after the Greek god of medicine and healing, and also
of plagues, so it was only appropriate to choose him. He was not going to be happy at me pulling
him out, but the fate of our Golden Empire relies on it! I filled up a small dish of water and got
two q-tips. The plan was to go in, get Apollo out, and
try to collect a few Hypoaspis mites from his body. I started to dig, and carefully moved the
soil around until I heard his voice, well stridulation. There he was! As expected, he was very upset at my intrusion. Behold, our mighty gladiator Apollo, small
horns beautiful colour. And now, the possible saviour to deliver the
Golden Empire from doom. I carefully tried to look around Apollo’s
body for mites. I didn’t need a tonne of mites, just a couple
for our experiment. Turning him upside down, I saw them, and quickly
ran the swab to collect. Got it! I picked up one of the test tubes, and carefully
introduced the Hypoaspis mite inside with the ants. The mite instantly bolted into the test tube! This entire process made my heart race a million
miles a minute! I went back to Apollo and swabbed again one
last time, and placed the second mite into the same test tube. The test tube now had two Hypoaspis mites. I placed two inside so that if they were male
and female they could hopefully breed, but we didn’t really need to measure breeding. We just needed to see if the Hypoaspis mites
would feed from the blood-sucking parasitic mites on the ants. Also, the reason I included a mite-free ant
in the mix was to see if the two Hypoaspis mites would feed on the parasitic mites enough
to keep the parasitic mites from breeding and infecting other ants. If the group with the Hypoaspis mites suddenly
end up with the parasitic mites all gone, we know that the Hypoaspis mites would be
an effective biological agent to eradicate the parasitic blood-sucking mites killing
the Golden Empire. I then marked the test tube that contained
the Hypoaspis mites with black tape, and left our control group tapeless. By the end of this experiment having the two
test tubes to compare, will make it easier for us to understand the results. I took both test tubes, inserted a drop of
honey onto the cotton in each, and placed them into a dark drawer, to simulate the soil
conditions underground. And all there was left to do now was pray
to God, that the results of this experiment were favourable. Apollo, completely upset and shaken up, dove
straight into his soils to get away from us. Thank you Apollo, you’ve been a greater help
than you’ll ever understand. Guys, as giants, perhaps we may not see everything
that happens in the soil, but this time, we were going to try to learn enough, to at least
bring salvation to an entire Empire of gold, fighting for the continuation of their throne,
as rulers of the ever-evolving Hacienda Del Dorado. I was going to wait with baited breath for
the results. Alright, AC Family, it’s do or die now! It’s been a crazy week, but I’ll be sure to
let you know the results of our experiment to save the Golden Empire. Let’s hope the Hypoaspis mites prove effective
at eating the parasitic mites on our ants. At this point, it’s our only hope. So guys, be sure to smash that subscribe button
and bell icon now, so you get notified at every single upload and follow this continuing
story, and hit the like button every single time, including now. If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to explore the new Hacienda Del Dorado! I’ve had to remodel, completely removing the
Golden Springs seeing as we no longer need a population limiter anymore, so go check
out what the Hacienda Del Dorado looks like now! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Why are the Hypoaspis mites we see
on the beetles a good thing? Congratulations to GAMER X who correctly answered: The mites are beneficial because they eat
small insects such as parasitic mites that suck blood from the beetles. Congratulations, GAMER X, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why did I choose Apollo to
participate in our experiment? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants


Now speaking of incredible workings happening
underground, there’s a new plot of soil in the Antiverse which houses a few creatures
that I am positive you guys will truly marvel at, creatures that I have yet to feature on
this channel, and I can’t wait to show our new incubating creatures. Please subscribe to my channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! AC Family, the utter beasts that lay hidden
within this container were unlike anything I have ever seen before in my life, gargatuans
creatures that I am certain will leave you in awe… either that, or make you grimmace
in disgust! Either way, I can’t wait to show you these
true natural wonders of the animal kingdom, so keep on watching until the end, as we uncover
the secret lives of these major players of the world’s forests. Khepri, Khepri, Ra, Ra, Ra
Soon to be this depicted god. In the soil, they wait and grow,
to become the creatures we all know, Make up more than a quarter,
of all we’ve discovered, In next week’s video,
they shall be uncovered. This was the riddle I left for you guys in
last week’s hidden video for anyone who wanted to take a stab at what our mystery creatures
were, featured in this week’s video, and turns out… Many of you hit the nail on the head, as I
knew AC Family would! Beetles as a group of insects, form the order
Coleoptera with about 400,000 species, making it the largest of all taxonomic orders, making
up a whopping 25% of all known animal life-forms we’ve ever discovered! Can you believe that of all the animals we’ve
ever documented, a quarter of them are beetles? If aliens were to study and survey the animals
of the planet Earth, it wouldn’t be surprising to me if they named Earth “Planet of the Beetles”. So, I’m pleased to announce that the newest
inhabitants of the Antiverse are beetles, but not just any beetles. They happen to be my favourite beetles in
the whole world: Scarab beetles! Scarab beetles, belonging to the family Scarabaeidae,
consists of over 30,000 species of beetles worldwide. Khepri, is an Egyptian god of creation with
the head of a scarab beetle. Chances are you’ve seen a scarab beetle at
least once in your life. Some of the well-known scarab beetles are
Japanese beetles, dung beetles, June beetles, rose chafers, Hercules beetles, and Goliath
beetles. But today, AC Family, the scarab beetles I’ll
be introducing to you are nothing less than epic! But first, the reason they’ve come to the
Antiverse! I opened my superworm farm last week and discovered
that it was empty. All that was left was an adult superworm,
a.k.a. a darkling beetle, but looking at the darkling beetle crawling across my hand, something
came to me. You see I had been thinking of what I could
possibly feed my ants for Canadian Thanksgiving which recently passed last weekend. I wanted to give them something other than
the ordinary superworms they were used to eating, something fatter and much more meatier. So I called up some beetle friends of mine,
and low and behold, so arrived this ominous container, which was allegedly full of fattened,
scarab beetle larvae collected from native forest soils, a beetle known to locals as
“salagubang”, the species: Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, the Siamese Rhinoceros beetle! These beetles can allegedly reach a whopping
length of 3.5–7 centimetres, which is massive. They are sexually dimorphic. The females are smaller, while males are larger
and have big rhino-like horns which can vary in size and shape, used to battle each other
for females and territory. I bet, the larvae of these Rhinoceros beetles
were just fat and juicy, the perfect Thanksgiving treats for my ants. Ahhh! I was so excited and nervous all at once to
peek inside! Upon arrival I immediately opened the container,
and saw the container was filled to the brim with digging medium. But, no… patience… I wasn’t going to harvest the beetle grubs
just yet. I promised myself to wait for Thanksgiving
Day before offering my ants, the fattened feasts they deserved. It was the morning of Canadian Thanksgiving,
and though I live in a completely different country on the opposite side of the planet,
I still celebrate Thanksgiving, and was eager to finally give my ants of the Antiverse their
fat, juicy turkeys, a.k.a. the scarab beetle grubs! But AC Family, I wasn’t ready to see what
I was about to see upon opening their container. Look! Mushrooms had sprouted in just two days since
the container’s arrival. And guys, it turns out those little black
pellets are the beetle grubs’ frass. Their droppings, which are super nutrient
rich for plants and I suppose mushrooms… hey! Did you guys see that movement? There must be a beetle grub now! I took my tweezers and tried to sift through
the soil for a beetle grub. Nothing. Alright, seriously though it’s time to dig
out these scarab beetle grubs! AC Family, let’s do this! I put on some gloves because I was told these
beetle grubs can bite with their powerful mandibles and it can hurt! I carefully sifted through the surface. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a bit
scared scraping through the soil like this! Suddenly, I hit something! A grub? No, a piece of wood. False alarm! Now, while digging, I decided to also collect
and store some of this frass-filled soil, because I could use it in the future as a
growing medium for terrariums and plants. In fact, you can buy insect frass in bags
for gardening. As mentioned, insect frass is jam-packed with
nutrients for plants. Comes to show you these beetles are super
essential in the forests they are part of as they recycle dead plants to nourish the
living plants. I continued to dig. I wasn’t sure how big these beetle grubs were
nor how many there were, but the whole time my heart was racing! Aside from the fear of being bitten, I’m also
mildly vermiphobic, and the sight of worms or anything worm-like, mini-snakes and legless
lizards excluded, make me shudder, and TBH, based on what I imagined these rhino beetle
larvae looked like, I knew I was going to initially be repulsed at first sight. But before I knew it, something shiny and
white caught my eye. We found one! OMG! Look at it! My jaw dropped to the floor. It was huge, fat, and curled up into a ball. Wow! Look at its body shape, and check out that
red head and massive mandibles. Indeed, it was unlike anything I’ve ever seen
before. I checked the back and underside of the beast. My ants were going to enjoy this giant morsel! It was time to prepare the ant turkey. I washed the grub clean with water, and it
flinched at every squirt, I held the creature in my hand. For such a big and scary beast, it sure didn’t
put up much of a fight. Alright, the grub was now ready for the execution
block. The first ant colony I planned on feeding
was my largest and hungriest of all, the Fire Nation. I knew this beetle grub would be enough to
feed my ravenous colony of fire ants for at least two days. I estimated that this fat larva had the equivalent
of at least two or three cockroaches. And as I do with all prey insects, I was to
put the creature out of its misery before feeding it to the ants. I took the execution scissors, still caked
with the dried blood and guts of previously killed prey insects. My plan was to split it in half so the ants
could easily get into the grub’s insides. Here we go… 1… 2… 3… Sorry, guys. 3! No…. I stood there motionless for a moment. My hand was frozen and defiant, unwilling
to close down. I watched the helpless beetle grub, curled
up in fetal position, awaiting its fate at the blades of my scissors. Ahhhh my heart… I couldn’t… I could not follow through with the execution. I withdrew my scissors and picked up beetle
grub with a heavy heart. I placed it back into the container. What was I going to do? It suddenly was no longer a vile beast to
my eyes, but in a strange way had become… well, cute! AC Family, how about you guys? Doesn’t it suddenly look real endearing to
you. The shift of perception was completely unexpected,
and with this new context, my plans had suddenly changed completely. They were to join our Antiverse as inhabitants. Behold, a simple container I bought from a
department store. It was to become the sacred home and growing
chamber of our rhinoceros beetles. Apparently, these grubs need at least 10 cm
x 10 cm x 10 cm of space, and it is allegedly better to keep the beetles singly because
they may fight and lethally puncture each other with their sharp mandibles. This container was perfect. I also modified the cover to create a much
more open top and airy sides. Next, I had to add the beetle larva’s food. Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, happen to
be notorious pests in coconut farms in the Philippines where I live, as they prey on
the wood and roots of coconut trees, living or decaying, and it just so happens that my
neighbourhood is abundant in coconut trees. So, I took a walk down the street, found a
pile of decaying coconut wood, and harvested this favoured rhino beetle larva food. I couldn’t wait to put our growing chamber
together, AC Family! I placed some decaying coconout wood at the
bottom of the chamber. It was amazing to think that these rhino beetle
larvae actually eat and grow into gigantic beetles, subsisting entirely on decaying wood. This blew my mind! It also meant that the larvae had within their
gut, the necessary microbiota to allow them to properly digest and acquire nutrition from
the cellulose in the wood, much like termites do! Many animals cannot digest this stuff! But these beetle larvae can. After this initial layer of decaying wood
was set in place, next I was going to add their main growing medium. This brick of coco peat, also purchased at
a department store, can be found in most home and gardening stores. It’s really cool, because all you need to
do is soak the brick in water and it instantly expands and becomes great growing medium for
epiphytic plants, and well in our case, rhinoceros beetles! I packed this coco peat into the growing chamber. The beetle larva may also very well, find
this coco peat to be a tasty food, as well. I then added another layer of decaying coconut
wood, then pack it off with another layer of coco peat. And volia our new rhino beetle larva growing
chamber – a dedicated, double food layered catacomb in which the beetle larva can grow
and develop into adulthood in peace. What do you guys think of it? I placed the modified cover back on and proceeded
to do the exact same thing, to prepare 10 other growing chambers. I returned to the container and set the growing
chamber on the ground, removed the cover, and carefully went to pick up the larva we
had found, and place it inside its new home. The larva lay motionless. I admired the neat auburn hairs that covered
the larva’s entire body, as well as those reddish spots running down the body, and that
rear end though, looking crazy extra-terrestrial to me! But it wasn’t long before our rhino beetle
baby began to move, and began to move the soil using its head, mandibles, and front
legs. But watching it burrow now, my initial thoughts
were that it didn’t seem like such an effective burrower. I mean, honestly at this pace, it seemed like
it would take at least a good half hour to get soil-deep! It even strangely began to burrow horizontally. What an ineffective burrower! Have a look! But AC Family, I was wrong! For when it finally found its preferred place
to really start digging, it quite effectively started using its legs, head, and powerful
body muscles to start excavating a nice tunnel downwards. Those hairs seemed pretty good at keeping
soil moved upwards in place, as it continued to dig deeper and deeper. In 5 minutes flat, the grub was completely
concealed deep within the soil. I had to move some soil aside to see it! AC Family, isn’t that incredible? What amazing subterrarean creatures, right? I proceeded to cover it up, placed the cover
back on, and continued to dig out the remaining beetle larvae! I carefully sifted through the soils, I didn’t
want to injure the delicate grubs during excavation. I felt as though their bodies could pop with
a single puncture. Wait! Yes, we found a second grub! I dug some more… a third grub! Alright! This was actually fun! It was like we were digging for gold! I hit something solid and pulled it out. It was a large piece of decaying wood. This was what the larvae were eating in here,
I guessed. I found a fourth grub and a fifth. Woah this one was huge! Could be a male, perhaps! I placed each grub in its own growing chamber,
and boy was it ever satisfying to set each grub in its own, special home we made for
them. Have a look! I felt like we were bees, placing our larvae
into cells in which they were to grow for their whole larval lives, until they emerge
as adults! Each one of these growing chambers had all
they needed to develop into adult rhinoceros beetles. All I needed to do was water them periodically. And look! One grub already blessed its chamber with
a frass pellet. How cute! I made sure to enjoy looking at the grubs
now that they were visible, because I knew that once they were below the surface feeding
on our decaying coconut wood, they would be completely concealed in the soil away from
view. Alright, it was time to keep digging! I wonder how many more were left. I dug, and I dug, and I dug, and managed to
pull out four more huge beetle grubs. Just look at those cute babies. Now I also realized that I should space them
out a bit when setting them down so they don’t bite each other. I placed them each into their own growing
cell. It kinda felt like I was planting a tree or
something. Haha! When I had found the final beetle grub, I
held the huge creature in my hand for a bit. I just couldn’t believe Nature had fashioned
such a spectacular and beautiful creature. I wanted to take a final and good look at
the larva before setting it into its growing chamber. I loved watching it move around. When I was ready, I picked it up. AC Family, I feel we made the right choice
by saving these beetle babies from becoming ant food. Alright, our baby is squirming now and just
wants to be buried. I placed it into its growing chamber and watched
it burrow into the soil. The process took 8 minutes. Eat well, our beloved beetle larva. I can’t wait to see what you look like when
you emerge. When all was settled, the growing chambers
were arranged neatly behind the Plateaus of Gaia. A total of 13 beetle larvae were collected,
so I had to create two more extra chambers. All the larvae had long burrowed deep into
their growing chambers and were nestled deep in darkness, where they would remain for the
next couple of months, feeding on the decaying coconut wood we had prepared for them. So it turns out the larvae are expected to
pupate and emerge as adult rhino beetles by Christmas! Oh man, won’t that be quite the Christmas
gift in the Antiverse?! I have decided to call these incubating beetle
catacombs, the Chambers of Sudan, as a tribute to Sudan, the last male northern white rhinoceros,
who died earlier this year on March the 20th. Though I realize, keeping carnivorous wild
animals like ants, as pets, often requires the killing of living prey animals like beetle
larvae and roaches, but having said that, I am happy we chose life for these beetle
grubs. For Thanksgiving, I just gave my ants some
extra roaches. So, what should we call these new beetles? Leave your name suggestions in the comments
and I will choose my top 5 favourites for us to vote on in a future video. The Chambers of Sudan are placed right next
to my closet, so I will make sure to check on our beetles every day, for on a random
day in December, we, the AC Family, shall be ready and waiting in celebration, for the
arrival of the great rhinoceros beetles into the Antiverse, and boy, do I have some epic
plans when they do! Yes, AC Family! Did you enjoy this week’s episode? I seriously can’t wait for the adults to emerge,
can you? Imagine seeing huge rhino beetles emerging
from the soil. So you know the drill! Hit that Subscribe button and bell icon now,
so you don’t miss out on their grand emergeance, and hit the Like button every single time,
including now. And hey, if you’re new to the channel, and
want to catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story
line playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so
you can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch extended play footage of the beetle larvae! They are incredible creatures to look at,
despite their scary demeanor! And before we proceed to the AC Question of
the Week, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel, daily vlogs which have become a full
out bird dad channel, as I am now raising a baby African Grey parrot! If you love birds, I’d love for you to meet
my new cute little bird! She’s quite the character, loves to cuddle,
is quite chatty, and is fun to watch grow up! Hope you can subscribe when you’re there. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What made it easier for
the ants in this video to dig more tunnels? Congratulations to Arnav Singh who correctly
answered: The moisture from the watering made
it easier for the ants in this video to dig more tunnels. Congratulations, Arnav, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why did we have to separate each beetle larva? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!