Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

Honey Bee Observation Hive 8-Frame Setup How to Start Keeping Bees with a split!

Honey Bee Observation Hive 8-Frame Setup How to Start Keeping Bees with a split!


okay so today what I’m showing you is
something that I’ve always wanted to have and that’s an observation hive and
this is an observation hive I purchased as an already assembled kit it comes
with everything except the glazing so we have to do that ourselves but this is
called a swing view hive it holds eight deep frames and I’m gonna go
step-by-step how to set it up and I had a special order this plexiglass I got
the thick stuff so it’s a little over a quarter of an inch thick and it’s
clarity is perfect it’s acrylic and of course you have this paper on it that
you have to peel off and make sure that your dimensions are perfect because you
don’t want to have to cut the Plexiglas yourself and this particular company I
will give you a link for them but they do custom cutting for you and they were
within a sixteenth of an inch to my dimensions the next thing you have to do
is bed the glass in a hundred percent pure silicon that’s rated for all
weather conditions and that’s what we did we put this little can bead down and
now we’re gonna drop in the Plexiglas and remember you test fit it dry before
you put this in to make sure you don’t have any problems and now once it’s in I
go around the edges and I press it up to make sure that the silicon bead goes the
full width of the joint we don’t want any movement in this we definitely don’t
want bees and debris to get between the Plexiglas and the frames that came with
this observation hive and they mark the sides a and B and we’re looking at the
top there and that’s actually a feeder screen and this is the B side it’s all
framed up you can see that there’s a full bead of silicone there and you can
later come and cut it off with a razor blade if you want to take out that
excess I ended up just leaving it but make sure that you absolutely fill the
joint just for a lot of reasons with strength being the first so we have the
a side and the B side nice and strong you have the option of course to finish
these frames finish the woodwork the exterior of it I wouldn’t put any finish
inside or just leave it plain and I’m leaving it plain this is the silicon
tube that I used 100% silicone totally stable inert material once it’s dry you
want to make sure when you’re using this stuff that you have plenty of
ventilation going and then once you have put the Plexiglas bedded in the silicon
into these frames give them at least 24 hours and here we are at the shed that
I’ve decided to put the observation hive in and this is the included landing
board that goes with it and you have to drill a 2 inch diameter hole from the
inside before you of coarse screw this on here and they use two inch grey
electrical conduit the plastic stuff that’s rated for sun exposure and i had
to do some modifications on the inside here because I’m using 2×4 supports and
this shed was Amish built so the dimensional lumber is a fall like when
they say 2×4 it is four inches so I had to chisel some of that out and we’re
vertically mounting these two by fours so they’re glued and they’re screwed in
because it’s gonna hold quite a bit of weight remember this is an eighth frame
observation hive and that’s eight deep frames so let’s say at the outside 20
pounds per frame so you’re looking at yeah quite a bit of weight if the thing
actually filled up completely with honey we know that’s not likely but if it did
you want to definitely be able to support it and this is the swing view
mounting bracket that goes on the wall some people actually put this thing
inside their house I really didn’t want to do that I couldn’t think of a great
way that I wanted to keep it plus inside your house sometimes you have to tend to
that you’d have to pull the thing off and carry it outside and so that you
could access the bees and do some maintenance with your observation hive
so here I’m just eyeballing the again it’s electrical conduit that came with it
and you can see that it’s already cut out there that landing board has a
receiver for it that’s perfect I did not glue or do anything other than
friction set that and when you put the the plate on for
the wall it also has a recess that houses that tube that the bees will use
to go in and out and at the top there’s that threaded grommet so that you can
put the bolt through the top on the bottom which is where the bees go in and
out it has that nice piece of angled wood that supports it and then again a
little tail piece of electrical conduit sticks out and the swing view is
actually going to turn on that so what they want you to do is put down some
beeswax so that it can sit on that and that becomes the gliding surface and so
here we are showing you the frame again without the glazing yet and this is that
little piece I talked about and these are clumps of beeswax that I put down
there and we’re just going to use the weight of the swing view itself to smear
that around and of course beeswax is pretty stable here it is mounted now and
again you can see that the joints are cutout dedos or whatever you want to
call that that will accommodate the frames and I’m going to show you
step-by-step how I set it up and those are order 20 threaded studs that are
there that will hold the frames on so it looks pretty good stainless steel
screens and again little segments that have been cut off of electrical conduit
that act like spring clips they hold it in there so it’s easy to remove if you
have to get inside also if you needed to close off the entry and exit point there
is this little galvanized piece of Steel there and it comes with a screw so I
just pulled it out which opens it up so the bees can come and go and then I just
put that screw back in the hole there so I don’t lose it but if you ever have to
close off your observation hive for transportation that’s the plate that you
put in the other thing is I’m going with acorn plastic frames these are food
grade plastic frames that come with a heavy heavy coat of beeswax on them in
the past I’ve used Piergo and these are what I’ve gone to now so and the green
stuff is actually drone frame so you’ll see that the the cell size is much
larger and people use that to get drones to
develop and they use that as some kind of protection for varroa because I’ll
just pull out the drone and then here’s the white frames it comes in white
plastic or black I prefer the black because I’m a photographer and I’m
trying to get a look at egg development larvae development and a lot of things
that are going on which is why I have the observation hive to begin with the
green here I’m just showing it to you’re really close and they’re marked on the
top again is your acorn frames and I’ll put a link to that in the description
one X means it’s dipped once 2 X dip twice and 3 X triple dip or what they
call heavy wax coating the more wax you have on these frames the more readily
your bees will start to draw them out and make their their honeycomb on that
so we’re gonna get to see all of that and it’s one of the great things about
having an observation hive because we get to watch them draw out comb and
start to occupy the hive now if you want to put in wooden frames or
something like that go ahead because then you’ll be able to watch how they
draw out comb without foundation and that company I believe also sells
plastic frame foundation without the full frame but I just personally prefer
the full frames and we’re gonna have both in care so the top four frames will
be the new acorn variety which now I prefer they don’t flex in the middle and
they don’t distort as much as the Piergo frames which are going to be the
bottom four as much as those did and those were out
in my beehives so the next thing I have to do is bring in some frames of bees to
populate the hive so I’m going to a hive that has a lot of activity they’ve got
some brood in there and I’m going to light load the observation hive because
again I want to watch them expand so I’m gonna pull some frames that have some
brood and some resources on them and I want to put those inside the frame and
then I’ve mail ordered in this Weaver queen which is a survivor bee line
they’re varroa resistant they’re super hygienic
and she comes out of Texas and there are workers of course in there because the
Queen can’t feed herself and you’ll just put her on top of all the frames inside
the observation hive and then what I did later was I just pulled that gray clip
out and the stainless steel screen and then used forceps to withdraw the cage
so you want to make sure of course and pulled the plug on the sugar side and
now we’re doing something different here normally you’d be Re-Queening because the
queen would have died and you’d have a queenless hive that means that the bees
that would be in there would be looking for a new queen and would readily accept
a new queen that’s not gonna happen here because we’re pulling frames from hives
that have Queens and those bees have pheromone associated with the Queen in
the hive they’ve come from so again here’s my first frame we’re gonna put
that in there and again I don’t want fully drawn out frames I don’t want them
to be complete because part of the fun is in watching them draw out wax on
their own and watching the colony establish itself and you notice how calm
these bees are you also want to position them carefully you don’t want to put it
right up against the surface where the Plexiglas will be because you want to
maintain these space they’re thinking about where the comb will be and how far
drawn out it will be and then leave additional bee space 3/16 of an inch
roughly is good but remember that once you close it up you’re not gonna have
access to move these things around so positioning them carefully now will be
worth its weight in gold later so what I’m doing is I’m putting the
frames in one by one and going back back out to the apiary collecting other
frames now look at this one it’s absolutely loaded with pollen there’s
also capped honey there so these are resources that the bees are going to use
to expand their colony now I did have to put on some protective clothing
remember I’m getting into hives and I am taking away their brood if you
want to kick off a defensive response from a colony of bees pull some brood
frames and you’ll see that they will really want to get you away from those
resources much different than if you were just pulling honey supers so here
again I’m just being very careful in the alignment of these frames now these are
all worker bees most of them my target bees of course
are nurse bees bees that are still in there cleaning stages feeding stages for
larvae and those that would otherwise occupy brood frames and that’s
because they haven’t been outside of their hive yet they don’t know where
they live all of their experience in life has been inside the hive so that
means hopefully that they will be better prepared to occupy this hive and stay
where I put them because the hives that I’m pulling them from are within a
hundred feet actually of this observation hive in the shed that it’s
in also you get a glass jar with a tin cap on it that is your feet our jar goes
right on the top there and I’m putting of course 50/50 sugar water and I use
super filtered water and I heat it up and sanitize it carefully before I put
that on the hive and here it is all together an eighth frame swing view hive
and if you’ve been watching any many other videos that show macro video
close-ups of different behavior whether it be a queen laying eggs or whether it
be baby bees hatching or the development of larvae that has all been filmed in
this observation hive and because we’re in the shed and now you can see there
are larvae there very small ones to the left and again here’s the reason why I
like the black plastic frames and in this case from acorn is because the
contrast there lets me see eggs better and lets me see developing larvae and
here we have a collection of bees that aren’t doing a lot
now but what they are is forming a physical barrier around these larvae to
keep the cooler air from getting to them and here is what looks like the start of
a queen cell but what they actually did within days after installing these
frames is they they dismantled that they chewed it all apart and some of these
little areas here are packed now with pollen pollen varies widely in color it
could be cheeto yellow or it can be very pale green and in some cases almost just
off-white and look at this variety of pollen here as soon as a worker comes in
and unloads the pollen directly into the cell a worker bee then goes right in and
starts to mix that pollen and seal it up with a little bit of honey and actually
the pollen will ferment in these cells so if you can smell it if you open up a
pollen area that’s been there for 48 hours you start to smell that it is
fermenting and actually the two-day-old pollen that’s been stored is most
frequently used by those nurse bees so here we are again I want you to notice
this behavior here’s the Queen and her workers and they’re in this cage look at
the abdomen of the occupants of this colony right now they are trying as hard
as they can to sting through that screen see how they bend their abdomens towards
the occupants of this little queen cage they’re trying to kill off the occupants
and the reason is they perceive the pheromone of this Queen and these
workers as alien to the hive and they definitely don’t want them there so
we’re gonna get back to that later now we’re gonna show here that there are
resources see the pollen in the top and then we also have honey lower down all
around the brood that are currently hatching here and that’s a convenience
thing the nurse bees don’t have to go very far to get resources to feed these
baby bees of course once they’re capped they’re not eating anything so it’s only
during the larvae stage that they’re being fed and then they’ll come out of
there capping on their own these baby bees will go right to work
they turn into nurse bees themselves and will turn around and attend to those
other developing larvae now here we are back at the Queen this is 24 hours later
notice the body posture of the bees that are on that screen now their abdomens
are laid out straight and what they’re actually doing is sticking their heads
in and extending their tongues to make sure that that Queen has plenty of food
Queens do not feed themselves they’re only fed by nurse bees in the hive so
now it’s safe to pull the plug and release that Queen into this new colony and here again we’re just we’re actually
shooting this through the opposite screen there are vents left and right
top and bottom and here’s the Queen out on her own and she is fertile and she
set right about laying eggs the only thing that really held her back in this
new hive was the number of cells that were available for her to lay in she
laid an egg in every single cell that was not occupied it was a fantastic
experience now the observation hive is set up and
ready to go and now all we have to do is drink coffee and watch and learn about
what goes on inside a honey bee hive I hope you’ve enjoyed watching this and if
you want to see bees at your leisure protected from weather I suggest that
you get an observation hive of your own or maybe even build one thank you so
much for watching this video and thank you again for your interest and honey
bees I hope this was helpful see ya!

Flow Hive Honey Bee keeping  Update YES the Queen can lay eggs in the Flow-Frames

Flow Hive Honey Bee keeping Update YES the Queen can lay eggs in the Flow-Frames


okay so it’s been a while since we’ve talked about the honey bees and the flow supers out in my apiary so let’s do an update since we’ve come out of winter and we went through a full winter with Flow supers on the bee hives and in some cases I took the flow supers off and we’re going to see the comparison there’s another issue that’s come out that we’re going to talk about in the last half of this presentation so first we have the Flow super that was taken off of a beehive after the colony had used most of its resources and I’m going to show you what the stored flow frames looked like now whenever you’re taking a part a beehive always make sure to have a bucket or something nearby where you can take wax and propolis scrapings and put those in there there’s always somebody that wants beeswax or propolis now you can see they have emptied this out and what’s left is solidified honey so this is considered crystallized or solidified honey so you’re just looking at sugar crystals really and the bees do come back and consume these, this whole side was full of solidified honey and the bees took it out and of course I removed the super about midwinter because they had plenty of resources in the lower medium super for that colony so I just wanted to show physically what these flow frames go through and this is a nice close look at the cells they’re nice and clean and there’s nothing on this Flo frame at all except the leftovers from the honey that they once stored now this is not one of the flow hive supers that we drew honey off of in the past I left it all on for the bees and you can see that the propolis has really made it challenging to pull these frames out and there you have it even more solidified honey and when capping it and everything in this frame is partially liquid but definitely not usable and you could not operate the flow frame with this residue in this condition so there are a couple of options when it comes to cleaning this out and it’s a question that I often get, what would you do if the honey became candied inside these flow frames because of course it’s a mechanism that has to function in order to drain honey and you’ll notice too that the stainless-steel cords that hold the flow hive components together has been propolized primarily on top not so much on the underside and here is some where the center section if you can see the difference is still liquid honey and could be uncapped and extracted if you wanted to you can take a flow super although these flow frames are designed to drain the honey through the mechanism but if you needed to and you had some that was solidified and some that’s still liquid as this frame is you could un cap it put it in a spinner and spin it out traditionally of course that defeats the whole purpose of the flow hive mechanism and now this is as you know a robust colony of bees and I’m going to take this frame and I’m going to put the flow super on it and allow these bees to clean it out another clean-out option would be just to take the flow frames out and spray them out with a power washer and I have one of those but here I’d rather see how well the bees clean it out themselves all of the frames that you’re looking at here are a form of food grade plastic there is one wooden frame there but the black and the white are both Piergo designs and later on we’ll be talking in another video about the new triple wax-coated frames that are made by a company called Acorn and you can see that the population of this colony is really high and this is early in the spring one of the few warm days that we’ve had we’ve had really erratic weather conditions where we get very cold and then warm and then cold again and that took a huge toll on bee populations in apiaries across the state of Pennsylvania some longtime beekeepers have reported losses of 50% or even higher in some cases so now we’re going to put this is my original flow super that I did my original review on and it was exposed to the cold all year long it was just removed from the colony always make sure that all the components still work when you’re putting it back on a colony and that there won’t be any binding or problems and there isn’t this came through just fine all the plastic components are fine they’re unaffected by cold and the box is a little weathered and that’s expected I made my own inner covers for these things so that it would be thick enough that when you put a telescoping cover over the top it will not interact with the mechanisms that you need to remove in order to operate the flow frames and then just a standard telescoping top with a zinc coated tin cover just making sure that I can still access everything since we’re kicking off the new season here and what you’re looking at is one of our early warm days in fact probably one of the first times I can actually get out in the apiary and check things out so the bees are immediately right up in the frames and it shows this is of course the end frame which faces the east in my apiary and there’s a little logo embossed in that removable panel and it felt like you might need a chicken fix here for those who are looking for my chicken videos we’ll just show this rooster that happened to be walking by now this brings us to today and the reason I wanted to get this video out right away to those who are waiting for flow hive updates in the past I’ve had a lot of questions about why I don’t use queen excluders in my apiary and if you don’t use queen excluder would the bees go up into the flo super and in the flow frames and would the Queen actually lay her eggs in those mechanisms and that would be a bad thing if you’ve heard me talk before I’ve always said that I don’t use queen excluders in the apiary and that’s because it slows down honey production so much as some of the workers can’t get through those queen excluders well when it comes to the flow hive and that mechanism you’re about to see why putting a queen excluder in your flow hive system between the brood boxes and your actual flow supers is very important we did actually get brood in the flow frames and I’m going to show you that in a moment we have terrific weather right now we’ve come out of a lot of rain and just look at all the colors of pollen that’s coming in on the hind legs with these workers you’ll also notice that we have an abundance of drones and that means with this immediate buildup of numbers in this colony that we could be favoring swarm conditions here so for me that means it’s time to start thinking about splitting the colony down and making some new colonies for observation and you’ll notice too this is an upper entrance the upper entrance is much bigger than the lower landing board entrance and all of my bee hives have an upper and a lower landing board entrance now we’re looking at the frames of the one that I showed at the beginning of this video and they are cleaned out nicely now if you look, I get questions sometimes when people see you down in the corners of this viewing frame that it looks like the mechanism was partially activated or some of the cells look a little skewed that’s really a visual distortion and if you can look across the surface of these things they are properly aligned, what happens is the surface is irregular so they’re not drawn out even as it would be if this were straight wax and they’re just cleaning it out so all of the honey that you saw and the candied honey and the solidified sugar crystals that were in the cells before are now completely gone and this colony is really ramping up for our Spring nectar flow you notice there’s even a little humidity building up on the inside of this clear plastic panel and this is again just another view same colony and this is the one remember that the colony was not left on through winter so the numbers are very strong now we’re going to get into the colony that was benefiting from the flow frames throughout winter so they came up into this flow super and used up all the honey resources that were in it and this is a closeup to show you the cells are absolutely clean as a whistle and there’s something going on here that you wouldn’t notice just looking at the end frames and that is that we’ve actually had the Queen come up into this flow super which is near the top of this hive and she actually started laying in the cells that’s a question I get frequently what would you do if the Queen started laying in the cells well we made lots of excuses about that number one, the queen would be primarily active in the lower boxes we have two deeps on this colony so it was highly unlikely that she would come up into the flow supers and use these deep plastic cells which again are very deep and kind of unusual for a queen to be attracted to for laying but what we’re looking at right here is the eastern panel that is exposed now because we took the cover off and inside these flow supers the plastic cells are clean as a whistle except for those that have now developing brood in them and when we’re looking at this light yellow somewhat convex surface on these cells this is different from honey stored caps because those you would see would be slick somewhat shiny and somewhat concave when it comes to brood cells they’re always slightly convex and of course the material is more fibrous so that the developing brood can breathe through them and if you look top center here you’ll see what I call Michelin men and those are developing baby bees the little grubs that are in the cells so the Queen has been all the way up into the flo supers and she’s been laying in the mechanism all the cells are synthetic they’re nothing but plastic and the only thing that the bees are providing is the egg they sealed the frame, of course the Queen provides the egg and then the workers are putting royal jelly into the cells and some of them are really shiny you can see that they have those resources provided and they’re capping them off and these are workers so the Queen has taken over the flow super in this case and the plastic mechanized flow frames and is using them to lay eggs and raise brood so now what does that mean for me well I’m not into beekeeping for the honey but if you are doing this for honey of course it completely arrests the function of your flow frame so you will not be able to use his flow frame for honey extraction while it’s being used for brood the other thing that I was always commenting about is if they were going to go and lay in these frames I would allow it simply so we could observe it and see what happens and of course here we are over a year from my first purchase and installation of flow frames and they’re using them now keep in mind the reason that they’re using these for brood is because there is no queen excluder so what I’m telling you is to make sure that you do use the provided queen excluder above the brood boxes on your flow hives and below the flow supers that holds these mechanized flow frames otherwise you’ll have what I have in this case which right now is just a very expensive brood box and you can see the bees attending to those grubs in there so now this is the difference what we’re looking at is just in case it has anything to do with the way they’re organized on the colonies number four is the one that has brood in the flow frames and those flow frames are the third box from the bottom on the right so the activity at the landing board is normal keep in mind we have temperatures in the high 20s low 30s Fahrenheit still at night so my entry reducers are still on look at the activity on the upper entrance and then there’s the top box now this is the one that does not have brood in it and now we go to number four here and this is one, look, we have a deep the box with number four is the second deep so the third box up is the flow hive or the flow super and that’s the one with flow frames in it and that’s also the one that has now lots of brood being developed in those mechanized frames and then above that is a shallow super that also has honey in it already so lesson learned if you do not put the Queen excluder underneath your flow super it is possible that you could have the Queen up in your flow frames laying her eggs in those plastic cells for me it’s just a learning experience for you it could be catastrophic if you’re counting on getting honey from those flow frames and that is their purpose so I’m glad to share that with you and I’m also glad that now you have an opportunity to see that a queen can and will lay her eggs inside the plastic flow frames if there is no queen excluder beneath it thank you for watching and I hope you learned something through my demonstration here if you have a flow hive and a flow super make sure you put a queen excluder beneath it thanks for watching and I hope you’ll follow us as we do other honeybee videos

Honey Bee and Wasp Sugar Water Preferences Open Feeding What Bees Use First


okay so today is Friday the 13th in
October and what we have is an abundance of foraging bees and wasps in the air
and the resources are low so competition is high now what a lot of beekeepers do
is they open feed and they open feed a variety of different materials the most
popular is 50/50 sugar water and sugar like C&H pure cane sugar and what I have
here for this test and you’re looking at the time-lapse sequence here 50% so
that’s the 50/50 sugar water all the way to the right and this is by volume 25%
second from the right and 10% second from the left and 5% sugar water all the
way to the left and the water resource is the pure P U R filtered water that
we talked about before in the last test and turned out to be the water that was
preferred by the bees so this four minute time lapse sequence shows that
the bees really pile on the twenty five and fifty percent sugar water now sugar
and water together just provides the carbohydrate that the bees need to have
the energy to warm the hive and to forage of course
so by open feeding what we’re doing is we’re giving something for those
foragers to do plus they are bringing resources to the hive and they won’t be
attacking other colonies of honeybees hopefully if there were no resources in
the environment and as you can see in the background there the corn is dry and
ready for harvest there are very few flowering plants left so the stronger
colonies tend to converge on weaker colonies and raid them out and take
their resources so by open feeding you do two things you give those foragers
something to do and get their energy away from weaker colonies that may be
robbed out and you provide resources that will help them keep their hives
warm now the more water percentage there is compared to the sugar the more
dehydrating they have to do so once the imitation nectar here is taken into the
hive the bees have to dry it out and
condense it so that it becomes honey now you want to do this open feeding well
after you’ve taken honey off of your hives because you obviously don’t want
to be taking sugar water honey off as a resource for your own consumption so do
this after you’ve done your last harvest and so as you can see here the 50% 25%
are equally consumed by the bees they are just taking it down now I wish it
were backlit better so that you could see right now they’re down by 1/3 what
goes on is the bees are taking this all off in just a day so the entire cycle of
what you’re seeing in this video happens within a 24 hour period and the
time-lapse sequence is what I’m starting off with but if you’ll continue watching
I’ll get over some close-ups of the bees and some more discussion about what
other insects come to these feeders and again we’re using highly filtered water
this is from a well because my house is on a well so that’s pre filtered and
then I use the PUR filters that we get from Amazon I’ll put a link for that
in the video description I’ll also put a link to these drinkers that I use these
are 1 quart plastic drinkers and that’ll also be in the video description now what happened during the day of
course it warms up we started this sequence right after sunrise and the
bees of course the activity picks up after noon most foraging occurs late
morning early afternoon and here we are in the final sequences 10% 25% and 50%
are completely empty now and you notice that they’re concentrated all the way to
the left and look what is predominantly present here these are all wasps for the
most part the honeybees have already gone into their colonies for nighttime
protection and the wasps continue to forage well after sunset now for those of you who want to know
the exact weather conditions I decided to take a picture of my weather station
here and the sensor for wind we’re at 4 miles an hour we have 74 degrees outside
and 67% average humidity rainfall of course has been light for the whole
month we only have three point four four inches so this gives you kind of a base
for when I started and did this test I guess I could also if you’re interested
in this weather station I’ll put a link to that I got it on Amazon now for the
time lapse sequences I use the GoPro Hero 5 I just had that thing up on a
tripod right in front of all four the drinkers and set it for a shot every 5
seconds so here we are first one is 5 percent 5 percent sugar to water by
volume and if you notice the honeybees really didn’t care too much for that
overall we went to 10 percent they did show moderate interest in this but so
long as 25 percent and 50 percent sugar to water ratio was made available they
really heavily concentrated on that and here you see a mix of the honeybees
which are from my apiary I know some people get concerned and have made
comments in the past when I open feed that bees are coming from other apiaries
and we’re mixing potential varroa mites and things like that
well my bees are isolated we are at least five miles from the nearest
beekeeper in my area so for me open feeding number one I’m not wasting my
resources feeding other people’s bees and number two I’m really not that
concerned about contagions passing back and forth bee to bee while they’re
concentrated at these drinkers and this just shows again the GoPros setup so
here they are they’re concentrating to the Yellowjackets here in the foreground
lining up and now Yellowjackets even though they do raid beehives when
they’re all at an area like this where there’s an abundant resource they
congregate without attacking each other the exception to that though is and
you’ll see them in here see that bald-faced hornet which is really a
wasp but she’s on the right there kind of in the middle of the pack they show
up for nectar resources which is the sugar water but they’re also here to
attack kill and fly away with some of the smaller wasps they don’t seem to be
very successful against the honeybees but they are definitely here as dual
purpose predators one for the nectar and the second is to get some protein by
capturing a smaller wasp tearing it apart and bringing that back
to their nest site so by sunset this future percent sugar water was basically
empty and twenty five percent went down pretty much at the exact same rate I
think during this sequence we do still have some of the water in those
reservoirs and you can still see as the sun’s back lit twenty-five and fifty
percent are at fifty percent and the ten and five percent are down by about 20
percent now bees have to drink their food any
insect that you see that has that thorax and then the very thread thin
connection between the thorax and the abdomen meat protein isn’t gonna pass
through that so they can only drink now insects of different styles can handle
thicker liquid than others I hope some of you enjoyed those
slow-motion sequences they are a lower-resolution of course we will
improve on those at another time but these are cool in slow motion and here
we are again we’re just gonna continue to show the bees and wasps kind of
cooperating here at the drinkers now if you look closely there are a
variety of wasp species here and the ones when you see their abdomens and
they’ve got the yellow and black stripes going across them now we’re going into
nighttime so even though the video looks well lit this is actually after sunset
so what’s left at the feeders wasps so and wasps are not all the same I have
to tell you that you know like mud dobbers and some of the smaller
Yellowjackets woodland Yellowjackets they are pretty gentle to be around but
what we’re looking at here this nice large black and white one is what’s
known as a bald-faced hornet now they’re really just a wasp themselves but they
are really at the top of the food chain when it comes to wasps in our area and
some of them are here licking up the sugar water that’s remaining if you
notice all of these reservoirs are empty except for the 5% sugar water by now and
these boldface Hornets if you’ve seen my other videos I am NOT a fan of these
wasps they are really aggressive they can fly at night they navigate at night
they can squirt venom in your eyes they are just I don’t know what to say they
are a very very defensive and capable flying stinging insect and the cool
thing is here now that we’re after sunset and most of the honeybees have
gone to their hives you get to see on these reservoirs all these different
varieties of wasps and some of these again they’ve come from the woods some
of them are meadow some of them come from ground nests and
others are paper wasps there’s a honey bee real quick they’re like look at this
curious looking Los long and slender and they’re pretty docile I’m close to these
things they don’t have any protection on and they’re just pretty passive at this
point of course it’s cooling down it’s nighttime there’s a honey bee there on
the left but again as I said most of the honey bees have gone there’s a bee fly
there right in front of us that’s an imitator now I’m showing you my
bug-zooka this is what I use to collect sometimes Yellowjackets if they’re
really getting pesky I’m trying to work the bees but tonight
you know I just can’t let these boldface Hornets go so I’m gonna have to go after
them these are Yellow Jackets these are not my target species right now but I am
collecting bald faced Hornet so that I can look at them up close the bug-zooka
lets you catch things alive if you get something that you don’t want to kill
you can release it later after observation and for me in my case I can
photograph them but look at these different wasp species they’re really
interesting five percent the only thing that’s left
to drink from and you can see the honeybees are
congregated there to the right side of the screen these bees are staying kind
of grouped together and they’re gonna stay on these feeders overnight which is
interesting too now look at these boldface Hornets I
just can’t let him sit there look there you go taking them out with my bug-zooka
oh there’s another one she’s aggressive just you know they’re not like any other
wasp goodbye and these are what I would call you know passive friendly wasps
here those of you know your wasp species very well could chime in in the comment
section and share with all of us again it’s it’s fairly dark now don’t be
fooled by the exposure of the video camera that I’m using which makes it
look well lit we are well past sunset and of course these honey bees have
moved up underneath this brick to protect themselves from heavy dew and of
course the cold temps overnight in the morning they’ll find their way back to
their hives another bald-faced hornet got that one and there’s a bald-faced
hornet if you’ve ever had an encounter with bald-faced hornet so you know
exactly what I’m talking about they come at you like nothing else just look at
her going after all the other wasps that are just there to drink she is not a
friendly wasp when it comes to the drinking hole here yeah got you too! so we’re putting away
everything packing up the GoPro and of course here’s a little wasp on it very
timid you know we’re out here we’re not at their nest so keep in mind wasps when
they’re out of the feeding space are not defending that site so they’re very easy
to approach and here’s my collection for the evening a bald-faced hornet so i’m
gonna take these back and get some close-up photographs of them and again
my least favorite wasp I’ll put a link to the bug-zooka – if you’re interested
in that now here we are this is the following morning actually right at
sunrise it’s cold and it’s rainy and who’s out flying around the Yellow
Jackets Yellow Jackets have a huge advantage over the honeybee they fly in
colder temperatures I’ve seen Yellow Jackets flying around in 38 degrees
Fahrenheit and they are able to gather resources before the honeybees are even
out and about and if you look at the ones that have the abdomens with the
independent dots on left and right going down the back that’s a queen so this
time of year a lot of the Yellowjackets that are going out and about are the
newly hatched Queens that are gonna hope to winner over here because the
temperatures are getting colder and they’ll be the ones that will establish
new colonies in the spring of next year so they are definitely hungry for
carbohydrates thank you for watching this video I hope you got something out
of it and I hope you enjoyed seeing these wasps up close and what sugar
preferences the bees and wasps have thanks again

How a Bee Becomes Queen

How a Bee Becomes Queen


(INTRO TUNE) Honey bees have a harsh caste system. Of
the tens of thousands of bees found in a hive just about all of them are female
workers and they do pretty much everything from cleaning and building
the hive, to collecting pollen and nectar. Their lives are so intense that while a
worker can live from four to nine months during the winter, a worker bee born in
the busy summer season will only last about six weeks before dying of
exhaustion. It’s not a whole lot better for the 300 to 3000 male drones who
basically hang around waiting to mate with the Queen during the summer after
which they die or are kicked out of the hive and when fall comes, and they are of no
more use. Then there’s that Queen. There’s one per hive and she can live to be up to five years old laying up to 2,000 eggs in a day. And she
owes her entire existence to a bitter protein-rich secretion called royal
jelly. Given their long life and unique position, there’s rarely a need for a new
queen, but when one dies or leaves the hive along with a swarm, the colony needs
to find a replacement and fast. In both situations, a larval bee is chosen to
become the new queen. The science of how and why this happens
isn’t entirely settled but one thing is certain, royal jelly plays a large role. Worker bees produce royal jelly from a
gland in their heads called the hypopharynx and feed it to newly hatched
honeybee larva. The milky-yellowish substance is made of digested pollen and
either honey or nectar. Not only is a high in protein but royal jelly also has
a combination of vitamins especially vitamin B plus lipids, sugars, hormones
and, minerals including potassium, magnesium, calcium, and iron. This bee “super-food”
also contains acetylcholine a neurotransmitter also found in humans.
It’s what nerves use to tell muscles to start or stop movement and may also
contribute to learning. All those nutrients might explain why royal jelly is often
marketed as an expensive, dietary supplement cure-all even though studies
haven’t been able to prove that it does anything too significant for humans. We are after all, not bees. But for bees, it
does a lot and around day three of the royal jelly diet is where things get
interesting. Worker bees will choose a few of the
larvae and continue to feed them royal jelly while every other larva is switched
to a less nutrient intensive diet of honey pollen and water. As the future
Queens gorge the royal jelly triggers other
phases of development that workers don’t experience like the formation of ovaries
for laying eggs. If one Queen emerges first she will search for and destroy
any other Queens still developing in their wax cells and if multiple Queens
come out simultaneously they will fight to the death until only one Queen
remains. We don’t know exactly how the worker
bees decide which larvae get the royal treatment but for a long time we thought
it was random. That would make sense because basically worker bees and queen
bees are genetically identical. But there’s some evidence that the selection of a
queen might not actually be so random. A 2011 study found that
the larvae of future Queens have higher levels of proteins that increase some
metabolic activities, so there may indeed be a tiny genetic
difference in the two that plays a huge role. Scientists are also still trying to
figure out what it is about the royal jelly that lets it change a larva’s whole
life. For a while we thought it might be a hormone in the jelly or the way it
affected insulin signals in the larvae then another 2011 study zeroed in on a
protein called ROYALACTIN which when isolated and combined with other
nutrients can transform larvae into queens just like royal jelly. Once they emerge Queens continue eating
royal jelly their entire lives and given that the Queen lives a lot longer than
the thousands of relatives around her, it sounds like a reasonable dietary
choice for a royal bee to make. Thank you for watching this SciShow dose which was
brought to you by our patrons on Patreon, if you want to help support the show you
can go to patreon.com/scishow and if you want to keep getting smarter with us just go to youtube.com/scishow and
subscribe (OUTRO MUSIC)

Honey Bees choose their favorite water source Do they really care?

Honey Bees choose their favorite water source Do they really care?


okay so this is something I’ve wanted to
do for a long time you watch honey bees going into water puddles drinking at the
edge of a pond at the edge of a river and we all have friends who have
swimming pools and the honey bees seem to go to their swimming pool to get
water from the edge of the pool sometimes it’s a birdbath so I decided
to make this test so on the Left I have the pure filtered water PU R which is
the name of the company that makes the filters unfiltered well water pond water
and chlorinated water which represents the swimming pool so what are the beads
gonna go to and what will they use the most the duration of this test is about
three days so at the end of this video I’m going to show you what they
preferred and what they went after I was actually kind of surprised because here
on my property we have at least four the filtered water it’s the water that we
drink so it’s ultra filtered 99% filled it out
lead and contaminants of any kind so it’s really clear and that’s one that
these bees are drinking from right here so I just assumed they would all go
after that water but do bees really judge it and then this be right here all
the way to the right this is the chlorinated water and by chlorinated I
don’t mean city water I mean it’s pool treated water so you
might speculate that they take water from chlorinated sources and they use
their tongues to paint it around the hive to disinfect it who knows and of
course here we have a yellowjacket wasp that’s also drinking this ultra filtered
water which is in the container all the way to the left so I thought honey bees
were just like anything else for example my chickens they just go wherever the
water happens to be whatever they’re thirsty they drink it honey bees are
much more discerning than that in fact honey bees will show up at a drinking
spot like this one and it’s important to keep the drinking spot location
consistent so the bees always know where to find it
but they’ll actually show up and often taste test water from another bee before
they go about drinking of themselves so it’s always fun and interesting to watch
them do this now you may think and in rightly so that
bees go out early in the morning when there’s a heavy dew and you’ll see them
licking the dew off of plants they do go after puddles and drippings especially
if you’ve got a hose bib on the side of your house it’s a little bit leaky you
can often see honeybees there getting the drips but always go the extra yard
and make sure they have a nice shaded area in some cases or at least a cool
spot where they can go to get water and bees do not like to get their feet wet
while they’re drinking so if you’ve got a mash or something out that is soaked
with water or a sponge for example the bees will kind of land on that last
because they’re trying to stay dry while drinking even though we often see them
flipping into the water and buzzing around trying to get out again
now these drinkers are designed specifically for honeybees but these are
considered landing board entry feeders so the surface that we’re looking at
here would normally be inserted into the hive and this helps to prevent robbing
by other bees now of course if any of these water sources had sugar content
the bees will go after that first and they would be certain to empty that
right away but I’m just interested in their ability to pick out the highest
quality water in other words through impurities in the water even bother the
honeybees and I found that out here and of course in the middle there you can
see that they’ve flipped on their bags and they’re buzzing around in the water
these are designed with little stepping edges so they do ultimately get out
without a problem so don’t worry about those bees they’re gonna get out just
fine and of course we have the Yellow Jacket
wasps mix right in with the honeybees some people are concerned that when you
set up a feeding station of any kind that there’s fighting there really isn’t
this territory doesn’t belong to the wasps or the honeybees or honeybees from
various colonies so there’s no conflict here they they happily share watering
holes and so here’s the result and if you
recall all the way back at the beginning of this demo you can see the various
water levels and we can see that the pure filtered water all the way on the
left is their favourite source for water and they’ve taken that right down
unfiltered well water which has a lot of iron content in it is their second
favorite choice chlorinated as their third in pond water believe it or not
was the last source they wanted to drink from and the pond that I’m talking about
where this water sample was collected is one hundred twenty feet across and it’s
14 feet deep and is spring fed so it was a really good source so that’s a simple
test and I hope you enjoyed it I always wondered if they could tell water
quality differences and apparently they do and will close out watching them buzz
around here on the Astor’s thank you for watching and I hope you enjoyed it and
learn something new

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)


Hello everyone, this is a new antsite video In this episode we are going to rebuild an ant city. Keep watching until the end – i promise it will be super exciting… This is an old formicarium A thriving weaver ant colony lived in it before. You can saw this colony in some previous videos, or even personally on terraristic exhibitions. This colony lived 2, 2 and half year long in this formicarium. So the goal is to populate again this formicarium with a thriving ant colony. We have chance now to rebuild this system, so why don’t we upgrade a bit this whole formicarium to be more spectacular? You know i have plenty of creativity, so i find out a cylinder shape instead of the previous brick. This is more elegant and even more spectacular. Then I want something more in my mind.. If the weaver ants can get an own tower, why don’t they get an own city instead? This is the story how comes the idea to build an ant city. The structure build up from three different towers, with three outside gallery between them. There are three escape-prevent edge, and three openable ventilation grid on the top of the towers. There are more ventilation grids on two place at the sides, for the better breezing. There are many carcase laying on the floor of the old formicarium. Also can find tainted, unhatched larvae somewhere. The diameter of the biggest cylinder was planned for the size of the old bonsai tree. Meanwhile we get a big family of weaver ants so they will move into the new place. You can see what a massive nest they built in their previous home. They weaved almost everything for nest in the left formicarium, and there are many of workers in the left formicarium also. The ant city looks much amazing after the furnish. The old bonsai tree also looks epic in it, and i put another, smaller bonsai tree inside. Ants can hide between it’s roots. The ant city looks like a real metropolis after the ants have moved in. Every ants working on it’s own task busily. Some of them are building new home and others throwing out the garbage from the old nest. Every ants run fast to their work on the busy trails. After the settlement the ants moved in the old nest at the top of the tree immediately, and they start to throwing out the old larvaes and garbage from it. I didn’t record video from the settlement, because I have put them through almost one by one during an afternoon. It wasn’t too interesting for a video you can believe. An now let’s see the freshly building new nest. One day after the settlement some ants gathered spectacularly between the roots. At that time we could guess what they planning, and a few times later the first strings just appear. The ants just start to weaving their new nest. Catch their larvae in their mouth and working busy on the building operations, so they pass so much with the building on the first day! A few days later the new nest starts to equal to it’s final form. The walls became more stronger as the ants wave more and more layers on it. They use every kind of building material, this reason there are black and green threads in the walls which comes from the fake grass which covers the floor. Meanwhile they start to renew the old nest at the top of the tree. They have repaired the entrances, and they start to build together the nest with the wall of the cylinder. Can see well the fresh silks with brighter color than the old weaves. We can see inside the nest through the formicarium wall. There are many of workers and larvae working hard inside. That workers who don’t work, they guarding in a typical position on the most important strategy places. Sometimes we can notice winged males (drones) in the colony. The smallest, sloping tower still empty, because I give them food and water here. I put a test tube with full of water here, and they start to use it ardently. Hopefully they won’t drown in the open water, if this happens i have to find out another method for watering. There is a build in thermometer at the side of the formicarium. The back of the thermometer have to cover with grid, to avoid them to move inside it. Those areas where the ants feel the ventilation of the air, they try to discover new places. They stick out their antennae often through the dish to find out what is at the other side. A few workers waiting standby on the only door where no any escape-prevent oil around. But don’t worry, i never open this door. If they thirsty or hungry many workers start to raiding in their territory to find food or water. But of course their activity depends from the temperature and light also, in cooler temperature they goes inside the nest instead. And it seems they try to reach the lighter places – i think this could be some escaping instinct. It is such a catching sight, as these tiny insects organizing their society and living their everyday. We can admire them for hours, and can observe more and more interesting ant-things, but unfortunately our video is ending now, hope see you again next time! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and hit the 🔔 icon to get notifications for our new videos! 🙂

Honey Bees Swarming OUT of my Observation Hive Not Much you can Do


so here I was doing observation videos
in this observation hive of a queen in her Queen cell and I’m waiting for her
to hatch and wouldn’t you know it all of a sudden the bees in the observation
hive erupt into all of this activity so if you don’t know this yourself when the
hive gets active like this which you’re about to experience is a swarm
so these bees are headed out and often they do swarm just before subsequent
Queen’s hatch out and that’s what’s happening here so I turned off all my
video gear pulled the lights to the side and now we’re just going to share what’s
going on through the observation hive to show you what it looks like when workers
swarm out with an older queen now this observation hive is only been
in use since let’s say March or April so there is still some brood here there is
no open larvae and there are already Queen cells of course that are capped so
they’re swimming out and here’s the opening it goes through the bottom
there’s a tube because of the exterior and here’s what the outside landing
board looks like now if you weren’t paying attention to your beehives and
you were somewhere else this all happens very fast this entire
video is only 12 minutes and I’m giving it to you real time here this is what an
interest looks like when bees are swarming out and I’ll get you in close
so you can hear the buzzing it would be that they come and go now when they be swarm out wherever the
Queen land that’s where the formants wand that’s why you sometimes see them
hanging on a tree branch or a fence post or something else like that so we’ll
keep an eye out now that we know they’re swarming and I’m going to show you where
they land and how they congregate and you notice there are several trees in
the back on here that are within 100 feet of the tribe and it’s likely that
they’re going to go to one of these trees ran down a branch and that will
allow me to collect them and of course put them in another hive body I was hoping to catch the Queen flying
out but it happened so fast it’s a hot day that’s in the 80s we have
a nectar flow coming in the goldenrod is right now getting into bloom the answers
are blooming and there’s lots of pollen out there so my resources were very
strong before they started this swarm and you can see even while most of the
hive about 50% of the occupancy the type of flying out they are still worth of
these from the field they’re coming in with pulling on their legs and now sure enough here’s a blue spruce
tree and we can see that they are focusing their flight around this tree
so we know that that green is going to land on one of these branches and
hopefully they’ll land low enough that we can get a hold of them and collect
this worm after it congregates here on one of these branches this is a Colorado
blue spruce tree and the interesting thing is we’ve often gotten swarms off
of this tree in the past so they do tend to reuse the same branch of the same
locations to collect before they spread out to the new location and here they
are so that must mean the Queen has landed on this branch and so the workers
are now creating a swarm around her to protect the Queen most Scouts go out and even though I’m a little frustrated
of course that I’m leaving half the strength of the colony and the
observation hive and I’m working with it is also an opportunity to share how
swarms happen and then you know what the process is so we’ll just go ahead and
video this activity and show you what the beads do now keep in mind back
inside the observation hive about 50% of the beads are still there and there
there are braids so the colony is not doomed and just showing you that I’m not
wearing any protective clothing here just following the beads around until I
can get them in a position to come back and collect them now it’s warm still this is really not a
very big one even once all the workers collect on this branch we’re talking
maybe two to three pounds of beads and you notice that even some of the workers
that are going to swarm they have resources with them they have pollen and
most of them have filled up on honey resources before they go out because
they need to survive for the next 24 to 72 hours while they think they’re going
to find a new location but I’m going to locate them in a new light body myself and of course while I’m making this
video some of the worker beads are landing on me and landing on the camera
and they may land in your hair if you’re this close to a swarm but remember that
this is not a high this is not a colony since one node they’re looking for a new
place to live and therefore they’re not defensive so unless you’re allergic to
bees or there’s some other reason why you’re concerned about being stung
there really is very little chance we’re going to be stung and you’re following
up on a swarm so the bees are in survival mode they really don’t want to
give up their lives to defend something that they’re only going to occupy for a
small amount of time and when there is a swarm the Queen that
has left the colony is always the older Queen and she is driven out by the
workers it’s anyone’s guess this Queen was laying well she was laying eggs in
every available tell she was productive it’s anyone’s guess as to why the
workers suddenly turn on a queen and decide to change her around and stop
feeding her and dinner to lose weight so that she can fly out and start a new
felony elsewhere and a lot of people spend a lot of time trying to figure out
why they’d be sworn sometimes there’s no real rhyme or reason I mean you could
stop us warm by taking out the Queen and then of course the workers would remain
in the colony or the if you took the Queen out of the swarm they would return
to the colony they left and these are the residual bees and you can see the
activity inside now is calming down quite a bit
most of these are going to remain in this observation hive and again this is the entry point to the
hive at the bottom there now this is the queen cell that I was actually observing
I was planning to have her and hatch out and get macro video of it and did not
anticipate that they would swarm so soon within 48 hours of this swarm that Queen
cell did hatch out and we do now have a virgin queen in this colony and this is
the video gear that I was using to do the macro sequences of the Queen
hatching behavior which of course was interrupted now by the swarm activity
now notice the outside landing board if they had not been there and had not
noticed the behavior walking around a regular honeybee colony you would look
at a landing board and this looks normal you’d have no idea that they had swarmed
out to an adjacent tree like this so now I’m just going to go and get a
ladder and a bucket and collect this worm and get them in a hive so that we
can try to get them to survive their chances are low it’s mid-august and
here’s the ladder I’ve already taken the swarm away and put them in a body but
they’re going to need resources I’m going to have to feed them and we’re
going to have to really kind of coddle them through the winter here because
there won’t be time for them to build up reach the box I put him in so this is a
standard 10 frame honeybee hive and here’s the bucket next to it that I used
to collect them you can see that they are going in and now they’re fanning and
they’re controlling it you can take a frame of grief from one of your other
hives if you have it you can put that in the deep box here and they’re less
likely to abandon a frame of capped brood so that’s just one method you can
use I don’t have to with these guys I think all of these bees are going to
stay and they did so I hope you enjoyed that little frustrating for me to lose
the bees in the middle of a project an opportunity to inform you about
honeybees and swarming thanks for watching