Killer Insect | Full information of killer insect | Is killer insect Truly exist or not?

Killer Insect | Full information of killer insect | Is killer insect Truly exist or not?


nowadays an insect is getting viral
which is called killer insect and it’s found in India some people say never
this insect or never try to kill your bared hands because it can spread the
virus to your full body in minutes but there is an argument about this killer
insect is it true or fake different people have different opinions about it
some people say it’s true and some says it’s fake so I personally research on
Google about it to know more information finally the result came out it seems to
me faq news because this picture can be edited by Photoshop but sometimes the
comments of people made me feel this might be true but however besides all
the arguments if you think this killer insect exists then share this video to
your friends and family to alert them to stay away from this insect if they see
also tell them don’t touch it with bare hands as you know it’s able to circulate
the entire human system in minutes whatever if you have any more
information about the killer insect please share the information in the
comment as you know thanks for watching the video

The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look

The Double-Crossing Ants to Whom Friendship Means Nothing | Deep Look


The Peruvian Amazon rainforest is bursting
with life, but it’s a hard place to make a living,
especially when you’re small. Competition… is fierce. Violence and betrayal are everywhere. Up here, in the canopy? These trees have made it. Lots of leaves. Plenty of sunlight. But down here, on the forest floor, it’s
another story. This sapling desperately needs to grow, to
get more sun. And in the meantime, it’s vulnerable. It doesn’t have many leaves yet. Each one is valuable. Losing just a few could be its demise. So this young tree, it’s called an Inga,
enlists bodyguards.. hundreds of them. These big-headed ants swarm over the sapling,
fighting off any leaf-eating intruders, like this caterpillar. The price of protection: a meal: sugary nectar. The tree serves it up in ant-sized dishes
called nectaries. Both the ant and the tree have something to
gain from the deal. This is called “mutualism.” But that only works when both sides play by
the rules. Here’s another intruder. See how the ants rush to meet it? But they aren’t biting or stinging it. They don’t attack it like they’re supposed
to. Instead the ants just… watch… as the caterpillar gorges on the fresh leaves. They’re just letting it happen. Why? Because they found a better deal. See how the ants tap on the caterpillar’s
rear with their antennae? Those two little pits on the caterpillar’s
back are called tentacle nectaries. When the ants tap, the nectaries secrete drops
of nectar. It’s made of sugar that the caterpillar
drained out of the leaf. In exchange for the payoff, the ants give
the caterpillars free access to their so-called partner, the Inga tree. They’ve been bribed. As for the tree? It’s left weaker, a little less likely to
make it up to the canopy. And that’s the sad story of the young Inga. Sold out for a drop of sugar water by a fairweather
friend. You like ants? We got ants. Lots of ants. Winter ants battle Argentine ants with weapons caught on film for the very first time! Leafcutter ants that have been farming since
before we humans walked the earth. All that and more on Deep Look. So subscribe… And thanks for watching.

How to build an insect rearing cage from BugDorm

How to build an insect rearing cage from BugDorm


Hello and welcome to a quick video on how to construct one of BugDorm’s insect rearing cages. Now it comes with a front panel, 2 cover pannels, 3 side mesh panels, as well as a sleeve and a couple of zip ties. So to begin with we’ll take hold of the front panel and grab hold of the zip tie and sleeve. And the zip tie simply threads through the top and when it comes out of the other end we just gently pull it through so we can grab hold later and that just clips around the lip of the front panel and then we pull the zip tie nice and tight to secure the sleeve onto the panel. As for the side panels these are very simple to put together. Theres a cylinder running down one side, and a bar down the other. So making sure this bar goes on the inside of the cylinder of the next panel they just slot together, very quickly and very simply. The front panel then finishes off the main four sides of the rearing cage. Then grab one of the cover panels and press that down on top. Flip that over Put the other panel on And there you go, one insect rearing cage ready and set to go.

Zoo Tales – A very special insect


Hello, my name’s Ben Goodwin and I’m a keeper
on the Ectotherms section at Auckland Zoo and today we’re going to be talking about
a very special insect. So, if you have a look in here, we’ll get
one of the big girls out. This is a wētā punga. This is the largest insect in New Zealand
and it’s one of the heaviest insects in the world. This is an arboreal insect, it spends most
of its life up in the trees and so that’s why it’s got very very long legs. Further down the face here, we’ve got the
palps, so she’s always tasting what she’s standing on. Unfortunately, like many of our native species,
wētā punga are completely unable to survive in the presence of introduced mammalian predators. So, at Auckland Zoo we have a captive breeding
programme which we’re using to give us the animals that we need to restore the species
back to the islands where it was once found. This one will be released out to Otata Island
in the Noises. Yeah, so she’s about four months old. For me, working with the wētā punga – this
is a species I’ve known about for my entire life, so I feel very privileged to be working
with them now and to contribute directly to their conservation is why I work in the Zoo
and why the Zoo exists.

Robert Wood: Robotic Insects | Nat Geo Live

Robert Wood: Robotic Insects | Nat Geo Live


( intro music ) ( applause ) Robert: I’m going to
start off with a bold and probably
unsubstantiated claim which is that robotics
is the next internet. What I mean by that is
it’s the next big thing to impact our lives whether it’s biomedical applications, whether it’s automating
our daily lives. Before I get into what I
think are the big topics, the hot topics in
some of our research, I want to give you
a little bit of history. Robotics as a term was
coined actually back in the 1920’s by
a Czech playwright in a play called “Rossum’s
Universal Robots.” Apparently, the play wasn’t
very good but nonetheless, it brought the word robots
to the English language. In fact, the word
initially meant the use of mechanized labor. Basically, doing things
that we didn’t wanna do, automating our lives. The next example I’ll give is
from Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” which I’m sure most of
you have seen or if not, have seen some of the iconic
art work from this film. Another example progressing
on in terms of time is Asimov’s robot series. I won’t keep going
on forward through Terminator movies
and Star Wars movies and that sort of thing. You’ll notice a theme
in these examples is the robot uprising
and the dystopic view of what robots will
do to the world. To depart from that, I’d
like to give an example of what I think are my two
favorite robots in history. Voyager 1 was a robot. It was a teleoperated
robot but it took one of the most
profound pictures, I’m sure you now
agree, of earth. This is back in 1990. The second photo that I
think is very telling about not just robots
but human curiosity and the advances of technology
is what I would think is one of the
first robot selfies which is the Curiosity
rover on Mars. These are two of
my favorite images and what I find the
most powerful and moving photographs that I’ve ever seen. Okay, that said and
if you think about these examples and
you think about all the science fiction
movies that you’ve seen that have robots in them,
you could be asking, “Where are all the robots? Why are there no robots
that are making me dinner, and folding my
clothes et cetera?” The answer is that there’s
a lot of big challenges. There’s a lot of difficulty in bringing these
things to real life. I’ll show you just
a couple brief examples of where these
things actually exist in modern life and technology. One is the things that
are welding the doors on your cars in
the assembly line. These are big, bulky,
very precise fast things. One of the things
you’ll notice in this is that there’s no humans
anywhere near these because they’re very dangerous. Thinking about adopting
these technologies to more household
or everyday use, there’s some challenges there. Perhaps, you have one
of these in your house. Here’s what might be the
first useful, accessible robotic technology
that you can use. The obligatory bullet points to
tell you what we are working on and our view of the world in terms of the
opportunities in robotics. The opportunities
to get these things to be more useful, more
ubiquitous, cheaper, et cetera, we focus on a couple of things. One is… I guess they can be
collectively combined into where we get
our inspiration. The first one is
inspiration from nature. For a lot of the
different functions that we might to
achieve with our robots there is likely
a biologic analog. We work with
biologists extensively to try to extract
out those principles and try to embody them
in our engineered systems. The second one is
non-traditional places. That’ll become a little bit
more clear in a few slides when I show you some
of the ways that we actually
build these robots. What I’m going to talk about is one example, I guess
a couple of examples, but one example in particular
of bioinspired robots and to do this, we have
to answer questions in new manufacturing,
new materials in ways of building
these systems. Okay so to phrase this question, let’s watch these video. This is a carpenter bee. As an engineer,
I can look at this and start to ask some
really well-posed questions that drives some
of our research. How are the wings moving? How are the wings
interacting with the air and generating vortices that it’s then manipulating
through its wings? What is the thoracic mechanics that is moving the wings about? What is the muscular that’s
driving thoracic mechanics? What are the metabolic processes that are driving the muscles, that are driving the mechanics, that are driving the wings? What is the flight mode? What are the sensors
that it’s using? What are the control
methodologies? What is the neurobiology? All these really
interesting questions… ( audience laughing ) …that we as engineers
can start to sort of boil down into the topics that
we have to work on if we wanted to actually
make one of these. This is the… one prototype
of our robotic insects. I’m not going to pass it around. I’d be happy to show
it to you afterwards. Questions about if we’re
going to make something that operates like this, this is just an
animation of a hoverfly. If we’re going to make something
in an engineered system that works something like this, how do we do it? What are the answers
to those questions that I just posed
that are derived from these natural systems? One of the biggest ones
is how do you make it? The first question that I had is how would I piece together
the components for this? I would argue that I don’t
want to do it this way. I don’t want to take
hundreds or even thousands of very complex
geometrical components and piece them together
under a microscope. That would my drive my
graduate students crazy. That wouldn’t work. We had to come up with
alternative solutions. I’m contradicting myself
because this is actually an attempt to sort of a
nuts and bolts approach, to actually piece
together components. This is the old way before
we had the discovery which I’ll show you in a minute. This is literally
what it looks like. You’re actually piecing together
all the different components and I won’t get into the
details what these things are. There are the motors. There are the wings. There are the little mechanisms that cause the thing
to move properly and that sort of thing. If we want to get around that, how do we do this? Well, it turns out we
took inspiration from, I guess in hindsight, is
a nontraditional place, my son’s library. My son at the time,
a couple of years ago, was really into pop-up books. If you think about
a pop-up book, I think about it as
fantastically complicated structures
and mechanisms that are created by
extremely unskilled users. I’m not talking about the
people that made the book. I’m talking about the kids
that operate the books. You open up the books. You do something very
simple like opening a page or pulling something and out of this page comes
these fantastic structures. We do something very similar. We call this process
pop-up book MEMS. It goes as follows. You basically build all of
the components that you want. Like I said, the motors,
the wings, et cetera. You also build
a scaffold around it. That’s what this sort of
surrounding area is here. Then by proper design of all
the individual components in this quasi
two-dimensional composite. If it’s designed right
and constructed properly, which of course I’m not
getting much into the details, then all I’d have
to do is push on it and that’s we’ll
show in this video. All you have to do is push on it and out pops the
device that I want because all of the
trajectories that are associated with the
assembly of this device are controlled by
the mechanisms that are built into this
pop-up structure. This allows us to build our
computational origami friends. This is a real thing. Actually, you can prove that
you can make anything you want in terms of any
geometric complexity, any mechanism that
you want to build can be done in this way. We can make things
arbitrarily complicated. We can make things with
any material combination, metals, composites, polymer,
ceramics, doesn’t matter. We can do this very quickly. We’re experimental robotics, we know actually very
little about the physics of the devices that we make. Not for lack of trying
but just because it’s complex, fluid
structure interactions, all these difficult things. What we do then is
we build and test, build and test, and
often test to failure as I’ll show you in a moment. This is a resulting device. You’ll notice that every device that I show you
will look different. That’s just because
we learn something and change the design
and reiterate on that. I should mention the way
that we’re building things, this concept of a scaffold building all the
components for you. We like to think in some way fulfills Richard
Feynman’s prophecy about small robots
building small robots. That’s the way that
we think about this. We can build things in
bulk just by the fact that this is inherently
parallelizable process. Bulk, for us, is only
a few but that’s okay. We plugged these things in. We test them. Flap wings around, do some
system identification, all sorts of interesting things to try to understand how
this thing actually works. Then plug it in, turn it on. This has sped down by
a factor of one eighth and this is what happens… ( audience laughing ) …every time. In fact, if you look at it in
real time, this is very fast. This is just a consequence of
the dynamics of this system. Insects are very unlike
the airplanes that we ride in. The 747s of the world are
designed to be passively stable. If the engines turn off, it
should glide down to safety without the presence
of active control. Insects are not that way. They’re unstable and this
leads to the maneuverability that you’ve experienced if
you ever try to swat them. ( audience laughing ) What I’m saying is they’re
the fighter jets of the world. If we can properly
stabilize these systems then they become
quite maneuverable. After plenty of trial and error, again this has sped
down one eighth time. We are able to control
the flight of these things. One of the first
demonstrations that we had, which we were very excited about a couple of years ago,
was just hover. It turns out that’s one of
the more difficult things that we can try to do. We can also take advantage of
some of these fast dynamics that I was alluding
to and also some of the physics of scaling to
allow these things to perch. Once we have these
things working, we’re doing all sorts
of cute demonstrations of how they can behave
like the insects that
we try to mimic. I just want to wrap up with
a couple of other topics and other broad
statements of course. We also make a host of
other bioinspired robots. I’m showing you these not just
because they’re cool or creepy but because they actually
represent one of our big pushes which is all of our bioinspired
work takes cues from nature and tries to instantiate
that in robots. We’re actually seeing that
arrow of bioinspiration reverse because now we can
start to build robots which mimics some of the
features of natural systems that we can test our
hypothesis on natural systems and I say us, our
biologist colleagues, in ways that would be difficult
to do with the actual animal. This is really exciting for us. We also make little
cockroach-like robots. This is in real time. I’m just showing you this
because we can make claims that these things are actually some of the fastest
robots in the world if you normalize the body
length which of course a caveat. In fact, twice as fast
as Usain Bolt. Okay. I often get the questions so
I will preemptively answer it which is what would you
do with these things? Why are you doing this? The main thing that
gets us excited is that it’s a basic
research topic that all of these topics
in fluid mechanics and microfabrication and
bioengineering, et cetera are what really drive us. The technology fallout
that comes from this meaning technology fallout
like I have a former student that started a company
that’s trying to find commercial
applications for the way that we build things. We also have prototypes
for making little, minimally invasive surgical
tools using the same techniques. But you can also use these
things in the future, 10-20 years down the road
when they’re working for things like search
and rescue where a firefighter might have a
thousand of these things onsite that flies through a building
looking for human survivors, or even hazardous
environment explorations, space exploration, et cetera. These are the common
themes that are the longer term goals of this. Lastly, I’ll say that
these things turn out to be extremely useful
for education purposes. We go from school to school, and also festivals,
local and national to try to get kids excited
in STEM. It turns out and I
mean no disrespect to our theoretical
physicist colleagues that this is much more
likely to get kids interested in science and engineering
than string theories. I apologize if that’s your area. With that, I will stop and
I’ll thank you for listening. Thank you. ( applause ) ( outro music )

Winter is Coming For These Argentine Ant Invaders | Deep Look

Winter is Coming For These Argentine Ant Invaders | Deep Look


Once upon a time, the Argentine ant seemed invincible. Why? Well normally, ants in different colonies
of the same species fight each other to the death for territory and food. But take an Argentine ant from a colony in
Japan, or Spain, or from your kitchen, put ‘em together and… Nothing happens. They recognize each other by smell. Just like
these nest mates. Worldwide, Argentine ants act like a huge,
international super colony. Countless nests, each home to hundreds of
queens, producing millions of highly disposable workers. Massive Argentine ant super-colonies are spreading
all over the globe, overwhelming local ant populations. They can take down much bigger ants. Like
this harvester. The tiny Argentines throw themselves at their
enemy. Exhaust her. Then slowly pull her apart. They seemed unstoppable. But there’s more to this story. The Argentine ant has an Achilles heel. At Jasper Ridge, near Stanford University,
Nicole Heller has been tracking ant populations since the late 1990s. She wanted to know, how long would it take
for Argentines to completely overwhelm the native species here? One year? Five? But it didn’t happen. To her surprise, one native species was actually
thriving behind enemy lines. The winter ant. Winter ants aren’t much bigger than Argentine
ants. They aren’t much stronger. But they have a secret weapon. Put Argentine and winter ants together near
something they both want, like this cotton ball soaked in honey. See how the winter ant aims its abdomen at
the Argentine? And that little white dot appears right at the tip? And how the Argentine scurries away? No one had ever seen this before. In fact,
as far as we know, this is the first time anyone’s caught it on camera. No one knows yet what exactly it is, but this secretion can repel, even kill, those Argentine workers. At Jasper Ridge, this little drop has been enough to halt an implacable invader’s march toward world domination. Hi, it’s Amy. See how these ants all tap
each other when they go by? Well when ants touch antenna, they’re not
just exchanging information…they ARE the information. They switch jobs based on how
many other ants they run into doing the same thing. Join our ant army. Subscribe. Tap that button and we’ll let
you know about our next episode. Thanks for watching!

Days Gone – Infected Predators | PS4

Days Gone – Infected Predators | PS4


When you’re exploring the world
of Days Gone, you’re going to run
into infected animals. [ROARING] [AGGRESSIVE CAWING] One of the things that
I think is really surprising about the world of Days Gone is that it isn’t limited
to just human. John, is that you? Everything in Days Gone is
grounded in reality, and one of the things
we really wanted to do was make sure that if we have
infected creatures in the Farewell Wilderness that they’re
the kinds of animals that you would find here
anyways. [GROWLING] It’s a virus
that has jumped species so that we have infected wolves
which we call Runners, we have infected bears
which we call Ragers, and we have infected crows
which we call Criers. And all of these things are
super dangerous threats. So you take these creatures that
are already predators themselves and it just makes them way more
lethal, way more dangerous, way hungrier,
and way more aggressive, and way more interested
in the player, and also way more interested in
knocking him off his bike and eating him, and maybe
not even in that order. [GRUNTS] One of the cool things
about these animals is they’re survivors too. They’ve got primal instincts
that have given them the edge to keep them alive this long. In terms of gameplay, they offer very, very different
types of enemies. Things that wouldn’t normally
have been aggressive, like crows,
are now hyper aggressive, and they will dive bomb you if you go anywhere
near their nests. [CAW] Runners you always
have to be looking for. They’re infected wolves. There are these creatures that
are meant to take away your greatest asset,
which is the bike. [GUNSHOT, YELP] The players feel like
they’ve got this bike, that nothing can touch them,
but we have this creature type that can not only run
as fast as the bike but jump mid-air
and knock you off of it. So it levels the playing field. [GROWLING] [GRUNT, YELP] Good luck if you run
into a Rager bear because they’re big,
they’re strong, they’re hard to kill,
and they are relentless. They deal a lot of damage,
and if you get close, they’re going to grab you and
thrash you and throw you around, and you might survive that,
you may not. [GUNFIRE] They’ve got that strong
survival instinct, so you just have to get out
into the thick of it with them, but you also have
to keep your distance and constantly be moving to adjust it to keep separation
from them. Here, catch! [EXPLOSION] You’re going to be surprised
when you try to survive the world of Days Gone at just how many different types
of Freakers there are. Not just infected humans,
but animals as well. [ROARING] April 26th,
the world’s coming for you. [GROWLING]

Where Are the Ants Carrying All Those Leaves? | Deep Look

Where Are the Ants Carrying All Those Leaves? | Deep Look


We’re looking at some of the world’s earliest
and most competent farmers. These leafcutter ants make humans look like
newbies. We’ve been farming for 12,000 years. Ants have been doing it for 60 million. We developed plows and shovels. Ants use their own bodies. Their mandibles
are shears that cut through leaves with incredible efficiency. The ants drink the sap in the leaves for energy.
But they don’t eat them. Remember, they’re farming here. They’re using the leaves to grow something else. But first they have to haul the gigantic leaf
pieces away. This is no small matter. For a human, it would be like carrying more than
600 pounds between our teeth. Then, they clean the leaves. They crush them. Cut them into little pieces. Arrange them carefully in stacks. They even compost the leaves, with a little
of their own poop. They spread spores around, like seeds. Over time, a fungus grows. And that – this highly nutritious fungus
– that’s what the ants are after. They feed it to the colony’s offspring, millions of them. For humans, farming was the origin of our
civilization. And it’s the same for ants. They are fungus tycoons. Their colonies are
true underground cities with a bottomless need for resources. Having this reliable source of food has given
them the luxury to specialize. Leafcutter ants have the most complex division of labor
of any ants. There are tiny worker ants. And large worker ants. And enormous half-inch-long
soldiers that protect the colony. Like human farmers, their abundant food source
has made leafcutter ants very, very successful. And this is where two civilizations – ant
and human – collide. From Texas to South America, leafcutter ants
are huge agricultural pests. Working stealthily at night, they can strip an entire tree of
its best leaves in just hours. As their ant civilization grows, they build
up the soil in the tropical forest. But they also pose a threat to those around them. And in this way, we resemble them more than we might like to admit.