Beach Ants

Beach Ants


Ever wonder if there are ants at the beach? Do ants take tropical beach vacation getaways
like humans do? The answer will surprise you. This week, I had the opportunity to spend
my Christmas on some secluded but tiny tropical islands, and my main goal was to find out
what the ants on secluded beach islands were like, how they lived, or heck, find out if
there even were ants on secluded beach islands at all! AC Family, let’s make a quick escape from
the on-going tales of our antiverse in my ant room in Manila, Philippines and travel
thousands of miles westward to a gorgeous tropical country called Maldives, tucked far
away out into the Indian Ocean, and find out what beach ant colonies are like, in this
episode of the AntsCanada ant channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Tired of nature channels not showing nature
shows. Just watch this channel. Enjoy! The Republic of Maldives is a South Asian
country composed of over 1,000 coral islands out in the Indian Ocean, situated in the Arabian
Sea near the country of Sri Lanka. Its crystal clear waters, amazing wild life,
and luxurious beach resorts have made it a growing tourist spot for beach enthusiasts
around the world. I knew nothing about the place before coming
here, other than the fact that a few celebrities I follow online have vacationed here and posted
some pretty neat photos of the place. But when I arrived I was shocked to see not
only how beautiful it was, but also how rich the Maldivian wildlife was, both in the sea
and on land. Allegedly friendly reef sharks and some really
interesting marine fish swam all around us just outside our rooms, we interacted with
wild stingrays, which I had no idea was a safe thing to do, massive fruit bats flew
from tree to tree, huge solitary bees buzzed around, shore birds and herons hung out at
our pools, and super cute agamid lizards scurried about waiting for insects to pick off, and
oh, the plant life – man, that tropical, beach plant life though! But with such a lush and thriving ecosystem
on these secluded islands, I was sure there had to be ants here somewhere! So I asked the locals about where I might
be able to find ants and what type of ants existed in Maldives. Of course, if you’re not an ant nerd like
me, most ants might look the same, so the general consensus was that there were pretty
much only three types of ants in Maldives. They were described as follows: The first
type were described as being big and black, and that to me screamed Camponotus, i.e. carpenter
ants. Ooohh Maldivian carpenter ants! Super exciting. Let’s hope we see some today! The second were described as some small red
ones. That sounded like a fire ant species, perhaps
like our Fire Nation? We’ll find out! And finally some harmless black ones that
come in swarms, and of course, that to me sounded like black crazy ants! To think, our Dark Knights have a Maldivian
counterpart? So cool! So according to local sources, there were
these three ants and that was it. Now although Maldives was pretty geographically
secluded and each island was super small, I still found it hard to accept that there
were only three species of ants on these Maldivian islands, so it was time to find out! I booked some tours to go Maldives island
hopping and broke away from my tour group to shoot some ants! By the way, AC Family, if you’re excited about
today’s episode, please hit that ‘LIKE’ button and let me know. Alright so wandering off the tourist path
a little bit, I instantly came across this open sandy area with sparse vegetation, and
it was full of little pits. Ant holes! Check it out AC Family, it looks like we’ve
found our quote-unquote small, red ants! But looking closer at them, you could tell
right away that these red ants were NOT fire ants. These ants looked different from our Fire
Nation, but they were just as energetic! I loved watching them run about constructing
their holes and small ant hills. Have a look! Now one thing you might notice about the ant
hills of these ants is that they aren’t really huge nor too conspicuous. I feel when you live on a beach where you
don’t have a whole lot of plant coverage, you don’t want to make your fortress too obvious
and announce to predators that “Hey, this is where we live.” Now I couldn’t even pin a genus on these girls
to identify them, until I spotted from the corner of my eye this! A Supermajor! The supermajors were super shy and weren’t
plentiful. Now these ants weren’t our Titans, Asian Marauder
ants, but were probably a smaller and similar species belonging to the genus Pheidole. Red ant mystery solved! Let’s move on! My friend who was ant-hunting with me, called
me over saying “Hey, I found a huge black ant!” Yes, perhaps it was our native Camponotus! When I finally saw it, I was shocked and filmed
it with my eyes and mouth wide open the whole time. AC Family, check it out and see if you can
tell why! Do you see something funny about this big
black ant? Well, AC Family, this actually is not an ant. Believe it or not, this here is a spider! A jumping spider, to be exact, probably belonging
to the genus Myrmarachne. This spider was an ant mimic! Don’t believe me? That right there is its web den! Not only is its body shaped like that of an
ant, but it also moves its front legs in the same way an ant moves its antennae! Isn’t that just amazing, AC Family? Now you might be asking, why would a spider
want to mimic an ant? What evolutionary purpose? Well, there could be several reasons. First, many animals actually dislike or fear
ants, having learned to stay away from them due to their bites or their foul taste. A predator may choose to eat this jumping
spider before this apparent ant. Second, this spider may actually look like
her favourite prey, and so looking like an ant may help her get close enough to pounce. Whatever it is, these ant-mimicking spiders
of which there are hundreds of described species are super cool! Don’t you think? Ok, so this wasn’t our big, black carpenter
ant! Let’s move on! Plus, we still needed to find some wild Dark
Knights, Maldives chapter! Speaking of which, AC Family want to hear
something cool? Alright, so it made total sense that the Dark
Knights, commonly known as black crazy ants would be found here in Maldives. If you were ever wondering if ants take tropical
beach vacation getaways the answer is yes, they do, only they end up staying at these
tropical destinations, and black crazy ants happen to be the ultimate world vacationers. You see at one point these Maldivian islands
had their native set of ants species like the Pheidole ants, but as soon as the islands
began to develop and later turn into a tourist destination, it opened its borders to immigrant
ants. With human tourists, come the need for the
importation of supplies, including food items, building materials, decorative plants and
trees, and pretty much everything and anything that people can’t readily acquire on these
tiny islands. During a chat with the general manager of
the resort I was staying at, I was surprised to know that twice a week, huge barges of
supplies are shipped into the island to stock the resort with everything they need. And of course, with these supplies, can come
tiny ant vacationers traveling for free. All it takes is one pregnant queen ant, or
even whole colonies inhabiting any of the goods coming in, for a colony of immigrant
ants to establish themselves on a small island. They can even be hiding in something as simple
as a garbage can on a boat. And low and behold, near a school in one of
the local communities, I saw some naturalized Maldivian citizens of Dark Knights. As was described to me by the locals they
moved in huge swarms with such vigor and power! Having whole armies of immigrant ants like
these black crazy ants move in to a new place can be problematic for the local ecosystem
especially for a small island, because they can displace, kill, or out-compete native
ants, which already have stable relationships with the plants and animals around them. Imagine if these black crazy ants wipe out
a native species of ant that a certain species of plant depends on to disperse its seeds
or pollinate to bear fruit? Or what if these black crazy ants have a taste
for creatures that native ants typically leave alone? Black Crazy Ants, though we love our Dark
Knights, actually pose dangers to ecosystems especially on small islands around the world,
because of the fact that they are such avid world travelers. And so are these ants, ghost ants! Tapinoma melanocephalum. These tiny bundles of energy are called ghost
ants because of their semi-transparent gasters which make them look like floating heads. Ghost ants are also notorious world travelers
having established themselves in subtropical and tropical regions around the world. I spotted them forming a massive trail running
up and down this tree and towards the beach! And here is exactly what I was talking about! AC Family, look! It looks like these ghost ants have stolen
the bounty of some larger Maldivian native ant, and have formic acid sprayed it to immobilization. I watched as it kicked and struggled in pain,
as the ghost ants feasted on what was supposed to be a meal for the native ant’s colony. Scenes like this are heart-breaking, but it’s
part of the natural world where the survival of the fittest rule reigns supreme. So what are people doing now to try to stop
ant tourism? Surely, for islands like Maldives, human tourism
is an important industry, bringing the nation a steady amount of income, but how do we protect
the native ecosystems from falling apart due to invasive, tourist ants to these small islands
like those of Maldives. So, to deal with that, prior to landing in
Maldives, I was surprised to see that the Maldivian government required all planes coming
in to be sprayed with a pesticide. If you find it weird that they would do that,
check out this huge spider that flew with me sandwiched between the two panes of glass
making up my plane window. The flight staff told me, they had watched
that spider grow, which means, beyond the mystery of how it got in there in the first
place, it was actually feeding on a regular supply of insects! Fact is, insects can be anywhere and travel
thousands of miles with people more often than one would think. Also, thankfully, most countries are strict
with what fauna enter and leave its borders. Our GAN Project, which has supplied thousands
of ant keepers with ants for their ant farms also aims at reducing the black market trade
of ant colonies as pets to private owners, to help stop the migration of foreign ants
to new places, by connecting local ant keepers. But no other sight spoke the message of the
need for preservation of native ants and ecosystems as clearly and beautifully as this next scene
you are about to see, AC Family. At the base of one of the trees, near the
ocean, I spotted something totally magical! It was a huge, black ant! We found our native Camponotus ant. Wow! Look at how gorgeous it was! But then I noticed something even cooler! It was attending to some small tiny pink creatures,
and that’s when I realized, AC Family, that OMG, this carpenter ant was milking a mealy
bug. What we are witnessing here was a carpenter
ant milking an ant cow! You see the mealy bugs feed from the juices
within this tree root and if you look carefully, you will see the ant gently stroking the mealy
bug with its antennae. This stroking eventually causes the mealy
big to release a sweet secretion called honeydew, a bi-product, which the ant drinks up cum
gusto! I have never been able to film this beautiful
act of symbiosis this close. You can almost see the small appendage of
the mealy bug running through the ants’ mouth parts. Is that like an ant cow teat? I watched for a long time as the carpenter
ant milked the mealy bug then left to visit other mealy bug sites that it knew, including
this one which was a mealy bug with baby mealy bug calves around her! Isn’t this all just unbelievable. An ant farmer with her ant cows, AC Family. In order to preserve these beautiful and important
moments of nature, as has been the common message these days, we humans do need to be
mindful of our activities as key players in the natural world. The final ants I saw as I left Maldives a
few days ago, were some native black ants of which I didn’t know the species, relocating
a dead Maldivian native carpenter ant to an area not blocking one of their foraging trails. They were cleaning up! This made me think, hey if tiny ants can work
together at cleaning up a mess that isn’t theirs, why do we people have such problems
working together to clean up our own? It’s ant love forever. Yes! AC Family, thanks for watching another week
of ant discovery! Hope you guys are enjoying your holidays! What types of ants have you guys seen while
on vacation? Let me know in the comments! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would just like to watch a super cool video of ants and other creatures
I shot in the wilderness and oceans of Maldives! And before we proceed to the AC Question of
the Week, in case you haven’t heard yet, our annual Christmas Sale at AntsCanada.com is
still in full effect but there are only two days left! This year we have a great sale on our brand
new Hybrid Nest 2.0 and our All You Need Formica Hybrid Nest Gear Pack! So if you’ve always wanted to get into ant
keeping, I have left links in the description box to these sale items so you can pick one
up for yourself or someone you love. We ship worldwide, but this sale ends this
weekend, so do place your order in, and we also have gift cards in case you would like
to get your special loved one an ant setup but are not sure what they would like. I would love for you guys to keep ants with
me and discover these amazing creatures that live in your neighbourood! Alright, and now it’s time for the AC Question
of the week! Last week we asked: Which of our ant colonies
was the first to receive their Christmas gift? Now this was a trick question because a lot
of you answered the Fire Nation which indeed was the first recipient of their Christmas
gift in the video, but congratulations to MobileChampion 21 who correctly answered: The Golden Empire It was mentioned in the video that the Gold
Play Button was considered the Golden Empire’s early Christmas gift, hence they technically
were the first. Congratulations MobileChampion 21, you just
won a free ebook handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name any of the two species of
ants in this video that are not native to Maldives Islands. Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free ebook handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, & SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home | Deep Look

The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home | Deep Look


Ok, under a log, you uncover a wispy white web. You’re thinking: spider. Not so fast. This maze of woven silk has nothing to do
with arachnids. It’s actually created by a kind of insect
called a webspinner. They’re related to stick insects and praying
mantises. Never heard of ’em? Not surprised. They give spiders a run for their money. Their handiwork is a tent … umbrella … and
invisibility cloak all-in-one. But while spiders produce silk from their
backends, a webspinner’s silk comes from her feet. Yep, her front feet. She intertwines the strands, waving back and
forth, back and forth. She has tiny hair-like ejectors on the bottom
of each foot, which shoot out the silk. It’s the thinnest silk of any animal. The work is painstaking. But the result is pretty cozy – kinda like
a quilted roof. Their home – also known as a gallery – is their
only defense, hiding their soft bodies from predators. There’s also plenty of moss and lichen to
eat inside. So why leave? And if they need to do some housekeeping,
it’s easy to take out the trash. They just stick it to the roof … and forget
about it. The silk also keeps out something they really
like to avoid: rain. Webspinners can easily drown if a downpour
floods their gallery. Luckily, they’ve got exceptional weather-proofing. Water just beads up on the silk’s surface,
like on a rose petal. And that water actually changes the silk,
making the surface more slippery by transforming the proteins. So it becomes extra waterproof. But having silk-slinging front feet has a
downside. Say an unwanted visitor comes along. If they want to get away, webspinners have
to tiptoe to avoid triggering their silk ejectors. Not exactly the fastest runner. So to get away, webspinners dart … backwards,
to avoid getting tangled up. They’re much faster in reverse. Small price to pay for the ability to weave
an entire hidden world. One that will keep the webspinners – and
their young – safe … for generations to come. Hi, it’s Lauren. Music fans – here’s a special playlist for
ya of Deep Look creatures that make music of their own. Also, check out Sound Field, a new show from
PBS Digital Studios that breaks down our favorite songs and artists from all genres … from
Bach to Beyonce. It’s hosted by two amazing musicians, Nahre
Soul and LA Buckner, who even come up with an original song in every episode. Link is in the description. Thanks.

Insects Photography-Insects-Natural Photography -Macro Photography-Nature


Swayamkrushigroup Official Channel Scan this Qr to Buy an VR Headset Natural Photography Photography by C ShankarPrasad Edited by VinayV it’s a HandMade Video Read our Blog: www.deepphilosophy.org visit our website: www.swayamkrushigroup.com Thankyou For Watching Please Subscribe!!!

Act Wild for Lord Howe Island Stick Insects

Act Wild for Lord Howe Island Stick Insects


>>The Lord Howe Island’s stick
insect was thought to be extinct until a handful of survivors
were discovered clinging to Ball’s Pyramid just
off Lord Howe Island. A single pair was
brought to Melbourne Zoo where the invertebrate
team managed to literally bring the
species back from the brink.>>So from the single pair that
was removed from Ball’s Pyramid in 2003, Melbourne Zoo has bred over 9,000 Lord Howe Island
stick insects to date. The size is quite remarkable
on these animals as well. An adult can weigh
anywhere up to 25 grammes. The young start out bright
green, and then they turn to a mottled green
and then brown. And that’s when they start only
coming out at night to feed and to mate and drink and things
like that in their glass houses that we have set up
here at Melbourne Zoo. [ Music ] The Lord Howe Island stick
insect hatching video that I did took me quite
some time, about two weeks to actually finally
get it in the end. It was just a matter of getting
some eggs that were close to hatching in that time, and
then the success was there. And next thing that you know I
am videoing this newly hatched animal coming out of the egg, and that was purely
amazing to watch. [ Music ]>>Lord Howe Island’s
stick insects, like some other stick
insects, are able to breed without the need for males. This is called parthenogenesis. When they do this, the offspring
will be entirely female and essentially clones
of their mum.>>The Lord Howe Island stick
insect was thought to be extinct for nearly eighty years. And the main reason for that
was in 1918 a ship ran aground on Ned’s Beach on
Lord Howe Island. It was stuck there
for nine days, and in those nine days ship
rats or black rats had escaped onto Lord Howe Island. And they found the Lord Howe
Island stick insect very tasty indeed. And by the 1920s, 1930s
they were presumed extinct on Lord Howe Island. We are now able to breed them
successfully, and we are able to transport lots of eggs
and young to other zoos and breeders around the world. Being an invertebrate keeper at
Melbourne Zoo, it’s very lucky that we have been able to hold
such an interesting species like stick insects, something
again that was thought to be extinct on the planet. What you can do at home is
to look after invertebrates. You can also keep
stick insects yourself. They are fascinating
animals to keep. There are lots of species that you can actually
keep at home as pets. And one day soon with a lot
of luck and support we hope to get these stick insects back to their rightful home
on Lord Howe Island. [ Music ]

পাতা নাকি পোকা  ||  Leaf Insect ||  News Valley

পাতা নাকি পোকা || Leaf Insect || News Valley


Don’t believe in things you haven’t seen. That’s what we always say. But everything seen may not be as true. How the noise is pushing, Is that so? But after watching the animal presented in this video, your faith will be shaken. Suppose a tree has 5 leaves. But you are told that there are only 4 leaves. You see, by the way, there are 5 leaves. But after a while it turned out that a leaf of 5 leaves was moving. So far you have certainly found what I’ve said about the matter. Yes, it does not look like a leaf, but it is actually a leaf. It’s a kind of insect. Its real name is in Phylliidae which we know as leaf insect or leaf insect. hey are also called walking leaves or moving leaves. Usually we know some green insects or grasses that can be mixed with green, But they can be recognized only if they are well noticed. On the other hand, you cannot recognize this leaf insect sitting on the actual leaf, unless it is moving. The leaves are not always fresh. Sometimes it gets torn up, eaten by insects. The amazing thing is that these leaf insects are so dense that they sometimes have to look like the leaves of these insects. And in a perfect way, they look like leaves or worms. In the animal world, there is no more perfect animal in the sample of camouflage power or camouflage. This ability to camouflage protects them from eating insect pests. About 50 species of insect leaves are found. The leafy eat plants and usually live in densely vegetated areas. Their natural range extends from the islands of the Indian Ocean to mainland South Asia and various regions of Southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea and the Western Pacific to Australia. The leaves are about 28 to 100 mm long in body length. The boy is smaller in size than the female insect. Their eggs are strange to look at and can not be easily identified in the soil. In the spring the baby will hatch from these eggs. New-born insects are not green to see at the beginning, After eating the leaves, their body becomes green. The amazing thing is that even in the absence of men, children can have children in a complex natural way. This leaf insect lives for up to ten years.

True bugs: Hypselonotus – Biodiversity Shorts #2

True bugs: Hypselonotus – Biodiversity Shorts #2


Hello my name is Marc and tonight
we’re looking at the true bug Hypselonotus. I’ve got my macro gear
just behind me here and he’s on the branches of this
little plant Let’s take a closer look. I found a whole heap of these guys on the one plant in the garden which made
them really easy to film. and this is a shot, I’m just going to pop my
finger into frame here so it can give you an idea of his size. I did most of the shooting at night which might the job even easier because
they are very slow-moving and very docile. Now most people think of a bug and they think of anything that is small and creepy. When a scientist thinks of a bug they think of the Hemiptera order of insects which are knows as true bugs. One way to recognise true bugs is to look for their long straw like probosis, which is used
usually to suck sap that is in most species, but in some species they will use it to suck the insides out of other insects as in the assassin bug or in the case of
the bed bug to suck blood. I could not figure out what
these guys were doing most of them were just sitting about. This one was playing with a caterpillar, and another one who was really busy being dinner for this spider. Just a guess, but I think this spider is somehow realted to the red back spider of Australia When I came back about a week later to film the start and end of this video I found that these little guys were
actually feeding on incredibly tiny little flowers
that are at the base of each of the leaves of this plant. That explained to me why these guys congregated around this
particular plant It’s because of those tiny flowers. Which probably only this insect can get its mouth parts into. The last thing I observed is that these
guys will actively the defend the best flowers and
chase away competitors In this shot I actually got him chasing away another bug, and I’m sure if it came to
it, if they were equally matched there would be a small fight. I hope you’ve enjoyed my video and thanks to Andreas and the other people on the various forums who helped me to identify this bug I wouldn’t have had a hope on my own of trying to identify this little guy and if you like these type of videos then please subscribe and please click like and comment below and tell your friends
every little bit of feedback helps whether it’s good or bad or whatever you
feel like doing I’ll put a link to my previous video just
after this and a my name is Marc and this is
Biodiversity Shorts Cheers.

The Jagged Ambush Bug – Secret Killer

The Jagged Ambush Bug – Secret Killer


Hey you guys doing? Chris Egnoto here, and you are watching Nature
Now! So, I know it’s the winter months, but I still
have some warmer weather topics to share with you guys. So without farther ado, here’s a cool little
creature I am sure will impress you. Let’s get started. Picture this: You are taking a slow and quiet
stroll through your local park. It’s a warm September afternoon accompanied
by a soft breeze, carrying with it the songs of some bird who’s name you do not know,
but his song is lovely. You happen upon a nice goldenrod meadow. This meadow is filled with all sorts of vibrant
colors. The greens of summer grasses, the fuchsia
of knapweed and numerous arching stems filled with pink and magenta from various flowers
ready to make their seeds. The meadow is dominated by the warm rich yellow
of the goldenrods. You see a honeybee going about it’s duties
and peak a little closer to appreciate all her hard work. Just as you get ready to snap a photo with
your phone POOF! something has happened. The bee is now on its side and moving rather….un
bee like. The flower has grabbed onto it. No This is no flower. It is some strange alien composed of greens
and yellows and maybe even a little pink. You are witnessing non other than the stealthy
and formidable ambush bug. The silent assassin of the summer meadow. These insects are members of a group of insects
known as Assassin bugs (family Reduviidae),and are among the few who can officially claim
the name “bug”. Such a lovely fright these creatures are! Not very large, having short, stout bodies
which makes them unique among the assassin bug group. To humans they can often be a beneficial insect
at times, but a nuisance at other times. While they feed on insects such as hoppers,
thrips and other insects that can harm garden plants and vegetables, they sometimes feed
on beneficial insects such as bees and even other assassin bugs. Although to humans, ambush bugs are not much
of a threat and are in fact, a welcome visiter to our gardens. Both the juveniles sporting their little wing
buds and THE adults are insect predators. I have never been bitten or pinched by one,
and I don’t fear that I ever will be. And they’re not actually that big reaching
about half an inch at most. Lets talk about their “tools of the trade”. Obviously, you may gather that their adornment
is their first weapon, and rightly so. They wear such impressive camouflage that
I have had trouble getting other people to see them while pointing directly at them. Like many assassin bugs they blend in so well
with the environment they inhabit that there is no need to improve this design. Along with their color, they have little projections
on their body, perhaps resembling the ends of maybe flower petals or leaf buds. There is even a species in the family that
wears the carcasses of its defeated prey on its back like some shroud or trophy of the
macabre, some day, I hope to have footage of THAT species. Once in a while, a little head bobbing might
catch your eye, but thats it. They will sit so still that a prey item might
even walk on their face or back and even then, the ambush bug will sit patiently still. Not until something tasty comes and entices
it, and everything lines up just right, do you see movement. This can occur in two ways. It might slowly approach its victim to within
striking distance, or more often than not, it might wait until its food source is directly
in front of its face. Then….with a flash! it snatches it up. With the speed of a kung fu guru, it lunges
out with its modified front legs and grasps its prey. The insect never saw it coming. These forelegs are wonderful hunting tools. The fore tibia (front half of the legs) are
thin, curved hooks, complete with tiny teeth or spines for gripping. The fore femora (the half of the leg closer
to the insects body) is swollen with muscles used to snatch and restrain their prey mercilessly. These legs resemble the forelegs of a more
popular insect known as the praying mantis or even the mantidfly and clearly show that
through necessity, evolution can often take on similar solutions to best suit the situation. That’s not all though. Now comes the true assassins weapon – a deadly
elixir. Ambush bugs (and most assassin bugs) harbor
a powerful venom for subduing their prey. After it has caught its food it will extend
its pointy “beak”, which when at rest, will be tucked into a groove under its face
and between the forelegs. It will pierce its victim with this beak and
inject a paralyzing concoction that often begins the digestive process before the bug
even starts to feed. The beak is, in essence, a straw. This “straw” will be used to suck the
insides out of the insect it has just hunted. When all is done, it just discards the hollow
husk a lot like a kid might do with an empty sandwich wrapper after lunch. The ambush bug, together with its combination
of stealth and cunning, powerfully adapted hooked front legs, and its immobilizing saliva
is an amazing addition to the hunters out there in the invertebrate world. I am so glad that ambush bugs are not something
us humans will ever have to look over our shoulders for. So, I really hope you guys like this video
and in the future I will probably have a more in depth video with more detail and stuff
but we will have to wait for that one. I hope you guys enjoyed this video and next
time you are in a meadow, keep your eyes open and maybe you will see an ambush bug for yourselves. Thanks a lot for watching, once again I am
Chris Egnoto; singing out. Thanks a lot for watching and remember if
you like this video, be sure to check out this video over here that YouTube has selected
specifically for YOU based on your watch time. And don’t forget to hit that SUBSCRIBE button
but you gotta click the bell icon, because if you don’t, YouTube will never let you know
when a new video of mine comes out. Remember passion inspires spirit!

The World’s Most Dangerous Ant  – Bulldog Ants – One Minute Nature Show

The World’s Most Dangerous Ant – Bulldog Ants – One Minute Nature Show


Native to Australia, bulldog ants are some
of the meanest insects alive and, according to the Guinness Book of World records, the
world’s most dangerous ant. I mean, just look at this thing! Those jaws are terrifying! But that’s not all. They’re highly aggressive, have a venomous
stinger on their butt, and some species can even jump! So you really don’t want these critters in
your home. While bullet ants have the most painful insect
sting, there are no records of bullet ants killing people. However, the same can’t be said for bulldog
ants. Between 1980 and 2000, six people died from
bulldog ant stings. That’s because bulldog ant venom often causes
severe allergic reactions. The venom is potent, but the allergic reaction
is deadly. But that’s all for now, so tune in next time
for another episode of One Minute Nature Show!

This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look


We like to think we’re in control … that
our minds are our own. But that’s not true for this fruit fly. Its brain has been hijacked by another organism
and it’s not going to end well. It all starts when the fly is innocently walking
around, sipping on overripe fruit. It picks up an invisible fungus spore, which
bores under its skin. For a few days, everything seems normal. But inside, the fungus is growing, feeding
on the fly’s fat … and infiltrating its mind. At dusk on the fourth or fifth day, the fly
gets a little erratic, wandering around. It climbs to a high place. Scientists call this behavior “summiting.” Then it starts twitching. The fungus is in control. The fly sticks out its mouthpart and spits
out a tiny drop of sticky liquid. That glues the fly down, sealing its fate. A few minutes later, its wings shoot up. And it dies. Now that the fungus has forced the fly into
this death pose … wings out of the way … nothing can stop it. It emerges. Tiny spore launchers burst out of the fly’s
skin. Hundreds of spores shoot out at high speed,
catching a breeze if the fly climbed high enough. They’re the next generation of killer fungus. It continues for hours, spores flying out. These flies are in the wrong place at the
wrong time. And if spores land on a wing, which they can’t
bore into, they shoot out a secondary spore to increase their chances of spreading. So how does a fungus take control of a brain? At Harvard, Carolyn Elya is trying to understand
that. She thinks the fungus secretes chemicals to
manipulate the fly’s neurons, maybe stimulating the ones that make flies climb. But don’t worry: The fungus can’t hurt
humans. Scientists have tried to harness its power
for our benefit, to kill flies in our kitchens and farms. They haven’t had any luck though. The deadly spores are actually pretty fragile
and short-lived. It turns out, this lethal puppet master does
only what it needs to for its *own* survival. Hi, it’s Lauren again. If you love Deep Look, why not help us grow
on Patreon? We’re raising funds to go on a filming expedition
to Oaxaca, Mexico. And for a limited time, we’re sweetening the
deal with a special gift. Link is in the description. And if you’re craving more spooky videos,
here’s a playlist of our scariest episodes. Don’t watch ‘em after midnight. See you soon.

Borneo Jungle Diaries: Episode Three – Bugs: Bold, Beautiful and Bizarre [UHD/4K] SZtv

Borneo Jungle Diaries: Episode Three – Bugs: Bold, Beautiful and Bizarre [UHD/4K] SZtv


In the jungles of Borneo, live one group
of animals.. .. more bizarre and diverse than any other. Borneo is home to an amazing array of
weird and wonderful bugs and beasties. They might not be as large as elephants
or famous as orangutans. The insects are critical to the ecosystem, propping up
the food chain and shaping their environment. Plus, up close, they look amazing. Borneo is one of the world’s insect hotspot. With as many as a
thousand species found on just one tree. Tonight I’m with DGFC’s resident bug
boffin Jack and we’re on a mission to.. ..find some of the jungles craziest creepy
crawlies. My name is Jack Devlin and I’m from Wales. The reason why I decided to
study bugs.. ..it was the incredible alien nature of
them really, it’s a whole new world. It’s incredibly important that insects are
studied and appreciated because without them.. a forest can’t evolve. A little things are just as important as the megafauna. Danau Girang is such a special place.. ..given that there’s so so many insect
species and predictions have said there’s up to five million more left to
discover. This would be the place that.. you’d find some more species definitely. -How does this thing work? -It’s quite simple really. It’s just a nice plain white sheet and
behind it we’ll put a mercury ball which.. ..is special kind of bulb which doesn’t
give off any heat but a lot of light and what we’re going to do is draw the bugs
in from the forest and have them collect on the sheet so it gives us an amazing
opportunity to see some of the more freaky nocturnal bugs we have here. – Jack, I’ve had an idea. – Well, give it an hour or so.. .. to really settle in and draw the bugs
in so we’ll go for a wander and see what ..we get when we come back. – Good stuff. -So, I’ve got a bit of a trick, we have a.. ..Malaysian forest scorpion in here. Now this is a little UV torch here.. ..so if we turn our headlights off,
and we turn this little thing on.. you should be able to get the scorpion. – That is incredible. It’s not just scorpions that fluoresce,
our teeth do to.. ..and is also used in banknotes for security. It’s thought that
scorpions fluoresce to protect themselves. A substance in their
exoskeleton causes them to glow under UV light. If they glow too bright they’ll
stay hidden, keeping them safe than waiting predators. So this is one of the
largest species we have here in Borneo. Not entirely venomous, to us anyway. But It’s enough for her to take down large insects, small
reptiles, things like that. – And the fact that she’s right next to the center,
is that alright? -None to worry about. They are lovely species, really. – She’s beautiful. But Jack tells me that glow in the dark scorpions.. ..aren’t the weirdest thing we might find
in the forest at night. Jack, this is awesome. It’s like a night safari but for bugs.
– Exactly. -What is that? But even after all these creepy-crawlies,
Jack has managed to save.. ..the best until last.
-So just in here we’ve got a tarantula.. ..who’s just had spiderlings and they’re
really small probably in their first instar and spiders, a lot of them show
maternal instinct which means she’ll guard these for up to 1 month after
they’ve hatched, so there must be at least over 10 in there. The female, she would
have hidden down into the bottom now but.. those are all little tiny spiderlings.
-This is the coolest thing I’ve seen in.. ..the jungle. That is..they’re moving! Cool thing is they as well have an instinct to stay in..
– but that’s good! That’s a very good thing. I’ve got an instinct to.. stay away from the nest.
-That’s also probably a smart idea. – You think? – Alright, alright, enjoy. See you later!
-Okay, bye Bertie. -Jack, bugs are awesome and.. ..now I can see why you study them. After our walk full of
the most unusual creatures Borneo has to offer.. ..it’s back to our light trap to
check on our findings. -So here we have a really cool species of moth. To me it looks like a moon moth. So this moth don’t have any mouth part,
so when they emerge from their chrysalis they have that two weeks to find a mate and pass
on their genes and then that’s it. They starve to death.
So a bit morose. -Brutal.
It’s stunning though. -Absolutely gorgeous. What else have we got? -Dragonfly!
-Oh amazing! Nice, we’ve got a moth coming in. – Um, let me just grab a tub. Well done mate like, a ninja. So this is one of the larger
hawk moth species we have here. I’m not entirely sure what this species is so we’ll take it into the lab and use our identification
books and see what it is ! Amazing
-Cool. Let’s do it. So, good start Bertie. All these are the books you want..
-Wow And these are all about moths? There are hundreds and hundreds of different species of moths here.. ..and each of these books is about the different families. So we might be here for sometime. -Well thank you, Jack. You’ve shown me a side to Borneo
that I never knew existed. Can I go to bed now? – No, unfortunately.
You have got quite a lot of things to do. I’ll leave you to it. Bye, Bertie. – Jack’s knowledge and enthusiasm highlights
how important insects are to Borneo’s ecosystem. This forest is incredibly
diverse and rich in bug life. From the weird to the wonderful
and the downright terrifying. And now, if you’ll excuse me.. I have a long night ahead of me.