How to use Alpine Yellow Jacket Wasp Bait Stations

How to use Alpine Yellow Jacket Wasp Bait Stations


An easy way to kill Yellow Jacket Wasps around
your home or business is by using a bait station. This is a great method to use the nest can’t
be located for a direct drench treatment. We first recommend testing a few types of
bait before using the stations. Recommended food baits include raw chicken pieces, raw
fish, canned tuna, or cat food. Raw chicken pieces or tuna tend to work the best. Also
test using a sweet bait like jelly. Whatever bait the wasps go for, this will be the bait
to use in your stations. The second step is mixing the bait you have
chosen with an insecticide labeled for Yellow Jacket Wasps. You only need a small amount
insecticide for the bait to be effective. Mix a quarter teaspoon of insecticide per
12 ounces of bait thoroughly in the station. The third step is to hang the stations outside
your home five to six feet off the ground. Space the stations about 50 feet apart to
cover as much of your property as possible. Keep the stations out of reach of children,
but in areas where the wasps can access them. A good place to hang the stations are on tree
limbs. The fourth and final step is to check the
bait stations every few days to see if the bait has been consumed or if the the bait
is rancid. Replace the bait as needed until the yellow jacket population is under control. And it’s that easy with the expert help
from Do My Own Pest Control dot com! Subscribe to our channel for more DIY and
product videos!

Killer wasps leave dozens dead in China

Killer wasps leave dozens dead in China


Wasps have killed 19 people in northwest China
– with nearly 600 severely injured. This hospital in Hanzhong City has treated
87 victims – 8 have died and four are in a critical condition. Victims here described being chased and stung
hundred of times. “These wasps surrounded me and I could not
stand it, so I used basket to cover my head and that’s how I saved myself.” The insect’s highly toxic stings can lead
to anaphylactic shock and renal failure. Officials have urged people to seek medical
help if they’ve been stung more than 10 times.

Animals Galore! Episode 5: European Paper Wasp

Animals Galore! Episode 5: European Paper Wasp


Salutations, my friends! I’m Luke Fleming.
On this episode of Animals Galore, we will learn about the first invertebrate
featured on this show; The infamous European paper wasp. This
particular wasp is named Pablo. He has been captured, as in America, he is a
harmful invasive species. These wasps are social insects, ruled by a queen that can
live for up to 12 months! They make their nests out of a paper pulp created when
they chew wood. The nests can reach a diameter of six to eight inches. Unlike
the more aggressive hornets and yellowjackets, paper wasps generally only
attack when they feel their nest is threatened. True or False: Wasps can only sting once. The answer is false. If you said true,
you’re probably thinking of bees. Wasps can sting multiple times, which is why
many people happen to despise them.

Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen – Kenny Coogan

Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen – Kenny Coogan


As the April sun rises
on a pile of firewood, something royal stirs inside. This wasp queen is one of thousands
who mated in late autumn and hibernated through the winter. Now she emerges into the spring air
to begin her reign. Most of her sisters weren’t so lucky. While hibernating in compost piles
and underground burrows, many sleeping queens
were eaten by spiders. Warm winters caused by climate change
led other queens to emerge early, only to find there was no available food. And some queens that survived the winter
fell victim to the threats of spring, such as carnivorous plants, birds,
and manmade pesticides. Our queen is the lone survivor
of her old hive, and now, she must become
the foundress of a new one. But first, breakfast. The queen heads for a citrus grove
full of honeybee hives. The bees can be dangerous if provoked, but right now they’re paralyzed
by the morning cold. Their hairy bodies are dripping
with sugar water from an earlier feeding, and the resourceful queen
licks them for a morning snack. Newly energized, our queen searches
for a safe nesting area. This tree hollow, safe from rain, wind,
and predators, is ideal. She chews the surrounding wood
and plant fibers to make a paper-like pulp. Then she builds around 50 brood cells
that comprise the beginning of her nest. Using sperm stored from last fall, the queen lays a fertilized egg
into each cell, producing as many as 12 in 20 minutes. Within a week,
these will hatch into female larva. But until then, the queen must hunt down
smaller insects to feed her brood, all while expanding the hive, laying eggs,
and defending against intruders. Fortunately, our queen is well prepared. Unlike bees, wasps can sting as many times
as they need to. With such a busy schedule,
the queen barely has time to feed herself. Luckily, she doesn’t have to. When she feeds an insect to her grubs, they digest the bug into a sugary
substance that sustains their mother. By the end of July, these first larva
have matured into adult workers, ready to take on foraging,
building, and defense. The queen can now lay eggs full-time, sustaining herself on her worker’s spoils
and their unfertilized eggs. Although each worker only lives
for roughly 3 weeks, the queen’s continuous egg-laying
swells their ranks. In just one summer,
the nest reaches the size of a basketball, supporting thousands of workers. Such a large population needs to eat, and the nearby garden
provides a veritable buffet. As the swarm descends,
alarmed humans try to swat them. They even fight back with pesticides
that purposefully poison wasps, and inadvertently impact
a wide-range of local wildlife. But the wasps are actually vital
to this ecosystem. Sitting at the top
of the local invertebrate food chain, these insects keep spiders, mites,
and centipedes, in check. Wasps consume crop-eating insects, making them particularly helpful
for farms and gardens. They even pollinate fruits and vegetables, and help winemakers
by biting into their grapes and jump-starting fermentation. This feast continues until autumn,
when the foundress changes course. She begins grooming some eggs
into a new generation of queens, while also laying unfertilized eggs that will mature into reproductive males
called drones. This new crop of queens and males
requires more food. But with summer over,
the usual sources run dry, and the foraging wasps
start taking more aggressive risks. By September,
the hive’s organization deteriorates. Hungry workers no longer clean the nest
and various scavengers move in. Just when it seems
the hive can no longer sustain itself, the fertile queens and their drones
depart in a massive swarm. As the days grow colder,
the workers starve, and our queen
reaches the end of her lifespan. But above, a swarm of reproductive wasps
has successfully mated. The males die off shortly after, but the newly fertilized queens are ready
to find shelter for their long sleep. And this woodpile looks like
the perfect place to spend the winter.

What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps | Deep Look


Plenty of animals build
their homes in oak trees, but it’s another thing
entirely to get the oak tree to do all the work. To build your house for you. Say you’re an oak tree,
just sitting there minding your own business, when suddenly
this tiny wasp comes along. She says hey, why
don’t you build me a nursery for these baby
wasps I’m about to have? And then she injects her
eggs under your skin. You find yourself creating an
entirely new structure, one you would have never
built for yourself. What nerve, you
might say, what gall! And you’d be right. This thing, this parasitic
wasp house, it’s called a gall. There can be dozens of types
of galls on a single tree, each one built to order for
a specific species of wasp. They’re called
gall-inducing wasps, and each gall is weirder and
more flamboyant than the next. Sometimes the wasps
prefer a mobile home. This one is called
a jumping gall. It falls from the
tree and bounces across the ground like
a Mexican jumping bean until it finds a
safe place to hatch. As a protection
against predators, galls can taste
incredibly bitter, bitter like the bile produced
by a gallbladder. In fact, the earliest doctors
believed being bitter and angry meant an excess of
gall in the body. Anyway, back to our tree. Inside the gall, the
larvae mature and develop, and as they grow they
release chemicals that tell the tree
how to build the gall. The tree is tricked
into funneling nutrients into the gall to feed
the hungry wasp larvae. Scientists call this
a physiologic sink. For the larvae, it’s like
living inside a giant banana, an endless supply of food. But the peace and
quiet don’t last long. All that free food starts
attracting uninvited guests. That original wasp
itself becomes a host for another set of
wasps, called parasitoids. One study in the UK found
17 different wasp species living in one gall. But the oak tree? It does just fine, in most cases
unharmed by the tiny rivalries in tiny houses on its
branches and its leaves.

Honey Bee and Wasp Sugar Water Preferences Open Feeding What Bees Use First


okay so today is Friday the 13th in
October and what we have is an abundance of foraging bees and wasps in the air
and the resources are low so competition is high now what a lot of beekeepers do
is they open feed and they open feed a variety of different materials the most
popular is 50/50 sugar water and sugar like C&H pure cane sugar and what I have
here for this test and you’re looking at the time-lapse sequence here 50% so
that’s the 50/50 sugar water all the way to the right and this is by volume 25%
second from the right and 10% second from the left and 5% sugar water all the
way to the left and the water resource is the pure P U R filtered water that
we talked about before in the last test and turned out to be the water that was
preferred by the bees so this four minute time lapse sequence shows that
the bees really pile on the twenty five and fifty percent sugar water now sugar
and water together just provides the carbohydrate that the bees need to have
the energy to warm the hive and to forage of course
so by open feeding what we’re doing is we’re giving something for those
foragers to do plus they are bringing resources to the hive and they won’t be
attacking other colonies of honeybees hopefully if there were no resources in
the environment and as you can see in the background there the corn is dry and
ready for harvest there are very few flowering plants left so the stronger
colonies tend to converge on weaker colonies and raid them out and take
their resources so by open feeding you do two things you give those foragers
something to do and get their energy away from weaker colonies that may be
robbed out and you provide resources that will help them keep their hives
warm now the more water percentage there is compared to the sugar the more
dehydrating they have to do so once the imitation nectar here is taken into the
hive the bees have to dry it out and
condense it so that it becomes honey now you want to do this open feeding well
after you’ve taken honey off of your hives because you obviously don’t want
to be taking sugar water honey off as a resource for your own consumption so do
this after you’ve done your last harvest and so as you can see here the 50% 25%
are equally consumed by the bees they are just taking it down now I wish it
were backlit better so that you could see right now they’re down by 1/3 what
goes on is the bees are taking this all off in just a day so the entire cycle of
what you’re seeing in this video happens within a 24 hour period and the
time-lapse sequence is what I’m starting off with but if you’ll continue watching
I’ll get over some close-ups of the bees and some more discussion about what
other insects come to these feeders and again we’re using highly filtered water
this is from a well because my house is on a well so that’s pre filtered and
then I use the PUR filters that we get from Amazon I’ll put a link for that
in the video description I’ll also put a link to these drinkers that I use these
are 1 quart plastic drinkers and that’ll also be in the video description now what happened during the day of
course it warms up we started this sequence right after sunrise and the
bees of course the activity picks up after noon most foraging occurs late
morning early afternoon and here we are in the final sequences 10% 25% and 50%
are completely empty now and you notice that they’re concentrated all the way to
the left and look what is predominantly present here these are all wasps for the
most part the honeybees have already gone into their colonies for nighttime
protection and the wasps continue to forage well after sunset now for those of you who want to know
the exact weather conditions I decided to take a picture of my weather station
here and the sensor for wind we’re at 4 miles an hour we have 74 degrees outside
and 67% average humidity rainfall of course has been light for the whole
month we only have three point four four inches so this gives you kind of a base
for when I started and did this test I guess I could also if you’re interested
in this weather station I’ll put a link to that I got it on Amazon now for the
time lapse sequences I use the GoPro Hero 5 I just had that thing up on a
tripod right in front of all four the drinkers and set it for a shot every 5
seconds so here we are first one is 5 percent 5 percent sugar to water by
volume and if you notice the honeybees really didn’t care too much for that
overall we went to 10 percent they did show moderate interest in this but so
long as 25 percent and 50 percent sugar to water ratio was made available they
really heavily concentrated on that and here you see a mix of the honeybees
which are from my apiary I know some people get concerned and have made
comments in the past when I open feed that bees are coming from other apiaries
and we’re mixing potential varroa mites and things like that
well my bees are isolated we are at least five miles from the nearest
beekeeper in my area so for me open feeding number one I’m not wasting my
resources feeding other people’s bees and number two I’m really not that
concerned about contagions passing back and forth bee to bee while they’re
concentrated at these drinkers and this just shows again the GoPros setup so
here they are they’re concentrating to the Yellowjackets here in the foreground
lining up and now Yellowjackets even though they do raid beehives when
they’re all at an area like this where there’s an abundant resource they
congregate without attacking each other the exception to that though is and
you’ll see them in here see that bald-faced hornet which is really a
wasp but she’s on the right there kind of in the middle of the pack they show
up for nectar resources which is the sugar water but they’re also here to
attack kill and fly away with some of the smaller wasps they don’t seem to be
very successful against the honeybees but they are definitely here as dual
purpose predators one for the nectar and the second is to get some protein by
capturing a smaller wasp tearing it apart and bringing that back
to their nest site so by sunset this future percent sugar water was basically
empty and twenty five percent went down pretty much at the exact same rate I
think during this sequence we do still have some of the water in those
reservoirs and you can still see as the sun’s back lit twenty-five and fifty
percent are at fifty percent and the ten and five percent are down by about 20
percent now bees have to drink their food any
insect that you see that has that thorax and then the very thread thin
connection between the thorax and the abdomen meat protein isn’t gonna pass
through that so they can only drink now insects of different styles can handle
thicker liquid than others I hope some of you enjoyed those
slow-motion sequences they are a lower-resolution of course we will
improve on those at another time but these are cool in slow motion and here
we are again we’re just gonna continue to show the bees and wasps kind of
cooperating here at the drinkers now if you look closely there are a
variety of wasp species here and the ones when you see their abdomens and
they’ve got the yellow and black stripes going across them now we’re going into
nighttime so even though the video looks well lit this is actually after sunset
so what’s left at the feeders wasps so and wasps are not all the same I have
to tell you that you know like mud dobbers and some of the smaller
Yellowjackets woodland Yellowjackets they are pretty gentle to be around but
what we’re looking at here this nice large black and white one is what’s
known as a bald-faced hornet now they’re really just a wasp themselves but they
are really at the top of the food chain when it comes to wasps in our area and
some of them are here licking up the sugar water that’s remaining if you
notice all of these reservoirs are empty except for the 5% sugar water by now and
these boldface Hornets if you’ve seen my other videos I am NOT a fan of these
wasps they are really aggressive they can fly at night they navigate at night
they can squirt venom in your eyes they are just I don’t know what to say they
are a very very defensive and capable flying stinging insect and the cool
thing is here now that we’re after sunset and most of the honeybees have
gone to their hives you get to see on these reservoirs all these different
varieties of wasps and some of these again they’ve come from the woods some
of them are meadow some of them come from ground nests and
others are paper wasps there’s a honey bee real quick they’re like look at this
curious looking Los long and slender and they’re pretty docile I’m close to these
things they don’t have any protection on and they’re just pretty passive at this
point of course it’s cooling down it’s nighttime there’s a honey bee there on
the left but again as I said most of the honey bees have gone there’s a bee fly
there right in front of us that’s an imitator now I’m showing you my
bug-zooka this is what I use to collect sometimes Yellowjackets if they’re
really getting pesky I’m trying to work the bees but tonight
you know I just can’t let these boldface Hornets go so I’m gonna have to go after
them these are Yellow Jackets these are not my target species right now but I am
collecting bald faced Hornet so that I can look at them up close the bug-zooka
lets you catch things alive if you get something that you don’t want to kill
you can release it later after observation and for me in my case I can
photograph them but look at these different wasp species they’re really
interesting five percent the only thing that’s left
to drink from and you can see the honeybees are
congregated there to the right side of the screen these bees are staying kind
of grouped together and they’re gonna stay on these feeders overnight which is
interesting too now look at these boldface Hornets I
just can’t let him sit there look there you go taking them out with my bug-zooka
oh there’s another one she’s aggressive just you know they’re not like any other
wasp goodbye and these are what I would call you know passive friendly wasps
here those of you know your wasp species very well could chime in in the comment
section and share with all of us again it’s it’s fairly dark now don’t be
fooled by the exposure of the video camera that I’m using which makes it
look well lit we are well past sunset and of course these honey bees have
moved up underneath this brick to protect themselves from heavy dew and of
course the cold temps overnight in the morning they’ll find their way back to
their hives another bald-faced hornet got that one and there’s a bald-faced
hornet if you’ve ever had an encounter with bald-faced hornet so you know
exactly what I’m talking about they come at you like nothing else just look at
her going after all the other wasps that are just there to drink she is not a
friendly wasp when it comes to the drinking hole here yeah got you too! so we’re putting away
everything packing up the GoPro and of course here’s a little wasp on it very
timid you know we’re out here we’re not at their nest so keep in mind wasps when
they’re out of the feeding space are not defending that site so they’re very easy
to approach and here’s my collection for the evening a bald-faced hornet so i’m
gonna take these back and get some close-up photographs of them and again
my least favorite wasp I’ll put a link to the bug-zooka – if you’re interested
in that now here we are this is the following morning actually right at
sunrise it’s cold and it’s rainy and who’s out flying around the Yellow
Jackets Yellow Jackets have a huge advantage over the honeybee they fly in
colder temperatures I’ve seen Yellow Jackets flying around in 38 degrees
Fahrenheit and they are able to gather resources before the honeybees are even
out and about and if you look at the ones that have the abdomens with the
independent dots on left and right going down the back that’s a queen so this
time of year a lot of the Yellowjackets that are going out and about are the
newly hatched Queens that are gonna hope to winner over here because the
temperatures are getting colder and they’ll be the ones that will establish
new colonies in the spring of next year so they are definitely hungry for
carbohydrates thank you for watching this video I hope you got something out
of it and I hope you enjoyed seeing these wasps up close and what sugar
preferences the bees and wasps have thanks again

European wasp picnic | Department of Agriculture and Food WA

European wasp picnic | Department of Agriculture and Food WA


European wasps are a declared pest in WA, and we don’t want them sharing our picnics here. They’re black and yellow bee-shaped insects
– and look for the black antennae. European wasps are insect predators and scavengers. They’re unique among wasps because they’re
attracted to sweet foods and proteins, as seen here with this one tearing of a chunk of meat, see the black feelers. In area of the world where they’ve established,
including the eastern states of Australia, you have to watch your food and drinks at
outdoor events such as picnics, BBQ’s or even just feeding your pets outside. Here in WA, we’ve been battling this wasp for 40 years since the 1st nest turned up in 1977. If they ever established here, quite possibly,
outdoor events like this could be a thing of the past. If you ever notice wasps with black feelers
like this, or wasps going for meat products, please call the Department of Agriculture and Food. They’re the world’s worst social wasp
pest, and we do not want them here

This Is Not A Bee

This Is Not A Bee


Hi, this is Kate fom MinuteEarth. Close your eyes…no seriously, close your
eyes, and imagine a bee. Now open your eyes. You probably imagined something with yellow
and black stripes, like a honeybee. But bee-lieve it or not, most bees aren’t
yellow-and-black striped. And what’s even more confusing is that there
are lots of stripey “bees” that are not actually bees. They’re flies, wasps, and even moths, yet
they look so much like our idea of a bee that we’re constantly getting fooled. But we’re not actually the ones they’re
out to bee-devil. Many insects that can defend themselves have
bright patterns that teach predators to keep their distance. Say two hypothetical stinging species have
different warning colorations; a predator must sample lots of individuals of each before
learning that both patterns yield un-happy meals. Yet if the two species look similar, far fewer
of each kind will get chomped before the predator learns to avoid that pattern. So stinging species, like bees and wasps,
often end up converging on a single appearance. Once predators learn that yellow-and-black
striped prey aren’t worth the risk, cheaters creep into the system. Neither flies nor moths have stingers for
defense, but simply looking like an insect that does provides pretty much the same protection. So is that insect a bee or not a bee? If it just stung you, it’s a bee or a wasp. Along with stingers, both have short, elbow-shaped
antennae and four wings – although those can be hard to see; bees are the super-hairy ones,
while wasps are mostly bald. On the non-stinging side, if it has two wings
and looks like it’s wearing giant goggles, it’s a fly. If it has long feathery antennae, it’s probably
a moth. If you can get beyond the fear of getting
stung and begin to appreciate their differences, you may find that beauty is in the eye of
the bee-holder, or the not-a-bee holder. Like bees, we humans are also hairy – and
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of the Executive Razor with a tube of Dr. Carver’s Shave Butter for only $5 with free
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