How to make a wasp trap from an energy drink


Here’s a
wasp trap
that I bought spiders, a moth but no wasps Here’s a better way first you need an empty can fill 1/3 with juice slide tab so that it partially covers the opening let wasps in but keep them from flying back out set outside and wait let’s see what we’ve caught

Protect Small Honeybee colonies from Robbing and predators Wasp VS Wasp?


okay so here we are on September 4th so it’s very late in the season and what you’re looking at is a box it’s the bottom box of a flow hive and we have a swarm in it very late in the season they’re gonna need every edge we can give them and we’re gonna have to feed these bees one of the things I want you to notice when we’re trying to help out the honey bees is first of all look at this wide entrance this landing board now this hive the bottom board is screened so there’s plenty of ventilation here but we want to give them another edge and that’s giving them a smaller area to defend the culprits of course are robbing bees and the notorious Yellowjackets very simple thing this is regular window screen and I just cut equal lengths of it and tripled it over here and we’re gonna fold it into a little V and just hand push it into this little opening now the flow hive bottom boards do not have the standard size entrance reducer openings they’re a little smaller so we’re just going to loose fit this in there and wasps for example the Yellowjackets can’t pull it out the only thing that’s going to move this would be a mouse or something trying to get in and we’re not worried about that and if it were moved we would know that there’s a mouse around trying to get into our colony here but what we’re trying to cut down on is the amount of effort that they have to put out to defend the colony and of course limit the access zone for the Yellowjackets which sometimes sneaked in on the far edges to either side it’s a small colony the swarm I suspect was about 3 or 4 pounds not huge but not terribly small I think their chances are really good because we’re still going into a pretty strong nectar flow here with the goldenrod the asters they’re getting pollen from a number of sources including sunflowers and this is a simple thing so we’re closing it in without shutting down ventilation we want them to stay cool today is 88 degrees Fahrenheit so now we’ve got about a four inch opening that they can very easily defend and they inspect the beads that are coming in from the field here and this is just a close-up to show you that our guards are doing their job pretty easily notice them grabbing and inspecting every bee that comes in this is a pretty good behavior for a newly captured and hived swarm so I’m pretty pleased with them I had no problems we have Acorn pre-waxed frames inside some have drawn comb if you want to keep your swarm from taking off put a frame of brood in there and they will not leave those developing brood and it gives them a good kick off they’re kind of have their work cut out for them here as we’re gonna run out of resources within the next eight to ten weeks and we’ll talk a little more about the pollen resources in the area but I’m also doing things to other beehives that I have in my apiary and I want to show you some of the landing board and entry differences and what we’re doing about Yellowjackets in the apiary you can hear my chickens in the background here they roam freely through the apiary and they collect bugs all day long and of course this hive is situated in the shade so that’s going to help them out too the blue spruce which is on our right here as we’re looking at the scene is where the swarm congregated and we clipped the branch off and then I put it right on top of the hive this is one of those beesmart design ventilated tops also which vents without allowing other insects to get in like the Yellow Jackets and even the bees can’t come in through the top and now we’re looking at the whole width of the board and the activity is pretty good so it’s good to see them already bringing in pollen which is interesting to me consider they really don’t have any place to put it unless they’re drawing out comb in record time now we’re looking at another standard Langstroth hive this is the landing board and we have not restricted the entrance that’s because there’s an abundance of bees this is an extremely strong colony of bees and they’re more than capable of defending their entrance from the full length of their landing board and there’s something you should notice they are doing deck washing here so if you look at the bees on the leading edge of the landing board they’re all kind of moving forward and going backwards they are licking every inch of the surface of that landing board now to the left you can see that they’re lined up like aircrafts and they’re flapping their wings as much as they can if you could smell it if you were in front of this hive you would notice that it is just heavy with nectar the honey is being dehydrated inside all of the colonies they’re bringing on about 2 to 3 pounds per day and hive numbers are great the health of the bees is fantastic and again you can see the abdomens in the foreground here of those that are doing the deck washing maneuver and you can just listen to it the air movement here is substantial right in front of the hive they really do a fantastic job of ventilating and again this is just a standard Langstroth hive design and notice how big the opening is here where we would normally put an entry reducer and real of course install that later on in the year when their numbers get down in the temperatures drop now we do see some of the drones moving around now we’re at the landing board of the flow hive 2 notice that it has a much smaller entrance we can’t fit standard entry reducers here but also notice that it has an aluminum bottom board cover so it is a ventilated bottom board and we have that plastic tray inside where we can do varroa counts varroa this year are extremely low we’ve not treated I’ve only been able to find one or two four row up per colony so they’re doing a fantastic job of keeping those under control on their own again we’re just showing a nice strong colony they don’t need to have their entrance reduced any more and now we’re looking at another flow hive this is the full size flow hive standard not the flow hive 2- and notice that I did restrict their entrance now we have wooden shims stuck in here and that’s because the bottom board of this colony of this hive is screened so they have plenty of ventilation inside we can pull out the insert and increase ventilation or we can push the insert back in from the back and reduce air circulation as needed so if you may recall if you’ve been watching my other videos these are the colonies that had the new Queen’s installed now this looks like a cast-off box but this is my ongoing experiment in my apiary I’m repurposing old bee boxes that I’ve had and you notice they have the vent holes and this is what I’m culturing in the bee yard this is a paper wasp so I decided early in the year since paper wasps don’t attack or harass the honeybees and I’ve never seen a bee hive being robbed by paper wasps I’ve also seen paper wasps driving off Yellow Jackets so it occurred to me if we install a paper wasp nest intentionally in the apiary then we would displace Yellowjackets and we could use wasps to repel other wasps so the beneficial wasps like these paper wasps wish you a terrific job in pest control are actually being raised by me right here in the apiary and I’m going to show you what their nest looks like here in a second but since they have no impact on the honeybees but do displace Yellowjackets my ongoing experiment is to see if increasing the numbers of paper wasps and providing them with habitat in close proximity to my honeybees would help reduce the numbers of the Yellowjackets and so far that has been working we have Yellowjackets everywhere in the environment this time of year and their numbers are extremely small here in my bee yard so let’s open it up I want you to see what they look like and just like managing bees you just move slowly I’m not smoking them I’m just gonna move slow and deliberate and show you what they’re like here I also want you to notice as they come flying out here listen to how quiet their wings are now they’re actually considering that I’m opening their nest and exposing them they really are not that defensive I am protected with a bee suit I’m wearing a ventilated bee suit because it is so hot today but I’m only wearing surgical gloves and I want to show you this nest they do have capped brood that’s what you see the white cottony looking pieces around the perimeter and there are a couple in the middle of the field here we’ll get you in closer so you can take a look and you can see that summer in the process of hatching we’re coming to the end of their hatching season actually so eventually the last batch that grows here we’ll all be queens and then they will go into the next season after wintering over in solitary locations around the environment so we’re just going to you put them back here again listen to them they don’t sound angry at all they’re very laid-back that doesn’t mean you can’t be stung by them you certainly can this is my experiment that I wanted to share with you and that is that I’m keeping them in the middle of my apiary they have had zero impact on the bees the bees don’t seem to pay attention to them they don’t pay attention to the bees they are not competing with the same they’re not competing for the same resources that the bees do although they do get some nectar they’re mostly pest control they do get some pollen but mostly their protein comes from other insects that they are feeding to they’re developing brood so I think having paper wasps like these in the bee yard is a very interesting method for kind of having a wasp versus wasp situation so that the Yellowjackets don’t have free reign I would never manage Yellowjackets like this they would just boil out and sting you anyone who’s had encounters with Yellowjackets knows that they’re extremely defensive I am within a foot of these guys and they are of course very much on alert but they don’t really consider me personally to be a threat so they didn’t really attack get getting you in closer here get a nice look at them I appreciate your comments down below if you have ever seen paper wasps used to displace Yellowjackets I’d like to know more about that from your personal experiences and I can say that this seems to be working out really well now listen to the difference in wing frequency that’s a yellowjacket flying by me and the paper wants just don’t tolerate it now we also have a large paper wasps nest inside my be shed and I go in and out of it and they don’t pay any attention to me at all I also have them in the eaves on either side of my bee shed again to prevent Yellowjackets from moving in so if I have to have wasps around I would say these paper wasps are at the top of my list for those that are passive towards people yet not passive towards other wasps and species now of course we’re out on the golden rod here and there’s another wasp he is not a great pollinator obviously they don’t have the fur that the bees have there none of those split ends that collect the pollen but this loss is actively getting nectar so not every wasp is a yellowjacket keep that in mind and let me know your thoughts thanks for watching

Q&A – Are the wasps on my corn beneficial?

Q&A – Are the wasps on my corn beneficial?


I’ve seen wasp on my corn more than usual this year, are they harmful or
beneficial? And does the dry spell this year have anything to do with their presence? And this is from Mister Mike in
Ringgold, Georgia. So thanks for watching, Mister Mike, Ringgold, Georgia, and obviously they had a dry spell. We didn’t
have too much of a dry spell this May. – We’ve not had a dry spell, but wasps are
beneficial. I would say they would be a beneficial. They would attack a lot of caterpillars and things like that.
I don’t know whether the dry spell has any effect on the number of wasps that are there. It might just indicate there’s
something for them to predate upon. They’re predators and so take care of those wasps. Don’t get up too close and
personal with them. They may take it wrong. – Yeah, that’s right. Don’t start swatting
or things like that. – Yeah, don’t start swatting the wasp or anything
like that, but I certainly would be good to have, wasps are beneficial about any crop. – I think they’re only there to help. They’re
beneficial.

What If You Were Stung By The Most Painful Bee?


Have you ever come upon a small bee or wasp
and it scared you out of your mind?! It might feel silly to be afraid of such a
small insect, however your instincts are right on track… Sometimes the smallest little bugs are some
of the most dangerous! And that can include the bees and wasps that
are in your backyard right now! When you hear buzzing coming from a nearby
tree, you might immediately take notice. We really love honey, but nobody likes a bee
sting. While a simple bee sting from a honeybee is
unlikely to cause much harm, some people are allergic to a specific chemical in the bee
venom. They can have severe reactions to bee venom
causing them to go into anaphylactic shock that causes swelling and difficulty breathing. Luckily a quick dose of epinephrine through
an EpiPen can quickly counteract the bee venom… But if the person can’t get that dose they
could possibly die. But there are bees and wasps that are dangerous
even to those without a bee venom allergy. First off there’s the hybrid honey bee called
the Africanized honey bee. These bees are an invasive species that take
over local honey bee hives. These bees are more aggressive than your average
honey bee. If they perceive a threat to their home, like
a human accidentally disturbing the hive, the bees go into hyper defensive mode. They can swarm a person in cloud up to 60
thousand bees strong, stinging the victim thousands of times. The stings from these thousands of bees can
cause tissues and body functions to breakdown almost immediately. People have been known to suffer cardiac arrest
and die almost instantly from these bee swarms! If you see a hive, stay clear, and notify
animal control to take care of it. But even those bees are no match for the Giant
Asian Hornet. These guys are up to 2 inches in length and
eat bees for breakfast, literally. They are carnivorous species of hornet and
contain a neurotoxin that shuts down their prey’s nervous system. They are also prone to hyper defensiveness. If a person gets stung by even one of these
Hornets, they can go into anaphylactic shock and die. The deadliest of all though, is the Vespa
luctuosa, a species of wasp found only in the Philippines. It has the most toxic venom of any bee or
wasp and only a couple insects in the whole world are known to be more toxic. A single bite from this little wasp is extremely
painful and can lead to convulsions, your skin turning blue, and even death. Luckily for us they rarely build their hives
around humans so unless you’re walking through the Filipino wilderness you’re not likely
to meet one. Whether you’re allergic to bees or not though,
be careful. Some of them might be more dangerous than
you think so it’s always best to keep your distance and not take any chances. Even if you get a honey craving and see a
hive – under no circumstances should you disturb them. Leave it to the pros and both you and the
bees will be much happier. Thanks for watching and don’t forget to
subscribe for lots more Fuzzy and Nutz.

Man Trying to Kill Wasps Accidentally Starts Massive Fire


It was the largest fire recorded in California history. Now we know it was all started by accident, by one man who was just trying to seal off a wasp nest. Jim Murray explains what happened. It was the largest recorded wildfire in California history. Now a just released investigation reveals it was started by a rancher and it was a total accident. Investigators say it started when the rancher came upon a nest of wasps buried underground. Because he’s allergic to their stings, he took a metal stake and pounded it into the ground, hoping to seal off the nest. Unfortunately a single spark flew up and ignited dry grass on his property. It happened on this ranch three hours north of San Francisco. And here is the rancher, his name is Glenn Kile. He told The New York Times, “I smelled smoke, I turned around, and there it was. There was nothing I could do. Mother nature, you have no control.” What followed last July was a total conflagration, the historic fire, known as the Ranch Fire. 150 homes were destroyed, more than 400,000 acres went up in smoke, half the size of Rhode Island. A firefighter was killed when a tree fell on him. In the report released this week by Cal Fire, Glenn Kile was said to be responsible for the fire, but not negligent. In other words he made an innocent mistake. California Fire Information Officer, Richard Cordoba, showed Inside Edition how hammering a stake can create sparks. The connection that you hit and a right angle, it could cause a spark, just like a match. (intense music)

How to use Alpine Yellow Jacket Wasp Bait Stations

How to use Alpine Yellow Jacket Wasp Bait Stations


An easy way to kill Yellow Jacket Wasps around
your home or business is by using a bait station. This is a great method to use the nest can’t
be located for a direct drench treatment. We first recommend testing a few types of
bait before using the stations. Recommended food baits include raw chicken pieces, raw
fish, canned tuna, or cat food. Raw chicken pieces or tuna tend to work the best. Also
test using a sweet bait like jelly. Whatever bait the wasps go for, this will be the bait
to use in your stations. The second step is mixing the bait you have
chosen with an insecticide labeled for Yellow Jacket Wasps. You only need a small amount
insecticide for the bait to be effective. Mix a quarter teaspoon of insecticide per
12 ounces of bait thoroughly in the station. The third step is to hang the stations outside
your home five to six feet off the ground. Space the stations about 50 feet apart to
cover as much of your property as possible. Keep the stations out of reach of children,
but in areas where the wasps can access them. A good place to hang the stations are on tree
limbs. The fourth and final step is to check the
bait stations every few days to see if the bait has been consumed or if the the bait
is rancid. Replace the bait as needed until the yellow jacket population is under control. And it’s that easy with the expert help
from Do My Own Pest Control dot com! Subscribe to our channel for more DIY and
product videos!

Killer wasps leave dozens dead in China

Killer wasps leave dozens dead in China


Wasps have killed 19 people in northwest China
– with nearly 600 severely injured. This hospital in Hanzhong City has treated
87 victims – 8 have died and four are in a critical condition. Victims here described being chased and stung
hundred of times. “These wasps surrounded me and I could not
stand it, so I used basket to cover my head and that’s how I saved myself.” The insect’s highly toxic stings can lead
to anaphylactic shock and renal failure. Officials have urged people to seek medical
help if they’ve been stung more than 10 times.

Animals Galore! Episode 5: European Paper Wasp

Animals Galore! Episode 5: European Paper Wasp


Salutations, my friends! I’m Luke Fleming.
On this episode of Animals Galore, we will learn about the first invertebrate
featured on this show; The infamous European paper wasp. This
particular wasp is named Pablo. He has been captured, as in America, he is a
harmful invasive species. These wasps are social insects, ruled by a queen that can
live for up to 12 months! They make their nests out of a paper pulp created when
they chew wood. The nests can reach a diameter of six to eight inches. Unlike
the more aggressive hornets and yellowjackets, paper wasps generally only
attack when they feel their nest is threatened. True or False: Wasps can only sting once. The answer is false. If you said true,
you’re probably thinking of bees. Wasps can sting multiple times, which is why
many people happen to despise them.