How do you get a UTI (urinary tract infection)?

How do you get a UTI (urinary tract infection)?


Urinary tract infections are one very troublesome
complication of an obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia that can cause patients significant
symptoms. There are two main ways in which BPH cause urinary infections. Firstly, the
obstructing urine may inhibit complete emptying of the bladder such that a post void residual
urine is left within the bladder. This urine can become stagnant and undergo secondary
and bacterial infection leading to urinary tract infection with symptoms of cystitis.
The second mechanism by which benign prostatic hyperplasia can predispose to urinary tract
infections is that to overcome the obstructing prostate, a bladder needs to increase its
pressure: the force with which it exerts to pass urine. This increased pressure against
an obstructing prostate can force urine into the prostatic ducts. This urine sitting within
prosthetic ducts can cause a chemical inflammation which again can predispose to bacterial infection
leading to symptoms of a urinary tract infection such as cystitis and indeed prostatitis.

Urinary Tract Infection In Women | Causes & Treatment

Urinary Tract Infection In Women | Causes & Treatment


Feminine health and hygiene issues are often considered uncomfortable to talk about but we at Glamrs want to open up the conversation. One of the topics being, Urinary Tract Infections or UTI’s. Have you heard about UTI’s, but aren’t sure exactly what they are and how to prevent them? We’re here to help you understand how they occur and how they can be easily avoided, to make sure you’re informed, healthy and confident! A UTI is a type of infection that can affect any part of your urinary system. Including your kidneys, ureters, bladder or urethra. A UTI occurs when fecal bacteria from your large intestine enters your urethra, the tube that carries urine from your bladder to outside your body. Once it enters your urethra, it can travel up to your bladder and cause an infection. If left untreated this infection could travel even further up to your kidneys and result in more severe symptoms. Unfortunately, women are more prone to UTI’s than men because of our anatomy. Our urethras are much shorter than men which makes it easy for bacteria to travel up to our bladder easily. UTI’s can also be caused by sexual activity, improper hygiene or menopause. We are also more prone to the infection while pregnant. A UTI is accompanied by symptoms like a strong and frequent urge to urinate without actually being able to pass much. And an extreme burning pain when you urinate as well. Another symptom is urine that is cloudy or contains blood. If you experience these symptoms, see a doctor immediately! You will be made to give a urine sample to test and then can be easily cured in just 2-3 days with antibiotics. Although it’s frustrating that women are so easily prone to UTI’s, it’s also very simple to prevent them by incorporating these quick tips into your daily life. Drink lots of water and liquids throughout the day to stay hydrated and cleanse your urinary system. Urinate before and after sex as it will flush out any bacteria that may have entered your system. Make sure you’re pushing bacteria away from your urethra by wiping yourself from front to back in the bathroom. Scented feminine hygiene products like washes and wipes might make you feel like you’re fresher down there but they might irritate you instead. Cranberry juice doesn’t cure UTI’s but prevents it by stopping bacteria from traveling in your system, so drink up! Above all make sure to maintain proper hygiene and keep yourself clean. UTI’s often recur so if you have experienced one in the past be extra cautious! Urinary Tract Infections are a pain, literally! But they are also extremely easy to avoid. So we hope you find these tips helpful and that this information arms you with the knowledge you need to feel comfortable, safe and to openly talk about female health issues. Until next time, stay tuned and stay Glamrs.

How Do Insects Poop?

How Do Insects Poop?


The crapper. John. Dunny. Latrine. Loo. Porcelain
throne. Potty. There are more than one hundred words for toilet, but did you know that more
people have cellphones than a place to go poo? Hey there science fans! Dr. Kiki from This
Week in Science here for DNews. A study in the Public Library of Science journal
PLoS One this week investigated the sanitation habits of Lasius niger, otherwise called black
garden ants. On observing colonies of the ants in the laboratory, the researchers noticed
what looked like dark patches in the corners. To see whether the patches were indoor lavatories,
they fed the ants colored food. The result is hard to deny… the ants dedicate special
areas within their homes for defecation. But, why would ants use a toilet when the
whole world could be their bathroom? Humans and other animals tend to separate
the places where they eat and socialize from the places where they defecate. The reason
for this is thought to be mainly for sanitation. Excrement, feces, what you might call poop,
has the potential to harbor pathogenic bacteria and parasites. Human feces is known to contain
E. coli, which causes disease. Highly populated areas with poor or no sanitation often suffer
from devastating water-borne diseases because people live too close to waterways, and excrement
gets into the drinking water supply. So, good health and survival depend on the drive to
not poop where you eat. Social insects, like ants, have been observed
in many studies removing waste materials from their nests. And, like humans, it’s thought
to keep things clean, and provide for the health of the colony. Honey bees take their defecation outside,
and like to poop as they fly. Bee larvae don’t actually poop until they take their first
flight, letting the waste build up inside of them until they become adult bees and are
old enough to venture outside alone. Adult cockroaches collect poop from their
nests and dump it outside. But, there are wood-boring beetles who just fill old, unused
tunnels with their bodily refuse. In this study the ants continued to remove
other solid waste to the outside, adding strength to the conclusion that these patches were
actually toilets. However, the ants did not seem to avoid the toilet area, so the researchers
wondered whether the indoor toilets might serve some additional beneficial purpose,
like providing healthful bacteria to young ants.
Leaf-cutter ants fertilize their gardens with their poop. Termites use their fecal matter
to build their homes. And, some ants use poo to not only mark their territories, but also
identify themselves as part of the group by wiping it on walls and themselves. Then there are insects like the dung beetle
who need the poop from herbivorous and omnivorous animals to survive. They are attracted to
and collect the poop from large creatures for use as food and a place to raise their
young. Although, at least one species lays its eggs on the mother’s own poop. If you are wondering after all this talk about
poop, whether insects like ants pee, the answer is that they do a little of both every time
they defecate. What we think of as pee, is our body’s way to get rid of excess water,
salts, and urea, which is liquid nitrogen waste. Insects don’t have a lot of excess water
remaining from their metabolic functions to excrete, and tend to produce an insoluble
solid called uric acid that gets mixed into the digestive waste via the Malphigian tubules
and pooped out the anus as a substance called frass. It’s not really known whether by
not making liquid pee insects are conserving water, or if turning it into a solid helps
with weight regulation since a water containing bladder would be big and heavy to carry around. And, if you want to know about the weirdest
not pee out there, woodlice, which are not insects but crustaceans, get rid of excess
nitrogen in a puff of ammonia gas through their exoskeleton. Anything else you wanna know about insect
bathroom habits?