Can A Yeast Infection Turn Into A Urinary Tract Infection If Left Untreated?

Can A Yeast Infection Turn Into A Urinary Tract Infection If Left Untreated?


Good day, Eric Bakker again, naturopath, with
another frequently asked question for Candida Crusher. Can a yeast infection turn into a urinary
tract infection if left untreated? Well, yeast infections can predispose you
to many different types of infections. They, in turn, are there because of poor or compromised
immunity and, in turn, can further compromise your lowered immunity and predispose you to
a UTI or urinary tract infection. Urinary tract infections are common for certain
types of people. Elderly women, I find, have more, but many women suffer from recurring
UTIs as well, particularly younger women who often have these. UTIS can come about through
increased sexual activity, but also infrequent emptying or bladder issues. Lowered immunity
or compromised immunity is a key reason why people would have a UTI. So drinking plenty
of water is a clever idea and boosting immunity up. Coming back to that question again, can a
UTI be there because of a yeast infection? It can be because of the predisposing factor,
but yeast infections don’t generally cause UTIs as such, but they can develop out of
yeast infections. So basically the smart thing to do if you
have got a UTI is to improve your immune health and your urinary health and I’ll be covering
more details in further FAQs on UTIs to give you some very good ideas on how you can overcome
a urinary tract infection. These are things that you can get on top of. So I hope that answers your question in a
roundabout way. Thank you.

How do you get a UTI (urinary tract infection)?

How do you get a UTI (urinary tract infection)?


Urinary tract infections are one very troublesome
complication of an obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia that can cause patients significant
symptoms. There are two main ways in which BPH cause urinary infections. Firstly, the
obstructing urine may inhibit complete emptying of the bladder such that a post void residual
urine is left within the bladder. This urine can become stagnant and undergo secondary
and bacterial infection leading to urinary tract infection with symptoms of cystitis.
The second mechanism by which benign prostatic hyperplasia can predispose to urinary tract
infections is that to overcome the obstructing prostate, a bladder needs to increase its
pressure: the force with which it exerts to pass urine. This increased pressure against
an obstructing prostate can force urine into the prostatic ducts. This urine sitting within
prosthetic ducts can cause a chemical inflammation which again can predispose to bacterial infection
leading to symptoms of a urinary tract infection such as cystitis and indeed prostatitis.

Urinary Tract Infections – 5

Urinary Tract Infections – 5


Op. Gotta pee. (door closing) (zipper unzipping) There are three things I wanna tell you about urine. (intro: slam and discreet cough) Lesson one, there is a system responsible for discharging urine. It does not include the vagina. Urine is produced in the kidneys, it comes
down two tubes called the ureters, it’s held in the bladder and then exits through
the urethra in a hole called the meatus. Most meatuses are located here in the vulva
in between the vagina and the clitoris and here on the penis at the glans or head. And then because no body is the same, we’ve got meatuses that are sometimes located here and here and here and here. Note, none of these holes are the vagina. Many people think that vaginas are the
exit point for urine, but they’re not. Not typically anyway. So why do people think that urine leaves the body via the vag? Perhaps they weren’t taught, or didn’t learn. Perhaps they think that the vagina is
the opposite of the penis and therefore since urine comes out of the penis then
it must come out of the vagina. Or maybe because they sit down on the toilet, urinate, and it feels like it’s coming out of their vagina. Lesson two, there aren’t usually germs in the urinary tract. Germs do attack the urinary tract by going
through the meatus up the urethra. This is commonly referred to as a urinary tract infection, or a UTI. Some people call it the “Honeymoon Disease”. Why do they call it that? Because when a newlywed couple is getting
sloppy, there are bodily fluids everywhere that transmit the bacteria from the anus to the vagina. Now you’ve just been told. Ok. It’s incredibly painful. You’ll feel the urge to pee, you’ll go to the bathroom
and nothing will come out except maybe a trickle. This sensation will persist,
minutes later the same process again. Then you add feeling feverish, nauseous, achy…. If you finally do get anything out of your
system, it’s cloudy and pungent smelling. Oh, and it burns. So you’re ready to get help. When you do, the doctor might say something like “You’ve got a urinary tract infection,
here’s a prescription for antibiotics. Take these and you’ll feel better soon”. And you might reply, “Oh no, I don’t want to put
antibiotics in my system, no unnecessary things here. I don’t want to create a giant superbug
that’s going to be drug resistant”. And the doctor might say, “If you don’t do
what I recommend, you’ll probably be crawling back in here tomorrow much worse.” And you might take the prescription, surrendering to the excruciating, inflamed irritation between your legs. Okay, so a few hours later,
you go to the bathroom again, and you think it’s going to be this agonizing pain but it’s not, so even though the physical issue isn’t there you’re still scrambling to figure out how
to prevent it from ever happening again. I can help some of you with this, and for others, hopefully prevent it from ever happening, because most of the bacteria is getting into
your urethra from your body’s own system, the anus, wiping back to front, poor hygiene,
and sloppy sex. Let’s go back to anatomy. This body…. Here you have the meatus. This is the anus. On this body, the meatus is here. the anus is some place back here, so if bacteria were to travel, it’d have to go
around the scrotum and then the length of the shaft, whereas here you’ve got about an inch. Making this body much more susceptible to infection
because the distance is shorter and easier to travel. Lesson three: wipe front to back,
pee before and after having sex, practice good hygiene by washing your genitals
and wearing breathable clothing. Where’s my dildo? When it comes to having sex, make
sure that if you’re the receptive partner, you’re the one putting the penetrative
object inside your body, so take it like this and make sure that it
finds the right orifice, because otherwise this person could be boinking around and accidentally hit your perineum or the anus
that’s covered in E. Coli or other bacteria. Bring that right up the vagina, which you
already know is so close to the meatus that we think we pee out of it. If you do wanna play anally, make sure
that you wash with soap and water whatever object you’ve put inside the anus
before you carry it over to the vagina. All clean! (outro music)

3 Simple Home Remedies To TREAT URINARY TRACT INFECTION (UTI) In Women

3 Simple Home Remedies To TREAT URINARY TRACT INFECTION (UTI) In Women


Hello and welcome, In this video we are going
to talk about urinary tract infection. UTI is a painful infection that often is accompanied
by a burning sensation during urination and an urge to urinate often. This occurs most commonly in women.
Lets take a look at some simple remedies that you can try at home. Take a glass of water. And add about one tea spoon of baking soda to this Stir this well, and drink this first thing in the morning.
This helps in reducing the acidic nature of your urine. Take some water, and add one table spoon parsley to this.
Boil this solution for about 6 to 10 minutes. Strain this and let it cool down and store it in your refrigerator.Drink this every day till the bacteria is washed out from your system. Take a glass of water and add a tea spoon of celery seeds also known as ajwain. Boil this solution for about 10 minutes and let it cool down and drink it. This will give you instant relief alternatively you can have 3 glass of cranberry juice everyday preferably without sugar.
Hope these remedies have helped you, for more such amazing video do not forget to like the
video and subscribe to Stlyecraze.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) – Home Remedies


Among the few infections that do not surface in the initial stages… is urinary tract infection. It is caused by germs, particularly bacteria. Women are more susceptible to it because they have a shorter urinary tract. UTIs are usually not serious, especially when treated in time. However, they could be a source of great discomfort
and embarrassment because of severe symptoms like: burning sensation during urination Cloudy and smelly urine The urge to urinate even when after the bladder is emptied and pressure in the lower abdomen and back. Though poor hygiene and sexual intercourse top the list of UTI causes, Some other factors that could increase the chances of this malady are kidney stones, menopause and enlarged prostate. While drinking 3-4 glasses of unsweetened cranberry juice
can be beneficial in treating this infection,
there are some other home remedies that you need to look. Take a glass of water. And mix 2 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in it and drink this solution. You can also add lemon juice and sweeten it with a little honey. Apple cider vinegar inhibits the growth of bacteria that cause UTIs. Another home remedy that you can try. Take a cup of water. Add 1 teaspoon of Indian gooseberry or amla powder to it and 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder. Boil the solution until half the water evaporates And drink the residue 3 times a day for up to 3-5 days. Tips to help you deal with UTI. Include vitamin C rich foods in your diet, and avoid sugary foods and beverages. Increase your water intake. And you may also drink tender coconut water
to relieve burning sensation during urination. To prevent UTIs, make sure you urinate before and after the intercourse. And do not neglect the urge to go to the bathroom.

Febrile Baby: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) – Pediatrics | Lecturio

Febrile Baby: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) – Pediatrics | Lecturio


Okay, let’s get away from HSV because I really want to focus on bacterial causes of children being sick in the hospital with a fever. The most common by far risk is urinary tract infection and this typically happens between 5 and 10% of the time, perhaps 10% in the first month and 5% after that. Bacteremia is relatively rare, about only 1% of the time, and meningitis is even rarer than that. So, the bacteria that cause these illnesses are very much the same, they’re bacteria that the child is exposed to during the delivery process. Delivery is not a sterile phenomenon as you probably seen if you’ve been at one. So there are risks for mostly fecal organism such asE. colior vaginal organisms such as group B strep especially in GBS positive mothers who are undertreated or untreated.Strep pneumoniaeis not a typical bacteria that kids are _____ at the time of birth but it absolutely can cause sepsis in these children, although it’s much less likely than in an older child. Likewise,Neisseria meningitidisis incredibly rare to get as a result of the birthing process but can rarely happen.Enterococcusis more of a fecal as isKlebsiellaand we’re seeing more and moreStaph aureusin these newborns as we’re seeing more aggressiveStaph aureustypes like MRSA or resistantStaph aureus, we are seeing it now and then and there can sometimes be outbreaks in newborn nurseries. Okay, I’m worried about urinary tract infection because that’s the most common cause of bacterial illness in these children. What do I do? Whenever we get a test, we want to ask “Is it sensitive or specific?” In the case of this, we have 2 ways we can check labs in these kids. We can get a bag or we can get a urine. If a child has a urinary tract infection, the bag is more sensitive. It’s more likely to be positive. If a child does not have a urinary tract infection, the cath is more likely to be negative. It’s more specific. In general, in the United States, we’ve decided that the cath specimen is superior. Now there are some ways you can work around this. If you have time you might bag the child and if the bag is negative then you’re done and then proceed the catheterization if it’s positive but most centers just go straight to catheterization or alternatively if you’re incapable of getting urine any other way, you might do a suprapubic tap. That’s where we insert a needle directly into the bladder through the abdominal wall to get the urine. It’s actually a fairly safe procedure, although how successful it is depends on the experience of the practitioner but in general in the United States we prefer to go to cath or suprapubic tap as opposed to what they recommend in England. The reason we went that way is because there is more and more a feeling that these urinary tract infections are not as serious as we’ve previously suspected. Kids tend to get better and many times it’s not truly a UTI but it’s bacteriuria, a benign shedding of bacteria in the urine. Okay, if we get that urine we’re going to send it for a urinalysis and the urinalysis has several aspects on it that tell us whether the child is likely to have the disease. Remember, the more tests you get you improve your sensitivity and you lose your specificity. So if we look at the individual elements you can see that these all have different amounts of sensitivity and specificity. The one I would call your attention to is nitrites. It’s 98% specific. That means if you have a positive nitrite on your urine dip, it’s very likely that child has a UTI. Overall, the UA is a very sensitive test. It’s 97% sensitive and has a high false positive rate, 30% false positive rate. So if a patient has UTI, it’s almost always positive but it can be positive in normal individuals. Remember those 3 numbers. How do we approach bacteremia? Very ill children may have overwhelming bacteremia or bacterial sepsis and this is more common in infants than it is in older children. Untreated sepsis can lead to shock and death. So we do worry about bacteremia. What’s the likelihood of bacteremia in a very well-appearing patient? It’s very unlikely. True bacteremia is rare and when real may even resolve untreated. Remember, you are probably bacteremic transiently yesterday when you brushed your teeth. Okay, so we need test that can tell us quickly whether a child is at risk for bacteremia so we can distinguish well-appearing children who we should worry about versus those who we shouldn’t and there are several tests out there. There seems to be early evidence that procalcitonin and CRP may in fact be better than the CBC in terms of screening for this but right now most people are still using a high white count. If the white count is above 15 or below 5, we worry a little bit about bacteremia. Coming soon to a theater near you is blood PCR. I suspect this may 1 day replace what we currently use as the goal standard test, which is culture. So right now we’ll get these preliminary tests, a procalcitonin or a CRP or a CBC looking specifically at the white count and if those are normal we feel comfortable saying it’s very unlikely this is a positive blood culture but if they’re abnormal it might be. Hopefully with advent of blood PCR we don’t need to wait for a definitive thing and we can get that blood PCR relatively quickly, typically takes about an hour and a half to get the test done. Okay, what about meningitis? You should send an LP in a baby if they have suspicion for meningitis. This is typically in children under 4 weeks of age and maybe in that 4 to 8-week range depending on whether you use the Philadelphia and Boston criteria as opposed to the Rochester criteria, we only do it if the white cell count is abnormal. So what labs should we send that cerebrospinal fluid for after we’ve obtained it? Well, the first is a cell count. In a patient with meningitis under a month of age, that cell count would be over 21. In a patient with meningitis who’s between 1 and 2 months, it will be over 11. We should send that CSF for glucose and generally the glucose is about 2/3 of the blood glucose. So if it’s less than that, it’s more likely to be meningitis. If you want to think about it, this is not the pathophysiology but you can think about it as if the bacteria are eating glucose and making protein. So if there’s bacterial meningitis, these patients will have a less than 2/3 of their serum glucose in their spinal fluid. Likewise, the protein will be high so if they have meningitis they should have a high protein above about 90. Gram stain is important and if the gram stain is positive, it’s very likely this is bacterial meningitis but remember the false negative rate is high. So it’s one of these things where if you see it you worry but if you don’t see it you don’t necessarily know. Culture is the goal standard and that’s what we’ll wait for but that takes couple of days and so these infants may be hospitalized for a period of time waiting for that culture to come back. However, if you send an enterovirus PCR in that test and it comes back positive which typically happens in the fall and winter months, you’re done. It’s a very accurate test and we will typically discontinue antibiotics and if the child is well send them home but keep in mind enterovirus meningitis can be very severe and sometimes these kids can get quite sick.

Urinary Tract Infection In Women | Causes & Treatment

Urinary Tract Infection In Women | Causes & Treatment


Feminine health and hygiene issues are often considered uncomfortable to talk about but we at Glamrs want to open up the conversation. One of the topics being, Urinary Tract Infections or UTI’s. Have you heard about UTI’s, but aren’t sure exactly what they are and how to prevent them? We’re here to help you understand how they occur and how they can be easily avoided, to make sure you’re informed, healthy and confident! A UTI is a type of infection that can affect any part of your urinary system. Including your kidneys, ureters, bladder or urethra. A UTI occurs when fecal bacteria from your large intestine enters your urethra, the tube that carries urine from your bladder to outside your body. Once it enters your urethra, it can travel up to your bladder and cause an infection. If left untreated this infection could travel even further up to your kidneys and result in more severe symptoms. Unfortunately, women are more prone to UTI’s than men because of our anatomy. Our urethras are much shorter than men which makes it easy for bacteria to travel up to our bladder easily. UTI’s can also be caused by sexual activity, improper hygiene or menopause. We are also more prone to the infection while pregnant. A UTI is accompanied by symptoms like a strong and frequent urge to urinate without actually being able to pass much. And an extreme burning pain when you urinate as well. Another symptom is urine that is cloudy or contains blood. If you experience these symptoms, see a doctor immediately! You will be made to give a urine sample to test and then can be easily cured in just 2-3 days with antibiotics. Although it’s frustrating that women are so easily prone to UTI’s, it’s also very simple to prevent them by incorporating these quick tips into your daily life. Drink lots of water and liquids throughout the day to stay hydrated and cleanse your urinary system. Urinate before and after sex as it will flush out any bacteria that may have entered your system. Make sure you’re pushing bacteria away from your urethra by wiping yourself from front to back in the bathroom. Scented feminine hygiene products like washes and wipes might make you feel like you’re fresher down there but they might irritate you instead. Cranberry juice doesn’t cure UTI’s but prevents it by stopping bacteria from traveling in your system, so drink up! Above all make sure to maintain proper hygiene and keep yourself clean. UTI’s often recur so if you have experienced one in the past be extra cautious! Urinary Tract Infections are a pain, literally! But they are also extremely easy to avoid. So we hope you find these tips helpful and that this information arms you with the knowledge you need to feel comfortable, safe and to openly talk about female health issues. Until next time, stay tuned and stay Glamrs.

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Home Treatments and Natural Remedies

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Home Treatments and Natural Remedies


Urinary Tract Infection UTI Home Treatments
and Natural Remedies Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a very
common health problem. While both men and women get UTIs, women are
more prone to them. A UTI occurs when the bladder and its exit
tubes are infected by bacteria. Common symptoms include a frequent urge to
urinate, passing small quantities of urine, a burning sensation when urinating and change
in urine color. There are many natural remedies that can help
prevent and treat UTIs. 1. Water One of the first things to do when you have
a urinary tract infection is to drink plenty of water. Thatís because drinking water can help flush
away the bacteria that’s causing your infection. How much should you drink? Aim for half of your body weight in ounces
of water, up to 80 ounces (oz) a day. 2. Vitamin C Getting plenty of foods high in vitamin C
is important, because large amounts of vitamin C make urine more acidic. This inhibits the growth of bacteria in your
urinary tract. 3. Heat Inflammation and irritation from UTIs cause
burning, pressure, and pain around your pubic area. Applying a heating pad can help soothe the
area. Keep the heat setting low, donít apply it
directly to the skin, and limit your use to 15 minutes at a time to avoid burns. 4. Diet When you have a UTI, caffeine, alcohol, spicy
food, nicotine, carbonated drinks, and artificial sweeteners can irritate your bladder further. This makes it harder for your body to heal. Focus on healthy foods, such as high-fiber
carbohydrates, which are good for your digestive health. 5. Empty Your Bladder Every time you empty your bladder ó even
if itís just a small amount ó you rid it of some of the bacteria causing the infection. Even though it can be uncomfortable, going
to the bathroom every chance you get is a vital part of recovering. 6. Apple Cider Vinegar Apple cider vinegar is a rich source of enzymes,
potassium and other useful minerals that can prevent the bacteria that cause UTIs from
multiplying or growing. Those suffering from UTIs can use apple cider
vinegar as a natural antibiotic to treat the infection. Add two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
to a glass of water. You can also add lemon juice and sweeten with
honey. Mix it well. Drink this two times a day for a few days. 7. Blueberries Blueberries have bacteria-inhibiting properties
that can help in the treatment of UTIs. The antioxidants present in blueberries are
good for the immune system, and they prevent growth of bacteria that causes UTIs. Including fresh blueberries or juice in your
daily diet is a good way to prevent UTIs. If you like the video, give it a thumbs†up
and share it with your friends! If you want more recipes and tips, subscribe
to the channel!

Septic Shock: Treating Blood Infections, Pneumonia, Urinary Tract Infections

Septic Shock: Treating Blood Infections, Pneumonia, Urinary Tract Infections


Septic shock is the result of an infection
that’s in the blood stream. These can be infections that come from different
sorts of areas. So, in the lungs, it would be called a pneumonia,
or in the urine, a urinary tract infection. And often times, when we get these infections,
our bodies are able to fight them off, and especially if we can get antibiotics and other
therapies, it can kind of turn the course. But sometimes the infection gets worse, and
the shock happens when the body has an abnormal, exaggerated response to the infection. And this can lead to a host of downstream
complications that are primarily related to the inability of the body to deliver oxygenated
blood to your vital organs, and when that happens, the organs can start to shut down,
or go into organ failure. And the key to treating this is to give antibiotics
early, effective antibiotics, to give intravenous fluids to help support blood flow to the organs,
and try to support all the organ function that the patient needs.

Urinary Tract Infection | How To Prevent UTI (2018)

Urinary Tract Infection | How To Prevent UTI (2018)


Urinary tract infections, does cranberry
juice really help? here’s five simple tips that can actually help prevent a UTI the urinary tract infection or UTI for short UTIs are a worldwide global issue with eight billion doctor visits worldwide it’s the number one bacterial infection and women are 20 to 1 men likely to have a UTI so before we start with the tips let’s first answer the question which I’m sure you all want to
know does cranberry juice really help with the UTIs? well I’m afraid not studies have shown it has no benefit whatsoever so I guess
we’ve at least busted that myth okay so first tip yes you should drink
plenty of fluids when you have a UTI because it can help dilute the amount of
bacteria that’s in your bladder and the urethra the urethra is the little tube
that your pee comes out but remember if you’re taking antibiotics you don’t want
to drink excessive amounts of fluids because you want to keep the levels of
antibiotic concentrated in the bladder and urethra so you can kill all those
bad bacteria tip 2, you’ve gone to the bathroom you’ve done your business you
feel amazing right and now you’re about to wipe but you need to make sure that
you wipe from front to back you don’t want to be wiping from back to front
because if you do the bad bacteria that colonises the rectum like E. coli can
get closer to the urethra and put you at higher risk of a UTI tip 3, emptying your
bladder soon after sexual intercourse can help prevent you from getting a UTI especially if you’re used to getting repeated UTIs after intercourse tip
number 4, try to empty your bladder fully when you go for a pee and if you
need to go don’t hold it in so if you’ve got the urge go for a pee tip 5, try
going for a shower instead of a bath as it can help also wear loose cotton
underwear what you want to avoid is wearing tight jeans trousers and
synthetic underwear like nylon so what are the symptoms of a UTI? urgency so having
to go to the bathroom straightaway frequency you pee you think you’ve done
and then you need to go again pain or burning sensation when you pee smelly, cloudy or even blood in your pee feeling tired or unwell and in older
people changes in behavior such as confusion or agitation and that’s the
end of the video I hope my tips help prevent any future UTIs and if you have
any friends or family that will benefit from this video then please help spread
the word I’ve also left more information in the description below about UTIs so
feel free to check it out hey guys thanks for watching this week’s video
make sure to click that like follow or subscribe button now to stay up to date
with new weekly videos E. coli can basically be transferred to your urethra (struggling to pronounce) when you need to go tip 4, try to empty your bladi, bladi? (laughter) bladi bladder that sounded a bit weird (laughter)