Jussie Smollett Indicted & The DOJ Meddles in Roger Stone’s Case | The Daily Show

Jussie Smollett Indicted & The DOJ Meddles in Roger Stone’s Case | The Daily Show


Jussie Smollett, Empire actor
and black Pinocchio. A year ago,
he told an incredible story about being jumped on the street
by two Trump supporters. And now someone
might finally go to jail for that attack. The dramatic new turn
that’s thrust the Jussie Smollett case back
into the spotlight. That’s right. He’s once again
facing charges in Chicago for claiming he was the victim
of a hate crime attack. NEWSMAN: This morning, Smollett
is facing six new charges of disorderly conduct
for lying to police. The move a stunning reversal
after prosecutors dropped all 16 charges
the actor originally faced. In this new indictment,
the special prosecutor’s office says Smollett
made numerous false statements to Chicago police
on multiple occasions, reporting a heinous hate crime that he, in fact,
knew had not occurred. Yes, Jussie Smollett is back
in the headlines, this time for being indicted over reporting
a fake hate crime. And it really sounds bad until you remember
that his plan all along was to get a recurring
story line that doesn’t go away. So he kind of got
what he wanted, you know? This is what he wanted. And look, I know
what Jussie did was wrong. But I won’t lie.
At the same time, I kind of feel bad for him,
all right? Because he gets into trouble now
for calling in fake crimes, but those Permit Pattys who made
those bullshit calls to 911, they live their lives.
They just do their thing. -(cheering and applause)
-In fact, maybe… Maybe that should be
Jussie’s punishment. He should be forced to get
a white lady nickname. That should be it. Yeah? Everywhere he goes,
people will be like, “Well, well, well,
there goes Subway Smollett. There he is.” But let’s move on
to Roger Stone, Trump campaign aide and the Monopoly Man’s
cocaine dealer. This week,
he was about to be sentenced for lying to the FBI
and threatening witnesses. But luckily, he’s got friends
in Oval places. NEWSMAN: Late tonight,
all four federal prosecutors on the Roger Stone case
have quit after the department undercut
their recommended sentence. Just yesterday,
those career prosecutors recommended he get seven
to nine years behind bars. But late tonight,
the DOJ in a filing calling
the initial recommendation excessive and unwarranted just hours
after President Trump tweeted overnight,
blasting the sentence prosecutors
initially recommended as horrible and very unfair. The president deny
he had anything to do with it. Yeah, I thought
it was ridiculous that… No, I didn’t,
because the Justice… I’d be able to do it
if I wanted. I have the absolute right
to do it. Uh, I stay out of things, uh, to a degree
that people wouldn’t believe. “That’s right, folks.
That’s right. “I stay out of things. “I stay out of everything. “Intelligence briefings,
church, Melania’s bedroom. “I stay out of all of it. I stay out. Stay out.” (applause) This is actually crazy,
what happened here. The Justice Department
recommended Roger Stone get seven to nine years
in prison, all right? Trump then tweets that their recommendation
is too harsh, so they then cancel
their recommendation. And then Trump says
he’s totally staying out of it. That’s not what he did.
He’s staying out of it the same way the Kool-Aid Man
stays out of a room. “Did use the door? Oh, no.” (laughter) Because here’s the thing. Trump is acting like
his Twitter account can’t influence
the Justice Department, like they can’t see his tweets. You know,
it’s like someone saying, “I didn’t ask her to marry me. “I just had ‘will you marry me?’
written in the sky. Anybody could have said yes.
It could have been anybody.” And not only was it wrong for Trump to get involved
in his friend’s case, it was also totally unnecessary
because there… If there’s one person who looks
like he can break out of prison on his own, it’s this guy. All right, and finally, you guys remember
how the Titanic crashed? Well, uh, it happened again. A new report claims
the wreck of the Titanic was hit by a submarine
last year, but the U.S. government
kept it a secret. That’s according to
legal documents reviewed by the British newspaper
The Telegraph. It says a $35 million
underwater vehicle hit the Titanic wreckage
in July. It comes ahead of what could be
a landmark court battle over the future
of the wreckage. Yo, this is insane. The Titanic was involved
in another crash? Oh, their Nationwide premiums are totally going
through the roof, man. I’m glad that no one was hurt. ‘Cause how would you explain
that to people? Yeah? It’d just be like, “Brian died in the Titanic. Yeah, this year,
this year, yeah.” Titanic versus submarine
is such a weird story. I mean, technically, though
the Titanic is also a submarine. Yeah, really,
any ship can be a submarine if your captain is shitty
enough, when you think about it. You know what would be crazy
though? Is if getting hit makes
the Titanic un-sink. Like,
that could be a rule, right? If you crash, you go down. If you crash again,
you get to come up. Yeah.
So now it floats up to the top, and then they’re back up
on the surface. Everyone’s like,
“Yeah! We’re alive!” And then the iceberg shows up,
like, “Well, well, who didn’t learn their lesson?”

The Trans Panic Epidemic: The Daily Show

The Trans Panic Epidemic: The Daily Show


So, what is it
that scares so many people about transgender communities? And what’s it like to live
as the focus of that fear? Jessica Williams finds out. WILLIAMS:Iowa’s most famous
for its cornfields,
butter sculptures, and butter
sculptures of cornfields.
Until last summer, when
transgender woman Meagan Taylor
tried to check in to the Drury
Inn in the city of Des Moines.
We sat down with Taylor herself
for an exclusive tell-all.
I could tell when I checked in to the hotel that it was…
it was…Shh. I got this,
real Meagan Taylor.
It was July 12, 2015.You presented your I.D.
to the hotel manager.
Hi. I have a reservation.But she was onto you.Fearing for her life,
she took immediate action.
WOMAN:And that’s when the cops came
and all hell broke loose.
But let’s rewind here.What triggered the cops
to respond?
You pull out a gun,
and then the cops come
and you’re arrested? None of that happened. Well, did you pull out a knife? ♪ ♪ No.Well, did you do drugs?Nothing of the sort. Well, then why the hell
were you arrested? Um, I got arrested because
I was a black transgender woman.Specifically, cops held her
because she didn’t have
a prescription
for her hormone pills.
And this is 2016.What were you doing in Iowa? I was there going to a funeral. -You were there for a funeral?
-Yeah. And did you get to attend
the funeral, -at least? -I didn’t get
to make the funeral at all. How long were you in jail for? I was in jail for eight days. I’m sorry. I… It’s terrible. Take your time.Ugh, I thought it was tough
being a black woman.
But compared
to a black transgender woman,
I might as well be
a white frat dude
at a Dave Matthews concert.Transgender women get arrested
all the time, especially
black transgender women, just by walking down the street
or anything.And by anything,
she means literally anything.
Because of discrimination
and profiling,
at least 47%
of black trans people
will have at some point in
their lives been incarcerated.
Let’s underline, bold, and set
fire to that
(bleep)graphic,because it’s 47%.You think there’d be laws
to correct this.
But instead, this year alone,state legislatures
have introduced
175 anti-trans bills.Many make it legal
to discriminate based solely
on religious beliefs.And then you have
these bathroom bills.
REPORTER:It would fine
and imprison transgender people
who use public restrooms
that don’t match
the gender
on their birth certificate. WILLIAMS:That’s what’s really
triggering this trans panic.
Just listen
to Colorado representative
and Elmer Fudd look-alike
Gordon Klingenschmitt.
Should we fear
the transgender community? Well, they not only want
to be confused about their own identity, but they want the rest of us
to be confused with them. Now they want the government
to join them in that pretense. -They’re making us into liars.
-Wow.Okay. I met
with these so-called liars
to find out
what their evil intentions are.
There’s a notion that
trans people are perpetrators in some way, that we’re sneaking
and trying to trick you for the purposes
of having sex with you. And that’s not the case at all. People just want
to see male and female, like it has to fit in one
of those two boxes, and if it doesn’t,
it makes people uncomfortable. -And it’s surely not a choice.
-That’s all you need to know.Well, not according
to Klingenschmitt, who thinks
that we’re all going to
get attacked in the bathroom.
A man can go into a ladies’ room and assault you
and your little girl.Especially in
our most important bathrooms.
Next time, ladies,
you go out to Olive Garden, watch out who’s gonna be
in the bathroom. There’s no reported incidences
of any trans person ever raping or assaulting anyone
in any bathroom ever. If anything, trans people
are the ones getting assaulted.These people are up against
some bull(bleep).
There must be some small way
I can help them out.
Give me some offensive comments
or questions, and I’ll give you
some good answers that you can use
in your day-to-day life. Why are your feet so small? Oh. You think my feet are small? -You have a (bleep).
-Wow. Whew! Okay, that’s guns a-blazing
on that question. Um, I don’t currently
have a (bleep), so… -How much?
-How much for…? -Sex.
-Oh, (bleep). Uh… -How do you have sex? -So,
are your parents ashamed of you? -What’s the gender mark on your
ID? -When do you tell them that -you’re really a man?
-I don’t know. When it’s appropriate? Do you have cadaver tits? -Don’t tell me what that is.
-What’s your real name? -Yeah. I just want to know.
-Yeah. What’s your name? -Tell us.
-Did you chop it off? Do straight women date you, -or gay women?
-How much would it cost? -(overlapping chatter)
-Do you like to suck (bleep)? -(overlapping chatter)
-What’s your real name? WILLIAMS:The transgender
community is more oppressed
than I could have ever
imagined,
so why does Gordon feel
so threatened?
Have you ever been attacked
by a transgender person? Is that why this is happening? No. Have you ever had a traumatic
experience with a trans person? I wouldn’t call it
traumatic, no. I-I… -Devastating?
-Yeah. No. You haven’t?So why does he feel this way?Dressing like a woman,
and he’s not a woman. WILLIAMS:Wait a second.
This guy’s a preacher, too?
And he thinks what?It’s not just
a psychological disorder. It’s actually a demonic spirit. WILLIAMS:
Okay, so now they’re possessed?
Go on.I would be comfortable talking
about religious freedom, but I’d have to change
into my alter ego if you’re okay with that. You have to change
into your alter ego? Who are you, Lady Gaga?
Go on ahead and change.Okay, hold up.
Is everybody seeing this?
I am actually waiting
for this man to transition
so that he can feel
more comfortable
during our interview.Oh, and also, hey, heads up.I am not judging him
for his personal choice.
Until he took out his phoneto judge others
for their personal choices.
And Deuteronomy 22:5 says, “A woman must not wear
men’s clothing, “nor a man wear women’s clothing for the Lord your God detests
anyone who does this.” I don’t remember that part, -but there is a part
about shellfish… -Mm-hmm. -…or stoning people to death.
-Mm-hmm. Getting tattoos. But what about their sincerely held
religious beliefs? They can go (bleep)
in their (bleep) hand, -because we have separation
of church and state. -Mm. Because we believe
in our constitution. WILLIAMS:Nevertheless,
these bathroom bills
are being passed,and Gordon is doing everything
he can to make it happen.
Get used to the idea of having your women
and children share bathrooms with cross-dressing men who are going to expose
themselves to you. Do you, for whatever reason, associate being transgender
with being a pervert? I mean, that is perversion. It’s people who label themselves as transgender for the purpose
of getting that access to violate the rights of others. Is it fair to say
that because you’re a priest that you’re a pedophile? Well, of course not. Why is it, “of course not.”?
Why? Because some people
are criminals, and some people
are not criminals. Could you take that logic and apply that
to the transgender community? They’re apples and oranges.
I think… By apples and oranges,
do you mean apples and apples?Unfortunately, a lot of people
think like Gordon.
So how can we end
this transphobic epidemic?
Hopefully, they can understand
that we are striving towards becoming a more
authentic version of ourselves, after a lot of soul-searching
and a lot of thought, and sometimes a lot of trauma
and tragedy. Passing these bills is
absolutely going to just add fuel to the fire
and ignite trans panic.Trans panic, panic, panic.WILLIAMS:They’ve existed
since the beginning of time.
They are not
who people think they are.
Girl, you know
we need to elevate that leg. WILLIAMS:
They come out at night.
-Stop! No!-Or during the day
depending on their schedule.
You forgot your hat. WILLIAMS:
They have an appetite.
When they’re hungry.You’re really gonna love
this salad! WILLIAMS:
This summer, get ready for…
the most boring movie everwhere transgender people
cause… transpanic!
(yelling) Lights went out again. WILLIAMS:Even though they’re
just like the rest of us.
What else is on Netflix?

Mariska Hargitay – “I Am Evidence” and America’s Sexual Assault Epidemic | The Daily Show

Mariska Hargitay – “I Am Evidence” and America’s Sexual Assault Epidemic | The Daily Show


Please welcome Mariska Hargitay. (cheering and applause) Welcome to the show. Thank you.
I am very happy to be here. This is so much fun having you,
because, I mean, like, Law & Order
I’ve watched my whole life, and I watched your show
in South Africa. -It’s big. And I always wonder,
-Hmm. like, when you’ve played
a character like Olivia Benson
for as long as you have, do you sometimes feel
like you, like, know the law? Like, do you ever feel
like you are in law enforcement -sometimes?
-No, I… Absolutely, I feel like I do. And I’m also somebody
that jumps in and gets confused about what my real job is.
(laughs) There-there have been times
in my life where I’ve seen something
on the street and I jump in. Like, “Hey! Put that down! Get in here! Come here.” And I’ve done it so many times. I’m like, “Mariska,
you need to calm down.” -Yeah, but I-I feel like you
play your character -Seriously. so convincingly that if you
did that to me in real life, I’d be like, “Yeah,
it’s Law & Order.” (cries out) I’d be like, “It’s Law & Order.” No, it’s been fun, you know. This-this…
When you do something -Right.
-for 19 years– I started the show
when I was four– and when you do… -(laughs)
-No, but when you do some… Why is he laughing? That feels weird. I’m gonna be 23.
Anyway, um, I… I, um, when you do something
for this long, -you know, your body
sort of reacts to it. -Right. -Right, right.
-So when I get… When there’s crisis,
I go into crisis mode. I like that, I like that a lot. I go into lieutenant mode. -Go into lieutenant mode.
-I’m not in that mode right now. (both laugh) The, uh, the show is-is
an interesting one because, you know, Law & Order
has so many different spin-offs, but Special Victims Unit is one that connected
with so many people -in a visceral way.
-Yeah. Hmm. Because we were used
to glamorous crimes. You know,
it was always all the murder. It was the this, it was
the swindling, it was the… But Special Victims Unit
tackled something that, like, a lot of people
have experienced, unfortunately. -Hmm. -You know,
the #MeToo movement has exposed how pervasive sexual assault
and harassment have been, and that’s-that’s what your show
has been covering -for so long.
-Mm-hmm. You went through
an interesting experience where people who were victims, uh, and survivors
of sexual assault or harassment reached out to your character, like, they wrote you fan mail -and asked you for help.
-They did. Like, they actually went,
“I need your help.” Did people not know
that your character wasn’t real or-or was it something else? You know, I think that,
for so long, um, survivors have been living
in a culture of, um… of shame and isolation. Uh, when I started the show,
I started… -I’d come off E.R.
-Right. And so when you’re, you know,
getting normal fan mail, you get, “Hi, I love your show.
Can I get an autographed photo?” And… (clears throat) all
of a sudden, when I started SVU, after the show had been airing
for a while, I started getting a very
different kind of fan letter, um, with victims
actually disclosing their stories of abuse. And many for the first time. And in those letters, there always was
the same theme, again, of shame, stigma, and isolation. -Isolation.
-Right. And them saying
“I’ve never told anyone before” and not feeling safe
to tell anyone or feeling scared
that it wouldn’t… they wouldn’t be believed or
it wouldn’t be received right. -Right. -So I think
that they went to this… f-fictionalized character that maybe was the first person that showed empathy
and compassion. And they knew that Olivia was
always for the victim first and felt safe there. And hopefully now
that is indeed changing. Right. And that’s a powerful
connection for people to have with a character and with a…
with-with a show. And it’s something that I think many people
would find overwhelming. I don’t know if I’d be able
to handle that. I don’t know
how I would handle it. But you, you took it
and turned it into something really positive. You started your foundation,
Joyful Heart. What is Joyful Heart all about? Thank you. Well, I… You know, when I started getting these
letters, as you can imagine, I was, um… shocked and wanted to respond
and was so, uh… -It was very painful, receiving
these letters. -Mm-hmm. And I-I didn’t know
how to respond. So I tried to-to educate myself. And, uh, I was so… enraged when I learned about the
statistics of sexual assault, that-that one in three women
and one in six men will be abused
in their lifetime. I mean, this wa…
these were crazy statistics. And I thought, if-if those were
the statistics, uh, one in four women will be
assaulted by her 18th birthday, h-how is it that everybody
wasn’t talking about this? -Right.
-This was an epidemic. So that’s when I started
educating myself. And when I did, um, my research for the role
of-of playing Olivia, besides hanging out…
(clears throat) in police, you know, precincts and
with cops and doing ride-alongs, I also went
through a 40-hour training to become
a rape crisis advocate, -which taught me how to deal
with survivors, -Wow. because I knew I wanted
to play this character, um, in-in a different way, with all of myself and all
of my humanity and empathy and-and femininity. And not in, you know,
a-a female in a man’s world, -and not in a…
in a sort of male way. -Right. Um, you know,
playing this hard-ass, you know, badass detective who, as we all have different sides
of us, also has compassion… -Yes. -empathy and humanity,
as I said. So, um, that’s when
I sort of put a… structure to…
to my anger and started
the Joyful Heart Foundation to help victims reclaim,
you know, their… reclaim their lives, or reclaim
possibility and joy. And then in 2009, I learned about
the rape kit backlog. Right. In 2009, I learned about… Uh, there was a study done
by Human Rights Watch that exposed this… (laughs) unbelievable travesty
in our nation that when a woman
was brave enough and courageous enough to come forward
after being assaulted, and would go through
a four to six-hour… often completely invasive, -and often retraumatizing
examination… -Mm-hmm. And they would do, you know,
a sexual assault evidence, you know, collection kit, and poke them and prod them. And, you know, it’s a
humiliating, painful process. And then we found out that these kits were sitting
on shelves in police storage facilities. And you would assume that
in America, in this country, obviously if the evidence
collection kit was-was taken, -it would be processed.
-Right. And we found
that that wasn’t the case. And I found out
the first case was… Um, the first time I found out
about it was the study done in-in California,
in Los Angeles that there were 12,000,
I think, 669 kits. So, the following year, I went to testify
before Congress, and that’s when I met this amazing badass of a woman named Kym Worthy who was
the Wayne Country Prosecutor… -Right.
-…who was also testifying. And when we met, it was… -We were done.
-You-you… You know, it was a little bit
of a match… -Right.
-…made in heaven. And you’ve been on a journey
ever since. And this documentary, I think,
is in many ways a culmination of that journey, because this story
is illuminating in so many different ways. We learn about these rape kits
that are taken. Uh, we learn about
the experiences of these women who have survived
these horrific incidents. And then we learn
that there are just backlogs. There are kits
that are sitting on shelves, and rapists are walking free
in the streets. Some people may say,
“Okay, that-that’s bad.” But there’s a story
in particular where one woman’s rape was tied
to another woman’s rape… -Yeah.
-…13 years later. Is this a story
that you come across often? Well, you know, the… the rape kit backlog,
which of course, after we found that there were,
you know… This was the same…
the same story in every city. -Right.
-Right? And there are estimated
hundreds of thousands of-of rape kits sitting
in police storage facility, and there are so many reasons
to test these kits. But not testing them clearly
sends a message to survivors, saying, “You don’t matter
and your kit doesn’t matter and your case doesn’t matter,” and it certainly tells
perpetrators, -“Well, it doesn’t matter.
Continue.” -Right. What we learn is that
by putting the DNA in the CODIS, which is the national database,
we kept finding hits, and that there were
so many serial rapists. Kym found, in Detroit,
I think out of 11,000 kids, there were… eight hundred… 879 serial rapists. So in the movie,
which was very, you know, difficult to put together–
this was my first documentary, and we interviewed 14 women,
all with the most… who were
so extraordinarily brave, but with these
compelling stories– and I’ll tell you,
I could have made a documentary -on each one of these woman,
with their stories. -Right. But, you know, a documentary,
how do you tell the story, how do you weave it together? And then…
we found that one of… one of the rapists was indeed
a, um, truck driver -who, uh, had…
hadn’t been apprehended. -Right. And one of the women
was waiting, uh, 11 years… 14 years for the precinct
to call her back. They never did. And in the meantime… he was busy assaulting
other women. -So…
-It’s… yeah, it’s a story -that… that is enraging,
-It’s enraging. it’s frustrating, um,
and at the same time, uplifting, because of what
we see in the documentary. We see the work that
your organization is doing. We see the work that
these women are doing, fighting this process. What can be done, though? Some people go, it’s a backlog, the police department
cannot do anything, -Oh, we can. -but New York City
has done something. -What can be done?
-And I wanted to make this movie because it’s so hard…
hard-hitting. And again, when I found out
about it in 2009, you know,
my head almost exploded. I just remember going,
“This can’t… this cannot be.” -Right.
-It can’t be. This is America. How… It can’t be. And I remember doing
a satellite media tour the following year, and none
of the journalists, nobody knew. They’d go, “Wait, what?” They would stop me and say,
“You’re telling me… “that the woman goes
through this examination and they’re not testing
the kits?” And so… this is an incredibly… You know, how do you measure
sexual assault in this country? How do you measure
how women are being treated? And that’s what I thought–
this is a perfect -sort of microcosm
of how we treat women, -Right. how we treat survivors. And, uh… it’s sort of, like… sort of holds a mirror
up to the country, and says, “This is what we’re doing,
so let’s change it.” The good news is, it’s fixable. The good news is
that Joyful Heart, my foundation
that I founded in 2004, has been… has made
the rape kit backlog our number one
advocacy priority. And so we have made
these six pillars of legislation that we’re trying
to push through, and we are changing legislation
in every state. Um, New York doesn’t have
a backlog. Thank God. And, um, certain…
certain states by states and cities by cities
are cleaning up their backlog. -Right. -So you can go
to endthebacklog.org and find out what you can do,
write to your legislators, write to your congressmen,
and we can change it. We just have to be persistent
and never give up. I think that sounds amazing. -Thank you so much for being
on the show. -Thank you so much. I Am Evidence debuts
Monday, April 16, at 8:00 p.m. on HBO. And for more information
about how you can help, visit endthebacklog.org. Mariska Hargitay, everybody.

Brian Tyree Henry – Anarchy and Infectious Chemistry in “Hotel Artemis” | The Daily Show

Brian Tyree Henry – Anarchy and Infectious Chemistry in “Hotel Artemis” | The Daily Show


Please welcome
Brian Tyree Henry! -♪ ♪
-(cheering, applause) Yeah! Hey. (cheering continues) Thank you. I don’t know
why I felt like I had to bow… You have to bow.
You have to bow. I don’t know why I did that.
I’m sorry. -That is the sign of humility.
-It’s a sign of respect. -I bow to the applause.
-I bow to… (laughs) -Welcome back to the show.
-Thanks, man. First things first–
congratulations on your Tony Award nomination. That is really exciting.
That’s coming up on Sunday? -Yeah.
-(cheering, applause) -Congratulations.
-Yeah. It’s crazy. That’s really exciting.
You know, I was thinking, you’ve got a Tony Award
nomination, right, you were nominated for an Emmy,
I mean, sooner or later you’re gonna win
all of these things. I heard you singing
in an episode of This Is Us. -Yeah.
-Like, why not just… why not just go into music,
be the real Paper Boi, -and then just go for an EGOT?
-I mean, ’cause, like, I want to stay in my lane
a little bit. You know, like, Donald’s already
taken over the music thing, so I don’t want to,
like, go over there. I was like,
I’ll just do theater. I’ll stay and do theater
and let him, like, -let him do the music side.
-Oh, that’s nice of you. I’m a courteous guy.
You know this. Like… I like to share, man. I’m not here
to take it all. I am. Um, l-let’s talk a little bit about all the projects
that you’re doing. -That clip that we just saw
-Yeah. -is from the new movie
Hotel Artemis. -Yeah. And in that scene, you were acting
with Sterling K. Brown– and we’ll chat about that
in a moment– but what is the premise
of Hotel Artemis? It’s a really interesting story. I don’t want
to give too much away, but, first of all, Jodie Foster. -That’s, that’s one.
-Right. And, uh, so it’s a hotel for criminals during
a water drought. -Right. -Which may happen
in the near-distant future. So it’s set in 2028. There’s a water riot going on,
and these criminals, Sterling and I,
who are brothers, we get injured, and we
have to go to this hotel -that is literally made
for criminals. -Right. You pay a membership,
and Jodie Foster plays a nurse that takes care of all
of us there. But we’re not the only criminals that have checked-in
that same day. Right. It’s-It’s
a really crazy premise. -It is insane.
-The two of you being brothers is funny enough, is, like,
the most believable part of the story in terms of
a crazy world, because in real life,
you two are best friends. -Yeah.
-I didn’t know this. Yeah, I’ve known him
for over 11 years. -We actually– uh,
he went to NYU, -Right. uh, for grad school here. And after I graduated from Yale, I came to New York
and started doing theater. And we have been doing, like,
plays here ever since. But we never got to act
in scenes together. We were always, what I call,
“acting adjacent.” So, like, I know he’s over there
talking, but I’m like, I don’t have any scenes
with him, but… (laughs) But, like, so we were
“acting adjacent.” So this time, we finally got to
do this movie, where we’re like, hey, man, like, let’s-let’s
really, like, play brothers. -Like, let’s really do it.
-Right. And I can’t believe
we made it happen. It’s still unbelievable to me. Yeah, because he got you the
role on This Is Us, didn’t he? -Yeah, man. -The role that got
you nominated for the Emmy. -Yeah. Don’t say all that
to him. -That’s really… Now he’s gonna know that,
and he’s gonna, like, run around
and tell everybody that. Oh, you-you want, you want him
to be humble for what…? -Yes.
-Oh, okay. I mean, he already won the Emmy,
so… Well, you got yourself the role
on his show -through him knowing you.
-Thank you, Trevor. -Yes, that’s how it happened.
-Thank you. But, yeah, it’s like, when you
are acting with somebody that you’ve known for that long, is it harder to change
the characters, or do you get into the roles
even deeper? No, it, actually,
you become more of a jackass -because you’re just playing
all the time. -Right. Like, we, literally, we were
there, uh, playing all the time. There was one moment, man,
that, uh, you know, my character
gets injured and I’m laying on the gurney,
and, like, he– I just feel this wetness
on my mouth, and I guess this was his choice to give me mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation? He did not– that’s not
in the script. So after the director yells,
“cut!” I was like, “Oh, yeah.
That’s what we’re gonna do? Just gonna put your mouth
on mine?” So right before he yells,
“action”, I was like, “You have the most tenderest
lips I’ve ever, uh, felt.” And he’s like, “action.” I was
like, “you can’t break now.” Like, what are you gonna do? -You have to finish the scene,
so, yeah. -Right. And now that the story has taken
a completely different turn. It’s all new. That’ll be
the sequel. Uh, it was,
it was a great time, man. We spent a lot of time
just playing and joking. And, like, I feel like
when you have a-a chemistry like that
with somebody, -it’s infectious on set.
-Right. So, you know, we had just
a great time, man. That’s something that seems
to be a trend wherever you go. You’re known for being
an affable person who’s great to work with,
you know. Your cast members speak about
you in such a beautiful way, whether it’s in theater,
whether it’s in TV or movies. I mean, Atlanta is one
of the shows where every single one of us
who’s a fan of the show feels like we know you and
your castmates intimately. -We feel like you’re a family.
-Yeah, well, yeah. You know, wh-when we see Alfred
and the gang hanging out, we feel like that is a family. I’ve always wondered this,
though: Why do you always refer to him as Alfred and not as Paper Boi? Well, because I wanted,
I wanted everyone to be very clear that
that’s who he is. You know what I’m saying?
Paper Boi is the persona that’s put upon him, that’s not,
that’s not who he is. And, um, I just always want to
make sure to remind myself to always check-in with Alfred before I check in
with Paper Boi, ’cause Paper Boi is the one
that gets the fame, and has all these things,
but deep down inside, like, you know,
he’s still Alfred. He started as Alfred,
and I want to make sure that he stays Alfred. You have a lot of roles
coming up. I mean, everyone loves you. People are waiting for you
to play any role that you want. Trev, stop it, man.
I love you. -This is true. This is true.
-You’re, like… -Ugh, man. I love this man
so much. -But this is true. You-You are, you are dearly,
dearly loved. -I am telling you this now.
-Thank you. Are there any roles that
you wish you could play? There’s got to be, like,
dream roles where you go like, “Yeah, I’ve always wanted
to play that character.” I want to be Bruce Leroy. -Bruce Leroy? -Do you guys–
any of y’all know the movie -The Last Dragon?
-Like, from way back? -From, like, The Last Dragon.
-Yeah. Yeah. -Like, I want to be Bruce Leroy.
-Okay. I think it would be–
No, actually, I want you to be Bruce Leroy, and I’d be Sho’nuff. -Don’t get me started.
-I mean, like, I don’t know. Would y’all watch it? Y’all
would watch that, right? (cheering and applause) You need to think about it,
Trev. Think about this project,
and, like, I-I think we can make it happen. You see, and then you wonder
why people love you. This is what– you go around
giving people movie roles, -and then you wonder why people
love you. -I just… I just want to have a chance
for me and you to do something together, man.
I know we’d smash it. No, man, it would,
it would be great. -Thank you so much for being
on the show. -Thank you, man. Hotel Artemis will be in
theaters June 8. Brian Tyree Henry, everybody.