STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Millipede vs Centipede!

Millipede vs Centipede!


– I’m Coyote Peterson, welcome
to the desert millipede versus the desert centipede. (upbeat adventure music) Venturing into the
nighttime desert is not for the faint of heart, as this cactus strewn ecosystem is laced with a plethora
of nocturnal predators. Whether it be
scorpions, spiders, that right there
is a black widow, solpugids, or vinegaroons, these arachnids are
certain to be on the prowl, as they use the
cover of darkness to silently hunt for their prey. Look at that. Does that thing not
look like an alien? All arachnids come
equipped with eight legs, and most are also armed
with a set of fangs or a venom injecting stinger. That is the most venomous
species of scorpion in the United States. And he’s on my hand. All right, this makes
me a little bit nervous. I wanna see if I can get
him to just sit still. However, if eight legs, fangs, and stingers aren’t
enough to scare you, Arizona’s Sonoran
Desert is also home to a subphylum of creatures with even more
legs, the myriapods, which consists of
centipedes and millipedes. At the end of the day, both of these animals do
their best to avoid humans, however, today we are going
to capture one of each so we can get them in
front of the cameras for an up close comparison. First, let’s talk about
the desert millipede. Now, millipede
means thousand feet. And each one of these
little body segments has two pairs of legs on it. Now there’s no way
that I’m going to get underneath this creature
and count its legs, but I can tell you from
it crawling across my arm, that there are a ton of
them tickling me right now. It feels like a bunch of
little tiny pieces of Velcro grabbing onto your arm hairs. Despite the name,
there isn’t actually a species of millipede
on the planet that has a thousand feet. On average they have around 400, with the record being 750, more than any other
animal in the world. These myriapods have
very poor eyesight. They have very
simple eyes up front, so they’re really using these
antenna to help them navigate through the environment. And you’ll see as he dances
up in the air like that, he’s basically looking
for what his next move is going to be. If he can’t feel anything
with those antenna, he’s kinda like, woah, woah, I’ve run out of road here. And until he bumps
into something that he can walk on, he’s just gonna stay
put until he can get those front legs planted. Now, the millipede doesn’t
have many predators, and that’s because
these little myriapods are actually poisonous. They do have glands that run
along the side of their body, and if they are really,
really threatened, they will secrete a
nasty orange fluid. And it absolutely stinks. I actually got it all over
my hands the other night. Now, if you get this
poison on your skin, all you need to do
is wash you hands with soap and water, and you’ll be just fine. Now I’m completely
comfortable with millipedes. They don’t bite. If it doesn’t bite, it
can crawl all over me all that it wants. But the centipede is a
whole different ball game. And we’re gonna get that
guy out in a second, and get a close look at that
venomous little desert dweller. The desert millipede is
virtually harmless to humans. And if you encounter
one in the wild, just admire it from
a safe distance. (breathes out) OK, now we’re
on to the part of the episode that I have been dreading. There is no good way to do this. You just have to plop
him out and go for it. All right, here we go, ready? Oh boy. Now he’s kinda like,
oh, I’m on the ground, and I’m on the move. Desert centipedes can
inflict a very painful and venomous bite, so I stress, never
attempt what I am doing. OK, there we go. Now that I have his
head under control, and more importantly,
those fangs, I feel a lot better
about this situation. Oh, look at how creepy that
little desert creature is. Now, what’s really interesting
is that the centipede means hundred feet. Each species of
centipede varies. There’s no way that this
one has a hundred feet, but as they continue to grow, and their body
segments elongate, they grow more legs. Now one major difference between the centipede and the millipede is that the centipede has
a very flattened body. This allows them to fit
into crevices between rocks, and allows them to
glide very quickly over the surface of the desert. Now, these are
voracious predators. They are out here right
now walking the washes and searching through the
rocks for other animals. They will eat bugs,
they will eat scorpions, they will eat lizards, and the ones that
grow to the size of the giant desert centipede, they will even take rodents. But the bite from a
centipede of even this size is gonna put you into
some incredible pain. That’s why I wanna be
as careful as possible while handling this myriapod. One really interesting
feature about all centipedes is that you see
the back end here? This rump? You have these two modified legs on the back end here which have little hooks in them. And this back end is
pretty much a false head. It’s the same color
as the head is. And these two little modified
feet on the back end here have hooks on them. So, let’s say you’re a predator, and you’re coming, and
you’re like, all right, I’m gonna get him, I’m gonna
bite his head right off. These little modified
feet go up in the air, boom, and you get pricked
with those little spikes, throws you off guard, the
centipede spins around, and that’s when you get a bite
from those venomous fangs. This is not a creature that
is very easy to consume. Centipede venom is not
considered deadly to humans, however, the pain has been
said to keep a full grown man on the ground and in
pain for several hours. Moral of the story, steer
clear of centipedes. I hope everybody
enjoyed this comparison. The desert centipede versus
the desert millipede. Both species are native
to the Sonoran Desert. And I’d suggest avoiding both because the
centipede is venomous and the millipede is poisonous. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. Both of these myriapods
play an important role in the ecosystem. And while they may be creepy and have a gazillion legs
as compared to you and me, always try to remember that they’re going to
use each and every one to run in the
opposite direction. If you thought that
comparison was cool, check out the alligator
snapping turtle versus the common
snapping turtle. And don’t forget subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Free Handling Bullet Ants?!

Free Handling Bullet Ants?!


– I’m going to
free-handle a bullet ant. – Oh, risky. Now you’re conquering
the bullet ant. – Well I do feel pretty
confident at this point that I’ve already taken a sting, it was a pretty bad sting. But, I’m pretty comfortable
just free-handling one of these ants. – Mark, are you ready? – Are you gonna do it?
– Is it possible? – Yeah.
– Ooh, ooh, ooh. – (Laughing) Be careful. (pounding jungle
music with drums) Well guys, it is
officially the end of 2016. I cannot believe
it, I’m still alive, gone through many crazy
episodes this past year. What I wanna do is to
actually bring the guys who are normally
behind the camera in front of the cameras with me. So Mark, Mario, come on
down here and join me. – [Mark] Woo, all right!
– Yeah. Ah!
– Mario, we’re on screen. (laughter and claps) – These guys, what a year, dude. – Yeah.
– My buddies right here. We could not bring you
guys all this content without these two guys
behind the camera. Now it’s been a wild year. It has been the year
of the bullet ant. – [Mark] Yeah it
has been actually. – And actually, I’ve
got one right here in this little container. – (Laughing) You brought one? – Yeah I did, and you know what? – Uh oh!
– What are you doing? – I’m going to
free-handle a bullet ant. – Oh, risky. Now you’re conquering
the bullet ant. – Look at that, well I
do feel pretty confident at this point, that I’ve
already taken a sting. It was a pretty bad sting. But, I’m pretty comfortable
just free-handling one of these ants.
– Mark, are you ready? – Is that possible?
– You gonna do it? You ready?
– Yeah, oh, oh, ooh. – Be careful.
(suspenseful drumbeats) – [Mark] I need a little help. – There you go.
– [Mario] There you go, Mark. – [Coyote] Look at that,
there’s the director of Brave Wilderness Shows
free-handling a bullet ant. A little nerve-wracking, huh? – A little bit.
– What’s that feel like? – [Mark] I try not to
think about it right now. – [Coyote] Now what
we need you to do. – [Mark] I’m trying to
stay as still as possible. – Is take a sting
and then present. – (laughing) Okay, I don’t
want to take your job, that’s your job. – [Coyote] Yeah, we already
cut, let’s do that again, Mark. – (Laughing) No, no. – [Coyote] All right,
let me get the ant back onto my hand,
okay there we go. – Woo!
(laughing) – Bullet ant back
in the container. Okay, let’s back it up. So the beginning
of the year started with the harvester ants.
– That’s right. – [Coyote] Then there
were the fire ants. – [Mark] That was bad,
that was a lot worse than we anticipated. – [Coyote] Yeah, the fire
ants were really, really bad. Then it went to
the alligator bite. – [Mark] Um, hm.
– That one was pretty gnarly. – [Mark] Yeah.
– Then it was. – [Mark] Leeches?
– The leeches, we did the leeches. There was the crab pinch. Then there was the
velvet ant sting. – [Mark] And the
tarantula hawk sting. – And the tarantula hawk sting, that was a rough one for me. And then we finally made
it here to Costa Rica where we faced the
bullet ant challenge, and that was crazy. The ant’s stinger actually
got lodged in my arm. I actually still have.
– You can still see it, yeah. – A scar right there.
– Right there. – Man, that was wild. And we’re at the end of our
Costa Rica trip right now and you may notice my
voice is pretty hoarse. – [Mark] Yeah,
we’ve been filming for the last 12 days straight. – 12 straight days
of power presenting in front of the camera. What are we coming
away with, 15 episodes? – 15 pieces, yeah. – 15 pieces of
content in 12 days. So looking back on
the whole year, Mario, which episode or location do
you think was your favorite? – Oh well, Alaska was such a
different environment for me. The animals are different,
the climate was different, everything about it. So I think that stands
out for me, Alaska, yeah. – Well definitely, I mean,
I think the craziest thing that happened to us in Alaska
was that bear encounter, where we ran into
that sow and her cubs on the side of river. I mean, talk about a real moment that you could never
plan to capture on camera that we got little
bits and pieces of and managed to put out that
episode, The Bear Scare. – Yeah I’ll never forget that. I remember hearing
you, that this is like, “Bear, bear.” And I’m like, “Am I getting
attacked by a bear?” (laughing) “Wait, is he getting
attacked by a bear?” – All right, so Mark what
was your favorite location or moment from this past year? – For me personally, it’s
actually unreleased video. You guys are gonna be
seeing it soon, the green and black poison frog has
been my favorite animal since I was nine years old. If Ms. Honeycutt’s out there,
I actually did a project in Science class on that frog. So getting to actually
be out here in Costa Rica and hold one, that’s
been a 23 year journey for that moment. So, for me that
was really special. So hopefully you guys
will like that episode, it’s gonna be coming soon,
but that’s my highlight. – Um hm, oh so many great
episodes are coming out of this trip here to Costa Rica. I probably have a favorite I
could pick out of this trip, but when I look back at
the year, I’d have to say that the wolverine
was my favorite. – [Mark] Um, hm, right, yeah. – As we expressed to you
guys in that episode, it has taken us so many
years to be able to get to Alaska, I got to
work with Steve Kroschel and get up close with
that amazing animal. It’s something I
will never forget and it was awesome. I mean, you talk about
our year on YouTube, the wolverine episode
premiered, trending as the number one video
the day after Thanksgiving. Which was amazing.
– Amazing. – A 30 minute video,
and that was you guys watching the video,
getting it to number one. I mean, we trended so
many times this past year and subscribers, all of you,
new members of the Coyote Pack. – Yeah.
– I mean Mark, what was the biggest day we had? – I think the velvet
ant sting day. – Yeah.
– I remember I was on a flight to Spain actually, and I was watching
our sub counter just
go ding, ding, ding. So, just so humbling that
that many people are jumping on board the Brave
Wilderness ship and watching all this great animal content. – And what was it? 342,000 new subscribers
in a single day? – In a single day. I think we got, there
was a million of you who joined in just a
period of three days. – Yeah, three days there
was 1.2 million new members of the Coyote Pack
in just three days. Now we do have some
cool stuff planned for you guys in 2017. First of all, we will
be traveling worldwide at this point. What’s our first location? – [Mark] We’re actually
going to be coming back to Costa Rica in January on
the west coast this time. So we’ll be bringing you
cool stuff from there. But what Mario and I are
really excited about, we’re going to Australia. So that’s.
– Oh man. Lots and lots of reptiles. – [Mark] Yeah,
it’s gonna be good. Lots of snakes, lots of lizards. – [Coyote] Lots of danger. – Lots of tide pools, all
kinds of cool, creepy crawlies to get in front of the camera.
– Yeah. – We’ve only explored
just one little part of the world so far.
– Yeah. – [Mario] I mean
the world is huge. – [Mark] North America. – [Mario] The animal
kingdom is huge. Like so many bizarre
creatures that we haven’t even come upon yet. – [Coyote] Um, hm.
– I’m excited. – Well I know, speaking
on behalf of myself and the entire crew,
both here in the field and in post production,
we couldn’t thank the audience more,
the Coyote Pack. You guys grow more and
more every single day. It inspires us to get
out here into the wild, take the risks that we
do, battling the elements of nature to get the
episodes right there in front of the lens,
and then eventually out to you guys on YouTube. And all I know is that
if we can come near to as close in 2017
as we did in 2016, it’s gonna be
another amazing year. You guys ready? – [Mario] Yeah.
– Let’s do it. – Let’s do it.
– All right. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you guys next year. – Woo!
– Woo, bullet ants! If you enjoyed our
end of the year video, make sure to go back and
watch my favorite episode of 2016, Phantom
of the Wilderness, featuring the wolverine. And don’t forget,
subscribe so you can join me and the crew on
our next location. No, no, no, no, no, no,
we’ve got meat and you, I need you to go this way. Go this way, okay I’ll
get behind the meat. (growling, crackling) (crashing pound, wolf howls) (birds chirp)

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Flesh Ripping Ants?

Flesh Ripping Ants?


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Recently, I ran into a
species of ant with a bite so powerful, it’s capable of
breaking through human skin. If you don’t believe
me? Watch this. One (phew) Two, three Ouch (grunts) Ah. Ah! Yep, that might break it
through the skin there. Oh, like little razor blades. Ah! Yeah, he’s popping
holes into my finger. Ahhh! Oh, yeah, that hurts. He’s got me good right there. Ahhhhhh! Oww! Look he’s
banged his head in my finger. Argh! Ah! Ahhh! Ah ah ah Ooh! Yikes! Yeah, that hurt. (panicky wilderness music) – [Voiceover] All
right, Coyote, yikes. That leaf-cutter ant. That was something, but what
people at home might not know, is that was actually
not the first time you were bitten by
that ant, was it? – No, no it was not. Now when we arrived
at Costa Rico, we were told by all the locals
that when you’re out there looking for creatures,
whatever you do, make sure to avoid
leaf-cutter ants. I said to myself,
leaf-cutter ants? I didn’t even know you
had leaf-cutter ants. Do they bite? Sting? They
said, “No, no, no, no. They don’t sting.
They only bite. The bite is so powerful, it
can break through human skin.” Knowing me, first
thing I think is, “I gotta see if this
is really true.” So as we’re out there
walking through rain forests, we finally came across
a track of leaf-cutters. Found some workers,
found some soldiers. Mark said, “Okay,
here’s the ants. Let’s catch one, and
let’s do the scene.” So I picked up an
ant. You guys ready? – [Mark] I’m ready. Wait, wait. Where are you
gonna let him bite you? – Right there in
the crux of my hand. Hold up my hand like
this, put it right there, and let it start chomping,
and it’s chomping, and it’s chomping, but
it’s not breaking skin. Even with all that
power and that pinch… Ouch! That really, really hurts. I don’t think he’s gonna
be able to break skin. We’re thinking, okay.
It’s just a myth. Leaf-cutter ants can’t really
cut through human skin. Ah, there we go. – How’s that feel?
– [Coyote] Wow! Ah! Feels good to have
it off of my hand. Well, there ya go. Finally. An ant challenge where I’m
walking away mostly unscathed. Well, as we’re heading
back to our base camp, we come upon the nest. All right, well we
have found the nest. Watch your feet. Look at how many of
these monster-sized leaf-cutters are coming out. They are sending out
the troops right now. What you didn’t see
is me wandering into
the nest at first. Me, I’m like, holy cow,
these ants are everywhere. And just for fun, I
pick up another ant, put it on my finger, and boom! Immediately, it cuts
through the skin. Those things are monster! Ow! Ooh, yeah.
Ow! Bite me there. Oh, geez! Ah! Ah! Ah! That one definitely popped
right through the skin. Look at that. Holy cow. Fortunately, you’re
looking at it here. This is me holding up my finger, and you can see all
the blood running down. Now you didn’t see
this in the episode because we weren’t
ready to actually shoot the scene a second time. I didn’t think he was
gonna bite me that hard. The one that we were working
with through the scene didn’t. Break skin. Ah, an angry one is definitely
capable of breaking skin. What should we do? Should
we shoot that again? – [Mark] Think we have to. – Like right here. – [Mark] Yeah. Sigh. – Hehe. So, like a good director, Mark
says, “Cut, cut, cut, cut. Back to one. We gotta
shoot this scene again.” Now at this point,
I’m pretty nervous, because I’m thinking
to myself, oh, boy. That ant just massacred my
finger in one single chomp. Now he want to actually
put an ant on my finger, and let it do its thing. So, what you did see
is Mark, Mario, and I heading back into the nest, and this is where all the
ants were swarming out. Mark’s getting bitten.
Mario’s getting bitten. And finally, I get a
large, angry soldier. Come back into the
scene, sit down, put up my finger, and
place the ant right there, and it was painful. Now, I did last more
than 60 seconds, and I had to last
more than 60 seconds so that we could
get all the shots. Shooting these episodes
is pretty tough because there’s
multiple cameras going, and we have to make sure
we get the cool shots so that you guys can
enjoy the episode. In total, I was really chomped
by this leaf-cutter ant for probably about two
and a half minutes. Now that also includes,
once the video camera stopped rolling, and we
get out the still cameras to get that cool shot, you know
that’s the screen grab there on the YouTube video of
me like this, “Ahhhhhhh!” of an ant on my finger. A lot of pain to go through
just to get that single frame, but it was totally worth it because ultimately we
proved a myth to be true. The leaf-cutter ant is capable of chomping through human skin. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see ya next week. – Whoa whoa whoa. What
about the million subs? – Oh, yes! Sorry. I get so excited
about those ants. Coyota pack, we have made it to a million subscribers
on YouTube. How cool is that? ♪ Oh, yes ♪ Oh, yes ♪ Oh, yes ♪ Yes, yes, yes ♪ Now, on behalf of
myself and the entire B rave Wilderness team, I
just want to take a moment to thank each and
every one of you out there who’s
watching all our shows. We couldn’t do this without you. It’s you guys that keep
us out here in the field making these awesome adventures, and getting ya up
close with animals, whether it’s Breaking
Trail, Dragon Tails, Coyote’s Backyard
or a new series that’s about to come out
this summer, Beyond the Tide. Stay tuned for that. We couldn’t do it without
each and every one of you. So from the bottom of my heart, thank you for being
such an awesome member of the Coyote Pack. All right. That’s it for me. We’ll see you guys next week. If you enjoyed this
behind-the-scenes look, make sure to go back and
watch the full ant attack, and don’t forget, subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
“Breaking Trail.” Oww! Ahh! (loud rumble) (coyote howling)

SUPER Toxic Ant Venom!

SUPER Toxic Ant Venom!


– You know what I love
about laying in the snow? There aren’t any ants,
which is good news for me considering what I had
to endure in Arizona. But stay tuned ’cause today
we’re talking about ant venom. (dramatic, fast-paced music) (growl) Welcome back, coyote pack. Man, it’s just not getting
any warmer here in Ohio, and to keep my fingers warm, I’m gonna mentally
project myself back to the scorching
hot deserts of Arizona. Oh, wait. Last time I was there, I was bitten by a Gila monster, attacked by cactus, and
swarmed by harvester ants. Ah! Ugh! I guess there really
is no place like home even if it is freezing cold. Okay, so we had
several great questions about the harvester ant episode. Now, many of you wanted to
know if the harvester ants could only sting once or if
they could sting repeatedly. The simple answer is yes. They can sting many times, and, unlike a honey bee, they
don’t lose their stinger. In fact, once an ant has
latched on with its mandibles, they swing their abdomen
underneath their body, where they will hold
themselves in position and inflict a sting
over and over again without letting go all the while pumping
more and more venom into their victim. This happened to me
in several areas. Where it wasn’t a sting and
go, it was a sting and stay, and these sting zones
were the worst by far. (exhales) Still one in my pants. Ah! This is truly the meaning
of ants in your pants. Honey bees are actually
one of the only animals that lose their stingers,
and it’s not for the better. These stingers are barbed, so when they sting, it
gets stuck in the victim and then gets pulled from
the body when they fly away, resulting in an
abdominal rupture, and sadly the bee ends
up dying in the end. Now, another question we had,
asked by Christine two, was “If a harvester ant’s sting “is 20 times more
potent than a honey bee, “what makes it bad? “Is it the venom or is it
how deep the stinger goes?” Oh, that burns. Ah, they’re all over my
hands now, look at that. Well, Christine, when
we’re talking about venom, it’s all about the
potency and the yield. The potency is how
toxic the venom is, and the yield is the
amount that’s injected. Now, it is true that
harvester ant venom is 20 times more potent
than a honey bee. However, their
yield is rather low, especially from a single sting. This is how my body was able
to take so many stings at once. Ah! Ah! Now, if I had been stung
60 times by honey bees, which have a much
higher venom yield, I might have been in
some serious trouble. All venomous animals, whether it be a Gila
monster, a scorpion, or a harvester ant, are all ranked on
the LD50 scale, which means lethal dose of
venom required to kill 50% or half the members of
a tested population. It’s a controversial test as it’s often
performed on lab rats. However, it does allow
scientists to rank venom toxicity in
the animal kingdom. So while the harvester
ant is considered one of the most toxic insects, it has a rather low venom yield, making it less
dangerous to humans. Hence why I was able to
be stung so many times. Make sense? Ah. – [Voiceover] I know it hurts. (exhales) Whoo! Aw, man. Arms, legs, neck, armpit
all on fire right now. Now, I know this could all
be just a bit confusing, so let’s just
remember one thing. As long as you stay
a safe distance from animals in the wild,
there’s a good chance that you won’t end up
in the strike zone, pretty much guaranteeing
that you won’t ever be bitten or stung. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see you next week. If you want to see me get
swarmed by harvester ants, make sure to check out
the Ants Attack episode, and don’t forget. Subscribe to join
me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (bear growls)
(rumbling) (birds chirping)
(howling)