Can a urinary tract infection go away by itself? – Jean McDonald

Can a urinary tract infection go away by itself? – Jean McDonald


Sometimes the symptoms of a urinary tract infection can be reduced. This can be reduced by drinking lots of fluids, which dilutes the organisms and therefore the symptoms would be much less. There are other things that can be done, like drinking cranberry juice to sort of change the acidity of the urine. Also, one can have probiotics. A spoonful of one of these yoghurts can help to reduce the symptoms. Usually however, it’s important if one keeps getting frequent urinary tract infections that one sees a urologist, so that other investigations can be done to see whether
or not the patient is emptying their bladder and if there are any other causes of a urinary
tract infection. Example: stones in the bladder or in extremes,
in other circumstances, a bladder tumour. There are various medications that can be
given to patients to slow down the way that the bladder is actually functioning. These
medications are called anticholinergics. And these medications work by preventing one passing
urine as frequently as they were passing it. It would be good to actually see a urologist
who can decide on the various treatment options, depending on the type of incontinence that
one has.

How do you get a UTI (urinary tract infection)?

How do you get a UTI (urinary tract infection)?


Urinary tract infections are one very troublesome
complication of an obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia that can cause patients significant
symptoms. There are two main ways in which BPH cause urinary infections. Firstly, the
obstructing urine may inhibit complete emptying of the bladder such that a post void residual
urine is left within the bladder. This urine can become stagnant and undergo secondary
and bacterial infection leading to urinary tract infection with symptoms of cystitis.
The second mechanism by which benign prostatic hyperplasia can predispose to urinary tract
infections is that to overcome the obstructing prostate, a bladder needs to increase its
pressure: the force with which it exerts to pass urine. This increased pressure against
an obstructing prostate can force urine into the prostatic ducts. This urine sitting within
prosthetic ducts can cause a chemical inflammation which again can predispose to bacterial infection
leading to symptoms of a urinary tract infection such as cystitis and indeed prostatitis.