Honey Bee Feeder Shim How to Make Your Own with Basic Skills Feeding Bees


okay it’s happy Friday everyone today is
March 29th and the weather’s not cooperating wouldn’t you know it that
when it warms up it also rains which leads me to my frequently asked
questions response this week which is going to be how to build these feeder
shims these things are valuable this time of year because they’re gonna help
us get our bees off to a great start and I’m gonna show you how to make it step
by step there’s a lot of different ways to do this I’m going to use the most basic
carpentry skills you can imagine this is my pollen feeder I have mann Lake top
pollen substitute in here I think it’s ultra bee or something like
that and it has been proven scientifically to improve brood in the
spring so I want to make sure that as many resources are available to these
bees as possible this year we’re trying to really get some robust colonies going
and that’s gonna lead us to the Shim that we’re making today lots of people
have asked to show a step-by-step of how it’s done and I’m going to do that with
rough cut lumber look what a lousy day we have and even though it’s warming up
they told us it would be in the 60s on Sunday
you’re dropping that right off it’s gonna be 39 again so this is gonna be an
important fixture in your bee yard I have several of them this is my rough
cut lumber variable thicknesses variable material walnut maple cherry oak pine
you name it it’s all here and it’s all different thicknesses you can see
where the bark was here and this is a you know cut with a mobil saw milll that a
friend of mine owns and I just buy the lumber from him after it’s aged a little
bit and this is a nice pine piece that I think we’re gonna use today look at the
thickness inch and an eighth looks like if you’re buying dimensional lumber at
the hardware store this would probably be a three quarter inch piece look at
this piece over a hundred years old I’m saving it for something special so
anyway our deciding factor for why we’re gonna make it a 5 inch shim is
this controller here this little wheel I’m going to put everything in the video
description so if you want to look at any of this stuff it’ll be there now on
the bottom here we have a standard mann Lake medium 10 frame and we’re comparing
it see the dimensions are off it’s a little larger
then the flow hive of 10 frame larger by about a quarter of an inch so if you’re
making this shim for a flow hive you can I want to cut that quarter inch down
just measure your box and go by the outside dimensions 16 inches little over
and width here and they’re all 20 inches long so we’re gonna make that shim I
found a piece that’s 5 inches wide already so all I have to do is cut the
lengths and smooth it down a little bit let’s get on with that here I also put a
nice straight edge along this piece of wood here so I’ll have a reference it’s
90 degrees when I’m scoring things up pretty easy to do I’m going to cut the
ends off here but these Diablo blades those things are super sharp if you’ve
never checked those out look into them boy they cut through wood like a saw blade
cutting through wood and then we’re gonna cut the next one here and so we’re
cutting the lengths and then once we get that down we’re gonna do a test fit up
here I don’t want to dress this off because it’s gonna be like fine
furniture for the bees I know you’re probably jealous of my carpentry skills
here because this is what you would call a finish work and I hope you know I’m
just kidding somebody’s gonna yell at me for that
anyway I just stack it on top of the box here and measure the inside dimensions
and that’s what you like to do too because your material thicknesses will
differ from mine and then once I cut the pieces to length I just dry fit
everything up here and make sure that it’s all good before I go to clamping
and gluing and putting screws in it gonna dress it up again remember we’re
making furniture for the bees look at the rough cut aspects of this wood I
think it’s really great and it’s a really good insulator but this is just a
feeding shim and these will stay on your beehives all year round you can use them
don’t forget get some really good wood glue and a clear 100% silicon sealant
because we’re gonna seal all the interior joint surfaces to make sure
bugs and mites and things can’t hide so here it is we got the clamps on it
squared it up against that edge of that plywood it’s sitting on and we’re using
two inch self-tapping stainless steel screws get the ones with the square
Drive heads or you’re gonna be putting a lot of money in your cursing jar there
if you use the Phillips heads and things like that these things going nice we did
put glue on here I didn’t show that step and we’re verifying that it’s nice and
square before we move on from here so there we go we have a shim now normally
a feeder shim would be just like this no bottom to it nothing else it would just
be a spacer so you could put a feeder inside and stack it on your box but
that’s not what we’re doing here we’re gonna put interior pine and I’m gonna
show you how I do that and I’m gonna leave bee space underneath of it as well
so we can put feed of all types under and in this feeding shim so we’re at 14
1/4 there and then we’re at 18 and 1/8 just under 18 and 8 remember put it all
together screw it together square it up before you take these dimensions to make
that interior and I wrote down 14 and a quarter by 18 and 1/8 and I put a little
down arrow there to show me that it is just under an 8th so I’ll know when I go to cut it
now I’m using this big thick piece of pine first I’m gonna cut the lengths but
they’re not going to be exact yet I’m going to show you why remember these
edges are rough cut and they’re not parallel so I’m gonna have to square
this up later and so I’m going to create a straight
edge on one side of each of these boards again this Diablo blade I think that
means devil termite and we’re gonna cut that off there we’re gonna do the
next one and if there’s any bow or anything to
the wood you want of course to pick the side that’s the truest when you make
this initial cut and this just gives us a nice straight side to the board that
we can now use to cut a parallel cut so now we’re going to cut to the dimension
that you need flip it over there turn on the devil termite blade and now we have
perfectly parallel sides so what did that do
well that means that what we cut on the miter saw may not be square anymore so
we’re gonna have to go back to that and that’s why I cut these larger than I
needed to when you’re using dimensional
you don’t have to worry about that you’ve already got the perfectly
parallel lines in the nice and square and everything else this is rough cut
stuff nice thick pine gonna be the bottom of my feeder Shim don’t
forget to bury that blade I don’t want anybody getting cut there anyway now I
cut the pieces together because I want them to be absolutely perfect so once
I have that and you can see the bottom one was a little bit off there so
they weren’t quite parallel when we began and now we’re cutting the final
exact dimensions I need because remember this is a floating shim it’s gonna go
inside that frame that we made so this is going to compose the bottom of it
which would be like an inner cover integrated to the feeder shim nice and
thick and again this is just pine I used a really good wood for the outside now
the other thing is we have to cut that center hole because we’re gonna use a
rapid round feeder and you want to give your bees access to this feeder shim so
I’m gonna put that as near the centre as possible this is gonna really be
critical if you’re making one for a eight frame shim with the ten frame
there’s lots of extra space here so this will be off-center a little bit and then
using a two inch Forstner bit to drill that through there look at these nice
clean ribbons flipping off at the camera there a nice sharp bit and we’ll cut through that and this is
done before we glue up the pieces that compose that inner cover there you go
so when we put this shim together we’re gonna clamp and glue that up and you
don’t get a lot of play time here this video actually took me a long time to
make I know we’re doing this in just fourteen or fifteen minutes here and now
there it is inside edges are nice and square and now I have these shims there
are 3/8 of an inch thick and that’s because we’re gonna create Bee space
underneath this inner cover that’s part of this feeder shim so gonna pull that
out put the spaces underneath here and then when I put this in after we glue it
up we’re gonna put wood glue all around the circumference just gonna test fit it
here first always test fit first and now we know
it’s gonna set there and we’ll have three eights space 3/8 of an inch of space
underneath I also cut these 90-degree corners and we glue those in there too
and then we put a nice sealant with silicon we run that bead everywhere
because we don’t want those mites we don’t want small hive beetle to have
a place to hide this is the underside that’s that three-eighths inch gap we
created and I’m showing that it’s all sealed up too so this is it from the
bottom look how basic this is you can’t get a more basic joint design even with
rough cut lumber you can just kind of wing it as you go remember this is not
critical it’s just nice heavy-duty stuff now we’re going to go to corner to
corner here because I’m going to find the center of this face piece here and
then that’s where we’re going to drill that upper entrance which is also going
to be a vent or it’s going to be just closed off so we can use this feeder
shim for a lot of different things it has an integrated inner cover to it so
this can be set up with just a roof on it now if you do not have the rapid
round in there you’re going to have to put an inner cover
over the top of it but when you have the rapid round feeders in here you do not
have to have an inner cover on top of this so this is an interesting really
basic thing and I hope this is satisfying those of you who wanted to
know how to make it if you have other questions just write them down in the
discussion beneath this just make a comment there I use an inch and an
eighth for that upper entrance hole most entrance holes are under an inch
generally but this one we have control over you have the queen excluder you
have the vent and you can close it off completely so again this is for
year-round use and I put some stainless steel washers there and I have a
stainless steel screw holding it in place here’s another really ugly
homemade bottom board super thick again because I’m using this rough cut lumber
again and this one is all glued up and then of course sealed again with silicon
around the edges just trying to see how this thing’s gonna hold up next thing I
also built this slatted rack here that I’m gonna put in this year I’m gonna put
a few of these out in the Bee Yard just to see how they do and if you’re doing Oxalic aleck
vapor and things like that this gives the standoff space so your bees don’t
get burned by that vaporizer when you stick it in there
so we’re gonna put that out this year and I’m just showing it because we’re
creating a miniature fancy hive here for demonstration purposes now we have a
deep box that goes on top of that and we’re going to want to put some pre
waxed frames in there so there they are we have ten of them now this is where if
you’re just starting out you would be using this deep box by itself and you
want to make sure that those starting bees get lots of feed and that’s where
this feeder shim comes in so we’re gonna put that on there and what would you do
depending on the time of year it’s early spring so we’re gonna put a rapid round
feeder in there and you can start with your I feed but you know we’re at the
time where we can actually put a two to one syrup in there or one to one syrup
and that’s by weight one pound of granulated sugar for example – one pound
of distilled water mix it all up put it in there and now even when it rains your
bees have access to at least sugar syrup I do not recommend that you put dry
pollen protein in there also this shows that the position allows you to put that
telescope and cover on it it does not cover that upper entrance that we just
made now I’m showing these ultrabee patties
these are high-protein patties again I just looked at a study that was done
that showed these actually were very good for the bees and they did cause a
stronger brood buildup in spring so we’re gonna experiment with them but I’m
showing you that even with these thick patties on top of the frames there we
put this feeder Shin remember we have a 3/8 inch bee space underneath of it so
it doesn’t smash down on these patties and you don’t have to push the patties
down there they are plenty of space for the bees to be on top of and under the
patties while they feed on it and we’ve got that rapid round in there going
through that center hole and that’s why we spaced the patties out so that feeder
could be accessed also so if the bees need the protein patties they can get to
them and if they need to get up in there and get sugar syrup they can get to that
as well you only want to put sugar syrup on when they can fly out and when the
whether is warm enough which it is now it just happens to be rainy so we’re
putting these mann lake patties out there we have that dry pollen substitute
available out there west of the bee yard this year and then let’s say your bees
start to build up as they do in spring you want to be ready to expand that
colony right away and expand the hive dimension so now we have a medium super
on top now when I put on a medium super like this I’m just gonna let the bees
fill that with honey so I don’t put a queen excluder in there I’m not going to
draw this off and then we’re gonna put the feeder shim up above that there again
because once they start building brood and once they kick in and they commit to
that if it starts raining and you get a couple weeks of rain you’re gonna be
happy to have a feeder shim like this on top so you can at least keep that sugar
syrup coming now if I took that rapid round out I would have to put an inner
cover on there now what are the bees gonna do with that space now well there gonna get up in there and they’re gonna create lots of burr comb and that’s
gonna be chunk honey for me I’m going to carve that out later and put it right in
jars and them I’m going to pour honey around it and I’m gonna use this box to harvest
that so there you have the whole thing bottom board slatted rack deep box
medium super and then your feeder shim I hope I answered all your questions if
you have more questions about it put them down in the comment section I’ll be
more than happy to answer those and look for another frequently asked questions
video next week thank you so much for watching and I hope your bees are making
it this spring

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

Honey Bee and Wasp Sugar Water Preferences Open Feeding What Bees Use First


okay so today is Friday the 13th in
October and what we have is an abundance of foraging bees and wasps in the air
and the resources are low so competition is high now what a lot of beekeepers do
is they open feed and they open feed a variety of different materials the most
popular is 50/50 sugar water and sugar like C&H pure cane sugar and what I have
here for this test and you’re looking at the time-lapse sequence here 50% so
that’s the 50/50 sugar water all the way to the right and this is by volume 25%
second from the right and 10% second from the left and 5% sugar water all the
way to the left and the water resource is the pure P U R filtered water that
we talked about before in the last test and turned out to be the water that was
preferred by the bees so this four minute time lapse sequence shows that
the bees really pile on the twenty five and fifty percent sugar water now sugar
and water together just provides the carbohydrate that the bees need to have
the energy to warm the hive and to forage of course
so by open feeding what we’re doing is we’re giving something for those
foragers to do plus they are bringing resources to the hive and they won’t be
attacking other colonies of honeybees hopefully if there were no resources in
the environment and as you can see in the background there the corn is dry and
ready for harvest there are very few flowering plants left so the stronger
colonies tend to converge on weaker colonies and raid them out and take
their resources so by open feeding you do two things you give those foragers
something to do and get their energy away from weaker colonies that may be
robbed out and you provide resources that will help them keep their hives
warm now the more water percentage there is compared to the sugar the more
dehydrating they have to do so once the imitation nectar here is taken into the
hive the bees have to dry it out and
condense it so that it becomes honey now you want to do this open feeding well
after you’ve taken honey off of your hives because you obviously don’t want
to be taking sugar water honey off as a resource for your own consumption so do
this after you’ve done your last harvest and so as you can see here the 50% 25%
are equally consumed by the bees they are just taking it down now I wish it
were backlit better so that you could see right now they’re down by 1/3 what
goes on is the bees are taking this all off in just a day so the entire cycle of
what you’re seeing in this video happens within a 24 hour period and the
time-lapse sequence is what I’m starting off with but if you’ll continue watching
I’ll get over some close-ups of the bees and some more discussion about what
other insects come to these feeders and again we’re using highly filtered water
this is from a well because my house is on a well so that’s pre filtered and
then I use the PUR filters that we get from Amazon I’ll put a link for that
in the video description I’ll also put a link to these drinkers that I use these
are 1 quart plastic drinkers and that’ll also be in the video description now what happened during the day of
course it warms up we started this sequence right after sunrise and the
bees of course the activity picks up after noon most foraging occurs late
morning early afternoon and here we are in the final sequences 10% 25% and 50%
are completely empty now and you notice that they’re concentrated all the way to
the left and look what is predominantly present here these are all wasps for the
most part the honeybees have already gone into their colonies for nighttime
protection and the wasps continue to forage well after sunset now for those of you who want to know
the exact weather conditions I decided to take a picture of my weather station
here and the sensor for wind we’re at 4 miles an hour we have 74 degrees outside
and 67% average humidity rainfall of course has been light for the whole
month we only have three point four four inches so this gives you kind of a base
for when I started and did this test I guess I could also if you’re interested
in this weather station I’ll put a link to that I got it on Amazon now for the
time lapse sequences I use the GoPro Hero 5 I just had that thing up on a
tripod right in front of all four the drinkers and set it for a shot every 5
seconds so here we are first one is 5 percent 5 percent sugar to water by
volume and if you notice the honeybees really didn’t care too much for that
overall we went to 10 percent they did show moderate interest in this but so
long as 25 percent and 50 percent sugar to water ratio was made available they
really heavily concentrated on that and here you see a mix of the honeybees
which are from my apiary I know some people get concerned and have made
comments in the past when I open feed that bees are coming from other apiaries
and we’re mixing potential varroa mites and things like that
well my bees are isolated we are at least five miles from the nearest
beekeeper in my area so for me open feeding number one I’m not wasting my
resources feeding other people’s bees and number two I’m really not that
concerned about contagions passing back and forth bee to bee while they’re
concentrated at these drinkers and this just shows again the GoPros setup so
here they are they’re concentrating to the Yellowjackets here in the foreground
lining up and now Yellowjackets even though they do raid beehives when
they’re all at an area like this where there’s an abundant resource they
congregate without attacking each other the exception to that though is and
you’ll see them in here see that bald-faced hornet which is really a
wasp but she’s on the right there kind of in the middle of the pack they show
up for nectar resources which is the sugar water but they’re also here to
attack kill and fly away with some of the smaller wasps they don’t seem to be
very successful against the honeybees but they are definitely here as dual
purpose predators one for the nectar and the second is to get some protein by
capturing a smaller wasp tearing it apart and bringing that back
to their nest site so by sunset this future percent sugar water was basically
empty and twenty five percent went down pretty much at the exact same rate I
think during this sequence we do still have some of the water in those
reservoirs and you can still see as the sun’s back lit twenty-five and fifty
percent are at fifty percent and the ten and five percent are down by about 20
percent now bees have to drink their food any
insect that you see that has that thorax and then the very thread thin
connection between the thorax and the abdomen meat protein isn’t gonna pass
through that so they can only drink now insects of different styles can handle
thicker liquid than others I hope some of you enjoyed those
slow-motion sequences they are a lower-resolution of course we will
improve on those at another time but these are cool in slow motion and here
we are again we’re just gonna continue to show the bees and wasps kind of
cooperating here at the drinkers now if you look closely there are a
variety of wasp species here and the ones when you see their abdomens and
they’ve got the yellow and black stripes going across them now we’re going into
nighttime so even though the video looks well lit this is actually after sunset
so what’s left at the feeders wasps so and wasps are not all the same I have
to tell you that you know like mud dobbers and some of the smaller
Yellowjackets woodland Yellowjackets they are pretty gentle to be around but
what we’re looking at here this nice large black and white one is what’s
known as a bald-faced hornet now they’re really just a wasp themselves but they
are really at the top of the food chain when it comes to wasps in our area and
some of them are here licking up the sugar water that’s remaining if you
notice all of these reservoirs are empty except for the 5% sugar water by now and
these boldface Hornets if you’ve seen my other videos I am NOT a fan of these
wasps they are really aggressive they can fly at night they navigate at night
they can squirt venom in your eyes they are just I don’t know what to say they
are a very very defensive and capable flying stinging insect and the cool
thing is here now that we’re after sunset and most of the honeybees have
gone to their hives you get to see on these reservoirs all these different
varieties of wasps and some of these again they’ve come from the woods some
of them are meadow some of them come from ground nests and
others are paper wasps there’s a honey bee real quick they’re like look at this
curious looking Los long and slender and they’re pretty docile I’m close to these
things they don’t have any protection on and they’re just pretty passive at this
point of course it’s cooling down it’s nighttime there’s a honey bee there on
the left but again as I said most of the honey bees have gone there’s a bee fly
there right in front of us that’s an imitator now I’m showing you my
bug-zooka this is what I use to collect sometimes Yellowjackets if they’re
really getting pesky I’m trying to work the bees but tonight
you know I just can’t let these boldface Hornets go so I’m gonna have to go after
them these are Yellow Jackets these are not my target species right now but I am
collecting bald faced Hornet so that I can look at them up close the bug-zooka
lets you catch things alive if you get something that you don’t want to kill
you can release it later after observation and for me in my case I can
photograph them but look at these different wasp species they’re really
interesting five percent the only thing that’s left
to drink from and you can see the honeybees are
congregated there to the right side of the screen these bees are staying kind
of grouped together and they’re gonna stay on these feeders overnight which is
interesting too now look at these boldface Hornets I
just can’t let him sit there look there you go taking them out with my bug-zooka
oh there’s another one she’s aggressive just you know they’re not like any other
wasp goodbye and these are what I would call you know passive friendly wasps
here those of you know your wasp species very well could chime in in the comment
section and share with all of us again it’s it’s fairly dark now don’t be
fooled by the exposure of the video camera that I’m using which makes it
look well lit we are well past sunset and of course these honey bees have
moved up underneath this brick to protect themselves from heavy dew and of
course the cold temps overnight in the morning they’ll find their way back to
their hives another bald-faced hornet got that one and there’s a bald-faced
hornet if you’ve ever had an encounter with bald-faced hornet so you know
exactly what I’m talking about they come at you like nothing else just look at
her going after all the other wasps that are just there to drink she is not a
friendly wasp when it comes to the drinking hole here yeah got you too! so we’re putting away
everything packing up the GoPro and of course here’s a little wasp on it very
timid you know we’re out here we’re not at their nest so keep in mind wasps when
they’re out of the feeding space are not defending that site so they’re very easy
to approach and here’s my collection for the evening a bald-faced hornet so i’m
gonna take these back and get some close-up photographs of them and again
my least favorite wasp I’ll put a link to the bug-zooka – if you’re interested
in that now here we are this is the following morning actually right at
sunrise it’s cold and it’s rainy and who’s out flying around the Yellow
Jackets Yellow Jackets have a huge advantage over the honeybee they fly in
colder temperatures I’ve seen Yellow Jackets flying around in 38 degrees
Fahrenheit and they are able to gather resources before the honeybees are even
out and about and if you look at the ones that have the abdomens with the
independent dots on left and right going down the back that’s a queen so this
time of year a lot of the Yellowjackets that are going out and about are the
newly hatched Queens that are gonna hope to winner over here because the
temperatures are getting colder and they’ll be the ones that will establish
new colonies in the spring of next year so they are definitely hungry for
carbohydrates thank you for watching this video I hope you got something out
of it and I hope you enjoyed seeing these wasps up close and what sugar
preferences the bees and wasps have thanks again

TOP 5 Ways to Get Rid of Ants Around Your Home

TOP 5 Ways to Get Rid of Ants Around Your Home


My name is Aaron Massey
from mrfixitdiy.com, and today I’m here to talk
about my Top Five DIY ways to get rid of ants around your home. (lively music) If you own a home,
you’ve likely experienced some unwanted visitors, and
while you might not be able to deter all unfavorable guests as easily, in the case of ants, you can. There are a couple different species that typically invade the home. And even though most
are seemingly harmless, they can still contaminate food, destroy parts of the home, and even bite. So here are a few ways to
get ants out of the house and keep them from coming back. Number five is to make a DIY ant spray. An alternative to an insecticide as well as one of the easiest
solutions to your ant problem uses only a couple of ingredients that you probably already
have in your kitchen. By combining equal
parts vinegar and water, you can create a mixture
that ants don’t like. Spraying the vinegar in
problem areas deters them by disrupting the trails of
pheromones that the ants leave. These trails allow other
ants to follow their scent, which is why you’ll typically
see ants in long trails. Disrupting the scent trail will
help keep other worker ants from finding the trail. However, this solution is temporary and won’t prevent the ants
from coming back long-term. But it can dissuade them from
specific areas of the home if you use it regularly. Remember that the ants
you see in the house are the worker ants so just getting rid of those ants won’t stop
them from coming back. The colony will just keep
sending out new worker ants. Your best bet is to
treat the colony itself, which leads me to number four,
which is utilizing ant baits. Liquid baits are typically
made up of a combination of sugar and borax and are used to initially attract the ants to the bait, and then the worker ants will bring enough of the poison back to
the colony to kill it. I’ve had a lot of success with
these TERRO liquid ant baits, which are available online or
at your local hardware store. These baits typically
attract a lot of ants in the first day or two,
and then after that, I rarely see any. While it’s simple to
set up traps or baits, be careful of this option if
you have small children or pets that might grab or try to play with them. Number three is sealing entry points. One of the most effective
ways to minimize ant problems is to try and minimize
entry points in the house. It’s impossible to seal
off every microscopic gap but addressing as many areas as possible can substantially
decrease infestation. Using caulks and sealants
to fill any problem areas both inside and outside
can help stop the problem before it starts. You can also color match
or paint most caulks so that the fix isn’t visible. Number two is to keep things clean. This might seem like a no-brainer but keeping your house
as clean as possible is one of the best ways
to prevent infestations and keep them from reoccurring. Forgetting to take the
trash out for too many days, leaving food waste in the kitchen, or having exposed dog food
can signal worker ants that your house is prime real estate. Take the trash out frequently,
and keep compost clean, or put extra food waste
down the garbage disposal. In hot and dry climates, ants may be prone to entering the home to find water, which is why infestations
are typically worse in the summer months and in areas with water like bathrooms and kitchens. And number one is to eliminate the source. The most important thing that you can do to keep ants away is to locate
where they are coming from and take care of them at their source. The source could be an outdoor garbage can that’s close to the house
or a bush whose leaves need to be trimmed because the
branches reach right up to your windowsills. Follow the trails to see where
the ants are coming from, and then use some of the other suggestions to eliminate them. Preventative measures are
important to keep them from coming back. You might also consider spraying
a pest preventative spray like Home Defense around
your foundation at least once every few months to keep them
from trying to come back in. Another option is to use
these outdoor ant baits, which you can add around your foundation and attack the ant colony
before they enter your home. So that’s it for this Top Five DIY video. I hope you guys enjoyed it, and I hope it helps you get
your ant problem under control. If you liked this video,
please hit that like button and leave a comment down
below letting me know your best DIY ant infestation remedies to help out other people who
might be having a problem. And if you’d like to
check out more of my DIY and home improvement videos, please consider
subscribing to the channel. And you can always visit my
website at mrfixitdiy.com. Thank you, guys, so much for watching. I’ll see you next time. (tranquil music)

Is there a cockroach at the table?!


Who would be better qualified than a
cockroach to hire an exterminator? Nobody has the perspective. Nobody would know better that there’s an infestation. Yet, when was the last time you talked to
your exterminator friend and he told you about how much new business he’s getting
from cockroaches? So how the heck does that relate to what you’re doing? Well,
what I find when you’re selling your content, when you’re selling your
solutions at the organizational or enterprise level that you actually have
a cockroach at the table. There’s something wrong that your
content can fix. There’s something lacking in the organization that your
work can make better. However, somebody at the table’s job was to actually do that.
And by bringing someone in with the expertise, with the insight, with the
outside domain experience, it might make them look bad. It might potentially
exterminate their career. So you need to be thinking about when you’re having
conversations with your clients or potential clients, is there a
cockroach at the table? Is there someone at the table who is at risk by bringing
you on board when it seems perfectly logical to bring you in to fix what is
so obvious to you? So again, cockroaches don’t call an
exterminator. And people that are at risk don’t hire people that will increase
their risk.

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)


Hello everyone, this is a new antsite video In this episode we are going to rebuild an ant city. Keep watching until the end – i promise it will be super exciting… This is an old formicarium A thriving weaver ant colony lived in it before. You can saw this colony in some previous videos, or even personally on terraristic exhibitions. This colony lived 2, 2 and half year long in this formicarium. So the goal is to populate again this formicarium with a thriving ant colony. We have chance now to rebuild this system, so why don’t we upgrade a bit this whole formicarium to be more spectacular? You know i have plenty of creativity, so i find out a cylinder shape instead of the previous brick. This is more elegant and even more spectacular. Then I want something more in my mind.. If the weaver ants can get an own tower, why don’t they get an own city instead? This is the story how comes the idea to build an ant city. The structure build up from three different towers, with three outside gallery between them. There are three escape-prevent edge, and three openable ventilation grid on the top of the towers. There are more ventilation grids on two place at the sides, for the better breezing. There are many carcase laying on the floor of the old formicarium. Also can find tainted, unhatched larvae somewhere. The diameter of the biggest cylinder was planned for the size of the old bonsai tree. Meanwhile we get a big family of weaver ants so they will move into the new place. You can see what a massive nest they built in their previous home. They weaved almost everything for nest in the left formicarium, and there are many of workers in the left formicarium also. The ant city looks much amazing after the furnish. The old bonsai tree also looks epic in it, and i put another, smaller bonsai tree inside. Ants can hide between it’s roots. The ant city looks like a real metropolis after the ants have moved in. Every ants working on it’s own task busily. Some of them are building new home and others throwing out the garbage from the old nest. Every ants run fast to their work on the busy trails. After the settlement the ants moved in the old nest at the top of the tree immediately, and they start to throwing out the old larvaes and garbage from it. I didn’t record video from the settlement, because I have put them through almost one by one during an afternoon. It wasn’t too interesting for a video you can believe. An now let’s see the freshly building new nest. One day after the settlement some ants gathered spectacularly between the roots. At that time we could guess what they planning, and a few times later the first strings just appear. The ants just start to weaving their new nest. Catch their larvae in their mouth and working busy on the building operations, so they pass so much with the building on the first day! A few days later the new nest starts to equal to it’s final form. The walls became more stronger as the ants wave more and more layers on it. They use every kind of building material, this reason there are black and green threads in the walls which comes from the fake grass which covers the floor. Meanwhile they start to renew the old nest at the top of the tree. They have repaired the entrances, and they start to build together the nest with the wall of the cylinder. Can see well the fresh silks with brighter color than the old weaves. We can see inside the nest through the formicarium wall. There are many of workers and larvae working hard inside. That workers who don’t work, they guarding in a typical position on the most important strategy places. Sometimes we can notice winged males (drones) in the colony. The smallest, sloping tower still empty, because I give them food and water here. I put a test tube with full of water here, and they start to use it ardently. Hopefully they won’t drown in the open water, if this happens i have to find out another method for watering. There is a build in thermometer at the side of the formicarium. The back of the thermometer have to cover with grid, to avoid them to move inside it. Those areas where the ants feel the ventilation of the air, they try to discover new places. They stick out their antennae often through the dish to find out what is at the other side. A few workers waiting standby on the only door where no any escape-prevent oil around. But don’t worry, i never open this door. If they thirsty or hungry many workers start to raiding in their territory to find food or water. But of course their activity depends from the temperature and light also, in cooler temperature they goes inside the nest instead. And it seems they try to reach the lighter places – i think this could be some escaping instinct. It is such a catching sight, as these tiny insects organizing their society and living their everyday. We can admire them for hours, and can observe more and more interesting ant-things, but unfortunately our video is ending now, hope see you again next time! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and hit the 🔔 icon to get notifications for our new videos! 🙂

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát – 3-6/B. rész

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát – 3-6/B. rész


antsite.eu presents: How to raise an ant colony? – part: 3/B If the colony grows out the test tube, and it gets dirty, we possibly keep them in an open test tube. This is a “velvety tree ant” colony with hundreds of workers. Normally it’s a bad idea to open this test tube, but i show you a technique which we can use this time. Temporarily we can use a simple container box for it, but the best will be the formicarium – i will tell you later why. As first step we should put on some escape-prevent oil to the top of the container. This will prevent the ants to run away. Oiling only a few, otherwise the oil will leak down, and the ants will stick in it. Put the colony into the container, and open the test tube carefully. Ants will flooding out immediately, but they can’t run out from the box. Much easy to feeding such a big colony in this box than in the test tube. Even the ants have more space, and they can react if someting goes wrong in the test tube. In a closed test tube the water can flooding the ants, but with this open test-tube keeping method the whole colony can escape out from the tube. Put tinfoil on a clean test tube setup. Put this into the box and the ants will moving into this one later from the old and dirty test tube. They do it because they feels the darker and cleaner test tube more safety and comfortable. We can hurry them if we tip them out from the test tube, but this species spray formic-acid during stress so we don’t want as many ants to be suicide. Carefully get out the wool-pieces. The ants find the honey immediately – they really need enough food now. Throw some cutted worms also to give them protein. You can see the workers not really successfull on the escap-prevent oil. They can’t walk on this oiled surface. Few days later the ants has moved to the new test tube, so we can get out the old one. But make sure to tip out all of the workers from it. If we check them closer, we can see they moved all the brood with eggs and larvae to the new test tube. So this is a really effective method for moving a colony. The ants did it themselves, we only has to give the ideal conditions for them. Now let’s see the detriments: The escape-prevent oil will disappear from the top of the container within a few weeks. It goes dry or the ants put some dust on it, or somehow fight themselves through. So time to time we should put some fresh oil on it, and could be a good idea to close the container with a cap. But now i have to say another problem! If the box hasn’t got enough ventilation the colony inside can be suicide during stress with their formic-acid, or can choke without enough fresh air. Better ventilation or some soil could help on this, but the best final solution if we keep the ants in a formicarium. In this the ventilation optimal for sure, and we can observe the nest much better than in a test tube. So if we have a bigger formicarium we can use the arena-part similarly like the container before. But first we have to close the nest-part to prevent the ants to move in too early. Then put the test tube in the arena-part. We can use test-tube holder to prevent the rolling. Now open the test tube and let the spotters out. We put the food in the arena not into the test tube anymore. Can feed in small bowls or just simply on the ground of the arena, because acrylic formicariums are easy to clean. We can put in different kind of foods, and we can learn the ants to find the food themselves everywhere in the arena. If the test tube gets dirty or goes dry we can put in a new, clean test tube near the old, and the ants can move themselves within some days. If they don’t want to move Just tip them out from the old test tube and let the new one inside the arena, so they have to move into the new one. But with this method we will loss some brood, because some of the eggs and larvae will stick into the test tube, so we have to put them back carefully with a brush. So better if the ants move themselves. Our colony number will raising because of the more space and more food. It could happen some weeks or some months later – depends of the species. When they have enough workers to find every food in the arena the ants are ready to move in the formicarium’s nest-part. Important to wait until they have enough workers, because if we let them in too early the colony could move in, but maybe they won’t have enough workers to go out searching for food. It could emerge a crisis in the colony because they don’t have enough food to grow workers, but even don’t have enough workers to find food. The recommend worker number to open the nest is different – depends of the species. It could around 30-50 workers with a smaller species, but with a bigger species maybe 20 can be enough. After we open the nest-part the spotters will scout their new territory. If they find it suitable the whole colony will move in. Sometimes needs days for the moving – it depends from the colony number. Bigger colonies has more workers so they find the new place faster and moves themselves faster. After that we only have to feed and drink the colony, so we can observe as they grow more and more workers, and our ant-society grows up slowly. Don’t forget to like and subscribe, and hit the bell 🔔 icon! Click for the next episode!