The Most ICONIC Scandals, Bugs and Broken Updates in CS:GO History


CS:GO’s history features some of the
most scandalous and quite frankly hilarious moments across the gaming
world and this is a tribute to some of the game’s most ridiculous shocking and
intriguing past. Considered one of the biggest controversies at the time, Fnatic’s infamous Overpass boost is
still debated to this day. Whether you think the boost was an amazing play that
was engineered by the great CS:GO minds at Fnatic or whether you think the
boost was completely illegal and unnecessary, you have to admit it made
for a memorable Major. Down 13-3 after the first 16
rounds, Fnatic finally made their three-man booth works as olofmeister
secured two quick kills on the unsuspecting LDLC. Fnatic would continue
to use and abuse the boost round after round for the rest of the game and it
would eventually win them that map over LDLC. The big issue with this boost was
actually that when using the boost, some textures would become invisible and that
was what was against tournament rules. “They realized by getting from social
media, that there is a texture bug. So a texture transparency from that spot where
you can see almost down to the T-spawn, you can see what’s called tunnel and in the
rules that is not allowed.” After a series of back-and-forth between the teams and
the admins, it was eventually ruled that the entire map would be replayed. After
the final decision, however, Fnatic forfeited that match and LDLC would go
on to win their first Major championship. Although it’s impossible to know exactly when this lobby raider first appeared in
the private lobbies of professional CS:GO players and tournaments around the world,
what we do know is the incredible amount of craze this raider generated across the
CS:GO community. Appearing in the private lobbies of even Valve sponsored events
such as ESL One: Katowice 2015 and ESL One: Cologne 2015, this Raider gained
notoriety within the community at a rapid pace. (Casting) In no time, this chiken had a booming social media following and so many fake accounts
imitating him that it would become almost impossible to keep track of the
real one. This lobby raider gained so much popularity so fast
that he even held an AMA with almost 500 comments and over 1600 upvotes. There are
several theories about the identity of this anonymous lobby raider, with the
most popular being that this is a character creation of the Youtuber
Failu, especially considering his video contribution to the chiken craze. But I
guess there’s no real way to tell for sure. Like all things, however, this
character/meme would eventually fade into obscurity, but we’ll never forget
that time when no one was safe from the chiken. Valve’s Christmas gift to the CS:GO community, the R8 update. The R8 update was, at the time,
probably the most game breaking update in the history of CS:GO. Not only was the
R8 the most powerful pistol on release, it was hands down the most powerful gun
in the game. Although there were so many things wrong about the R8 on release, the
damage model was hands-down the most broken. The gun had an extremely high
base damage of 115 which meant you could kill an enemy with one shot to the chest. But not only that it came with a million bugs. Not only could you waste
ammo during freeze time, you could hold both the left and right mouse buttons to
get the accuracy of a channeled mouse one, but the speed of a mouse two shot. Not only
that, players could defuse the bomb and right-click opponents at the exact same
time. Needless to say, the community
was outraged and tournament organizers such as ESL refused to play on the new
update. With the entire wrath of the community at its doors, Valve nerfed the
R8 in a blog post entitled damage control. The nerfs were significant enough
that less and less players began using the R8 over time, and although the R8 is
hardly ever used now, there was a point in time when the R8 outdid every other
gun. The infamous Train bug, aka the bird boost. In December of 2014, Train was reintroduced to CS:GO and it came with a complete facelift. This
was significant because it was the first time in the game’s history where a map
that was already in the game would receive a complete overall signaling
more of that to come in the future. Building the map from the ground up, the
new de_train was stunningly beautiful, but valve included a critical mistake. It
would only take a couple of hours before the community would learn of the bird boost.
With all the changes that Valve had made to the map, a new addition was the spawning
of pigeons every couple of rounds down by ivy. The big issue was that these
pigeons had hit boxes that players could use to jump on top of and then enter
the map with. The game breaking part of this bug, was that, if used properly, it
would allow clear vision down into the A bomb site for the player outside of
the map, giving them an extreme unfair advantage. The bird boost was not
long-lived however as Valve quickly got rid of the bug and set up this mural in
memory of this hilarious moment Considered the worst tournament ever held in the history of
CS:GO, 2015’s Gaming Paradise was anything but. To start things off, the tournament
itself began with a 12 hour delay in which the tournament organizers explained the
delay was due to a road driver who allegedly went missing with the
computers needed to run the tournament. Replacement computers were eventually
brought in, but they apparently were not up to par and would drop frames and net
less than 100 frames per second in smokes. It gets worse. Police eventually arrived
at the players’ hotels and confiscated their passports because, as it turns out,
the organizers had not paid for those hotel rooms. The passports were later returned
to the players once the police were able to confirm that the rooms were in fact
booked by the organizers and not the players or teams. The story continues with the tournament organizers
eventually drafting up a new contract that stated that the players would be
receiving their prize money by completing their games. But to no one’s
surprise G2, who acquired the Kinguin lineup that won the tournament,
released a statement later that year which made it clear that the team was
not to receive any of the money that they were promised. A fittingly
horrendous end to a terrible tournament. “And we found this new site called CS:GO lotto.” For better or
worse CS:GO and the gambling market has been in an intricate love affair since skins
were first released in the arms deal update back in 2013.
Many would even say that weapon skins are the reason why the game is so
popular. Although it can be said that the gambling scandals first began with
former CS:GO player and now popular streamer Mohamad “m0E” Assad versus
CS:GO diamonds, the gambling scandals actually really exploded when a Youtuber by the
name of Honour the Call made a video providing evidence that popular Call of
Duty Youtubers TmarTn and ProSyndicate have promoted and gambled on CS:GO lotto
without disclosing the fact that they were owners of that website. Through this
story, several other notable streamers and prominent personalities were dragged into the forefront and the community began to
seriously consider the legitimacy and morality of such websites. Valve’s response came in July, when it released an announcement stating that
they had no business relationships with any of the gambling websites and that it
would send out notices to cease operations. Valve followed through shortly
after, with said letter and the letter requested the immediate cease and desist
of a long list of popular gambling websites such as CS:GO Lotto, CS:GO Wild,
CS:GO Diamonds, and most notably CS:GO lounge. The gambling crackdown had
some stating that this was the end of CS:GO’s competitive scene and viewership,
but the CS:GO community held strong and were able to set new viewership records
during the ELEAGUE Major. “l I don’t even care, we’re all on adderall. Like I don’t even give a f–k.” CS:GO’s doping scandal exploded mid
2015, when former Cloud9 member Semphis admitted that he and the entire
C9 lineup at ESL One Katowice were on adderall. These remarks sparked a world
of controversy about the use of drugs in esports and ESL responded quickly,
teaming up with the NADA to run their first anti PED drug test for
ESL One: Cologne of that year. When Cologne ended, ESL released an article
detailing the immense success of the event along with news that the random PED testing held during the event came back negative, successfully putting an end to the biggest drug scandal in CS:GO history. Near the end of 2014, a German pro player
SMN was first caught cheating through the ESEA client. Valve and ESEA then
quickly worked together to help update the Valve anti-cheat system and it was able
to detect and ban SMN of Team Alternate Sf of Epsilon and most notably
Titan’s very own KQLY. (Casting) KQLY soon after the VAC ban came clean, stating that he had in fact used the cheat for a week. Following these VAC bans came an
extreme witch hunt. “I know that a couple of my teammates are convinced that…they think they cheat.” The man most affected by this witch hunt was flusha of Fnatic.
As several videos accusing the Swede of cheating became more and more popular
over the Internet. flusha defended his stance stating that he had never
cheated and that he will never cheat explaining that his unique playstyle and
tendency to lift his mouse a lot more than other pros as some of the
explanations for the community suspicions. Although the witch hunt would die down
eventually as time past, speculations and suspicions of pro players cheating still
continue to this day. A mistake that would change the lives of all the members involved, the iBUYPOWER
match-fixing scandal is probably the biggest esports scandal of all time. On
August 20th of 2014, two North American teams iBUYPOWER
and NetcodeGuides.com were set to face off in an online match for the fifth
season of CEVO’s professional league. iBUYPOWER were heavily favored in this
matchup, but were blown out 4-16. When the match ended there was some
speculation that the match was thrown by iBUYPOWER, but it was quickly brushed
aside as just rumors. The story then later resurfaced when veteran
esports journalist Richard Lewis brought to light new evidence in January of 2015. The new evidence provided by Richard Lewis was incriminating text
messages by Derek “dboorN” Boorn to his former girlfriend. The text explicitly
said that quote they really did throw that match and I bet for them on
alternate accounts end quote. The rest is as they say history, as Valve put their
foot down on the people involved through a blog post entitled integrity and fair
play in January of 2015. Although at the time the bans were indefinite, Valve in
their 2016 blog post entitled “A follow-up on integrity and fair play”
confirmed that the bans would be in fact permanent. Looking at the topic as a whole, we have to trace it back to Canada’s own Northern Arena where IMT’s HEN1 was found not wearing his headphones for the first two rounds of
their final map against Cloud9. This event sparked a slew of controversy
around the importance of headgear regulation and competitive play. Fast
forward about a month or so and sean gares tweets out the following Tweet.
quote there needs to be rules on hazard events without booths. You should never be
able to see a player’s ear end quote. This tweet stirred up a relevant
conversation about whether hats or headgear in some way reduce the
effectiveness of noise canceling headphones on the players heads. Although
no firm conclusion could be made about whether headgear was in fact obtrusive
to the noise canceling headphones or whether pro players could use that to an
advantage, the fact that the topic itself was generating unnecessary controversy
around fair play became an issue. The response was swift as ESL made an
official rule ahead of its pro league finals that headgear such as beanies would
not be allowed to be worn. This trend continued on to the recent ELEAGUE
Major qualifiers and even the ELEAGUE Major itself and it will most likely
continue on for the foreseeable future. And that’s the list. Please let us know
in the comments below if you felt like we might have missed anything and
make sure to hit that like button and subscribe for more CS:GO content.

The Most ICONIC Scandals, Bugs & Broken Updates in Dota 2 History

The Most ICONIC Scandals, Bugs & Broken Updates in Dota 2 History


The history of Dota 2 is one of greatness. LD: Not yet! Sylar to fall, Liquid are doing it! They’re gonna take it! KuroKy: I waited four f***ing years for this day. This time we’re gonna rewrite history. Capitalist: EG might be able to do this! Evil Geniuses, they’re holding! LD: Ravage on everyone! The black hole as well! LighTofHeaveN, turns it around! Ravage as well! Stolen by Dendi, are you kidding me!? TobiWan: TNC have done it! The dream, the reality! But it’s also a history that’s not exempt from the absurd, the embarrassing, and the controversial. From game ruining bugs, to the biggest of professional scandals… TobiWan: I cannot believe it! Let’s look back into the most hilarious balancing blunders, the most shocking news, and the lowest points of Dota 2’s storied past. Match-fixing and intentional throws are a hazard of any competitive game and we’re kicking things off with two of the the most infamous examples in Dota 2 history. On June 14th 2013, RoX.KiS took on zRage in an online match in StarLadder Star Series sixth season. Despite being the favourites, RoX lost the game in suspicious fashion with a number of highly questionable engages and buybacks throughout the game. Sheever: They actually want to try to go in with this, Bzz… He was already very low to begin with… They just run in here to die! What’s up with that? That’s not good… The surprise upset was investigated by StarLadder officials, and two days later it was determined that Alexei “Solo” Berezin had intentionally thrown the match after placing a bet against his own team on egamingbets.com Solo publicly apologized for throwing the match, and admitted to using his girlfriend’s account to place a one-hundred dollar bet against his team. And on June 21st, RoX removed Solo from their roster. StarLadder had initially handed Solo a lifetime ban for his actions, but ended up reducing his ban to one
year following his public apology and cleared up any suspicion against the organization and its other players. Solo’s winnings would have totaled three-hundred and twenty-two dollars and the community wasted no time in making the number three-two-two a popular meme throughout esports, often sarcastically referenced when a player is playing so badly it is borderline suspicious. Maut: Don’t do it Zai, you’re too young! What are you doing?! [laughter] But, a year later, a highly publicized match-fixing scandal took place that ended with much more dire consequences. In October of 2014, in Southeast Asia’s Synergy League, the heavily favoured Arrow Gaming lost to Australian squad Can’t Say Wips, prompting an investigation by Dota 2 Lounge. The examination uncovered several bets placed by individuals associated with the team leading Arrow Gaming to be disqualified from the tournament. Further investigations uncovered that the bets originated from accounts belonging to the girlfriends of ddz and Lance, resulting in the two players receiving lifetime bans from the event. Soon after the investigation, Arrow Gaming protested the players’ innocence providing Synergy League with chat logs and statements regarding the situation in ddz’s name. However, the logs were proven to be doctored and the statements false, and as a result, Synergy League extended the bans to Arrow Gaming’s entire organization. As a result of the whole debacle, Arrow Gaming and all of its players were removed from the line-up for The Summit 2’s SEA qualifiers and are still banned from Synergy League. Shortly after the incident ddz took to Facebook to publicly apologize on behalf of the players. Admitting that they had three-two-two’d and that the statements and chat logs provided to Synergy League were forged by Arrow’s management and not written by the players. A few days later Dota website 2p reported that team manager Jaren Gan had threatened to sue Lance and ddz for eight-thousand dollars each for breach of contract should they not retract their confession. Arrow Gaming would eventually release its entire roster. But that wasn’t the end of it. On March 28th, 2015, Valve stepped in, handing out permanent bans to all former members of Arrow Gaming from Valve sponsored events – including the International. While there are other examples of Dota 2 match-fixing, and still some we might not even know about, Arrow Gaming and Solo’s three-to-two are among the most memorable. Bugs come and bugs go, but some remain in infamy for just how ridiculous they are. Of all the bugs in Dota 2’s history, one stands above the rest for both how broken and straight-up hilarious it was. In patch 6.75 Chen’s abilities received a minor tweak as the ability to send allies back to base was moved off Holy Persuasion and back to Test of Faith. But in this process, something broke in the game. For some reason, Holy Persuasion, the ability used to control creeps, now worked on Roshan. You’d think that having Roshan, with his thousands of health, crushing basic attacks and abilities would be a bit strong to have as a pet… …And you’d be right. The discovery spread like wildfire and pretty soon, level one heroes, towers, and neutral creeps were falling to Roshan’s relentless attack. Basically, whichever team had a Chen would have free reign of the map from minute one. In all but the rarest of times that would lead to a dominant victory. Within hours of the bug’s discovery, Valve issued a hotfix… …Ending Chen’s very brief reign of terror. Now, nearly five-years old this bug remains one of Dota’s most iconic. While it generated plenty of salt at the time of its release, Today, you have to laugh at its absurdity. The International 2014 set records for its 10 million dollar prize pool and with that much money, teams were looking to gain every advantage possible, pouring hours into carefully crafting winning strategies that would make them millionaires. So when a Chinese news crew leaked team strategies during the tournament, you could imagine that some people were pretty pissed. The outrage stemmed from a Weibo post made by a user known as Dr.Kleiber, who posted a passionate open letter explaining the situation. According to the post, the crew of the website Gamefy made their way into Team DK’s off-limits game room and started rolling, despite having no permission from Team DK or Valve to do so. Initially posted to Youku, the video was translated to English and submitted to Gosu Gamers, spreading across the community. While both videos were taken down, after a furious interview by Team DK coach “71”, the video had spawned mirrors and copies all over the internet. According to “71”, the video revealed DK’s core strategy and drafting ideas. For not just the game in question, but the entire tournament. To make matters worse, the Weibo post also indicated that Gamefy had posted a similar video on June 11th, where they recorded Invictus Gaming’s team conversation. Thankfully, Ferrari_430 noticed the camera and left the room meaning not too much of IG’s discussion was leaked. Following the leak, iceiceice joined his coach in expressing his displeasure with Gamefy. A day after the outrage, Gamefy posted an apology to their Weibo, where they begged the community for forgiveness. In compliance with Valve’s rules, the personnel who were involved in the leak did not continue reporting on the event. Although Gamefy still worked for the remainder of the tournament. The community, upon hearing of the leak was understandably furious at the journalist in question. The outrage prompted Gamefy’s producer to post another apology, this time directly defending the “well-intentioned” reporter from whom the leak resulted. The overall impact of the Gamefy leak on TI4’s outcome is hard to extrapolate, But it’s even harder to deny its influence on Team DK, who headed into the tournament as one of the clear favourites. Needless to say, it is one of the largest scale leaks in Dota 2’s history and remains the most memorable scandal to emerge from The International. The term game-breaking can be thrown around loosely… Ayesee: He’s gonna try it again, can he… Got him that time! [crowd cheers] See you in the base, Mu! Welcome home! But in Dota 2, one particular bug stands out for quite literally breaking the game. In patch 6.81, Vengeful Spirit received a change to her aura that would apply a damage debuff to any hero that killed her. Simple right? Unfortunately, a bug caused the game to instantly crash if the aura debuff was applied to any non-player. Essentially a death to creeps or towers would force everyone out of the lobby. The bug was exploited almost instantly, much to the frustration of a large part of the community, as griefers intentionally suicided to prevent themselves from losing, ruining countless games. To no one’s surprise the issue was hot-fixed by Valve within a day of its discovery after massive community outcry. While many bugs have appeared since this rage inducer from 2014, few have had the catastrophic consequences of 6.81’s Venge aura. While Dota has had its fair share of bad tournaments in the past, none have captured the community’s ire quite like the Shanghai Major. KotLGuy: Where to begin? It seemed like every hour saw a new issue arise. As the days rolled on the event went from rage inducing… Draskyl: What? ODPixel: Did they say GG? Draskyl: They definitely didn’t. ..to almost comedic in its ineptitude. [laughter] Between the wealth of production issues, logistical nightmares, and endless delays, nothing seemed to be going right for anyone involved. And that doesn’t even cover all the problems, such as players’ keyboards going missing, talent not receiving food, water or transportation to the venue, the laughable VIP room… LD: So, they’ve added some chairs since I last came in. Not so soundproof booths, and fans and cosplayers being asked to leave the venue. We could go on, but you get the idea. ppd: There’s been so many delays and problems and it really makes our game and what we’re doing here look bad, which is unfortunate for everyone involved. Sheever: Because the production is not great… We’re gonna continue here with one more match today though, Evil Geniuses, MVP Phoenix and we’re gonna go continue with that after a small break, so we’ll see you soon. Soon. [laughter] Eventually Valve fired production company Perfect World and PGL was hired to salvage the rapidly sinking ship. And while PGL saved the show, it was too late. The Shanghai Major was already going to go down in history as one of Dota 2’s most embarrassing events. It really is a shame that the event went so wrong because against the backdrop of disaster, the games were fantastic and the casters and talent poured their all into it. TobiWan: The black hole! The vac is there! There’s a hole! Now they go! Universe force staffs the other way to safety! They can’t do anything to the cleave! In from Arteezy, and that’s the danger zone! In some cases, pulling double or even triple shifts to make sure that the show would go on. But while all that might be enough to put Shanghai on the wrong side of history, it was the firing of James “2GD” Harding that elevated the major to a new level of infamy. On day two, desk host 2GD was unexpectedly replaced on the panel. While the change raised some eyebrows in the community since 2GD was seen as an entertaining if slightly provocative host, there had been little to suggest that his off-brand style of humor would be grounds to have him fired. 2GD: It’s not just me here to talk about the dos and don’ts of Dota 2, and the cans and c***s of the teams. 2GD: The Chinese hotel had disabled pornography. Mr. Wang’s amazing wheelchaired antics were pretty amazing. WinteR: It shouldn’t be “Sir” 2GD, it should be “Old” 2GD. [laughter] 2GD: You can f*** off, WinteR. 2GD: Cons for CDEC… …they’re stubborn and only have one D. [laughter] But it wasn’t just his firing that got the community up in arms, it was the inflammatory response to the situation on Reddit by Valve co-founder and president, Gabe Newell. In that statement, Newell called 2GD “an ass”, while offering little in the way of an explanation for his dismissal. 2GD responded to the post suggesting that he was not just removed from the panel for his raunchy humor, but for a history of conflict with Valve employees and producers. ppd: He came in here trying to be himself and, you know, you can appreciate that but him being himself just isn’t what Valve wanted to be for the face of their Major and that’s their call. Regardless of the reasons or any past history between James and Valve, the manner in which Newell and Valve handled the dismissal and the community fallout it generated has become infamous. To this day, “is an ass” is a high tier meme within the Dota 2 scene. Despite the subsequent Manila, Boston, and Kiev Majors all being praised for their fantastic production values, the aftertaste left by the Shanghai Major will never be forgotten by Dota 2 fans. 2GD: So let’s check out some of the highlights. SyndereN: Your face is a beautiful highlight. Yep. [laughter] Broken hero releases are a pitfall of any MOBA and Dota 2 owns arguably the most outrageous one of all time. The introduction of Centaur Warrunner into Dota 2 in October of 2012 was basically a disaster. He was unkillable levels of tanky, dealt ridiculous damage, and could chain stun into death with ease. His opening day win rate in Dota 2 was staggering, at over sixty-seven percent. The hero was a complete and total nightmare to play against. Part of the reason for this unheard of dominance was that as part of the port from Dota to Dota 2 Centaur was given a new ultimate. Instead of Great Fortitude which gave flat strength, he received Stampede, a global ability on a tiny cooldown that gave all allies maximum movement speed, a ridiculous stun upon contact with an enemy and massive damage. Things were so bad that just four days later, Centaur received nerfs – specifically to Stampede. More nerfs would be dealt to the hero in December, removing the stuns from both Double Edge and Stampede. The hero had finally been brought back into line. Needless to say, the memory of Centaur stomping players into oblivion in 1v3 scenarios is pretty funny in retrospect, but easily makes it one of Dota 2’s most iconic broken updates. [laughs] Hopefully we never see such a busted hero release ever again. CW: Long shall my name be remembered. Since its formation in 2014, Team Secret has been a hotbed of controversy. From public roster disputes to reports of a hostile team environment, it seemed like for a long time Secret couldn’t keep their name out of the news – and not in a good way. Even going back to their inaugural roster, messy break-ups have been all too frequent. From N0tail and Fly’s bitter removal, To w33 and MiSeRy’s very public exits, changing rosters has rarely been smooth sailing for captain, Puppey, and the rest of Team Secret’s management. Redeye: A team of superstars, as they are, but yet to gel properly, perhaps. But if dramatic roster moves were the only thing that they were known for, Secret would not make this list. On February 16th, 2016, Team Secret’s now former manager, Evany Chang, took to Twitlonger and posted a lengthy account of her time with the team, where she alleged that Team Secret had missed making payments to players and staff and neglected to hand out tournament winnings in a timely manner. Later that year, EternalEnvy made similar accusations, alleging that he had yet to be paid for a number of tournaments. Additionally, stating that team director Kemal Sadikoglu and captain Puppey had committed other abuses. EternalEnvy claimed that the organization was secretly removing ten percent of all player winnings without previous consent, that players had never signed contracts and that Puppey had physically bullied w33 – among other accusations. That same day, another former player, MiSeRy, came forward. Stating that the team had failed to pay him for numerous tournaments and claimed that he hadn’t received agreed upon revenue from merchandise. A little more than a week later, Team Secret posted a response on their website simply titled “Update”, which while not acknowledging any accusations directly did admit that the organization had made mistakes attributed to its rapid growth. In March of 2017, Puppey would post his own Twitlonger announcing the departure of Sadikoglu and apologizing to past members of the organization that felt that they had been wronged, further claiming that all obligations to those individuals had now been met. Since then, Team Secret has settled down and kept their name out of negative news, but despite consistently being a strong team that has attracted serious talent over the years, the organization has yet to fully rehabilitate its image in the eyes of many community members. Thanks for watching! If you want to see some more iconic esports moments subscribe to our channel and let us know what you’d like to see next.

Getting CS:GO’d: The Best Bugs, Glitches and WTF Moments in CS:GO

Getting CS:GO’d: The Best Bugs, Glitches and WTF Moments in CS:GO


To be CS:GO’d is to be rekt, to be wronged,
to be utterly destroyed, through no fault of your own, by the one they call Valve. Now the traditional definition of getting CS:GO’d
involves putting your crosshair over somebody’s head, pulling the trigger, and having the
bullets go through them like nothing happened. But for the purposes of this video, we’ve
expanded the definition to include those pesky bugs, those glitches, and the general what-the-f–kery
that has happened in pro play. So let’s get it started with the traditional
definition of getting CS:GO’d. (Casting) Now, while getting CS:GO’d can really make
your blood boil, arguably worse are the random seemingly unpredictable bugs that can cost you
your life, the round, and even the game. (Casting) Now, to round this one out guys, we wanted to look at some of the more lighthearted glitches in the game of CS:GO. This kind of stuff you can’t even be mad at, you just have to sit back and laugh. (Casting) “It’s just a flesh wound.” (Casting) Well guys, that’s all we’ve got for you this week on Best of. Now, this particular installment is really near and dear to my heart, because I’m always getting CS:GO’d in my games. Nobody in the office even believes me. But you guys do, right??? Let me know in the comments and I will see you next week.