5 Disgusting Facts About Cockroaches

5 Disgusting Facts About Cockroaches


five disgusting facts about cockroaches the cockroaches one annoying and
troublesome insects that we humans still aren’t used to and probably never will
be this is even though roaches have adapted
to hang around us since forever and seems to be enjoying the relationship
there are lots of interesting and disgusting facts about roaches that many
of us do not know for example they are super bugs that can survive for weeks
with vital parts missing they love our ears and they can bite us when we
stopped leaving food for them cockroaches are tough survivors and getting rid of
them is ridiculously difficult cutting of a roach head does not even count as
death sentence because the pest can survive for weeks without it the roach
only does later because it doesn’t have a mouth with which to eat or drink
cockroaches can live without their hands because they do not use their heads the
same we do we humans died soon after decapitation because our bodies lose lots
of blood and blood pressure cockroaches do not have much blood or
blood pressure to begin with so their necks just clot and they continue
roaming around as if nothing happened even if we humans managed to find a way
around the massive loss of blood and blood pressure we would still be finished
because the nerves in our bodies need to be connected to our brains to survive we
also need our noses and mouths to breathe the bodies of roaches work
independently of their tiny brains they also breathe through small holes on
their bodies all these features allow cockroaches to
live for weeks without their heads they only succumb to hunger and thirst
because they have not figured out a way to eat and drink with their skin
interestingly the head of cockroach remains alive for hours after decapitation as evidenced by its moving antennae in
fact the head can remain alive for longer if it is refrigerated and given
enough nutrients according to one common cockroach fact
that has been appearing on the Internet this creatures hated when human touch
them so much that they often flee to start cleaning themselves of disgusting
human contact but it’s not what you think
cockroaches hate humans or anything else touching them because that simple
contact can be dangerous for their existence to be clear
cockroaches hate being around humans as much as humans hate being around this
disgusting insects cockroaches naturally flee from larger creatures human or not
because they know that any contact with larger creatures will often lead to
death in fact contact with almost any organism could have some residue on the
roach that could be detrimental to its survival in the case of humans it is the
natural oils that we unwittingly leave on anything we touch that oil can also
disrupt how the cockroach body works most affected are the antennae they seem
unremarkable to us but they are crucial to the cockroach survival they work as
the creatures nose and are required for smelling food and finding potential mate
those oils will reduce the pest ability to smell which is bad for the roach cockroaches are smarter than we think
they can even make decisions in groups just like many other insects and animals
several years back Dr. Jose Halloy of the free university of brussels belgium
conducted a study to observe how roaches think he put several of them inside a
dish with three homes and waited to see how they will divide themselves Dr.
Halloy observed that the roaches first came together touching each other with
their antennae after some time they divided themselves into the homes
equally for example 50 roaches split into two groups of 25 each when they
were given three homes with a capacity of 40 roaches each one grouped lived in
the first home and the other group lived in the second the third home was
abandoned all 50 roaches also opted to live in a single home when they were
given three homes that would accommodate over 50 roaches each termites and cockroaches belong to
the same order Blattodea so termites are technically cockroaches
interestingly termites were not considered cockroaches until 2018 before
then termites belong to the order I Isoptera
studies into the similarities between both creatures began in 1934 when
researchers observed that their guts contains similar microbes a research
paper published in 2007 finally confirmed that they were relatives and
recommended that the taxonomic rank be adjusted to put them under the same
family actually the paper suggested that the order Blattodea for cockroaches
and Isoptera for termites should be considered sub families under a new
family called Termitidae several scientists with entomological Society of
America refused this suggestion at the time because they did not want termites
to be considered cockroaches besides another termitidae family already
existed in the taxonomic rank and could cause confusion with the new suggested
termitidae family the ESA later backtrack and agreed to categorize
termites as cockroach under putting it to a vote in 2018 ESA reclassified the
termite order. Isoptera as a sub order and place it under the
cockroach Blattodea order instead of creating a new family as the 2007
paper suggested that does not mean you should call
termites cockroach though termites should be called termites and cockroaches
cockroaches remember that saying about knowing a tomato is a fruit but not
putting it into fruit salad a similar idea applies here knowledge is knowing
that a termite is a cockroach wisdom is not calling it a cockroach cockroaches love sugar they will give
you a thumbs up if you leave candy cakes fruits and juice with high sugar content
lying uncovered around your home leave raw sugar lying around and they will love
you forever pest control businesses discovered this in 1980s they observed
that sprinkling sugar in a location would leave roach milling around in no
time the businesses use that to their advantage and started to bait roaches with
glucose laced with insecticide the meal killed the roaches when they returned to
their homes other roaches who opened eat the remains of the dead which is not
surprising because these creatures will eat almost anything the scavenging
roaches also died as the body of the dead roaches still contain the poison
this went on for some time until the cockroach learned that sugar was
killing them cockroaches later began to resist this sugar their senses quickly
adjusted to detect sweet sugar as bitter many pest control businesses
discovered that too and replaced the glucose with fructose a different sugar
the roaches quickly caught on and started avoiding fructose as well
scientists traced this surprising switch to millions of years ago when roaches
first developed the ability to detect sweet but poisonous parts of certain
plants they ate as bitter that scale was genetically suppressed when they started
to live around humans and only returned when humans started to poison their food you

Can You Guess What Insects Invaded My Flat?

Can You Guess What Insects Invaded My Flat?


Hey everyone!
It’s Inés from Draw Curiosity! Firstly, sorry for being gone for so long without much
explanation! I don’t really want to go into too many details and don’t think I should
need to go into them anyway, but a concise summary would basically be I was very burnt
out after my PhD, I was quite stressed, this made me relapse with my OCD, and I felt it
like the best decision was to take a step back away from the Internet and YouTube and
try and reduce stressors in my life, get everything in order and basically do what I needed to
do to be less stressed. Now, sadly I wouldn’t say I am totally better and honestly, I’m
still pretty stressed, but I am definitely doing a lot better than I was and I’m in a
much better frame of mind to come back and make videos about science and curiosities
and bugs and all the other things which I am really enthusiastic about and which I hope
you will enjoy too – so here I am! Secondly, there have been changes – I know
you’re all looking at the hair! It has indeed all gone! For me this is quite old news now,
it’s been like this for a while now and I really like it. However, I’m determined
for the comment section to not be about my appearance, so if you do have any questions,
I actually preemptively already made a few videos on my second channel explaining why
I cut my hair, so please go watch those if you have any questions because I have hopefully
answered any question you could possibly have had about it. I do have a challenge for you
though – and if you haven’t done this already, because I have posted about this on twitter
and instagram, but I would love for you to go to this link, bit.ly/BraidWeight and guess
how much you thought the braid that I cut off weighed – please do weigh in with your
best guess, I will be weight-ing 😉 all that I ask is that you don’t write your guess
in the comments, otherwise it might bias and influence other people’s guesses, and we
want to be scientific as possible here! And anyway, if you felt that the meagre 1
metre change in hair length was a big deal, wait till I tell you all about the eleven
thousand kilometer difference I’ve made to my life! A couple of months ago I finally
moved out of Oxford back to my hometown Seville, and then about a month later I moved continents
to Malaysia, so now I’m living on the island of Borneo, in the city of Kuching, capital
of Sarawak state. I will probably also make a video on the second channel explaining why,
but today’s little story is set right here in this apartment in Kuching. [Raw Curiosity intro (yeah, I don’t know why
I made it like this)] So if you know me well, you’ll know that
I love my insects and I will fully admit to the fact that one of the main things for which
I was most excited about moving to Malaysia was the wildlife, specifically the insects.
Tropical regions have a much higher biodiversity than temperate regions, and I’m here for
it. Also I really love the heat, and apparently the humidity as well, so I haven’t even
used the aircon in this place yet and instead I usually just have my window open for ventilation
and also in the secret hopes that maybe some insect from the outside will make its way
indoors for me to have a closer look! I know it probably sounds like I have a deathwish,
but there are actually these really giant wasps, maybe hornets, I don’t know, and they
fly around outside and I secretly really want one of them to grace me a visit. I really
want to see one of them up close – I know, you can call me nuts. Anyway, indeed, ask and you shall receive,
and in my case perhaps I received a little bit more than I bargained for. Now, I’m
living in a high-ish rise building in the middle of a city, so it probably shouldn’t
surprise me that the vast majority of invertebrates that I have allowed to trespass on my premises,
whether voluntarily or involuntarily, were not cool tropical bugs from the depth of the
Bornean jungle… but household pests. And today’s story is no different. In fact,
I propose we play a little game, I am curious to know how long it takes you to figure out
what mysterious arthropod swarmed my flat, because as an entomologist I am personally
ashamed by how long it took me to realise what these insects were. So let’s set the scene. It’s a weekday
evening at the beginning of monsoon season, and the storms from the day had finally died
down. I was working in my office, so like most days, I opened the window to allow a
gentle breeze to come through whilst I sat at my keyboard. As the sun began to set, I
noticed that a UFI, an unidentified flying insect, had made its way into my room.
The first two seconds I saw it, I thought it could be a wasp, as its body trailed behind
it – but I noticed that it seemed to struggle a lot with flight and Hymenopterans are relatively
skilled flyers. My next thought was this might be a Neuropteran, because from what I could
tell it had roughly four equally sized wings that seemed quite large and membranous. However,
this insect was also flying quite haphazardly and whilst Neuropterans might not be the most
agile of flyers, they are generally quite graceful when they do fly. In fact, because
it was flying with quite a nosedive, and desperately spiralling into the ground, at first I thought
it might have something wrong with its wing, and whilst this was happening, I noticed that
another identical insect flew into my office – I had been graced with not one, but two,
and then three and four and five – – and by this point there were quite a few of them
flying manically around my office, so I decided to quickly slink out into the kitchen, turning
on a couple of lights along the way because it was actually quite dark now that the sun
had already fully set, to quickly grab an empty bottle and a glass to see if I could
contain these insects. By the time I got back to the office, which
was only about 10 seconds later, there were over 10 of them in the room, so I quickly
closed the window and put a glass on the top of one of them to see if it would encourage
it to stop flying and settle down so I could take a closer look. I tried to use my bottle
with the other one, and it’s wing fell off which actually made me feel quite guilty so
I decided I needed to brainstorm a safer way to catch them. I did notice that one of them
got stuck in a drop of water that had fallen out of the bottle, so I decided to fill the
bottle with water and just pour it all over my tiled floor. Because they were flying intentionally
into the ground, and their wings were so big, the water actually did a very good job at
pinning them to the ground without drowning them. I briefly wondered if they were flying
ants, because honestly this swarm reminded me of a nuptial flight, where many reproductive
individuals will fly out at the same time on the same day in order to find a mate and
found new colonies. So I did briefly think that they could be queen ants attempting to
nest in the ground. However, when the mystery insects were trapped in the water, I could
clearly tell that these were no Hymenopterans. They didn’t have the narrow waist nor the
elbowed antennae that are characteristic of queen ants. So I still didn’t know what
they were, and at this point I actually had to leave quite quickly as I was going to go
to a dance class, so as I opened the office door to go and get changed I was greeted by
a swarm of around 300 of these insects that had gathered in my living room after I had
carelessly turned the light on less than 10 minutes earlier. So what did I do? I very
quickly refilled my water bottle and I just chucked it all over my floor and surprisingly
in 30 seconds flat every single one was glued to the floor. This was a surprisingly good
method, because the water creates a thin film on the floor, shallow enough such that the
insect won’t drown in the water, but because the insect’s wings were so large, they are
actually unable to unstick them from the water due to the surface tension. It is also reversible,
because if you remove the insect from the water and you allow it to dry, it will actually
just be able to fly and live exactly as it did before ending up in water – and to be
honest I expect no less of an insect living in a tropical rainy country. Additionally,
also because it is so humid in Kuching, I believe it is actually the most humid city
in Malaysia, the water shouldn’t be evaporating any time soon, so I was hoping it would keep
them glued in place whilst I bought myself some time and went to enjoy my dance class,
and you know, just delay dealing with them! So, the whole area of the city seemed to be
covered in these insects, as the stairway that lead up to my dance class was also peppered
with these mystery insects. On my way back two and a half hours later and still none
the wiser as to what these non-Hymenopteran insects were, I remember I asked the guard
at the apartment gates what they were. And he said something like “sempoh” or “sempah”,
not for lack of trying, I have not been able to find any word in Sarawak Malay or related
dialects that matches with any type of flying insect that sounds like that. The closest
I can think of is sampah, which means rubbish, so I don’t know what he was referring to sadly.
I saw quite a few on the ground and some were missing their wings and they were clearly
being chased by their mates in a behaviour known as tandem run, where several males chase
a female and the female chooses the one she wishes to mate with, so it was clear to me
that this was definitely some sort of nuptial flight. Now, going up in the lift I encountered
two of my neighbours, and I also asked them what these mysterious abundant insects were.
They spoke in Chinese about it, but sadly my Chinese wasn’t – and still isn’t – good
enough to pick out the name, but basically they said they didn’t know the name in English
but they swarm occasionally in the early evening after there’s heavy rain and they smell
really bad. I’m ashamed to say I actually verified that claim. When I finally opened
the door home, Malaysia’s humidity didn’t let me down and thankfully I wasn’t received
by another swarm but instead by the insects still being mostly glued to the ground. However,
some giant versions of these insects, almost like the boss of a videogame, they suddenly
materialised out of nowhere, but when they finally landed in my water trap they seemed
to almost purposefully shed or yank their wings off in order to continue being able
to move – and the dealate insect honestly looked very similar to a cockroach. And this
is when the penny finally dropped for me! What insect has a life cycle very similar
to that of ants, in that they engage in nuptial flights in huge numbers and shed their wings
soon before or after mating and they seem to attempt to bury into the ground to found
a new nest but aren’t Hymenopterans and are closely related to cockroaches? Ding ding
ding! Termites!! and termites are never good news, so we entered DEFCON-3, time to terminate
the termites, say bye to the 白蚁, chuck out the cekeler, termuerte a las termitas,
shiroari wa mou shindeiru and the termites promptly went from reversible floorwater quarantine
to swift death by summer footwear compression and disposal via the sewage system.
Anyway, admittedly there is a very high chance now that some of the several hundred termites
that invaded could have shed their wings and for there to have been a pair of the opposite
sex who used their strong smelly termite pheromones to find each other somewhere in my flat and
mate and found a colony… but so far I have thankfully not found any evidence of termites
and neither have the termite experts that I paranoidly brought around – but I will keep
you posted in a few months, because you know, it takes some time.
I did keep some of the wings and corpses for identification purposes, and I’m quite convinced
– although I’m also very prepared to be wrong and to be corrected, termite experts
please do weigh in, but I think the small ones sadly, do look like Formosan termites,
or Coptotermes – which is bad news because they are basically one of the most invasive
and destructive species out there. The big ones might have been a separate species altogether
because they were unusually large, maybe they were physogastric, I’m thinking maybe Macrotermes
gilvus based on their size and coloration and wing shape, but who knows, maybe they
were just mutant alates of those smaller termites, which were probably Coptotermes. Anyway, there goes my story on how I’m adjusting
to life halfway across the world and how my naive love of insects is going to land me
with some household pest infestation. I really hope you enjoyed this, and I would love to
know if you guessed they were termites before I did. I’m still actually quite ashamed it
took me that long, although in my defence I’ve actually never seen an alate termite
before! And honestly, I feel I’ve filled my lifetime quota of them, so I hope never to
see one again. Anyway, I will be posting regularly from now
on, so it would be a great time to the notification bell if you do enjoy my content and my ramblings.
I would love to be posting weekly, but I do still currently do everything myself, so research,
present, edit, design, animate, the thumbnails and jump through all of the youtube publishing
hoops, so unless I make more videos that are little bit more like this which are a little
bit more vloggy and require a little bit less post-production, honestly it might still just
be 2-3 times a month, and also I obviously still work on other things on the side and
one of the most recent things is I worked on the new Edge of Science series that the
BBC and YouTube Originals are releasing on the 10th of December (AKA today), and of course,
I’m also determined to try and maintain a healthy work-life balance which is the whole
reason I stepped back in the first place. ANYWAY, I hope you’re doing well, and as
ever, thank you so much to my wonderful patreons for supporting me – which also, patreon has
now reopened after the hiatus, and as always thank you so much for watching me and I’ll
see you in the next one! Bye!

How to Use Taurus SC Termiticide | DoMyOwn.com

How to Use Taurus SC Termiticide | DoMyOwn.com


Hey I’m Chris the Bug Guy from Domyownpestcontrol.com,
and today we are going to show you how to get rid of termites using Taurus SC. Taurus
SC is a non-repellent termiticide/insecticide with fipronil as the active ingredient. Many
professionals use Taurus SC because it is economical and kills termites quickly. Taurus
SC is a concentrate and is found in a 20 oz and 78 oz bottle. One 20 oz bottle will make
25 gallons and treat 60 lineal feet. The 78 oz bottle will make up to 100 gallons and
treat 250 lineal feet. Let’s go outside and we’re going to show you how to apply Taurus
SC in the trench around your house. Step 1 is digging the trench. The trench against
your house should be 6″ wide and 6″ deep. You can use a shovel or a pick axe, and the
trench will be directly against the foundation. Once you have dug the trench, it is 4 gallons
per 10 feet, 10 lineal feet, along the house. So you are going to mix in the termiticide,
make a line on the bucket if you need to for 4 gallons, and once it’s mixed we’re going
to evenly distribute it over the trench. So we have a 10′ section over here. You are going
to evenly distribute those 4 gallons over the 10′, and then move on to the next section.
By the time you get back around this should have dissipated into the soil. Now once you
have finished trenching and filling the trench with the termiticide, and it’s had time to
dissipate into the soil you need to put the back fill back into the trench. Now the dirt
right now is untreated. This is the dirt we took out of the trench, but you want to make
sure that you treat it before you put it back in because you don’t want a layer of untreated
soil on top of the treated soil. If termites happen to go right near the surface, they
are going to skip the termiticide you placed in the trench. So this is a lot easier with
two people. You want to mix some termiticide in a 1 gallon pump sprayer, and then you want
to have a shovel or a rake to push the dirt back in the trench. The person with the sprayer
is going to go ahead and start just wetting the dirt down, not so much that it is muddy,
but just start wetting the dirt down, and as you are pushing it back in with the shovel
or rake, the other person is going to wet it down. Just move on down the line. Let him
wet it down a little bit. As you shovel it back in they’re just going to wet down that
back fill and get it mixed well with the termiticide. Now your house is completely protected by
the professional termiticide. I hope you found this video useful. For more information click
here.

Signs of Termites

Signs of Termites


Here we have an active infestation of leading
into an inaccessible area. Do to this Best Rate would recommend a fumigation. However, other treatment options can be provided.

Insect to Injury (1956)

Insect to Injury (1956)


Popeye the Sailor Insect to Injury [singing] Now me house is finished! Wow! Termites! Oh my gosh! They’ll eat me fence! Whew! Huh? Me house! [laughs] Why them blasted termites! Well, me termite troubles is over. This will stop them insect vultures! [laughs] I’m strong to the finish,
’cause I eats me spinach. I’m Popeye the Sailor Man! [Toot! Toot!]

Ants treat comrades injured on the field of battle

Ants treat comrades injured on the field of battle


The Matabele ant’s strict termite diet means many of these ants’ days are spent in dangerous raids on these combative insects. The termites are no pushovers, which leaves many ants wounded after each raid. Researchers recently found that injured ants are often carried back to the nest by their fellow soldiers. Now they have discovered that once back at the nest, the injured ants’ wounds are treated by their nestmates, who spend time grooming the open wounds to clear debris, adding antimicrobial chemicals, and removing any pesky termites. And the treatment works. Ants treated within the first hour had a mortality rate of 10%, while ants that received no treatment had a mortality rate of 80%. Researchers found that lightly injured ants altered their behavior when near a returning column of ants. When nest-mates were close, they slowed their pace dramatically, signaling that they’re injured If the ants passed them by without help, the injured ant immediately started walking faster, following them back to the nest. Ants that lost five or more limbs in a termite battle were rarely helped back to the nest. Normally, when an injured ant is found, it curls up into a ball to allow for easy transport. Heavily injured ants, however, flail their remaining limbs about and spin on their backs, becoming so uncooperative that they’re left behind. Moving forward, researchers hope to find out if this grooming behavior simply prevents infection after termite skirmishes or if it could also be an effective treatment if an infectious disease attacks the colony.

Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi Halloween Stories: Termites

Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi Halloween Stories: Termites


– Well, Yumi, there’s nothing better than Halloween.
– You betcha. – Hey, Mom, are you finished carving that pumpkin?
– I sure am. – (Doorbell Rings)
– Someone’s at the door.
– I’ll get it. Look who’s here. It’s our friend Tamika. Nice costume. – Thanks.
– Why don’t you come on in? – Hi, Tamika. Hey, I like your costume.
– Thanks. I’m a bat. Wanna go for a walk? That’ll be a good idea,
but I wanna ask Ryou something strange. What kinda strange thing are you about to ask him? Oh well, you’ll see. Ryou, before I go out for a walk with Yumi and Tamika,
I need to tell you a strange thing about… – termites.
– Termites? – Termites.
– What are termites? Termites are the grossest, ugliest and
most disgusting insects in the whole world. And they only come out at night to eat
boys just like you. There are no such things as termites! – There are!
– There aren’t! Stop fighting over each other!
Wait a minute, did you say something about termites? This gives me an idea. Let’s do a termite trap on Julie. (Crickets Chirping) This jar is full of termites.
On the count of 3, I’m gonna open it. 1… 2… 3. (Termites Buzzing) What’s that awful smell? Termites! Get–(Speaking Gibberish) – Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!
– Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! Well, since Yumi and Tamika are having
too much fun biting Julie with their termites, I’m gonna go meet a real bat since
Tamika is dressed as a bat this year. Aha. 3 bats. Hi. I’m Ami. Can you tell me your names? Sure. I’m Barney Bat. And I’m Betty Bat. We’re parents
because we have a baby. I’m Bobby Bat. What’s going on tonight? Well, I came to meet you because my best friend
Tamika is dressed like a bat this year. Plus, Yumi and I have 2 weeks until
the third Hi Hi Halloween episode premieres. What’s the third Hi Hi Halloween episode called? – The Monstrous Housewife.
– Wow.
– How lucky. Would you like to check out our cave? No thanks. Yumi and Tamika are
beating Julie with their pet termites. What are termites? Termites are insects that only come out at night.
I told Ryou they’re nasty. Yuck. Well, since it’s their trick,
can we do a trick ourselves? You can come up with one. Now I gotta go home
and get some candy. Have a good night. Good night. Well, Barney,
if we’re gonna come up with a plan, we gotta do so. I got it. How about this? We can go find
Master Shake and chew him down. Good idea. We’ll plan to do it tomorrow.