Getting the Most Out of Termite Inspection Reports đź“‘ Using Termite Reports to Scope & Plan Repairs

Getting the Most Out of Termite Inspection Reports đź“‘ Using Termite Reports to Scope & Plan Repairs


Industry best practices dictate that HOAs
undergo yearly termite inspections and treatments to protect buildings from termites and prevent
costly damages caused by termites and other wood destroying organisms. (see termite control in HOAs) Each year your termite control expert would
provide an inspection report for each building, at the very least, in the HOA. The report would detail findings of wood destroying
organisms that include drywood and subterranean termites as well as any damage that has been
caused by the infestations. Annual termite inspection and treatment services
are most valuable to HOAs when they include inspections and treatments of the majority
of unit interiors. (see best participation in TCPs) Savvy HOA community managers and HOA board
members will have usually prearranged a price for necessary termite treatments before the
project begins. This ensures there are no surprise expenses
related to the inspections and local treatments in the community. (See termite treatment types) Upon completion
of the entire inspection and treatment project, the only remaining issue to address would
be the structural damage found at the time of inspection. Proper planning and prioritizing is key to
maximizing productivity and ROI when the time comes to perform major wood repairs in your
HOA. Don’t treat the termite inspection reports
you received merely as a receipt of inspections done and infestations treated. Your inspection reports act like an MRI of
the buildings in your HOA. Provided by the right vendor, termite inspection
reports can give enough detail to be the roadmap you need to adequately prepare for performing
repairs in your community. Your termite control professional should provide
you with termite inspection reports promptly and with enough details that the reports themselves
can be converted into a scope of work from which you can acquire competitive bids. Details of the damage found should include:
Where the Damage is Located Lumber Type Damaged
Measurements and Dimensions of Damage Specific Recommended Action (Repairing Existing
Wood or Replacing with new Wood) Cost to Perform Recommended Work Know before you hire a termite control company
how much detail they will provide in their reports. You are entitled to receive as much information
as possible from inspections performed in the community. Would you be OK with a doctor that refuses
to share x-ray and MRI information that can help prevent major problems in the future? Here are examples of differing levels of detail
that may be provided to an HOA by their termite control company. Very Poor: “Finding: Structural Damage Caused
By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Poor:”Finding: Fascia and Belly-band Damage
Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Average: “Finding: Fascia 10 ft and Belly-band
18 ft Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Better: “Finding: Fascia 10 ft and Belly-band
18 ft Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Repair and Replace Fascia. Patch Belly-band” Best: “Finding: Fascia above Unit 3 (10 ft)
and Belly-band adjacent Unit 5 (18 ft) Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Repair and Replace Fascia
($X). Patch Belly-band ($Y)” Notice the difference in detail at each level. As a manager or volunteer community leader,
it is imperative that purchasing decisions be made based on complete and total information
and zero ambiguity. Notice that the average vendor provides no
information about what their recommended course of action is. Hiring someone with the vague promise that
they will “just fix it” is not enough to meet fiduciary duty. Accurate Termite and Pest Control provides
top-level details in their inspection reports and findings. For years, Accurate Termite and Pest Control
has been a leader in the level of detail provided to HOAs. Accurate remains one of the few companies
who provides an already prepared and detailed scope of work from which a community can acquire
apples-to-apples bids for wood repairs ( see apples to apples bid comparisons). Termite inspection reports are an essential
asset that come as part of the purchase of a yearly termite control program. Be sure to set your community up to maximize
ROI of your annual termite control program by optimizing the usability of the termite
inspection reports you will receive. We are committed to being the number one provider
of convenient and dependable pest control services, so you can Enjoy Home. Call or click for a free consultation. You can reach us at 1 (844) GOT-ANTS.

Getting the Most Out of Termite Inspection Reports đź“‘ Using Termite Reports to Scope & Plan Repairs


Industry best practices dictate that HOAs
undergo yearly termite inspections and treatments to protect buildings from termites and prevent
costly damages caused by termites and other wood destroying organisms. (see termite control in HOAs) Each year your termite control expert would
provide an inspection report for each building, at the very least, in the HOA. The report would detail findings of wood destroying
organisms that include drywood and subterranean termites as well as any damage that has been
caused by the infestations. Annual termite inspection and treatment services
are most valuable to HOAs when they include inspections and treatments of the majority
of unit interiors. (see best participation in TCPs) Savvy HOA community managers and HOA board
members will have usually prearranged a price for necessary termite treatments before the
project begins. This ensures there are no surprise expenses
related to the inspections and local treatments in the community. (See termite treatment types) Upon completion
of the entire inspection and treatment project, the only remaining issue to address would
be the structural damage found at the time of inspection. Proper planning and prioritizing is key to
maximizing productivity and ROI when the time comes to perform major wood repairs in your
HOA. Don’t treat the termite inspection reports
you received merely as a receipt of inspections done and infestations treated. Your inspection reports act like an MRI of
the buildings in your HOA. Provided by the right vendor, termite inspection
reports can give enough detail to be the roadmap you need to adequately prepare for performing
repairs in your community. Your termite control professional should provide
you with termite inspection reports promptly and with enough details that the reports themselves
can be converted into a scope of work from which you can acquire competitive bids. Details of the damage found should include:
Where the Damage is Located Lumber Type Damaged
Measurements and Dimensions of Damage Specific Recommended Action (Repairing Existing
Wood or Replacing with new Wood) Cost to Perform Recommended Work Know before you hire a termite control company
how much detail they will provide in their reports. You are entitled to receive as much information
as possible from inspections performed in the community. Would you be OK with a doctor that refuses
to share x-ray and MRI information that can help prevent major problems in the future? Here are examples of differing levels of detail
that may be provided to an HOA by their termite control company. Very Poor: “Finding: Structural Damage Caused
By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Poor:”Finding: Fascia and Belly-band Damage
Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Average: “Finding: Fascia 10 ft and Belly-band
18 ft Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Remediate Damage” Better: “Finding: Fascia 10 ft and Belly-band
18 ft Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Repair and Replace Fascia. Patch Belly-band” Best: “Finding: Fascia above Unit 3 (10 ft)
and Belly-band adjacent Unit 5 (18 ft) Damage Caused By Termite/ Wood Rot. Recommendation: Repair and Replace Fascia
($X). Patch Belly-band ($Y)” Notice the difference in detail at each level. As a manager or volunteer community leader,
it is imperative that purchasing decisions be made based on complete and total information
and zero ambiguity. Notice that the average vendor provides no
information about what their recommended course of action is. Hiring someone with the vague promise that
they will “just fix it” is not enough to meet fiduciary duty. Accurate Termite and Pest Control provides
top-level details in their inspection reports and findings. For years, Accurate Termite and Pest Control
has been a leader in the level of detail provided to HOAs. Accurate remains one of the few companies
who provides an already prepared and detailed scope of work from which a community can acquire
apples-to-apples bids for wood repairs ( see apples to apples bid comparisons). Termite inspection reports are an essential
asset that come as part of the purchase of a yearly termite control program. Be sure to set your community up to maximize
ROI of your annual termite control program by optimizing the usability of the termite
inspection reports you will receive. We are committed to being the number one provider
of convenient and dependable pest control services, so you can Enjoy Home. Call or click for a free consultation. You can reach us at 1 (844) GOT-ANTS.

Apache Junction Termite & Pest Control Services With Varsity

Apache Junction Termite & Pest Control Services With Varsity


The last thing you want to find in your home
in Apache Junction is Termites, but at Varsity Termite & Pest Control, we can help take care
of your termite problem. With free termite inspections to help determine
the severity and extent of your termite infestation, we can make sure you know the different kinds
of termites that can wreak havoc on your home and how to take care of them. For the very best results for termite, scorpion,
and other pest control services in Apache Junction, contact Varsity Termite & Pest Control
today at 602-757-8252 or visit our website at VarsityTermiteAndPestControl.com

What was my day like?  Foundation Find  Termite Find

What was my day like? Foundation Find Termite Find


We got two inspections in a marketing
event I’m not performing the home inspections my guys are I’m gonna sneak
up on them and see if I can find anything today the secret to real estate
agents hearts are through their stomachs and also good service just let me know
this is heavy extremely heavy didn’t get much video of the conference
they didn’t really want me videoing in there but it went really well I crushed
it let’s try to make it over to Robert’s inspection and try to figure out if we
can find anything good to show you on it we got two good finds in a funny one
this is a flood house they started ripping some walls out and we found some
termites and the garage foundations failing let me go show you those issues
all right so for the first time I’m going to show you the termites and I’m
gonna show you why they chose this area but mainly I want to show you what
termite damage looks like so let’s show you that so you can see how this on its
the woods almost like paper like and you have a lot of mud inside of here
this is all related to termite damage you also get these mud tubes here this
is what they use to travel Oh perfect yeah so you can see you can see how it’s
a little thick it’s not so granule II like if I touch this and this was ants it would
just fall right out let’s say use this for cover and then here you go all
around the window too as well pulling across the top right here across
the top right here in down same scenario Robert found termites in
this corner it’s actually a pretty good find and I’ll show you why they chose
this area too as well so right here in the corner really hard to find but he’s
able to pull back the wood and there’s a lotta termite activity through this the
stud right here alright so the main reason why they chose the chose this
area on the house it’s the perfect area for them they have wood to ground
contact they’re going to have a constant saw at the source of moisture coming off
the roof right here and also at the base you have a lot of wood to ground content
they were able to stay there and nobody could ever know that they were moving
because the sheet rock was in place they probably got a little bit of debris on
the inside let me show you why they chose the garage so on the garage the
reason why they chose this spot same scenario would a ground contact you also
have this nice little tree perfect amount of shade and moisture so let me
get a little closer so you can see Robert likes to call this the termite
honey hole alright for this next issue the garage foundation has failed this
happened a lot whenever it flooded in the area there’s a lot of movement
across the slab good thing the house is ok there was just very very little
movement but the garage is split in half and let me show you how I know and what
I was looking for ok so you can see right here or the crack goes straight
through the slab goes all the way down to the bottom and it travels all the way through one of the main
reasons why this happened is you have the tree over here get the flood it
costs a lot of movement and that’s the reason why the slab dropped not an
engineer but it’s just an educated guess alright so for the funny one I just
wanted to show it to you real quick I have a perfectly working shower in this
the flood home they like they like the way it looks I guess they kept it so you
know you know the shower pan is perfect it’s holding this water all the grout
looks good you know I got hot and cold water no your your shower might be I
mean your also might be flooded but you still can take a shower all right you
know the spiel by now if you please like and subscribe to the videos and if you
have any questions please reach out leave a comment thanks bye

Termites eat one million dollars, crush girl’s study abroad dream


Termites eat one million dollars, crush girl’s study abroad dream A student named Chen who graduated from Fu-Jen University had been saving up to study abroad since high school. She kept all her allowance money, gifts and hard-earned money in the family safe. She saved a NT$1 million over 8 years. Sometimes she would open up the safe to count the cash, encouraging herself to make more. This April she opened the safe to find all the cash saving had been eaten by termites. She put the money into a plastic bag and rushed it to the Ministry of Justice’s Bureau of Investigation, asking for help from the Bureau’s “currency expert”. The expert saved NT$ 6.7 million out of NT$7 million in water-logged cash for a businessman last year. But this time, there was nothing she could do. There were still termite eggs present when she received the damaged cash. Only the metal security thread survived. She killed the eggs using alcohol, but could only save NT$20,000. With her dreams crushed, Miss Chen burst into tears at the scene. The expert was also upset she could not help the girl save her dream. The money specialist reminded the public that most safes on the market are not bug-proof. Desiccating agents and camphor balls are recommended to keep bugs away when using a safe to store money.

Termites Glendale AZ – First Inspection – Pest Control

Termites Glendale AZ – First Inspection – Pest Control


Pest Control in
Glendale First Inspection Glendale’s top choice for pest control is
First Inspection. For over 15 years First Inspection Termite & Pest Management has been
helping people just like you solve their Glendale pest control problems.  Exterminating pests
of all kinds from termites, roaches, ants and scorpions to rats, mice, and pigeons!

Pest Control Phoenix – (602) 705-0655 – Termites

Pest Control Phoenix – (602) 705-0655 – Termites


Pest control in Phoenix. First Inspection.
We have guarantees on all of our service. We take being honest and integrity very
seriously. We say we’re going to do something, we back that up. We make sure it
gets done. and we give great quality work. One of the things that differentiates us
is our 4D Barrier System. And that is where we hit four different areas. We
start off with your fence line and your outlying areas of your yard. That protects
your home from pests that could be coming from your neighbor’s home. We then go
into around your landscaping areas around your grass barriers. We
granulate and dust those areas which is a waterproof chemical. We then spray right
up against the house and we love to dust around your door frames, because that’s a very
common area for pests to come into your home. And then if necessary we will come
into your home and spray inside there too. All of our indoor pesticides that we use
are odor free and color free so you won’t see them or smell them. They’re pet
friendly. Safe for all your cats and dogs. We do full treatments and that means we
drill garages, we drill front and back patios, we trench around the home. We use
all the best products in the industry. We do weeds and bee service as well. And we’ll
design a treatment that is unique to your needs. We are A-plus rated with the
Better Business Bureau. We’ll treat you the way we would want to be treated and
get rid of your pests. Please give us a call. We would love to make you part of the
First Inspection Family. If you’re looking for termite and pest control in
Phoenix, First Inspection is your number one exterminator. We know the bugs that
bug you and the best methods of protecting your home and family with our
pest control service. Call us for all pest control, including termites, bee
removal and scorpion control with our 4D Barrier System.

Traitement de charpente par injection et pulvĂ©risation: termite, capricorne, petite vrillette…MABI

Traitement de charpente par injection et pulvĂ©risation: termite, capricorne, petite vrillette…MABI


STEP 1: SCRAP Get rid of the worm-eaten parts with a manual scraper & the pneumatic Scrap’Air Save time with Scrap’Air Remove sawdust from the galleries with a wire brush Use a air blow gun for a perfect finish STEP 2: INSERT MABI INJECTORS Save time in the drilling process using a stop kit Drill two third of the beam thickness 3 to 5 holes per meter in staggered rows Insert the Mabi injectors with a mallet for hard to reach areas use a mounting tool STEP 3: INJECT MABI 8L Pump made for wood treatment Set the pressure to get 15 bars at the injection tip MABI injectors have a patented backflow prevention system Inject until runoff is observed STEP 4: SPRAY Adjust the pressure between 30/40 BARS Spray using a spray nozzle on your gun A lasting protection for your wood frame Visit www.mabi.fr Find all Mabi’s equipment Always wear the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) With the professional range of product required and officially approved for chemical handling MABI treat in-depth for lasting results

Community Ecology: Feel the Love – Crash Course Ecology #4

Community Ecology: Feel the Love – Crash Course Ecology #4


I wouldn’t be much of a teacher if I didn’t tell you that life is tough and that everyone’s looking out for themselves in this world. That’s just the way it is, people. You know how I always say that biology is
ultimately about sex and not dying? Well both of those things are more difficult
than we’d like them to be, because of competition. There’s a finite amount of resources on this
planet, so evolution drives us to compete for them so that we can survive long enough to spread
our genes all over the place And naturally, competition is a really important part of how different species interact when their habitats overlap. These interactions between species are what
define ecological communities. So it makes sense that community ecology studies
these interactions anywhere they take place, from a tide pool to the whole ocean,
from a rotting log to an entire forest. But just because inter-species interaction
is mostly competitive doesn’t necessarily mean that community ecology is all about big, bloody, tooth-and-claw scenes like from cable-TV nature shows. Actually, a lot of it is, but we’re not going
to get there until next week. For now, let’s just note that competition,
while prevalent and important, is also pretty dangerous, kind of a hassle,
and can, like, really hurt. So a lot of inter-species interaction is actually
about sidestepping direct competition and instead finding ways to divvy up resources,
or otherwise let species just get along. Can you feel the love? [Theme Music] Careful guys! Because right now we’re surrounded potentially lethal interspecific competition going on all over the place. Since we’re animals, we usually think of competition
as going on between animals, but really it happens between almost all members
of the four kingdoms of life. Whenever species compete, they’re going after
the same resources that they need for their survival and continued population growth. In this garden, the weeds are competing with the sunflower, the corn and the dill for nutrients and water in the soil. So these resources, because they’re finite in this area, are the limiting factors that we’ve talked about. The population can only get as big as these
factors will allow. Now, a particularly nasty weed could, over
time, eliminate the veggies entirely. Such elimination is known as competitive exclusion, and it’s one of the most fundamental properties
in community ecology, and also, like, life. Because the fact is, when two species are
competing for the same resources, one of them is eventually going to be more
successful and eliminate the other. This bitter truth is known as the Competitive
Exclusion Principle, and it was first identified in 1934 by Russian
ecologist G. F. Gause in a study of two closely-related species
of microscopic protists. When he was only 22 years old, Gause made
a name for himself by conducting experiments that pitted one species of protist, Paramecium
aurelia, against another, Paramecium caudatum. First, Gause grew each species separately
with the exact same resources, and found that each developed rapidly and
established stable populations. But, when he grew them in the same container, P. caudatum was soon driven to extinction by P. aurelia. Paramecium aurelia gained a competitive advantage because its population grew slightly faster than P. caudatum’s. So Gause’s experiment showed that, in the
absence of another disturbance, two species that require the same resources
cannot live indefinitely in the same habitat. The inferior competitor will be eliminated. Makes sense, but if competitive exclusion
is the natural law of the land, then why isn’t all of earth just a crazy crap-circus
of constant competition, predation, and ultimately, extinction of all those losers? Well, for a couple of reasons:
first, not all resources are limiting. Two species of sharks may compete for water
in the ocean, but the ocean is, you know, gigantic. So that’s not what limits their population
growth. Rather, the amount of food, like a specific
fish that they both eat, could be limiting, while other resources are plentiful. Second, as the overwhelming diversity of life in almost any community shows us, most species — even ones that are almost identical to each
other — are adaptable enough to find a way to survive in the face of competition. They do this by finding an ecological niche,
the sum of all resources, both biotic and abiotic, that a species uses in its environment. You can think of an organism’s niche as its job in the community that provides it with a certain lifestyle. We tend to keep jobs that we can do better
than anyone else in our community, and if we’re desperate, we do a job that nobody
else wants to do. But no matter what job we have, what it pays
in terms of resources dictates our lifestyle. So finding a nice, comfy niche that you have
pretty much to yourself not only provides a steady income of food and other stuff, it also allows a species to avoid competitive
exclusion, and this, in turn, helps create a more stable ecological community. It’s and elegant and peaceful solution, I wish that we humans could figure out something as good, but as with anything in life, this relative
security and stability comes at a price. The bummer is that it prevents some species
from living the lifestyle that they could have if nobody else competed with them at
all. This ideal situation is called a fundamental
niche, and it’s just that, an ideal. Few, if any species ever get to live that
way. Instead, because of the need to avoid competitive
exclusion in order to survive, many species end up with a different job,
and hence lifestyle. It’s not necessarily the job that they studied
for in college, but it makes a decent living, and that’s called a realized niche. This, my friends, is how nature does conflict
management. But it sounds kind of unnatural, doesn’t it? I mean, Gause taught us that competition, and winning the competition, was the natural order of things. So how could it be that part of the natural order actually involves letting everyone compete and win just a little bit? And how did we ever come to discover that
things actually worked this way? Well, it took a special kind of person, and to to tell you about him, I’m going to need a special kind of chair. Canadian born ecologist Robert MacArthur was
in his late 20s when he made a discovery that made him one of the most influential
ecologists of the 20th century. While researching his doctoral thesis at Yale
University in 1958, he was studying five species of warblers that live in coniferous forests in the northeastern United States. At the time, because there were so many different species of warblers that lived, fed, and mated in such close quarters, many ornithologists thought that the birds
occupied the exact same niche and thus were an exception to Gause’s competitive
exclusion principle. But MacArthur was not convinced. A mathematician by training, he set out to
measure exactly how and where each kind of warbler did its foraging, nesting, and mating. In order to do this, he studied each tree the birds lived in, dividing them into zones, 16 zones to be exact, from bare lichen at the base of the trunk, to new needles and buds at the tips of the branches. After many seasons of observing many birds
in many trees, he found that each species of warbler divided its time differently among the various parts of the tree. One warbler, called the Cape May, for example, spent most of its time toward the outside of the tree at the top. Meanwhile, the Bay Breasted fed mostly around
the middle interior. MacArthur also found that each of the warblers
had different hunting and foraging habits and even bred at slightly different times of the year, so that their highest food requirements didn’t overlap. These differences illustrated how the warblers
partitioned their limiting resources, each finding its realized niche that allowed
it to escape the fate of competitive exclusion. The phenomenon he observed is now known as
resource partitioning, when similar species settle into separate
niches that let them coexist. Thanks in part to this discovery, MacArthur
became known as a pioneer of modern ecology, encouraging curiosity and hypothesis driven research, championing the use of genetics in ecological study, and collaborating with biologists like E.
O. Wilson and Jared Diamond. Sadly, he died of renal caner at the age of
42, but his study of northern warblers remains a classic example of community ecology that is still taught today. So, if organisms can do this, if they can
behave in ways that help minimize competition while increasing their odds for survival, it follows that traits associated with this
behavior would start being selected favorably. After all, that’s what natural selection is for. When this happens, it’s known as character displacement. To demonstrate, let’s go back to some other
famous ecologists, our favorite couple of evolutionary biologists
and love birds, Peter and Rosemary Grant. I told you before about how they observed the process of speciation among Darwin’s famous Galapagos finches. Well on the same island, Daphne Major, in 2006, they witnessed character displacement in action. For a long time, a small population of finches
had the island to themselves, where they ate a variety of seeds, including
seeds of the feverplant, which were bigger and more nutritious than
the smaller seeds that were available but were harder for the little finches to open. Then in 1982, a group of much bigger finches
showed up on the island, and they began to commandeer the island’s
abundant supply of feverplant seeds. Within just 20 years, the Grants found that
the small finches’ beaks shrunk to allow them to specialize in eating only the smaller,
less nutritious seeds. But now the little finches had those seeds
all to themselves. The traits of the two populations had actually diverged to help facilitate the partitioning of resources. See? Competition can be hard on us, but it
also can make us better people, or you know, finches or warblers or kangaroo
mice. But there are also kinds of interspecies interaction in which species actually join forces in the fights for survival. This is the ultimate in conflict-avoidance. In these cases species in a community actually
manage to avoid competition altogether by forming downright tight relationships that
benefit one, if not both, of the parties involved. You may have heard of both of these cases:
First, mutualism, where both species benefit, and commensalism, where one species benefits
and the other is kind of like, “Whatever.” Mutualism abounds in nature, and for those
who’ve been paying attention to Crash Course, you’ve heard me talk about it many, many times
before. A prime example [of mutualism] are mychorrhizae, the fungal root that we talked about a few weeks ago, where fungi and plant roots get tangled and essentially rub each other’s backs for nutritious favors. Others you may have heard about include flowering
plants that produce nectars to attract pollinators, and that bear fruit to attract animals to
help spread the seeds inside. Oftentimes these relationships become rather
needy, like in the case of termites — they can’t break down the cellulose in the
wood they eat without the enzymes produced by the microorganisms that live inside their
digestive systems. Without the little critters, the bigger critters
would die. Such a needy relationship is called obligate
mutualism. By contrast, commensalism is where one species definitely benefits and the other isn’t really hurt or helped. Such neutrality, of course, is difficult to prove because even a seemingly benign interaction probably has some effect. Barnacles, for example, hitchhike on gray
whales, getting a free ride through swaths of plankton-rich water for feeding. While clearly a benefit to the barnacles,
the relationship is often considered commensal because the whales probably don’t really care
whether the barnacles are there or not. Or do they? The barnacles might slow down
the whale as it swims through the water, but on the other hand, they might also serve as a type of camouflage from predators like orcas, in which case they confer an advantage. So it probably comes down to “meh” for the
whale. And when you consider all the other possibilities out there when species interact, “meh” isn’t such a bad option. Especially considering that next week, we’re
going for the throat, by which I mean we’ll be investigating the
kill-or-be-killed world of animal predation and all of the fantastic evolutionary changes it can trigger that lead to even greater diversity in ecological communities. There probably is going to be a lot of blood
though, so you might want to bring your poncho. Thank you for watching this episode of Crash
Course: Ecology. If you want to review anything, there’s a
table of contents over here for you to click on any of the parts that you may want to review. Much love and appreciation to all the people
who helped us put this episode together, and if you have any questions or comments or ideas, you can leave them for us on Facebook or on Twitter, or, of course, down in the comments below.

What Do Termites Look Like, Panama City, FL – Arrow Pest Service


Hi Im Mack Glover the President of Arrow Pest Service I would like to show you what I found out in the field today so
come along with me let’s go check it out have you ever wondered what termites look like here they are get a good look at them these are
termite swarmers it’s just simply the reproductive form of the termite they
usually swarm out in late fall or early spring time this is where a male and
female pair up shed their wings and go back down to the ground to start a new
colony somewhere else if you see these in or around your home it is a good sign
you might have termites behind your walls doing damage without you know
it call Arrow Pest Service immediately we would love to give you a free consultation and free
estimate so we can ensure that your home your most valuable investment is
properly protected well I hope this video was helpful to you and again I’m Mack Glover the President of Arrow Pest Service give us a call today and ask about our free 58 a point Pest
analysis for your home or office thank you for watching this video and I hope
you have a great day