STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Bull Ants | The Giants of the Undergrowth

Bull Ants | The Giants of the Undergrowth


Hi, this is Jordan. In this video we’re going to be looking
at one of the largest and most aggressive ants out there, they’re known as Bull Ants. Bull Ants fall under the genus, Myrmecia,
and have around 90 different species, almost all of which are endemic to Australia. They’re one of the most primitive group
of ants on earth, and they function quite differently from most other ant species. Typically, when an ant wants to communicate
with its fellow colony members, it lays down pheromones, which the others can smell using
their antennae, and be guided towards, some food for example. Forming a sight, you’ll probably be familiar
with, a long trail of ants leading to a source of food. But, Bull Ants are different. Instead of laying down pheromone trails and
relying largely on their sense of smell to direct themselves, they navigate through a
different sense. Through their sense of sight. While most ants have relatively poor eyesight,
Bull Ants have exceptional vision. Just look at those massive eyes. They often travel long distances from their
nest in search of food. And as they go, they use their enhanced vision
to scan, and even memorise their environment. Relying on landmarks, like the surrounding
trees and logs, in order to navigate their way back to their nest. Bull Ants’ acute sense of vision, also makes
them incredibly effective at tracking down and stalking prey. The workers prefer to feed on sweet substances,
like nectar and tree sap, and fruit, like this apple core, if they get the chance. But the colonies’ larvae demand protein
rich foods, like other arthropods. Once they get within striking distance, they
use their powerful mandibles to grip onto, and then, quickly subdue their prey by delivering
a deadly sting, which they, like their wasp ancestors, can inject multiple times. Bull Ants occasionally prey upon other ants
too. Usually seen targeting Carpenter Ants, which
often live alongside them. A successful kill comes with great reward. Not only do the ants provide great nourishment
for their colony, but it also reduces the numbers, and subsequently the strength of
their neighboring colonies. Increasing the Bull Ants’ odds in finding
food within the area. This can be a little dangerous, however, as
these Carpenter Ants will raise alarm pheromones when felt threatened, causing their fellow
colony members to rush in against their attacker, sometimes even resulting in the predator becoming
the prey. So instead of constantly hunting these foreigners,
in order to compete for territory and resources, Bull Ants have developed a safer alternative. They do so through sabotage. The Bull Ants pay a visit to their neighbors,
and start dropping debris, like rocks and twigs, into their nest entrances. By shutting in the rival colony, it forces
them spend time and energy in order to clear these blockages, effectively, limiting their
foraging capabilities. Bull Ants are even known to multitask too. Here they’re cleaning out their nest, carrying
out scraps, like the exoskeletons of past prey, which they no longer have any use for. So they move it out of their nest and straight
into their, not so fortunate neighbors’. One of the most abundant and commonly found
Bull Ants across Australia, are Myrmecia pilosula, commonly known as Jumping Jack Ants. As their name suggests, they actually have
the ability to jump, and they utilize this unique trait for a number of different circumstances. When they’re agitated, particularly around
their nest, they perform a hoping like action, perhaps to warn intruders to stay clear by
showcasing their agility and ferocity. And when they really feel threatened, they
can use it as a defensive mechanism. Leaping into the air, several times their
own body length, in hope of escape. And paired with their great vision, they occasionally
use it whilst foraging, jumping from place to place relatively accurately, much like
a jumping spider would. Here’s a look inside the nest of a captive
colony of Jumping Jacks. This colony is only just in its early stages,
with a single queen and a few worker ants present. These workers eclosed from the queen’s very
first batch of eggs, and so, are known as nanitics. The first generation or two, tend to be smaller
in size than the preceding generations, as the colony simply has less workers around,
foraging for food and making sure that the brood and queen is well nurtured. Apart from the obvious size difference, Bull
ant queens look quite similar to regular workers. Most queens you’ll see, like this Carpenter
Ant queen here, tend to have a disproportionally large thorax and gaster section. After these queens dig themselves out an egg
laying chamber, known as a claustral cell, here they’ll remain, living off their fat
reserves and waiting patiently for their workers to arrive. These types of queens are known as fully-claustral
queens. Unlike fully-claustral queens however, Bull
Ant queens just don’t have the sufficient fat reserves to fast through this long period. And so, found their colonies in a semi-claustral
manner. Meaning, they leave their claustral cell to
search for food, so as to nourish both themselves and their hungry larvae. Bull Ants can be some of the largest ants
you’ll see. With some species, reaching up to 2.5cm in
length, and the queens measuring even larger. Here you can see the difference against an
averaged sized ant. As you can see, Bull Ants are like giants
by comparison. Generally, however, the larger the species,
the longer it takes for the brood to develop and for workers to emerge. Because these ants are so large, the life
cycle of the ant, from egg to adult, can take several months. It’s worth the wait though, as Bull Ant
workers exhibit greater longevity in comparison to other ants, having a life expectancy of
over a year in age. Whereas, the more common, smaller species,
tend to live for only just a few months. These Bull Ant workers also possess a unique
ability, in that they can actually reproduce with male ants and lay fertile eggs. Becoming what’s known as, gamergates. In most other species of ants, it’s only
the queen of the colony which is able to do this, and all the workers are completely sterile. This trait is particularly useful if the original
queen of the colony were to die. As a gamergate or two, would then be able
to take over the role of egg laying and extend the lifespan of colony. All these unique characteristics makes Bull
Ants a true favourite of mine. Despite this, I’ve never actually raised
up a colony of them until now. I was always a bit apprehensive, as they can
be quite aggressive and do have the ability to sting. Because of their great sense of sight, they’re
immediately drawn to any movements. So it’s really hard to do basic things around
their nest, like adding in and removing foods, without causing any alarm. I’ve never been stung by a Bull Ant before,
or ant for that matter. But apparently they deliver quite a potent
and painful sting. With some species of Bull Ants being considered
the most toxic within the entire insect world. So if you do come across these guys, I’d
recommend keeping a good distance and definitely wouldn’t recommend trying to raise them
if you’re a beginning ant keeper or prone to allergies. Currently, I’ve got this colony housed within
a test tube setup which is placed within a plastic container, acting as their foraging
area. Which is the kind of setup I’d recommend for
young colonies like this one. They really don’t require too much food
at this point. I’ve just been feeding them little slices
of fruit, like apple and mango, and occasionally some sugar water, every few days. They’re not so interested in insects right
now. This is due to colony not having any larvae
present. Unlike the omnivorous adults, Bull ant larvae
are known to be carnivorous, so once the eggs do hatch into larvae, I’ll be sure to offer
them insects more regularly. So far the colony looks to be doing well and
has quite a large pile eggs going, which I’ve noticed the queen likes to constantly stand
guard over. I didn’t actually catch this queen myself,
I obtained it through Brendon, who has only recently got into ant keeping. Within that time, however, he’s been engrossed
into the hobby, and has caught and raised dozens of different species, and has even
founded a website all about ant keeping, at gamergate.com.au. Here, they showcase intuitive formicarium
designs from ant keepers all over the world, and post some really amazing,
original photographs of all sorts of different ant species. They also offer queen ants and colonies for
sale. Which is great if you’re interested in getting
into the hobby, but struggling to find a queen, or just acquiring one of those rare, difficult
to find species, which in my case, would be these Jumping Jacks here. After observing Bull Ants in the wild and
filming all the footage for this video, and as well as raising a colony of these ants,
I’ve developed a real fondness for them. Discovering they aren’t as ruthless and aggressive
as they look, and as people make them out to be, but are actually rather timid and quirky
in behavior. If you keep still and don’t make any sudden
movements, they don’t really seem to take much notice of you and continue on going about
their business. When they do spot you, they become fixated
on your movements and usually will just cautiously back up. As long as they don’t see you as a threat
to them and their colony, they’re really quite harmless. And personally, I think they look adorable. Just look how curious this little worker is. So that’s it for this video. I really hope you’ve enjoyed. I put a lot of time and effort into making
these, so if you did like it, share it with your friends, it really helps me out. In my next video, I’ll be showcasing the infamous
Argentine Ants, and looking at a young colony of which I’ve recently started raising. So look forward to that and thanks for watching.

How to Treat Insect Bites & Stings : How to Reduce the Itching of an Insect Bite

How to Treat Insect Bites & Stings : How to Reduce the Itching of an Insect Bite


Hello, my name is Dr. Susan Jewell. Now in
this clip I’m going to demonstrate to you how you can find a way to reduce the itching
when you’re bitten by an insect like a mosquito. So what I have here is you can take an aspirin
tablet. Don’t do this if you’re allergic to aspirin though, okay so make sure you’re not
allergic to aspirin. But you take an aspirin tablet and then you pulverize it into a powder
form. So here I have a pulverized tablet of aspirin and I put it into this bowl here like
that. Then what I do is I’m going to make a little paste. So you just want to add a
little bit of water just so it dissolves the aspirin, you know the powder to make a very
paste like substance texture. Add a bit more. Keep doing that until it becomes like a paste
like that. So once you’ve got a paste off the pulverized aspirin, what you do for example
if I say that this was the area on my hand, on my arm where it’s bitten from the mosquito
and it is very itchy and inflamed, what I can do is the first thing I need to do is
to make sure that the area is cleansed with soapy water. So you got to clean the area
very well all over the area that is bitten with soapy water. Pat it all dry and then
to reduce the itching what you could do is you could use your fingers. But make sure
your hands are sterilized, wash it was soapy water. Then you can just add this paste all
onto the bite itself with this pulverized aspirin paste. Just put it over the area that
is bitten and that will help to give you some relief from the itch and the pain. It will
stop you from scratching as well because a lot of the inflammation, infection is caused
on mosquito bites it’s cause by repetitive scratch in the area and opening the skin wound.
So this is one way to help you alleviate the itching and prevent inflammation and infection.

Please Help Me Find the Queen Fire Ant

Please Help Me Find the Queen Fire Ant


Fire Ants galore! Check out our Fire Nation, our huge colony
of red tropical fire ants. They’ve officially moved into their new formicarium
from last week’s video and boy, is it busy in there! For the first time in almost a year, we get
to see what happens inside an ants’ nest, but my main goal today is to try to spot the
queen ant. We also will be voting for an official name
for this new Fire Nation lair. You won’t want to miss this epic fire ant
queen hunt, as we scour the chambers and tunnels, sort through the young, and attempt to locate
the mother of this massive colony, in this episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please subscribe to my channel, and hit the
bell icon, welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! So in case you didn’t tune in to our last
video, we recently introduced some fresh territory to the Fire Nation here. We added our new AC Hybrid Nest 2.0 to their
current living network of tubes, tubs, and outworlds. It was an incredible and hi-tech addition
to their home and they began to establish highways within the new nest. So let’s check up on their progress one week
later, shall we? Whoa! Check out all those ants! They really love this new nest. Alright, AC Family before we continue, I have
placed my top 5 picks from your name suggestions for this new nest, in an iPoll here, so please
take a moment to vote for your favourite name, so we will determine what to call this new,
very popular area of the Fire Nation. Also by the way AC Family, I know all too
well, how sharp some of your eyes are at catching details, so I’ll need your help. Throughout this video if you see the queen
or think you see her, be sure to point her out in the comments and leave a time stamp
for us to all check out. Look at how they’ve organized themselves in
here. Isn’t it just incredible how many ants have
managed to pack themselves in here. Wow! The Fire Nation is truly majestic. This nest is absolutely alive and active! The fire ants enter and exit the nest through
an opening here… and here… Check out how heavily guarded each of these
nest openings are. It’s important that there are large groups
of ants simply waiting around the exists ready to engage in battle at a single alarm because
inside the nest lays the valuable young and their queen, possibly. And if she is in here, I’m determined to find
her. Let’s check the rooms! Look at that flow of workers. Amazing to watch them follow organized highways
and not simply march everywhere randomly. It’s great traffic efficiency. In this chamber you will see a huge brood
pile. Those whitish things that look like rice are
all pupae, teenage ants in their developmental stage prior to becoming full-grown, fully
formed ants. They are immobile and helpless and rely on
the workers to care and transport them during this period of their lives. They remain in this phase for several days
and then become workers that survive for about 3 weeks to a month. The total lifespan of a worker ant is actually
about 1-2 months. This means then that every couple of months
the colony you see in these videos will all be dead and will have been replaced with new
workers. Every couple of months this fire ant colony
is a new colony, except for one member. The queen. I don’t see her here. Do you? The queen is the only one who survives for
many years. The record for a queen ant in captivity is
almost 30 yrs. Talk about the saying “Long Live the Queen!” Here is another brood room, also mostly pupae. Though it may seem like the pupae are the
most abundant form of brood in this nest, don’t be fooled. There are also lots of eggs and larvae stashed
around in this nest, but because they are smaller and less conspicuous they’re easier
to hide away. Here is one such room. Workers have decided to fill this room with
larvae of different stages and probably lots of eggs, as well. The larvae and eggs also depend on the workers,
who by the way are their sisters, to care, feed, and transport them around. Wanna hear something amazing about the larvae,
AC Family? Each larvae is fed and as it grows, its waste
collects inside its body and then only right before it pupates to become a pupa, it finally
releases the built up poop, in a fecal pellet known as a meconium. Yes, ant babies only poop once in their entire
lives and it is all in a compact fecal pellet which actually remains attached to the pupa
shell. This is evolutionary brilliance, because inside
an ant nest where there are many members, and it is moist, things can get dangerously
infested with bacteria and mold, so having that one meconium per larva and having it
packaged up on the outside of the pupa means ant baby poop isn’t just sitting around. Everything is sterile and it’s truly an amazing
biological ant feature. Let’s continue looking for our queen. Check out this huge room and all the brood
in here. Something tells me if our queen is in this
formicarium, she would be hiding somewhere here. I don’t think the queen would be near any
of the entrances as this would be dangerous for her. She’s got to be in the heart of the nest somewhere. There are some rooms of the nest which the
ants have not occupied. This room here has been elected the bathroom
of the colony. Ants enter and leave as needed. Some privacy please! These rooms lead to one of the water test
tubes. Not too many drinking from this one. But this one is a popular watering hole it
seems. Perhaps they’re trying to keep the second
test tube as clean as possible by drinking first from this test tube. Who knows? Here you will see one of the highway crossroads
within the nest. Ants in this area are moving in all directions. Each of those ants are on their own missions. To be honest I really miss watching the action
inside the nest. It’s just as interesting as watching external
ant activity in their outworlds. Now you might notice that some of the brood
are yellowish orange in colour. These are the pupae that are ready to ecolse,
meaning the adult ants are ready emerge from their pupal stage. Newly formed adults start off as a yellowish
orange colour then overtime, as their exoskelton hardens turn a dark red colour. This process is called tanning. Check out this room. This is one of the rooms with the perforrated
floors, allowing for the humidity to enter the nest from below. The Hybrid Nest’s hydration chambers are beneath
the nest, as you may have seen in our previous video. The ants make sure not to cover this too much
to allow for the moisture to enter the nest. I continued to check out the rooms as closely
as I could, but could not find the queen. What I’m looking for is a larger ant with
a fat gaster, the technical term for the abdomen or ant butt, as well as a cohort of worker
ants around her. Often she is seen as a head and thorax and
a swelling of worker ants around her gaster. It’s a bit difficult to find the queen because
they hide her well, but also, it’s easy to mistaken the majors as a queen. The ants with the massive heads are the majors,
specialized workers at cutting things open with their huge, muscled mandibles. I find the omnipresence of the majors makes
finding the queen a bit challenging. I truly love this nest and in the past several
months have been housing my ant colonies in natural nests, but with this dirtless formicarium
I can actually come super close to the ants and not bother them nor have to worry about
being stung. By the way, guys, these Hybrid Nests are available
now and I have placed a link to them at our store in the description box so if you’ve
been wanting to start ant keeping, you must have a look at them. They’re reliable, easy-to-use, and we ship
them worldwide! AC Family, I am not seeing the queen anywhere. Perhaps she hasn’t moved in yet? What do you guys think? Let’s just take some time to look shall we? Here we go. Keep your eyes peeled AC Family! To be honest, if the queen is anywere in here,
I feel she would be in this room, because I see a lot of eggs being kept around here. For 5 hrs I did my best to check all areas
of the nest for any signs of the queen, but to no avail. I swear she’s in here, but perhaps she’s deciding
not to let herself be seen this time around. Did any of you guys spot her? If you did, let us know in the comments. I too will keep rewatching this video to find
her! Otherwise, I’ll keep my eyes open over the
next few days and film her if I do manage to catch a glimpse of her royal ant highness. Thank you for watching another episode of
the AntsCanada ant channel. Until next time AC Family, this AntsCanada
signing out. It’s ant love forever. Alright AC Family, wasn’t this like one big
Where’s Waldo challenge? Ac Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would just like to watch extended play footage of the fire ants living
inside their new formicarium. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What does an ant colony do when their
current nest gets too dirty or too lived in? Congratulations to Lorcan Cooper who correctly
answered: They dig new tunnels and abandon
the old ones or completely move out. Congratulations Lorcan Cooper you just won
a brand new, free Hybrid Nest 2.0 formicarium from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is the name for the fecal pellet expelled
prior to pupation in an ant’s development? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free ant t-shirt from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, & SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

How to Treat Insect Bites & Stings : How to Reduce the Itching of an Insect Bite


Hello, my name is Dr. Susan Jewell. Now in
this clip I’m going to demonstrate to you how you can find a way to reduce the itching
when you’re bitten by an insect like a mosquito. So what I have here is you can take an aspirin
tablet. Don’t do this if you’re allergic to aspirin though, okay so make sure you’re not
allergic to aspirin. But you take an aspirin tablet and then you pulverize it into a powder
form. So here I have a pulverized tablet of aspirin and I put it into this bowl here like
that. Then what I do is I’m going to make a little paste. So you just want to add a
little bit of water just so it dissolves the aspirin, you know the powder to make a very
paste like substance texture. Add a bit more. Keep doing that until it becomes like a paste
like that. So once you’ve got a paste off the pulverized aspirin, what you do for example
if I say that this was the area on my hand, on my arm where it’s bitten from the mosquito
and it is very itchy and inflamed, what I can do is the first thing I need to do is
to make sure that the area is cleansed with soapy water. So you got to clean the area
very well all over the area that is bitten with soapy water. Pat it all dry and then
to reduce the itching what you could do is you could use your fingers. But make sure
your hands are sterilized, wash it was soapy water. Then you can just add this paste all
onto the bite itself with this pulverized aspirin paste. Just put it over the area that
is bitten and that will help to give you some relief from the itch and the pain. It will
stop you from scratching as well because a lot of the inflammation, infection is caused
on mosquito bites it’s cause by repetitive scratch in the area and opening the skin wound.
So this is one way to help you alleviate the itching and prevent inflammation and infection.

How to Treat Insect Bites & Stings : How to Reduce the Swelling of an Insect Bite

How to Treat Insect Bites & Stings : How to Reduce the Swelling of an Insect Bite


Hello, my name is Dr. Susan Jewell. Now in
this clip I’m going to show you some other ways to reduce the itching and the swelling
from insect bites; particularly mosquito bites. So here are some other ways you can do. You
can use Caldyphen lotion; like for example here I bought this in the local drug store.
It contains Calamine in the ingredients. You can also use it for you know poison ivy, besides
insect bites, poison oak. It has several functions. You can buy this probably not in this brand,
there is several others out there popular in the market to buy. Or you can use ice.
So what you do for example is, let me demonstrate; so imagine here is the insect bite and it’s
swollen up into a hive and it’s very irritating and itchy. So first thing you can do to is
to relief, to get some relief from the symptoms is to of course you know wash with soapy water
around the area. Make sure that you clean it and then you pat it dry, the soapy water.
Then what you can do is after that to relief some of the itchiness on the swelling could
you some ice. What you can do is just rub this over the inflamed area, or the swelling
or itchy area. The coldness actually helps to detract from the itchy and that horrible
itchy and swelling sensation. So just rub the ice over there. Now if you do that you
can that, of course the ice melts, it’s only temporary. You can also use the Caldyphen
and you just put a dab of that onto the bitten area and just rub it in. That should give
you some temporary relief anyway and to prevent you from scratching cause that is what you
should not do is scratch the itch and get it infected and then you’re going to get an
infection in that area. So these are just some more ways to be able to help reduce the
symptoms from insect bites and bee stings.

Controlling Red Imported Fire Ants

Controlling Red Imported Fire Ants


As red imported fireants spread into more
populated areas of the state, more people are likely to be stung. Encounters with fireants
can be expected not only outdoors, but indoors as well. Forging ants have invaded
homes as well as buildings such as offices, hospitals, and nursing homes. In these situations, fireant control is potentionally
more difficult because of concerns related to both the ants and the
indoor use of chemical insecticides. Because fireants cannot be eradicated over
wide areas, the goal should be to manage the ants with a combination of chemical and
non-chemical control tactics. You want to elliminate fireants in the areas
where the pose the most immediate hazard to people and animals. Fireants spend
a great deal of time searching for food. That forging activity can bring them
inside buildings. You can reduce ant forging around buildings by eliminating available
food sources. Outdoor trashcans around schools, parks and
other buildings should be emptied frequently during the day. Avoid leaving trash
in them over night. Keep the area around trash cans clean. At home trash cans
should have lids on them. Dumpsters and grease bins found in at food service facilities
should be emptied routinely, and the areas around them kept as clean as possible. Keep shrubs pruned away from buildings so
that ants can’t use them as a bridge to avoid treated areas. There are 2 basic approaches to chemical controlled
fireants. An insecticide could be applied to individual mounds or it my be
broadcast over a wide area infested with fireants colonies. Individual mound treatments
are usually more environmentally acceptable because they use
less insecticide and limit the areas treated. They are also likely to have less
impact on non-target insects. Regardless of the method used, the objective is to kill
not only the worker, but also the queen because she is the only ant in the colony
capable of laying eggs. Because insecticides are toxicants it goes
without saying that fireant chemicals should be used according to label directions.
There are several different insecticides formulations for controlling fireants that
you can purchase at your local farm and garden center. There are baits, drenches,
powers, and granulars to choose from. The formulation that you choose will depend
on how extensive the fireant infestations is on your property. Each insecticide
formulation is applied in a different way. Fireant baits are granular
formulations that contain slow acting insecticides dissolved in soybean oil. The
oil is a highly attractive food source for fireants. Consequently, ants that are forging
for food readily pick up and carry bait particles back to there nests where the oil
is abstracted from the particle and fed to the queen and immature ants. A fertilizer or seed spreader can be used
to broadcast baits over areas of the landscape that are infested with fireants.
Because ants are forging for food away from there mounds you do not need to apply
bait to every area of your yard. But it is important to uniformly apply the bait at
the rate specified on the product label. The manufacturer should have provided instructions
on how you can calibrate your application device. A broadcast treatment
is the best control option when the infested area is large, and infested with
too many fireant mounds to treat individually. Once they discover the bait,
ants will carry the bait product back to the mound and distribute the toxicant to the
whole colony. Then it was just a matter of time before the ants are killed and the
mound is destroyed. In addition to broadcast treatment, baits
can be applied to each mound. Mound applications is best used when they are just
a few ant mounds to control. Use a measuring spoon to sprinkle the bait around
each mound according to the label directions. Baits should not be applied to
the top of the mounds since fireants don’t forge for food in this area. Baits should
be applied when ants are actively forging that is when temperatures are above 70 degrees
and below 85 degrees fahrenheit . Some insecticides are mixed with water and
applied directly to the mounds. granular insecticides can be applied to the
surface of the mound, and then water is applied to leach the insecticide down into
the mound. It takes a minimum of 2 gallons of water per mound to distribute the
insecticide deep enough to contact all the ants in the mound including the queen.
That’s a lot of water hauling unless there is just a few mounds to be treated. The drenched method works best if you don’t
disturb the mound. Be sure to follow the directions carefully when preparing to
drench. Just pour the drench over the surface of the mound slowly enough that it
runs down into the mound. Also, be sure to pour some drench around the edge of the
mound. Powers are another type of individual mound
treatment. The toxic power works its way down into the mound exposing immatures
and the queen to the insecticide. For high risk areas, where it is likely that people
and pets maybe attached by fireants. A preventive treatment may be the best choice.
There are products on the market that can be applied to high traffic areas
to control fireants , and keep them from moving in for up to one year. These products
can be applied as a granular just like a fertilizer. They must be watered in before
they become effected. They are the most expensive of the fireant control products
available. But for high risk areas, they may be worth the money. To eliminate just a few fireant mounds , anyone
of the fireant formulations just described will work. However, if your property
is infested with a large number of fireants colonies you should consider using
a combination of methods. First, broadcast fireant baits over the entire
infested area, use a seed or fertilizer spreader to obtain uniform coverage. Next,
several days to a week after the broadcast treatment , treat individual problem
mounds . Only treat does mounds in high traffic areas . The two step method of
fireant control can be applied at anytime. But it’s most effected when applied
in the spring and in the fall. There are some non chemicals methods available
that can be used against fireants . They my be limited in there effectiveness.,
however. Water heated 90 degrees fahrenheit or hotter and mechanical disruption
have been used in many instances. Evaluations done at Texas A & M University
have shown that these treatments will kill large numbers of ants. However, satellite
mounds, formed by surviving ants subsequently appear. Thus these methods have
a useful, but temporary impact on fireant colonies. They may be necessary to
use in situations where pesticides of any type are considered unacceptable. Other non chemical mechanical devises that
disrupt colonies do not have scientifically based test data to support
there effectiveness. One potential down side to using hot water is that it can damage or
kill vegetation in the general vicinity. The key to reducing the threat of fireant
infestation indoors is prevention. Which menas removing exposed food sources that may
attractive these insects. In some cases, fireants my nest indoors inside walls
or under concrete slab floors . In these instances, you will likely see soil and other
debris pushed out around expansion joints near the edge of carpeting, or around
water or other utility pipes. In those situations , fireants are simply entering
the building from an outdoor nest. The treatment objective must be to reduce the
potential for accidental stings as quickly as possible. Insecticides labeled for indoor use can be
found in the NC Agricultural Chemicals manual. The pyrethroid insecticides products
containing chemicals such as permethrin, cyfluthrin, or Bifenthrin can
be used in home and public buildings to drive out forging ants. Select products that
are specifically labeled for indoor use. Be sure to carefully follow directions that
come with the pesticide you choose. Although baits work will for many ants species,
they are not the best choice for controlling fireants indoors. Because they
are likely to draw more ants inside. For this reason, it is important to positively
indentify the ants that are invading your home before applying any control measures. Information about other ant species, can be
found in A Guide to House-invading ants and their control. For information on controlling fireants in
your area, contact your local office of NC Cooperative Extension.

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.