Insects in English

Insects in English


hello welcome to my English a-to-z
channel with a new lessonabout insects listen and repeat after me butterfly moth beetles ladybug ladybug or ladybird ladybird bee wasp wasp fly fly mosquito praying mantis praying mantis walking stick
walking stick bug stick bug stick dragonfly dragonfly aunt aunt grasshopper grasshopper cricket cricket cockroach cockroach bugs bugs louse plural lice lice we have human
and animal louse and plant lice flea worm caterpillar spiders spiders scorpion scorpion centipede
centipede Ticks ticks this is the end of my lesson I
hope you like it don’t forget to subscribe thank you

Are spiders and scorpions insects ? | InfoShows | FixEd

Are spiders and scorpions insects ? | InfoShows | FixEd


Are spiders and scorpions insects Nope spiders and scorpions are not considered as insects if you thought so you are wrong Generally, insects have only three pairs of legs, while scorpions and spiders have four pairs An insect’s body is divided into three parts , Whereas in the case of spiders and scorpions their body have only two sections Because the head and chest are joined together

This is origami! He make insects with only a sheet of paper.

This is origami! He make insects with only a sheet of paper.


I loved insects and raise them too. I think my taste is reflected in my work. My works made by folding very thin paper, only one sheet of paper. I can make my works by cutting and pasting the paper. I can make my works by cutting and pasting the paper. But I don’t cut it, and just fold one sheet of paper. This is called origami. (Are all the pieces in the back made of only one paper?) Yes, just one. Mantis. This is more complicated than any other piece. it has a forewings, and hindwings. And there is eyes on the head. the structure is very complicated. It’ve got wrinkles in the abdomen. This is an insect designated as a natural monument in Korea. This is an insect designated as a natural monument in Korea. There are two spots on the chest that are characteristic of a Longhorned Beetle. I did this by turning a double-sided paper around. (Didn’t you make it by pasting?) No. I didn’t paste anything. Turn it over with a double-sided paper and different color comes out. There are wrinkles in the abdomen. and I also expressed claws. I prefer to fold them into the same shape as the actual insects. I care about the volume of real shape. For example, This is called the Dynastes neptunus. If you look at insects, they have thick abdomen and thin legs. I have to keep as little paper as possible in the legs. And put as much paper in the abdomen as I can. So, I need to design as good as possible. That’s the way to make the perfect shape. That’s the way to make the perfect shape. (I don’t think you’re just folding it up. Is there any way?) When I fold insects, I use a technique called Box Pleating. Fold the paper in a constant proportion Horizontally and vertically And if do that like folding the fan, it’s like be a graph paper. And if do that like folding the fan, it’s like be a graph paper. If I make a Leg, This is how the leg comes out. In my case, it’s different from person to person. Finish the legs first. Then make head and antennas. And finally, make a abdomen, and shape of body And finally, make a abdomen, and shape of body This is a simple version of a grasshopper. It doesn’t have the details. It is easy to transform. (Easy?) (Where did you find insects attractive?) novelty ? Different from us? It has many legs, unique shape and pretty colors. This is unusual thing. A long time ago, I raised a centipede. (Does anyone raise a centipede?) There are many people raise it. It has a lot of legs, so I had to do a lot of repetitive work. This is a scorpion. Unlike other insects, the scorpion looks very nice. I focused on the pedipalps. I think I did a great job. I’m not just making insects. There are animals and fantasy characters I imagine. There are game and movie characters too. This is Tyrael in Diablo. Originally, He has no shield. But I made a shield with paper left. (You made the shield and the sword separately, right?) No. It’s on body. It’s painted well, and the shield has a cross line. I made this all out of lines. It’s an alien, and the point is fingers. The length of the each fingers is different. The thigh and calf lines are curved. And that’s not what you see in insects. This is the Skill to make this curve. (Why should you make a piece by folding only one sheet of paper?) Fulfillment? Breaking my own limitations? It’s very boring to do origami. when you fold it, you want to cut it, and you think ‘why should I do it with one paper?’ But the pleasure of breaking it is incredible. Try to feel it. But the pleasure of breaking it is incredible. Try to feel it. There’s a lot of pleasure.

10 CREEPY INSECTS ANIMALS SURPRISE Toys – Ladybird Cicada Bee Wasp Praying Mantis

10 CREEPY INSECTS ANIMALS SURPRISE Toys – Ladybird Cicada Bee Wasp Praying Mantis


Hi Guys I’m Dan and today I am going to show you 10 Insects Surprise Toys hiding below these leaves. Ladybirds are found worldwide, with over 5,000 species discovered. If food is scarce, ladybugs will do what they must to survive, even if it means eating each other. A hungry ladybug will make a meal of any soft-bodied sibling it encounters. That is scary. Next we have a Grasshopper. Grasshoppers are insects with extremely powerful hind legs which enable them to escape from threats by leaping vigorously. A large grasshopper such as a locust can jump about a metre (twenty body lengths) without using its wings. Talk about a high jumper. There are over than 900 species of crickets described. Only male crickets chirp and do so to attract a female mate. Male crickets make their chirping noise by rubbing their wings together. They are considered to be a sign of good luck in many cultures including Japanese and Chinese. There are about 2,500 species of Cicadas described. They are commonly eaten by birds and sometimes by squirrels, as well as bats, wasps, mantids, spiders and robber flies. They do not bite or sting in a true sense, but may occasionally mistake a person’s arm for a plant limb and attempt to feed. Ants are capable of carrying objects which are 50 times their own body weight with their mandibles. That is very strong. Ants are present in almost every landmass on Earth. Their success in so many environments has been attributed to their social organisation. Wasps are a diverse group, estimated at over a hundred thousand described species around the world. Wasp nests made in or near houses, such as in roof spaces, can present a danger as wasps may sting if people come close to them. The Regal Jumping Spider, is a species of Jumping Spider. They have four pairs of eyes; three secondary pairs that are fixed and a principal pair that is movable. The eyes gives the spider a near 360-degree view of the world. Talk about Spider Sense. All honey bees live in colonies where the workers sting intruders as a form of defense, and alarmed bees release a pheromone that stimulates the attack response in other bees. Honey bees can fly at speeds of up to 15 miles per hour. An industrious worker bee may visit 2,000 flowers per day. Next we have a Praying Mantis. If you try to sneak up on a praying mantis, you may be startled when it looks over its shoulder at you. No other insect can do so. Praying Manstis have a flexible joint that enables them to swivel their heads. If a bee or fly happens to land within its reach, the praying mantis will extend its arms with lightning quick speed, and grab the hapless insect. Scorpions can use a sense of smell to find food and hide from danger. They rely on vibrations from their surroundings to help them determine what is taking place in their environment. It is true that a Scorpion is able to tell the difference between light and dark. Young Scorpions ride on their mother’s back for the first weeks of their life. The average lifespan in the wild for Scorpions is 3 to 8 years. Some have lived long years in captivity. Here are all the insects that I have shown you today. We have the Scorpion, Praying Mantis, Honey Bee, Jumping Spider, Wasp, Ladybird, Grasshopper, Cricket, Cicada, Ant. If you enjoyed this video, give it a thumbs up, share it and please subscribe. Goodbye!

Kid Insect Expert Shares His Love of Bugs with Sean Hayes

Kid Insect Expert Shares His Love of Bugs with Sean Hayes


Oh, my gosh. Look at the outfit. That’s so cool. Did you pick this out yourself? No my mom did. She’s my celebrity dresser. Oh, that’s so sweet. That’s so sweet. Look it, it’s so cool. I love these little
yellow socks. Thank you. And what are on the socks? They are– let’s see, lady
bugs and [INAUDIBLE] beetles. They’re bugs, yeah. So how in the world did
you get excited about bugs? Actually, I like all life,
cause I think bugs are first. And then sea animals are second. And then land animals are third. And then like organism kind
of animals are in fourth. Sure, similar–
similar to my list. [LAUGHTER] And most people
are really, really, really scared about bugs. So why don’t they gross you out? Well, because they have eyes
and mouth like human, right? Yeah. We have eyes and mouth. Yeah. So you’re saying
well, I’m disgusting, and you’re saying the bugs are
disgusting at the same time. Yes, so I should be
disgusted with myself if I’m going to be
disgusted about bugs. Yeah, because if you’re
like I’m beautiful today– oh, that looks disgusting. You’re just basically saying
the total opposite thing you just said to your body. Right. That’s so true. I should really
think about that. That’s interesting. So today, you’re going to
teach me about bugs, right? Yes. OK, should we go over to the
table, so we can talk about it? Yes. OK, let’s do it. OK. Time to talk about bugs. [APPLAUSE] Come on over. OK. OK, good. I go the stool. Oh, my gosh. OK, well, here, we’re
going to start here. Tell us about this bug first. The Annam walking stick. Look at this thing. I’ll be here all night, people. So this is an Annam
walking stick. Yeah. A live bug. yep. You see everyone. That certainly is alive. Yeah, it’s alive. And what else do you
know about this bug? That when it loses a
limb, it grows it back. And also, it doesn’t
need a male to mate. Actually, it actually
needs itself. And then– Wouldn’t that be a treat. –they’ll all be girls. So it doesn’t need a mate. No. You hear that, Scotty? That’s my husband, Scotty. It might need to,
but it mainly– that’s only if he doesn’t
find one, that’s [INAUDIBLE] OK, OK, well, let’s
put that guy back, because I want to see the next– I want to see the next bug. Here you go, Jay. Oh. Thank you. Large and in charge over here. [LAUGHTER] What’s this– what’s
the next bug called? What is this called? This is called a tail– tailless whip scorpion. It’s a tailless whip scorpion. Yeah. It’s not a scorpion or a spider. [INAUDIBLE] Oh, my god, look at that thing. It’s not a scorpion or a spider. It can bite you. So– OK. It’s only a little bit scary,
would you like to try it? No, no, I would not
like to try that. [LAUGHTER] That’s OK. It’s OK, it doesn’t kill you. It’s not a serial killer. We’ll put it there. You can put it there. No, no, on my arm. On my arm, yeah, OK. It’s not going to kill you. OK. Oh, my God. OK, that’s good,
plenty time with that. That’s good. [LAUGHTER] That’s amazing. That was fun for you. [LAUGHTER] OK, let’s go to
the last one here. What is this one? Oh, that one. This will be more for
you run away from. Oh, yeah, this– Rose hair tarantula. So tell us, what’s it called? It’s a rose hair tarantula. A rose hair tarantula. It’s scarier than it looks. It’s scarier than it looks. My head shot– Rose hair tarantula. Oh, my gosh, look at that. And now tell us about this. It gets it’s name from, it was
kinda rose hair kind of color. And does it bite and all that? Yes, except it scares
predators with it’s red thing. And also, they have
blue blood like humans. They have blue
blood, like humans? Yes. And it actually has five eyes. You can seen them
staring at you. So it’s staring. It wants to play
a staring contest. OK, well, it won. It won that. [LAUGHTER] Yeah. Are you sure scared of
these things at all? Are there any bugs, or animals,
or anything you’re scared of? Not really, if I
can think of, no. No, you just you just love it. And you love getting down there. So do you have like a
collection at home or anything, like is your bedroom
filled with bugs? It is filled with [INAUDIBLE]
which is [INAUDIBLE] What is that? And speaking of acting. Yes. I know you acted in TV. I know you acted
in Cat in the Hat. And I know you acted in– Cat in the Hat, yeah. And Monsters
University as Terri. And Monsters University,
that’s right. Thank you. Thank you. That’s so sweet of you. Garrett, I hear you’re
pretty popular in school with the ladies, is that true? Yes, I’m really cute and smart. OK, and confident. Yes. Yeah, tell us about this
last little guy in here. Emperor scorpion. Emperor scorpion. Make you want run
for your money. Run for my money? Yeah, because this guy. OK. He might look scary. Yeah, and that’s
a real scorpion? Yes, so– OK. Can it actually sting me? Is it poisonous? yeah Oh, that’s funny, yeah. [LAUGHTER] That’s a good time. Well, that’s incredible. I love– you know
I love you now. I love these bugs, not really. But since you love
bugs so much, we wanted to make sure
you had everything you need to keep
learning about them, OK? So I got you a little gift. What? You want to see it? Yes. Here it comes. Oh, my gosh, look at this. It’s a bunch of bug stuff. You want to put that guy back? Yeah. Look at this stuff. Look at this stuff. Isn’t that cool? [CHEERING] I want to thank Adam DeVine,
Lewis Capaldi, and Ellen, for letting me host. Thank you. As she says, be
kind to one another. Bye, guys. Hi, I’m Andy. Ellen asked me to remind you
to subscribe to her channel so you can see more
awesome videos, like videos of me getting scared or
saying embarrassing things, like ball peen hammer. And also some videos of
Ellen and other celebrities, if you’re into
that sort of thing. [BLEEP] God! [BLEEP]

Focus on Species: Stick Insects (Phasmatodea)


Hey, Austin Smith here and welcome to Focus
on Species. Let’s talk about stick insects. Also commonly known as walking sticks or stick
bugs, stick insects are an order of insects that include over 3,000 known species, with
many more specimens yet to be formally described by biologists. As their name indicates, these
insects are shaped in the form of various plant branches or sticks, the perfect camouflage
to blend into their environment from predators. Some species are also shaped to resemble leaves.
Many sway back and forth in an effort to mimic the effects of the wind on the plant they’re
standing on as well. All of this helps to protect them from the birds, reptiles, and
small mammals that prey upon them. Stick insects can be found all over the world in warmer
climates, each species suited to the type of vegetation that it lives on and eats. Because
of their incredible camouflage, stick insects can often be extremely difficult to spot,
but when they are discovered, they’re an interesting animal to observe. Like all insects,
stick insects have six legs and many others, like this species, have long flexible antennae
on their heads that help them to feel their way through their environment. Only discovered
in 2008, the Chan’s megastick insect from southeast Asia is the longest insect species
in the entire world, reaching lengths of over 22 inches! Stick insect reproduction varies
between species and some females can lay eggs without needing a mate. Eggs from virgin mothers
are entirely female and exact genetic clones of their mother. Other species that sexually
reproduce, such as this mating pair of southern two-striped walking sticks, show sexual dimorphism
where the males are substantially smaller than the females. Mating behavior is notable
in stick insects because of how long they couple in a single mating act. A record among
insects, one mating pair from India was recorded to have sex for 79 days straight at one time.
Competition between males may explain the long duration of pairing, as males try to
guard females from other potential mates. Some competing males will even hide and wait
for the sexually active male to get hungry, which forces him to dismount the female, leave
for a moment, and find something to eat before returning to the act. While the dominant male
is off taking a snack break to ease his case of the munchies, the hidden male takes his
own chance at the female, crawling on top of her in the other male’s absence. After
mating is finally over, the female lays anywhere from 100 to 1,200 eggs, depending on the species.
The eggs of stick insects are unique little capsules, resembling seeds in their size and
shape. They have hard shells and come in all different kinds of unique designs. Their resemblance
to seeds helps attract ants, which will carry the eggs in various directions, ensuring dispersal
of the species. On average, nymphs take about 20 to 30 days to hatch, and emerge from a
lid-like trap-door from the egg case. Adulthood is reached after a few months of growing and
molting, the insects browsing on various kinds of vegetation throughout their lives. Lifespans
range from less than a year to over two years in some species. Stick insects are essential
to the ecosystems of many tropical forests, creating light gaps in trees for other animals
by eating away at leaves. Their droppings, which are large for insects, also help to
fertilize the soil for young trees. In some parts of the world they’re seen as a menace
to crops, eating away at economically important plants. In some parts of the United States,
large outbreaks of stick insects have left large stands of trees ravaged in parks. Ultimately,
however, the stick insects are an important part of forest ecosystems across the world,
also acting as a huge source of food for a number of birds and other animals. While many
species are common, there are some that are critically endangered like the Lord Howe Island
stick insect, also known as the tree lobster. The animal was thought to have gone extinct
in 1930 after it went missing on its home of Lord Howe Island, a small island to the
east of the Australian mainland. People had been using the large insects as bait for fishing
and when rats were introduced to the island the last of the animals were eaten. 71 years
later, in 2001, however, the species was rediscovered on a tiny rock islet nearby, that had just
enough vegetation to keep them alive. When they were rediscovered, there were only 24
individuals still alive, making them the rarest insect in the world at the time. Since 2001,
captive breeding programs by zoos have saved that remnant number from extinction and there
are now thousands of the species in captivity. Unlike the Lord Howe Island stick insect,
other species of stick insects are very common and several species are often used in laboratories
and even kept as pets. So, next time you’re walking around outside, take a look at the
bushes and trees around you and you may be surprised to discover that one of the branches
is moving with six legs and two eyes staring back at you! If you enjoyed this episode of Focus on Species,
be sure to click the like button or subscribe to my channel for future videos. You can also
watch another episode right over here. Thanks for watching!

Bugs! Bugs! Bugs! Bugs! | Original Songs | By LBB Junior


Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! (come on) Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Creepy creepy crawly
Yes I am a bug I’m quite shy by nature
I live under this log If you see me running ’round
Please come say hello But don’t pick me up
I’d rather be left alone Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! (come on) Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Some of my bug friends
Have little wings Others have lots of legs
Some have legs like springs Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! (come on) Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! [Let’s sing it again] Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! (come on) Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Creepy creepy crawly
Yes I am a bug I’m quite shy by nature
I live under this log If you see me running ’round
Please come say hello But don’t pick me up
I’d rather be left alone Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! (come on) Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Some of my bug friends
Have little wings Others have lots of legs
Some have legs like springs Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! (come on) Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs! Bugs, bugs, bugs, bugs!

Hungry? A pop-up resturant sells bugs and insects for lunch


When you’re on-the-go and feeling hungry,
the idea of tucking into some fast food can be appealing. But at a pop up restaurant in Cardiff – the
food on offer may not be that appealing to everyone. On the menu are cricket chocolate chip cookies,
bug blinis, salt and vinegar crickets, locust and scorpion lollipops among some other delights. Deep fried insects are regularly eaten as
street food in places like Bangkok. Local delicacies include crickets and worms
which come in a range of flavours including, salt, cheese, seaweed and barbecue and cost
around 65 pence each. But for the British tongue – it’s safe to
say they’re an acquired taste.

10 Most Dangerous Insects You Don’t Want to Meet!


While they may not physically be the most
dangerous creatures in the wild, insects certainly hold their ground when it comes to danger
to us vulnerable humans. Today, we count 10 of the deadliest insects out in the wild. 10. Kissing Bug The kissing bug received it’s appropriate
name, because they’re known to kiss people near or in the mouth during the night while
you sleep – and by kiss, I mean they suck your blood. These little blood suckers are
responsible for spreading the deadly Chagas disease, which results in over 14,000 deaths
every year. 9. Giant Japanese/Asian Hornet
These giant hornets can achieve lengths of up to 3 inches full grown, and fly in small
numbers compared to their bee relatives. A group as little as 20 hornets can destroy
an entire hive of honeybees. They have a very painful string which in some cases can be
lethal, and can trigger allergic reactions, it even has an enzyme in its venom that can
dissolve human tissue. 8. Siafu, also known as Safari Ants
Imagine a colony of ants, so large, it can tear through the African countryside and obliterate
everything in it’s path. Sounds crazy right? But it’s real, these ants have up to 20
million ants in a singly colony. When there’s a food shortage, the colony as a group will
march through the lands to find food. While they’re not technically difficult to avoid,
the very young or elderly can quickly find themselves victims of asphyxiation and it’s
estimated that between 15-60 people die each year.
7. Black Spitting Thick Tail Scorpion Try saying that 3 times quickly..While they’re
not technically insects, I’ve included them in this list because they’re among the most
dangerous species of scorpions. Most of them live in South Africa, specifically in the
deserts. They’re most known for their massive tails which can end up as much as the rest
of the scorpion. They can spit venom from their tails, and their stings can cause severe
pain, paralysis and even death. You do NOT want to find one of these guys in your shoe.
6. Locusts This may seem a strange pick for number 6,
as Locusts do not directly harm humans at all.. However, they’re relentless when it comes to consuming
plants. Every year, swarms of locusts decimate thousands of acres of crops in a short period
of time which causes starvation and this indirectly results in many deaths each year.
5. Fire Ants These pesky little bugs tend to build large
mounds in sand or soil. They feed on plant life, and occasionally crickets and smaller
insects. Sounds innocent you say? Wrong. When fire ants are bothered, they sting with a
venomous prick that feels like it’s burning with fire, hence the name, and the skin swells
up into a painful pustule. A couple of stings can be treated quickly but when the ant’s
swarm, you’re in trouble. 4. TseTse Fly
These insects are large biting flies that inhabit much of mid-continental Africa, between
the Sahara and the Kalahari deserts. They feed on the blood animals and they carry a
deadly disease called the sleeping sickness. This disease starts out with fevers, headaches,
itchiness and joint pains. Eventually this moves on to confusion, poor coordination,
numbeness and trouble sleeping, and if left untreated it can eventually lead to death.
As of 2010 it caused around 9,000 deaths per year, down from 34,000 in 1990.
3. African Honey Bee The Afrizanized Honey Bee, also known as the
Killer Bee, are a hybrid species created by cross-breeding the African honey bees with
various European honey bees such as the Italian bee. They were first introduced to Brazil
in the 1950s to increase honey production. However, in 1957, 26 swarms accidentally escaped
quarantine and since then have spread throughout South and Central America. They arrived in
North America in 1985. They will attack with the slightest provocation in large numbers
and will chase the victim much further than other types of honey bees and cause thousands
of deaths every year. 2. Fleas
Fleas may look like pesky, harmless critters. But they are actually directly responsible
for the spread of the Bubonic Plague from their rat hosts to humans. Without treatment,
the bubonic plague kills about two thirds of infected humans within four days. The Bubonic
plague, among a couple of other plagues, Is believed to be the cause of the Black Death
that swept through Europe in the 14th century and killed an estimated 25 million people,
or between 30-60% of the European population at that time.
1. Anopheles Mosquito The Anopheles mosquito is a sub-species of mosquito most known for the transmission
of malaria. The female mosquito carries a parasite, which doesn’t harm the mosquito.
When the mosquito bits a human to feed on blood, it injects this parasite into the human’s
blood stream. The parasites then travel to the liver where they mature and reproduce.
Symptoms of Malaria begin 10 to 15 days after being bitten, and can cause fever, fatigue,
vomiting, headaches, yellow skin, seizures, coma or even death. In 2012, it’s estimated
that there were over 200 million cases of malaria, killing over half a million of those
who were infected, many of them children.