4K CC. Tarantula Hawk Swarm, Catching Amazing Pet Insects & Reptiles  CA NM AZ TX USA Herping HD.

4K CC. Tarantula Hawk Swarm, Catching Amazing Pet Insects & Reptiles CA NM AZ TX USA Herping HD.


Massive swarm Of Tarantula hawks that landed here This thing right here is gigantic and he’s lookin at me That thing is like 2 1/2 inches long wow Jeez that thing is huge That’s the biggest one so far he’s like 2 3/4 inches that last one Haha ha I hope I don’t get stung haha that’s gonna suck Buuzzzzz….Tarantula Hawk flies right past my head WOAH Oh my god That’s a giant Bumble Bee uh uh uh ah he he They are every where

What If a Bug Gets Stuck In Your Ear?


Hey there! Welcome to Life Noggin. So I was strolling through Reddit the other
day and ended up finding this story about someone who had a rock stuck in their ear
for over a decade! They put a rock in their ear when they were
9 years old and didn’t get rid of it until they pulled it out themselves at the age of
22… 13 years later! According to them, the lasting effects of
the ordeal are that they can’t really swim underwater, have more frequent headaches,
and have balance issues. It’s pretty wild, right? As soon as I saw this, I needed to explain
the science behind it. So, what happens if a rock gets stuck in your
ear? Well first off, if I were you, I’d be happy
that what was stuck in my ear wasn’t something more… creepy and crawly. That’s because it’s not just rocks and
similar objects that get stuck in people’s ears — insects like cockroaches and moths
have found temporary homes in people’s hearing bits. Sorry for saying hearing bits. Having something like a rock or a piece of
candy stuck in your ear is actually pretty common when dealing with babies and young
children — you know, cause their natural scientists, testing theories by putting things
everywhere and touching everything.—, but insects can make their way into anyone’s
ear as long as they have a path in. Alright, bring out the flamethrower! Thank you! I’m not dealing with this image anymore. No matter what you have stuck in your ear,
it’s important that you try and get it out as quickly as possible, while making sure
to not make matters worse. We’ll get more into that in a second. Not only can having something stuck in your
ear be painful in the short term, but it can also be pretty dangerous. If the situation persists, it can potentially
cause hearing loss, bleeding, infection, and even damage to your eardrum. Your ear canal is very sensitive and you can
easily make matters worse if you end up pushing the object in deeper, so please don’t go rooting
around trying to get the foreign object out with a cotton swab or some sort of sharp object Instead, Mayo Clinic advises that you follow
safer steps to try and solve the problem. First off, try moving your head around and
seeing if gravity can solve the problem for you. If that doesn’t work, and you can easily
see the object and think that you can remove it easily, you can VERY CAREFULLY try to get
it out with some tweezers. You can also try washing it out with a little
warm water. If you’re dealing with an insect, a tiny
bit of warm, not hot, oil can do the trick. Refrain from these methods if you have ear
tubes or if your eardrum is perforated. If these methods don’t work or you can’t
get all of it out, you should see a doctor immediately, especially if you’re having
pain or other discomforts. According to some case studies that came out
around 10 years ago, while the majority of ear blockages can be safely removed without
the help of a specialist, complex cases require the work of an ear nose and throat doctor,
Otherwise known as an otolaryngologist, if you wanna sound fancy. This is because tough cases can be associated
with significant rates of morbidity, rarely including tympanic membrane and ossicular
damage, hearing loss, vertigo, and even facial nerve damage. The factors that lead to these complex cases? Spherical objects, foreign bodies that touch
the tympanic membrane, and things that have been stuck in your ear for more than 24 hours. So naturally, if you had a rock there for
13 years, you’re really just increasing your risk all around. I’m sorry that this happened to you AurumJo. I’ll link to your post so you can see your
story. It’s really super interesting. Let me know in the comment section below if
there are any other cases you’d like me to explore. Curious to know what it’s like to be deaf? Deafness is not a one size fits all. Some people might be able to hear pitched
tones, while others might be able to hear deeper tones. Some may not be able to hear anything at all. As always, my name is Blocko, this has been
life noggin, please don’t put rocks in your ear, and keep on thinking!

Feeding Cockroaches to Ants

Feeding Cockroaches to Ants


Welcome to the AC Ant Room, home to three
very large ant colonies. Each colony contains thousands and thousands
of ants. With all of these ants and brood within these
nests, surely there are hungry mouths to feed, and on today’s menu, we have their favourite
food item. Cockroaches. In this episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel,
we will watch each of our three ant colonies, the Golden Empire, The Fire Nation, and the
Dark Knights feeding on cockroaches, and even check out some of the other snacks they enjoy! Also in this video we will announce the winner
of our grand annual Ant Love Contest 2017 and reveal the winner of a brand new All You
Need Omni Gear Pack, a complete AntsCanada ant setup! Today will be full of ant discovery and fun,
so be sure to keep watching until the end! AC Family, sit back, relax, and let’s watch
our ants dine, in this thrilling episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL icon! Welcome to the AC Family. Bon appetite! Today I wanted to present tonight’s ant feeding
session in a more natural and real light, so I figured for a change in this episode,
we would observe the ants non-timelapsed and with less editing, instead showing more intimate
footage of the ants feeding so we can truly admire what happens when ants get busy at
processing their food. First to be fed, is our Golden Empire, our
yellow crazy ants. It’s been about two weeks since they’ve moved
into this massive terrarium we call Hacienda Del Dorado. It was a way to help them get rid of their
body mites. It seems the ants now have the ability to
dispose of their garbage appropriately, as I see them creating rubbish piles in locations
away from the nest. Here are some discarded uneaten Fire Nation
alate body parts and look, mites have found these piles to feed on. Unfortunately, I still see mites on the ants,
but I do see some ants without mites, so we’ll have to wait, perhaps a month or two more,
until the new generation of workers has completely replaced the initial mite-infecected generation
in order to truly determine if the move into a massive terrarium helped. You will see ants feasting here on some rotting
mango as well as some raw honey. They’ve been working on this for two days
now and are definitely craving for their protein. So here we go. Dropping in a native Philippine cockroach! AC Family, enjoy watching the Golden Empire
feast! More workers are coming now. Word has reached the nest that food lays just
a skip and a hop away. It isn’t long before the roach is surrounded
by many hungry Golden Empire workers. Some have completely abandoned the raw honey
to come and help. Yellow Crazy Ants lack stingers. They instead spray formic acid, and they’re
using it to subdue and kill this huge roach which as you can see is many times their size. Other workers keep the cockroach pinned down. Look at these workers trying to pull the cockroach
by its antennae. Haha! Persistent little ones! Now for those wondering, I feed all prey insects
to my ants pre-killed which means they have been crushed. This also means that their body parts still
move because insects don’t have brains like ours. They have ganglia, a grouping of nerve cells
which run down the center of their body. This means then that even if you decapitate
or crush a cockroach to kill it, it still moves. OK, let’s let them continue to grapple with
this huge carcass and move on to our most aggressive and frightening ants, the Fire
Nation, our red tropical fire ants! As you know, we recently moved our fire ants
into the Fire Palace, this deep rubbermaid bin full of soil which they absolutley love! It has become the colony’s main nest! Let’s drop in a cockroach. This one is a no brainer. It gets swarmed by ants in a matter of seconds. It isn’t long before a thick carpet of ants
covers this roach. Let’s add another shall we? OK, and now time to head downstairs into the
abyss to visit the new outworld on the Silver Glacier of our Dark Knights, our Black Crazy
Ants. Let’s drop in a roach for these hungry and
deserving ants! Let’s reposition here so we can see a bit
more. In no time, the workers of the Dark Knights
are all over this cockroach. Watch them feed eagerly from the cockroach’s
wounds. These black crazy ants waste no time. Every night, I feed these three kingdoms different
foods. A varied diet is definitely the key to a healthy
ant colony. The Dark Knights usually get 1 or two roaches,
as does the Golden Empire, and the Fire Nation, being a lot larger than the other two ants
colonies, they take 12 or sometimes I feed them pieces of cooked meat, like this chicken
leg which we offered as their house warming gift, and yes, of course I filmed it, but
this needed to be timelapsed because it took 2 days! And gone! Now, I don’t know if you remember but a few
months back I caught a trapjaw queen ant and kept her in the dark and fed her hoping she
would give us eggs, so we could start a colony of trap jaw ants. Well, I have an update, and you will be both
shocked and super excited! And all of that to come, in next week’s video. Thanks for watching! And we’ll see you next week, AC Family! It’s ant love forever! Alright, AC Family! Were you grossed out or was that cool? Inner Colony members today’s episode was a
little taste of what you guys watch every week in our hidden videos, but of course I
still placed a hidden video for you here, for extended footage of a cockroach being
eaten by the Golden Empire. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What is the name of the specialized workers
in honeypot ants that store water? Congratulations to Regnerum who correctly
answered “Aquapletes”. Congratulations Regnerum you just won a free
ebook handbook from our shop! For this week’s question of the week, we ask: What is the name of the groupings of nerves
controling movement in insects? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free Tshirt from our shop! Alright, and speaking of free stuff, as you
know, we love doing fun contest giveaways to you guys our AC Family, and so last week
we launched our annual “Ant Love Contest”, where we asked the question “What is Ant Love
to You?” for a chance to win a FREE All You Need Omni Gear Pack. This year, we received over 1700 entries on
our official Facebook page, and so as is our problem every single year, it was SO hard
for us to narrow it down to just 1 winner! There were just so many great entries that
made us smile, made us laugh, made us go WOW!, made us go what da?, even some that made us
tear up a little and warmed our ant-loving hearts! So, here we go after reviewing over 1700 entries,
a big congratulations goes out to our ANT LOVE CONTEST 2017 winner: John Poster, who wrote a cool ant poem, which
we have included in the info section of this video. Congratulations as well goes out to our runners
up. You guys each have won a FREE EBOOK Handbook
from our shop! Thank you all for playing this year, and for
those that didn’t win, don’t worry as we are always giving away free stuff from AntsCanada.com Thanks for watching and we’ll see you next
week, AC Family! Ant love forever!

Venom Injection: How Ant Stingers Work!

Venom Injection: How Ant Stingers Work!


This is what happens underneath your
spin when an ant is stinging you. About a year ago I filmed this footage
of a fire ant about to sting my finger. And in the corner of the frame was
something I hadn’t seen: before a droplet of venom being formed at the tip of the
stinger. So, I went to read more about this, how venom is actually pumped out of the stinger, and I found out that no one’s actually filmed it before. So I’ve
been working on that and now I’ve got a bunch of footage that I want to show you. This is a stinger of an ant piercing a
thin wax film and pumping venom. It’s filmed in slow motion at a thousand
frames per second. I think I know why this has been filmed
before. Ant stingers and the parts of them that are moving are really tiny and
really fast. For scale, here’s the stinger of one of the ants in this video a
harvester ant. The stinger is about 40 microns wide that’s smaller than the
width of a human hair. Stingers are made up of three parts: a stylet and a pair of
lancets. The lancets attached to the stylet and form a hollow canal through
which venom is pumped. In some ants, like harvester ants, the tips of the lancets
are barbed. While others like this trap- -jaw ant stinger are smooth and more
needle-like. What I found most interesting about this
footage was seeing how an ant actually delivers venom. When it inserts its
stinger into something the lancets are moving back and forth beyond the length
of the stylet. That back and forth movement helps the stinger drill deeper
into its target but it’s also what actually pumps venom out of the stinger. Droplets of venom are formed with each
extension of a lancet. From analyzing these clips it takes an average of 75
milliseconds for a lancet to move back and forth. That’s faster than the blink
of an eye which takes about 80 milliseconds. So, in just one second an ant can deliver
13 droplets of venom and even more if the back-and-forth movements of those
lancets overlap. So what I think this footage is showing us is that back and
forth movement of the lancets controls how fast and how much venom an ant can
deliver during the sting. So whether or not an ant catches its prey or avoids
becoming prey itself is all wrapped up and how fast it can move these two
little threads of cuticle. For example, this is an ant trying to sting a
mealworm. This is slow-motion footage 25 times slower than real life. If the
ant wants any chance of successfully delivering venom and has to be fast. I hope this video has shown you something
new about ants, I know it has for me making it. While you are here check out the
full fire ant video that inspired this one and be sure to subscribe to this
channel for more videos like this. All right let’s cut it!

This Drug-Resistant Bacteria Could Be Hiding in Your Armpits Right Now

This Drug-Resistant Bacteria Could Be Hiding in Your Armpits Right Now


Staphylococcus or, as it’s more widely known,
staph, is one of the most common bacteria found on humans around the world. In some
cases, it can pose a real threat to your body’s immune system – even proving lethal.
So, if it’s so widespread, why aren’t we all getting infected? – Hi, my name is Vance Fowler. I’m an infectious
disease doctor in the division of infectious diseases at Duke University Medical Center.
For the last twenty years or so, I’ve focused on the clinical care, and the research
around drug-resistant bacteria, and staph aureus in particular. Staphylococcus is a bacteria that lives on
our skin. And about 40% of people on the planet carry it on their body but are asymptomatic.
So almost half of us are walking around unaware that we’re carriers of staph. And usually that’s just fine. – There are many different kinds of staph,
but the one that causes the greatest amount of problems in human medicine is a bacteria
called staphylococcus aureus. This is generally the bacteria that people are referring to
when they talk about a staph infection. Staph aureus can be colonized in the nose,
armpits, genital areas, and other parts of the skin. And this colonization can go on
for years, with the patient being totally asymptomatic throughout much of their lives. – Sometimes, for reasons that we really don’t
completely understand yet, this staph will change from being a bystander to being trouble. And when it makes that change, that trouble
becomes an infection in your skin or soft tissues. How this usually happens is with
a break in the skin, allowing the infection to enter the body and the bloodstream. – And once you get staph in your blood, or
staph aureus bacteremia, then things get a lot more serious. The reason it gets serious
is because now it has access to infect and cause an infection
in virtually any site in the body. For example, it can cause pneumonia and
involve the lungs. It can cause infections in your bone, called osteomyelitis, and it
can cause joint infections, cause arthritis, and it can cause infections of your heart,
cause endocarditis. And this is what makes it unique in the bacterial
world – its ability to cause a wide range of medical concerns. This is because staph
aureus has what are called virulence factors, or things that allow it to cause infection. – Basically, though, all of its virulence factors fall into one
of two categories. They’re either adhesions, which are proteins that allow the bacteria
to stick to things that it doesn’t need to stick to, like heart valves, spines, bone…
or toxins, which, generally speaking, are involved in causing local damage to cells
and tissue. So it will cause cell rupture, cause tissue to break down and die. With the help of these virulence factors,
the bacteria can turn lethal once it gets into the bloodstream. – So wow, I know that sounds scary, and it
is pretty serious. How do you know you have a staph infection? The key thing about
a staph infection is you’re going to have symptoms in the site that’s involved. Because staph mostly impacts the soft tissue,
infections can look like a boil or abscess that’s red, hot, swollen or seeping. Fortunately,
these can mostly be treated with antibiotics. – Some of the other forms of infection may
be a little more subtle, and they may require diagnosis in the hospital or in the emergency
room. If you get staph in your bloodstream, really the hallmark finding is fever and chills. There’s another type of staph that is even
more alarming: MRSA, or Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus. It’s a concern not
just because of its resistance to antibiotics, but also because it’s showing signs
of spreading into new territory. – The epidemiology of MRSA has also changed
over the years. Traditionally it was associated almost exclusively with patients who had been
in the hospital, or patients who had ongoing contact with the medical system, for example,
long-term care facilities, hemodialysis patients, things like that. But about fifteen years ago, something happened.
People with absolutely no contact with the health care system began to develop boils and
abscesses due to a MRSA infection. – Not only was this happening in the United
States, but throughout other parts of the world, other communities were experiencing
basically the same phenomenon of community-acquired MRSA infections. So, why in the world did this happen?
Well, that’sa great question and honestly I wish I could tell ya. It’s probably like most things,
a variety of several factors, but obviously critical amongst that has got to be
the overuse of antibiotics. And while there’s no commercially available
vaccine for staph aureus, there is some encouraging progress with medical advances. – One of the key elements that we’re just
beginning to understand is the role of the host in causing and perpetuating
staph infections. The interplay between the bacteria
and the host immunity is complex. Ultimately, because staph aureus is so common,
there are three main takeaways. These are: prevention – washing your hands
at home and in medical environments; recognizing the symptoms early: boils,
abscesses, and anything red or swollen; and seeing your healthcare provider
as soon as you see signs or feel ill. – We understand now that there are things
that we can do to help patients in the hospital have a dramatically lower rate
of developing staph infections. So for example, daily chlorhexidine baths
when they’re in the Intensive Care Units. While there have been setbacks in terms of
new epidemiology, new outbreaks, the opioid crisis… there’s a lot of reason to have
a good deal of optimism as well, in terms of new drugs and better understanding.

Project Nucleus: How I Create Mini Planets Within Glass

Project Nucleus: How I Create Mini Planets Within Glass


Before we begin today’s episode, I wanted
to let everyone know that AntsCanada.com is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the
20-20-20 sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook,” right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! And now enjoy today’s ant episode! After a long and successful day, I looked
down at the clippings and dead tree I had collected from our projects. Ordinarily, I would throw these away, but
suddenly an awesome idea came to me, an idea that I felt could completely change and affect
the lives of every creature and terrarium in the entire AC Antiverse! AC Family, it was time to embark on a new
and exciting biological engineering project! Last week, we had two major maintenance operations
for two of our beloved kingdoms in the AC Antiverse. First, the mystical double floating island
of Avista, home to the Big-Headed ants, you named the Bobbleheads, underwent a serious
makeover, receiving a new island to their open-air ant archipelago. The Red Banyon tree, the Great Tree of Wisdom,
also needed trimming, so I snipped around their sacred tree, which resulted in this
gorgeous well-manicured main island. We replaced a dead tree with a new one, and
gave them a superworm as house warming gift. East of Avista, stands the Canopy of Vortexia. Our tree-top forest home to our aggressive
Weaver Ant Colony, The Emerald Empire. The territories also needed maintenance as
one of the trees had seriously overgrown. It was a scary operation to snip away at the
overgrown leaves and perform general maintenance with weaver ants wanting to attack me the
whole time, but the biggest thing that came out of this was that I also took the opportunity,
to improve the biological profile of Vortexia’s soil life, through the addition of roaches,
superworms and other creatures, and then sealing the entire thing up! It resulted in a clean, healthy, and bioactive
environment, where creatures could eat decaying materials, reproduce on their own, and be
hunted, all inside the Canopy of Vortexia. It was the epic creation of an entire, contained
ecosystem, and the way I saw it, like the creation of a mini-planet within glass. And this gave me an idea. This week, our journey towards creating the
ultimate homes for our ants and other creatures continues, as we launch a super cool, biological
engineering project, I call Project Nucleus, and AC Family, I think you guys will totally
dig it, no pun intended! So sit back, relax and enjoy this week’s
info-packed episode, as I show you how life of a successful vivarium begins, and how I
plan to create mini-planets within glass. In the past few weeks, my recent projects
of making more bioactive terrariums have been undeniably successful, bioactive, basically
meaning throwing in a bunch of different organisms with different purposes into a single enclosed
environment, resulting in a healthier and more dynamic life for our ant colonies, as
well as the fellow tenants living with them. In the case of the Dark Knights a few weeks
back, for instance, a new life with bagworms, millipedes, jumping spider, springtails, isopods,
worms, and who knows what else came with the layer of leaf litter and plants I threw into
their new home, which by the way needs a new name so VOTE here, AC Council, meant that
the ants could truly live like they did in the wild, defending their territory, with prey at their disposal, and home bioactively cleaned by creatures
that would eat their poop and garbage, converting it to fertilizer for the plants
which would go on to produce oxygen for the system, and so on. The partnerships of these various creatures
made for a very self-sustaining, biodynamic world! I thoroughly loved this streak of successfully
creating these super-bioactive terrariums on steroids, which ultimately gave me the
idea to start Project Nucleus. So, what is Project Nucleus, you ask. Well, it goes like this. So you may or may not know, every time I start
building a new terrarium, I either recycle aged terrarium soil or collect leaf litter
from my neighborhood and add it to the soil. I do this because soil creatures, like springtails,
mites, worms, millipedes, and isopods are needed to help breakdown organic waste in
the terrarium. Wilted leaves from plants, exoskeletons and
other wastes from the prey, as well as ant excrement are all broken down by these soil-residing
organisms. Without them, the entire terrarium may rot,
fungus take over, and just lead to a gross terrarium mess. Plus these soil creatures are the missing
link between organic waste and plant life, because soil creature poop from organic waste
contains a tonne of amazing nutrients for plants. The problem with using new soil to create
new terrariums is that they contain only a few of these creatures. It would take some time for a new terrarium
to develop the populations of soil biota, so as a general rule, the older the soil,
the more lush and abundant the soil life is. Now to better understand what I’m talking
about, and appreciate how cool of an undertaking Project Nucleus is, let’s take a look at one
of the amazing ant kingdoms in the AC Antiverse, on which a lot of you have been patiently
waiting for an update. Welcome everyone to the home of the Golden
Empire. This colony of Yellow Crazy Ants, scientifically
known as Anoplolepis gracillipes is one of the OG ant colonies of this channel. They were once a massive glorious colony of
millions but were unexpectedly hit by a lethal plague of blood-sucking mites earlier this
year, which reduced them to several hundreds. I rescued a small population and put them
into quarantine where I treated their vampiric body mites with predatory Hypoapsis mites
harvested from rhino beetles, of all places. And lucky for me, I was able to recover at
least 5 of the 7 queens and rid the colony of the vampiric mites. To rehabilitate them, I transferred them,
into this Hybrid Nest + Ant Tower setup. We even documented the cured Golden Empire
workers, transferring their brood into their new home. What a trip and triumphant day that was! During the mass emmigration, we also noticed
that the Hypoaspis mites were still living with the Golden Empire, assumingly protecting
the colony from future bad mite attacks. You can watch all of this here, by the way. So it was clear that these relationships with
smaller organisms like the Hypoaspis mites were extremely important for the ants’ well-being. And AC Family, you’re about to see how much
these relationships have evolved since they moved in a few months ago, and how it has
helped the Golden Empire flourish! Look! I’m happy to announce that the Golden Empire
is doing great. Here are the queens, who prefer to hang out
in their Hybrid Nest, which has become the main mothernest of the colony. They’ve been laying lots of eggs. Look at those egg batches being carried around
by caring workers. I estimate the colony is well over a thousand
workers now and is about to get even bigger. But what’s more amazing is this, guys! Other creatures are also living in the Hybrid
Nest, in cooperation with the colony. Here are springtails, known in the Antiverse
as the Springcleaners, which help eat decaying material, ant poop, and mold. We also have beneficial mites eating up the
same stuff. But check this out! For the first time on the channel, we get
a glimpse at a species of symbiotic isopods that live with the ants! Isn’t that amazing? The ants don’t attack these isopods, which
are actually crustaceans, who thrive off the garbage left behind by the ants, mold that
might be growing around the premises, and possibly their poop. It’s possible these isopods were living with
the Golden Empire the whole time since the beginning, back when they were still residing
in the Hacienda Del Dorado, but we’ve only been able to see them now due to visual access
of the Hybrid Nest. And that’s not all, guys. I even discovered there are silverfish-type
insects, living with the ants! I don’t know what species these little turbo
guys are, but I am pretty sure, they also have a key role at eating up dead insects
leftovers, ant poop, and fungi. So, guys check out the beauty of how this
all works. The Golden Empire has a system. So like humans, the colony produces garbage,
and like humans, the ants keep the garbage in piles and bury it. They’ve chosen designated areas of the Hybrid
Nest as garbage rooms. They also delegate certain areas for bathrooms. It’s essential especially in an underground,
moist environment for the colony to be as clean and systematic with their waste management
as possible so all hell doesn’t break loose and the colony dies from unsanitation. So once these garbage and bathroom spots get
too soiled and littered, the colony then buries these areas up, and that’s when the clean-up
team of soil creatures take over and work their magic. They’re small enough to fit into the tight
spaces of the buried chambers where they proceed to eat up the garbage and ant poop, and keeping
dangerous fungus that grows on the garbage and poop under control. A lot of you ask how I clean my ant farms,
and well, now you know. I kinda don’t need to, because the ant farms
bioactively clean themselves. The lifeforms take care of the maintenance
like they would in the wild. I just add water and watch it all happen! There’s even a whole other decomposition process
happening at the microbial level. If we were to take a look at a sample of this
ant nest material under a microscope, we’d find a whole other world of bacteria and colonies
of unicellular organisms also busy eating and decomposing organic matter. So as you can see, there’s quite the system
happening here. It’s mutualistic symbiosis at its finest,
which basically means there’s a cooperation between all parties for the benefit of all. It’s amazing to be able to see all of this
in the Hybrid Nest, because you can’t really see it happening in a terrarium, but I assure
you, this is what’s going on underground in all our terrariums, perhaps with different
sets of soil creatures unique to each terrarium. And look, the creatures even migrate and travel
through the tubes to and from the colony’s neighbouring satellite nests. Speaking of which, let’s cover up their Hybrid
Nest and briefly take a look at the Golden Empire’s satellite nest in the large Ant Tower
shall we? As you can see, this is the popular hangout
for the Springcleaners! A tonne of Springtails for some reason love
this place, and seem to be quite busy at the moment working on a leftover superworm. Now wanna see something cool: see this little
contraption with a switch? I turn it on and a light beneath the Ant Tower
illuminates from inside. For those of you who are new to ants, ants
are naturally photophobic which means they don’t like light in their nests, but it is
said that ants cannot see red light, so keeping the ants under red film and lighting them
up with red light, causes the ants to feel like they are shrouded in darkness. And peeling off this red film reveals ants
congregating in one of their chambers. Check out all the tunnels they’ve created
down to the bottom of the Ant Tower! Springtails can be seen frequenting all areas. Now, AC Family, after seeing all of this,
it’s now time to talk about my idea, Project Nucleus! Rich bioactive ant homes like the Golden Empire’s
here don’t happen overnight. The creatures are few at first, usually coming
in with plants, rocks, and soil that you first place into the terrariums and it takes months
to create populations as rich as the one we see here in the Golden Empire, and a good
year for it to really be established. And as you know AC Family, we are always creating
new worlds and vivariums on this channel, and it would be very beneficial to have a
constant supply of soil creatures, to help speed up the bioactivation process in newly
created terrariums. And so, my idea. AC Family, I present to you Project Nucleus. In this glass enclosure, I plan on creating
what shall become the Nucleus of the AC Antiverse, the creational furnace from which shall be
born epic populations of soil biota for future terrariums we make from here on in. If we could create a place where we could
culture soil creatures, a place with aged soil and an established soil ecosystem, then
when creating a new terrarium or ant home, we could simply scoop up a bit of the medium
from the Nucleus, to place into our new terrarium, and thereby help populate the new terrarium’s
soil with its team of soil creatures. One scoop of medium from the Nucleus, would
be enough to bioactivate any terrarium much more quickly than if it were just created
from scratch. Plus the medium produced by the AC Nucleus
would be super rich in nutrients for plants. My plan was for the Nucleus to be a place
where I could take leaf clippings, decaying material or waste, or even dead creatures
from other kingdoms of our Antiverse, and have them feed our Nuclear soil creatures
to be processed back into the soil. Essentially, we’d be creating a composter,
just amped up with a tonne of soil creatures. And so to build this AC Nucleus, we will be
needing various materials. So here we go. First, we need this glass tank, our Nuclear
furnace of soil life culture. Through the glass we’ll be able to see the
activities as well as the progress of the Nuclear inhabitants in real-time. Next, I’ll be adding activated carbon, to
keep the growing medium purified from harmful metals and chemicals which could poison the
populations of creatures living in here. Now, let’s move on to my worst fear in life,
ahem… Worms! I had to face these vile-looking creatures
once more. I began to use my trowel to scoop up earth
from the bag and I was immediately repulsed by these squirming African Nightcrawlers seething
from within the soils. As a scoleciphobe, it was disgusting to see
the worms squirming, but I knew I had to do this because earthworms are good for composting. They breakdown organic wastes and turn them
into valuable compost or black soil, which are great for plants! Plus, populating a new terrarium with its
starting team of earthworms is always a good thing. I placed the soil into the glass enclosure. As time passed, I forced myself to really
look at the worms. Some worms fell and I had to pick them up. Ugh! I had to coach my mind that the worms were
friends and harmless. Mind over matter. Mind over matter. I filled up the tank and pressed the medium
down a bit as I went along. When I had filled it to as much as I could,
I decided to actually pick the worms up and hold them in my hand. Not so bad, huh? Next, I added leaf litter collected from outside. I knew it contained lots of different soil
creatures that would be the forefathers, foremothers, and forehamaphrodites to bring our AC Nucleus
to life. I immediately saw that I’d scooped up lots
of millipedes. I couldn’t touch them, as this species produces
cyanide, so bad for the eyes and enough to make a human sick, but they would be great
at eating up decaying material. And Oh! Look! These millipedes immediately began mating. Wasting no time, I see. Also, I had a handful of leaf clippings from
Selva de Fuego maintenance. I cut these up so they could break down much
more quickly and placed them into the Nucleus, as well. Then I placed filter foam to cover everything
up, to ensure no mischievous fly could enter and lay their eggs inside the tank. We wouldn’t want to repeat the maggot episode
hehe… right? The filter foam also helps keep all Nuclear
inhabitants inside, while allowing the entire system to breathe. After adding all of the components, our AC
Nucleus was complete. Two days later, the Nucleus was already a
happening place. Millipedes were still mating, and I suspect
we’re about to get a booming population of them soon. I was surprised to see another species of
millipede had dug a burrow into the soils. Also, earthworms were seen everywhere! They created a network of burrows. And Oh! I could see worm casts. I also saw that they had dragged pieces of
the leaves into the soils for further feeding. Good job, earthworms! Such hard-working creatures. Not scary or disgusting at all… Sorta. I could also see several awesome mites already
starting to populate the soils. Springtails frolicked their new territories,
as well. And look! A bagworm was crawling along the top with
its constructed home made of debris. I didn’t even know we put a bagworm in there! I’m not sure what else we’ll be finding in
this increasingly bioactive chamber we call the AC Nucleus, but I can’t wait to see how
this soil ecosystem evolves over time, and eventually use it to help speed up the bioactivation
process of the terrariums we make in the future. In fact, I’ve been thinking a lot about all
this focus lately on bioactive setups for the ants and other creatures of the Ant Room,
and I feel AC Family that the AC Antiverse is approaching a new age, where more focus
is placed on creating more hollistic setups for the lifeforms we care for. Before, I used to create homes that would
usually focus most on one creature, one star on a stage, whether it be an ant colony in
an ant farm, or a tarantula in an enclosure. But I’m realizing more and more, after all
these years of keeping ants, that this isn’t the best way to house these creatures nor
appreciate them to the fullest. In order to properly and naturalistically
house them and watch them at their fullest potential, you need to do more than just decorate
their home in a naturalistic way. The key here is remembering the context, in
which the creatures live in nature. The ant colonies we care for and love, are
actually part of an interconnected food web, a piece in a puzzle and to properly house
them and witness them in their truest and greatest form, you need to include all pieces
of the puzzle. This to me means then that there should be
a focus on developing the necessary associated animals like soil creatures in their soils,
as we saw with the Golden Empire, prey creatures living in the territories as we’ve established
with Vortexia, and allow the system to develop a collective biological profile of its own
in an enclosed space, like we did with the Dark Knight’s new vivarium. I caught some surviving darkling beetles,
superworm survivors, mating within Olympus this week. Usually, I’d fish these out and place them
in my superworm bin, but this time, I decided I’d keep them in there. Also, as you can probably imagine, I’m running
out of room in the AC Antiverse, and while our future giant two-story ant room in my
new house is currently being built, I feel this merging of creatures to share a space,
may be a great solution to my now overcrowded ant room. A few months ago, I tried placing one of our
vampire crabs into the Selva de Fuego. Now hold on, before you freak out, normally
I’d never consider this because, in my mind, the Fire Ants as we know are savages, but
I also knew the crab occupies an entirely different niche, and can get away by retreating
underwater, and turns out AC Family, after 8 weeks, the crab is still alive and happy
in the Selva de Fuego. The Fire ants surprisingly don’t bother it,
and the crab goes about its daily activities picking up garbage and dead ants the fire
ants dump into the river, sleeping within the shadowy wet caves behind
the falls, and picking off organic waste and algae off
the rocks. Pretty awesome right? I’ve gone ahead and placed a few crabs into
the Hacienda Del Dorado, as well, where it now resides with a few microfrogs, shrimp,
rasbora fish, and trap-jaw ants. So as you can see, this new era for our Antiverse
and philosophy are both exciting and much more beneficial to the creatures we care for. It means a more deliberate structuring of
their worlds, so that the worlds can feed and sustain themselves, thereby minimizing
my interaction with them for the most part anyway. I realized recently, that as an ant keeper,
caregiver of life forms, and your Creator of Worlds, I’m not keeping individual creatures
in inanimate setups, but rather I’m keeping biodynamic superorganisms. The Selva de Fuego, the Hacienda Del Dorado,
Vortexia, Avista, Olympus… These are all superorganisms, composed of
a multitude of living components that all depend on each other for survival… Little dynamic planets of life in our ever-expanding
AC Antiverse. AC Family, I’ve learned it’s the difference
between just keeping pets and creating planets within glass. Speaking of making new terrariums, it just
so happens, another beast has been waiting in the shadows for you all to meet her. Yes, we have a new addition to our ever growing
AC Antiverse, and she’s one of the most dangerous animals to ever reside in the Ant Room. AC Family, I can’t wait to show her to you. AC Family, did you enjoy today’s episode? What do you think of Project Nucleus? Let me know in the comments. Next week, we meet our newest addition to
the Antiverse, so you know what to do! Smash that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON
for notifications now, so you don’t miss out on who our new dangerous but beautiful beast
is, and don’t forget to hit the LIKE button every single time, including now! It would really help a lot! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like a clue as to who our newest beast is. Maybe you might be able to figure it out,
so go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Name one of the bioactive creatures found
in Vortexia. Congratulations to Tan Grace Lin who correctly
answered: Millipedes Congratulations, Tan Grace Lin, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is mutualistic symbiosis? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Fire Ants React to Cockroach on a Stick (Time Lapse)

Fire Ants React to Cockroach on a Stick (Time Lapse)


AntsCanada presents… Fire Ants React To Cockroach on a Stick We fed a precrushed cockroach to our fire ants and filmed them eating over a 2 day period Ants attacking cockroach. (Music in background) Cockroach Husk falls Ant Love Forever! Video by AntsCanada.com More Videos, Subscribe!

Looking for an Ant on a Mountain with No Name | California Academy of Sciences

Looking for an Ant on a Mountain with No Name | California Academy of Sciences


♪ (soft music) ♪ I do research on ants all around the world, but I specialize on the ants of Madagascar. But when I first started
working in Madagascar, I didn’t go to Madagascar. I went to museums to see
what was already known. There’s one ant
that looked really interesting. There was only a few specimens of it. No locality, just a number. I thought, “Oh, when I go to Madagascar, I’m sure I’ll find this ant.” Then I started working in Madagascar. I traveled everywhere,
from the north to the south, up the mountains, down the mountains,
and I never found this ant. Where was it collected? I started asking around, and it looked like it was part
of a French expedition. So I went to Paris. I talked
to people at the museum. They said, “Ah, I think
that’s from an expedition with an entomologist called Betsch.” I looked up Betsch. I went to his home, and he actually gave me his original notes from the expedition, and this is it. I looked it up and it said, “1900 meters. Mountain without a name.” I started asking people how to get there. Nobody’s been there since 1971. That’s why I decided
two years ago, finally, to go up this mountain without a name. Expeditions are the unknown. So you get a team together,
and then you start. It could be a failure.
You could not get there. We drove up the coast of Madagascar. We got to a village. We found an old porter, somebody
who helped the 1970s expedition. We interviewed him,
but he also said on their trip, they had climbing gear. We were like, “Oh, no.
We don’t have any ropes with us, so we may not be able to make it.” But we went on
and we just decided to go west. We made the mistake of deciding that the best way to go
is to follow the river up, but it was such a massive river,
and it was raining so much, we decided we can’t make it. We’re just going to have to find
the next bend of the river and set up camp. By chance, the only way
to get up the mountain was to go behind this camp. If we would have gone further up the river
to where the French did, we would have been blocked
by cliff faces and needed ropes. But we went up, luckily, to this one camp, spent 10 days there plotting routes
to get up the mountain, and we started then moving
our camps up the mountain. We were looking for the ant
the whole trip up there, but the original collection
was from near the summit, at almost 2000 meters. We actually, finally, got to the summit. We were working up there
for a couple of days in terrible rain, and we had to get back down the mountain, and we didn’t find the ant. It was kind of sad to have to be kind of almost pushed off the mountain
to get back home, but that means we’ll have to go back. We’re planning a major expedition. We’re going to go with botanists
and other entomologists and we’re going to back up there,
and hopefully, this time, spend a lot more time up
on the top of the mountain to explore the forest, and these beautiful wet prairies
that are up there. It’s really just by chance,
if you take some soil, and there’s your ant. We did a lot of soil digging,
but we didn’t find it. We might have been in the wrong habitat,
the wrong location. So we have to keep looking.

The Typhus Epidemic That Saved A Polish City From The Nazis


Dr. Eugene Lazowski was born in Poland in
1913. He was a Polish doctor and soldier during
World War II. He had been a prisoner of war in a German
Prisoner Of War camp for three years. Providence shone on Dr Eugene Lazowski one
night in 1942 when he saw a means of escape and took it. When Lazowski returned to Rozwadów, he went
to work for the Polish Red Cross – and the Underground. Eugene had a home next to the ghetto in Rozwadow. In fact, his fence bordered the ghetto, which
was filled with his fellow countrymen, many of them Jews. The ‘residents’ of the ghetto were sadly
undernourished and some of them were very ill. Despite the fact that the Germans had declared
it a crime to help these people, a crime that was punishable by death, Dr. Eugene Lazowski
came up with a way to treat the sick in the Rozwadow ghetto. He would have them come to his fence, under
cover of night, and tie a white cloth to it. When he saw the cloth, he would come out to
the fence and treat whoever was there. Dr. Eugene Lazowski was given the opportunity
to assist these people more, when his colleague, Dr. Stanislaw Matulewicz, made an amazing
discovery. If he injected healthy patients with the same
dead bacteria that was used to test for typhus, their tests would come back positive for the
disease, with no harm done to them. The Germans were terrified of contracting
the disease, so if a patient was found to have it, that would make them exempt from
transfer to labor and concentration camps. There was one problem, however. During the time of the Nazi occupation of
Poland, Jews who were discovered to have deadly communicable diseases were killed and their
homes burnt to the ground. If Dr. Eugene Lazowski and Dr. Matulewicz
were going to help, they would only be able to use the bacteria on non-Jewish patients. They first tested it on a man who was home
on leave from a labor camp. It worked. The test came back positive and the man did
not have to return. The doctors began slowly ‘spreading’ the
disease throughout Rozwadow and the surrounding villages. They were very careful not to ‘infect’
Jews and they made sure that some of the ‘infected’ were referred to other doctors, who did not
know of the deception, for testing. This way, all of the tests were not coming
from them. That would have been too obvious. Once there were enough cases of the disease,
which is transmitted through the bite of infected lice, the Germans quarantined the area. No more people were taken out of the area
and placed in camps. Dr. Eugene Lazowski was allowed to continue
‘treating’ the ‘epidemic’ and so, he was able to perpetuate it for nearly three
years. During that time, the Germans only came to
inspect the area once. Their fear of the disease prevented them from
doing a thorough job of it and so the deception was not discovered. Close to the end of World War II, a soldier
whom he had secretly treated for a venereal disease warned Eugene Lazowski that the Gestapo
was after him. He grabbed his wife and daughter and fled
the city. He moved to the United States in 1958 and
became a professor at the University of Illinois Medical Center. Dr. Eugene Lazowski passed away in Oregon
in December of 2006.