5 things ants can teach us about management | BBC Ideas


Ants and human societies
are similar in many ways. They live in communities numbering
from just a few individuals up to many millions. They can build vast empires
that span the world. They conduct diplomacy
with neighbouring settlements. And they can even go
to war with each other. All the ants have just one single
intent on their mind, and that’s the reproductive
success of the colony. Everything that they do is directed
towards that one aim. Most ant colonies consist of just
one reproductive individual – the queen –
and many non-reproductive workers. And the workers
are actually all female. So they’re a vast sisterhood
who does all the work. Now the title ‘queen’ seems to imply
some kind of political authority – that the queen is telling the workers
what to do at any one moment in time, but in fact it’s completely
self-organised. In a colony of ants,
there are no fixed managers. There are no CEOs or presidents. Everyone is working towards
the common goal. If one ant finds a trace of food, that ant will become,
in that moment, a leader, and get everyone else
to come into that food source. But the modern organisation
is obsessed with hierarchy. Obsessed with managers
and where you are up on the scale, which number or paygrade you are. And what happens is
lots of people lower down spend all their time trying to guess
what their manager wants, or their manager’s manager wants, rather than what’s going to work
for the organisation and the people they serve. When an ant encounters a food source,
for example, what it can do
on the way back to the colony is lay a trail using pheromones – and these are just chemicals
that they can lay on the ground so that when others ants come
along and encounter that trail, they know to follow it
all the way to the food. So this simple process
of positive feedback is surprisingly effective
at finding the shortest path. The idea,
borrowing from the ant world, of actually getting the data, making sure you’re capturing it from the very people
who are on the coalface, so to speak, makes tons of sense, because they’re the ones
with the rich qualitative data to be able to feed that back
into the decision-making. We have to be self-organised. We have to allow people to have
their own intelligence and wisdom and organize around a problem
or a project themselves, rather than always waiting for
someone else to tell them what to do, or for a three-year business
planning cycle to take effect. Just as ants respond immediately
to changes in their environment, say the diminishing
of a foraging patch, and adapt really quickly
to that change, organisations must be able
to do the same. If, by looking at ants for instance, it stimulates our thinking about how we might
try to do things differently, then that’s worth it
in and of itself. I just think you probably
want to start experimenting in a quite small and bounded way –
but yeah, why not? Thanks for watching. Don’t forget to subscribe and click the bell to receive notifications for new videos. See you again soon!

Do Bees Dance? | #aumsum

Do Bees Dance? | #aumsum


It’s AumSum Time Hey guys. Hold on. Did you download my app from Google Play Store? Remember, it’s called ”It’s AumSum Time”. And follow my Facebook page. Now, let’s guess the title of my next video. Muahahaha. Because I told it to do so. Oh. Because of the flame, the air around the candle is hot. Rise hot air, as you are lighter. Hurry up. Write your guess in the comments section below. Do bees dance? Yes. I’m always invited. Nectar-producing flowers. C’mon. Time to tell the otherrs. Gather around everybody. It’s time for the waggle dance. It looks like the figure 8. Longer the dance, farther the flowers. But, which direction dude? The sun is here. So, this is the direction of the flower with respect to the sun. Let’s go. Topic: Rancidity Why is a bag of chips half full? Looks like you don’t believe me. Open the bag. See I told you. The bag of chips is indeed half full. Why is that so? It is mainly because of a concept called rancidity. When food becomes rancid. It develops an unpleasant smell and taste and it becomes unsafe for consumption. Rancidity generally refers to a condition where the fats and oils present in food get oxidized Resulting in food spoilage. Since the chips contain fats and oils, they
are likely to get rancid. Therefore, to prevent this, nitrogen gas is
flushed into bags of chips by manufacturers. But, why nitrogen? Nitrogen does not react with fats and oils. As a result, rancidity does not take place. Moreover, a gas in the bag serves as a cushioning agent and prevents the chips from crumbling. That is why the bag of chips is only filled
till half. Topic: Air pressure. How do straws work? They work very hard. No. Straws work because of air pressure. Is it similar to acupressure? No. Air pressure is the weight of air pressing
down on earth and all other objects present on it. Now, when a straw is in a liquid. The air pressure upon the liquid in the glass and the air pressure upon the liquid in the straw is similar. Causing the levels of liquid to be almost equal. However, when we drink the liquid through
straw. We first inhale causing the air from the straw to flow into our lungs. Now due to absence of air, the air pressure
in the straw decreases. Hence, the air pressure present on the liquid of the glass pushes the liquid into the straw. Causing it to move upwards and thus, helping us drink. Why do bees build hexagonal honeycombs? I don’t know. Honeybees build honeycombs to store honey, pollen, eggs, etc. The honeycombs are built using beeswax which honeybees produce themselves. However, honeybees produce very less amount of this wax. Hence, honeybees required a shape that would give them maximum storage using minimum beeswax. Now, if each cell of the honeycomb would be a circle. Then there would be a lot of gaps or wasted space between cells. So why didn’t honeybees make triangular or square cells? These shapes don’t leave any wasted space. Popular research suggests that hexagonal cells use less wax. Provide more space as compared to triangles and squares. This means honeybees can store more honey while using the least amount of wax. Besides this, the overall structure is much
more stable and strong. Why do our muscles get sore? Because they want to go to a spa. No. When we begin to go to gym or perform a new intense physical workout. Our muscles begin to feel sore the next morning. This soreness is called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. DOMS occurs usually after eccentric contractions. What does that even mean? When a muscle is lengthening and contracting at the same time, it is known as an eccentric contraction. For example, when we lower a dumbbell, our biceps muscle is slowly relaxing and lengthening. But at the same time, it is still contracting
to hold the heavy weight of the dumbbell. Similarly, in a squat, as we lower ourselves,
our quadriceps muscle is lengthening. But at the same time, it is still contracting
to hold our upper body weight. Such eccentric contractions generate tension in the muscles, creating minute tears in them. Thus, causing the soreness or pain.

Spider Facts – Cyanide & Happiness Shorts

Spider Facts – Cyanide & Happiness Shorts


(Laughing) Bro, did you know you eat an average of one
spider a night? (Cough) Whatever dude, that’s a total myth. Statistics like that are always made up. (Slurp) No way, bro. It’s totally legit. (Chuckling) Shhhhh, bros, be quiet. Don’t wake him up. (Snoring) [Eerie Music] (Laughing) (Pop) (Crunch) (Squish) (Swallows) (Chewing) (Grunts) (Critter Noises) [Eerie Music] (Spits) [End Credits]

What if all the Oceans Dried up? | #aumsum

What if all the Oceans Dried up? | #aumsum


It’s AumSum Time. What if all the Oceans Dried up? Then I will go to the Moon and swim. Oh AumSum. Firstly, there will be extreme water scarcity
on Earth. Suddenly it will become more expensive than
gold. Secondly, coastal areas which rely on marine
life for their diet. Will face an unprecedented food shortage. Thirdly, global climate is influenced to a
great extent by ocean currents. With no oceans, world climate will enter an
uncharted territory. Fourthly, price of salt will crash as too
much of it will suddenly become available. Fifthly, African Elephant will replace Blue
Whale as the largest animal on Earth. Lastly, surfers will definitely get depressed
as no oceans means no waves. On the flip side, real estate brokers might
be one happy lot. As suddenly there will be vast stretches of
land available for sale. Lastly, vanishing oceans might reveal a number of hidden treasures.

Close up Wasp – Macro Adventure


Today I want to look for insects. And try to make some Macro Photos. Near where I live
Is a big street. On this Footpath are always hurt or dead Insects. This is Ivy
there are alot of Wasp and a Hornet up there
But I’m here for this. Back at home we are going to look at the findings. They are wasp or yellow jackets. I try to clean the worst
and take it to my microscope. There is still a lot of muck and pollen. They did lay on the ground for a while
so dirt is expected. I try to get some of the Dirt off
whitout destroying them. Next I want to stack some images and make
a big composite for that I take a movie
focus on every part and I try to overlapp a certain amount for
each stack. After I got a focus stack of ervery part of
the Body I cut it out of the movie
and export it as pictures I use Davinci resolve for this. Export as seperate clips in a picture format
and in seperate sub folders After the render is complete
I have 57 folders with images to stack. For the stacking I use Picolay. I open the folder choose my setting an let
it run Importen is I want to save the depth map for
later With every stack completed
I just need to sticth them together using Image composite Editor
That is quite good the wing I stitch manualy
and this is the result Now comes the fun part
You remember we saved the depthmap with picolay we can render a rocking 3D Animation
Just choose a stacked image an its coresponding Depth map
load it as result and depth map choose the dregrees and steps
and let it run if you don’t like the rocking action there
is another way You could do a circular motion you just need
the degrees I want 5 degree max rotation
for 45 Degrees I just take the sin of 45, times the degree I want
it is about 3,5 Degree and for the inbetewens I just take half of
45 22,5 Degree and multiply the sin and cosin
with my desired degree. After that I just add that manually into picolay
And I need to rename every picture so that it stays in the desired order
This is what I end up with. I will put every Programm I used in the comment
below.

Why do wasps build nests? | Natural History Museum


We have millions of wasp specimens here, and
amongst all the pinned insects we also have a more surprising collection, which is that
of about 1,000 or so wasp nests. These range in size from tiny little clay
pots to huge paper nests that fill people’s lofts. One of our most exciting examples of that
is this wasp nest. This is by the common wasp Vespula vulgaris. This made its nest in a bowler hat in an
outhouse on Sir Walter Rothschild’s estate. This is a fantastic example of how wasps
can be very opportunistic, making their nests anywhere which is safe,with
structural support.

The Bee | Miracles of Quran | Mind blowing


The Bee – Miracles of Quran Series The Bee. “And thy Lord taught the bee to build its cells in hills, on trees, and in men’s habitations; Then to eat of all the produce of the earth, and find with skill the spacious paths of its Lord.” Al-Qur’aan chapter 16 verses 68-69. Von-Frisch received the Nobel Prize in 1973 for his research on the behaviour and communication of the bees. The bee, after discovering any new garden or flower, goes back and tells its fellow bees the exact direction and map to get there, which is known as “bee dance”. The meanings of this insect’s movements that are intended to transmit information between worker bees have been discovered scientifically using photography and other methods. The Qur’aan mentions in the above verse how the bee finds with skill the spacious paths of its Lord. The worker bee or the soldier bee is a female bee. In Suratul Al-Nahl chapter no. 16, verses 68 to 69, the gender used for the bee is the female gender; (فَاسْلُكِي) and (كُلِّ), indicating that the bee that leaves its home for gathering food is a female bee. In other words the soldier or worker bee is a female bee. In fact, in Shakespeare’s play, “Henry the Fourth”, some of the characters speak about bees and mention that the bees are soldiers and that they have a king. That is what people thought in Shakespearean times. They thought that the worker bees are male bees and they go home and are answerable to a king bee. This, however, is not true. The worker bees are females and they do not report to a king bee but to a queen bee. But it took modern investigations in the last 300 years to discover this.

What If You Were Bitten By The Most Venomous Spider?

What If You Were Bitten By The Most Venomous Spider?


Spiders are all around us. There are over thirty-five thousand different
species and one study of homes in South Carolina found spiders present in one hundred percent
of them! Most spiders do not pose a threat to humans,
and are actually quite helpful in keeping populations of other bugs in check. However, there are some species whose bites
and venom can be extremely dangerous. There is a common misconception that the Daddy
Long Legs is the most venomous spider but that their fangs can’t pierce human skin. In truth, Daddy Long Legs do occasionally
bite people, however, their venom will produce a mild irritation at worst. According to scientists, the most venomous
spider on the planet today is actually the Brazilian Wandering Spider, which got its
name because it roams the forest floor looking for prey. A single bite from one of these spiders and
you will instantly feel pain. Immediate symptoms include inflammation of
the skin with severe burning and redness, goose bumps, and sweating. Their venom is strong enough to quickly kill
bugs, birds, small rodents, and even young children! But in adults, the venom generally takes longer
to work. As it courses through the bloodstream further
symptoms like blurred vision, nausea, erratic heartbeats, chills, and uncontrollable shaking
can occur. There have even been instances of a strange
side-effect in men where it can make your you-know-what painfully swell and cause permanent
damage! While the symptoms are very unpleasant, actual
deaths from Brazilian Wandering Spider bites are rare. Out of the more than 7,000 bites that have
been reported, there are only ten deaths that have been attributed to the Brazilian Wandering
Spider. That said, medical treatment is still required
so that an anti-venom can be administered. And while Brazilian Wandering Spiders are
only native to South America, there have been news stories of them traveling along with
banana shipments to other countries. So the next time you’re picking out fruit
at the grocery store you may want to be extra careful. If you want to make Fuzzy and Nutz happy,
click that like button and subscribe to their channel!

Honey bees and zebra fish come to a consensus, thanks to a little robotic intervention

Honey bees and zebra fish come to a consensus, thanks to a little robotic intervention


In the wild, animals affect each others behavior all the time—prey species keep away from predators’ turf, insects jump away from browsing herbivores—they may not be communicating per se but they shape each others’ environment. To further explore this relationship, researchers used robots to mediate between two species unlikely to ever encounter each other in the wild: zebrafish and honey bees. The researchers chose these species because they are both social and gregarious animals who regularly make decisions as a group. To do these experiments the animals were kept apart– in fact, they are in different countries. In Switzerland, a small school of zebrafish swim around a circular path, with a camera overhead tracking their position. Swimming along with them is a robot lure, the same size and shape as a zebrafish. Meanwhile in Austria, a swarm of young bees buzz around an oblong enclosure, with two robots in the middle. The bee-bots generate heat, which causes the bees to congregate around them. A proximity detector tracks the bees’ location. In each setup, the fish and bees have a binary collective choice to make – the bees can choose to congregate around one of two robots and the fish can swim either clockwise or counterclockwise around the circle. The researchers wanted to know if, using robots as mediators, the two species could come to a collective decision – could the species agree which direction to swim in and which bee-robot to gather around? Four different experiments were performed with varying degrees of communication between the animal groups. The first experiment established a control group, with no communication between the fish and the bees. In the second experiment, the bees’ behavior was observed and then transmitted to the fish robot, affecting which way it lured the school of zebrafish. After six minutes, the bees began to congregate around the left bee robot, causing the fish robot and, as a result, the fish to swim in a counter clockwise direction. In the third experiment, the fish’ behavior was observed and then transmitted to the bee robots, affecting which robot produced heat. The fish constantly changed the direction in which they were swimming, which caused the bees to continuously switch sides as well. In the final experiment, the behavior of both the bees and the fish was observed, and transmitted both ways At first, the fish and bees couldn’t come to a decision– one side did one thing, the other another, with lots of switching back and forth. But after about 20 minutes, they reached a consensus, with the fish swimming counter-clockwise and the bees congregating around the left bee-robot. This shows that two species, which would have no interaction whatsoever in nature, are actually able to interact and come to a collective decision thanks to the help of the robots. Moving forward, researchers would like to introduce machine learning into these types of scenarios So bee-bots learn behavior from bees and fish-bots from fish, instead of being programmed ahead of time. Researchers believe that in the future, this technology could be used to mediate species interactions not just in the laboratory, but also in the wild—the research could even be adapted to work with plants, fungi and microorganisms One day, machine-learning robots could be used to perceive a dramatic event in a bee colony, and react to help the bees to find a way to recover. This could be applied to any type of animal group, once the robot knows how they make collective decisions.

Ants Fight to Share Dominance


Contests for dominance are common in social animals. Usually there’s a winner and a loser, a champion and a line of failed
contenders, but we discovered an animal society where there is more than one winner at the top. Where instead, a group of individuals share dominance. I’m Clint Penick, a biologist at North Carolina State University and I want to tell you about my new research on social
dominance in ants. This is the ant I studied, the Indian Jumping Ant,Harpegnathos saltator all members of the colony are capable of acting as a queen and when the Queen dies, the workers
stage a months long tournament to determine who gets to lay eggs doesn’t.
When these tournaments end, a group of 10 to 20 ants share the top position as
dominant egg layers in the colony. My study aimed to figure out was how these share dominance hierarchies emerged from simple dominance interactions. To study this we
track individuals in these tournaments by giving them unique paint markings. There are three behaviors to watch for, biting is when one ant bits another and there is a clear winner and loser. Policing is when subordinate workers bite and hold a
potential dominant to shut down her chances of rising in the hierarchy. Finally, antennal duelling is the most common dominance behavior where two or more ants exchange rapid antennal strikes. What’s different about dueling from other dominance behaviours is that there’s no clear winner or loser. We predicted dueling may be the key to
establishing share dominance. To test this prediction my friend Takao and I
developed a computer model to study how these tournaments work. In the model
individual ants assess the social status of each other and decide whether they
should engage and biting, policing, or dueling we set up the models so that
when an ant is bitten she loses 10 status points and the winner gains 10 points.
When an ant is policed she loses all of her status points. When two ants duel we
model this behavior as a so-called winner-winner effect where both ants
increase in social status. When we ran the model with biting alone, a linear
hierarchy emerged, when policing was added there was only one ant at the top and all others equally subordinate. Shared dominance hierarchies that mimic what we see in real jumping and colonies emerged only when dueling was added to the model and only when doing had a positive effect on both ants. What we think is
happening is that the ants use dueling to pump up each other’s dopamine levels. It’s is sort of like teammates hyping each other up before a game. Shared dominance occurs beyond ant
societies. Winner-winner behaviors like antennal dueling are likely important for
forming hierarchies in other species though these behaviors have yet to be described. The co-authors of this research and I hope this study will inspire others to
look at the formation of dominance hierarchies in a new way. If you want to
try the model for yourself is a link to download and run the model for free in the description below.