Insect Extinction – Behind the News

Insect Extinction – Behind the News


They are sometimes seen
as creepy… ..and they’re often crawly… ..or jumpy… ..or wriggly… ..or fly…y? Actually, there are lots of
different ways to describe insects because there are 30 million
different insect species in the world and they’re just the ones
we know about. In fact, if you put
all the insects together into one big, creepy, crawly,
wriggling mass, they’d outweigh all of humanity at least 17 times over. Now, hearing all that, who could blame you for thinking,
“Hey, insects are doing just fine.” But scientists say
that’s not the case. They are actually disappearing
at a worrying rate. A new study has found
that over the past decade the world’s insect populations
have reduced by 41%. That includes around 46%
of bee populations, 49% of beetles, 50% of crickets and grasshoppers and 53% of butterflies and moths. So, why are some insects dying out? Well, the finger is pointing
mostly towards us humans. Scientists say
habitat loss from deforestation, pollution and pesticides
and climate change are some of the biggest factors. The study predicted
a pretty sad future too where more than 40% of all
insect species could go extinct over the next few decades. Hey, Dan. How are you doing, Amelia?
Great to see you. Great to see you. This is amazing.
Yeah, it’s a fantastic place. Well, I think we should get cracking
and go and catch some bugs. I brought you along a net. Awesome! Let’s do it!
Yeah. Ben is a entomologist. That’s a scientist
that studies insects. So, I’ve always loved bugs. Ever since I was a pup, all I ever
wanted to be is a bug scientist. So, check this out, Amelia. I’ve caught a nice little fly
in the grass here. Oh, wow! He says even the tiniest,
most irritating insects are more important than they appear. They pollinate plants, they help to recycle material
in the environment, like plant material
but also animal material. They also play important roles
in food webs because, not only do they consume
things like plants, they are actually food sources for animals further up
the food chain. Ben, what would the world be
like without insects? I think we wouldn’t have
a world without insects. Once we remove that chain
from this kind of food web, everything collapses around it. We would pretty much have waste
piling up everywhere, and this is animal waste
and plant waste. We wouldn’t have any food to eat.
Whoa! So, it’s a pretty scary idea to think about
a world without insects. Ben says that’s why
it’s so important to take care of our environment and to keep a close eye
on how insects are going. Hey, I’ve got something! Let’s have a look. Oh, so this is a male velvet ant. Oh, look at that! This is a really good catch. So, what can I do and what can the kids of Australia
do to help insects? Some easy things you can do
around the home is reduce your reliance
on insecticides, spraying them
in and around the house. And as far as habitat loss,
to actually provide… By planting native plants
in your backyard which provide food sources
but also kind of habitat. While we go work on that, scientists like Ben
will keep spreading the word that without insects both pretty… Aww! ..and creepy… Ew! ..our world just
wouldn’t be the same.

The Bugs That Turn Strawberry Yogurt Red

The Bugs That Turn Strawberry Yogurt Red


Narrator: No one likes
finding bugs in their food when they’re not expecting it. But I hate to break it to you, you’re actually eating them all the time. I’m not just talking about the critters that end up in juices or jams by accident. Some bugs are in our food because, well, we put them there. If you think it’s fruit that turns this strawberry
yogurt red, think again. Yes, there are in fact
strawberries in there, but they’re there for flavor
and texture, not color. That bright red comes from
something else called carmine. Oh, and it’s made from squashed bugs. Squashed female cochineal
bugs, to be specific. They’re tick-sized critters
native to Mesoamerica where they suck the juice
from prickly pear cactuses. Greig: And if you squish them,
they are bright red inside and kind of a purply,
deep purple-red color, and that’s the source of cochineal, cochineal dye, carmine,
whatever you wanna call it. Narrator: For thousands of
years, people have been using these bugs to dye everything
from clothes to pottery. But it wasn’t until more recently that they made their way
into commercial foods. From 1955 to 2010, the
consumption of food coloring rose by 500% in the United States. That’s mostly thanks to artificial colors like Red 40, Yellow 5, and Blue 1. But in the late 20th
century, consumers became increasingly concerned
about synthetic chemicals in their foods and demanded
more natural ingredients. So many companies turned to carmine. It’s FDA improved and tasteless. It resists degradation from
light, heat, and oxidation, and unlike some synthetic colorants, it hasn’t been linked to
cancers or tumor growth. Greig: Now, some people
apparently have allergies to it, but compared with the downsides of the chemical dye, it’s very benign. It’s like using beet juice. Narrator: And just like
that, carmine ended up in strawberry and cream Frappuccinos and cake pops at Starbucks, in Tropicana grapefruit juice, and, yes, in Yoplait yogurts. Just look for carmine or cochineal extract on the label to see for yourself. But today, carmine is becoming
harder and harder to come by. Some companies like Campari Group, maker of the famous Campari
aperitif, have phased it out for economic reasons in the US. Greig: It’s expensive to
make. I mean, it’s easier to just make a chemical dye, and this is a very specialized, you have to farm these little bugs, and collect billions of pounds of them, and dry all them and all that, so I think that just wasn’t as practical. Narrator: Other companies
took it out because, well, people still don’t like eating
bugs, especially vegans. In 2012, a vegan news site outed Starbucks for using cochineal in its Strawberries and Crème Frappuccino, saying that it’s not vegan, and a month later, the
company said they’d switch to a bug-free alternative. In fact, Yoplait now remains one of the only major brands that sells food colored with carmine. But even Yoplait may phase it out after customers expressed concerns about eating bug parts. Greig: So I just think it’s ironic people are freaked out about
insects, about eating insects, even though we eat 2 pounds of insects a year
on average by accident. Narrator: And to show just
how harmless they are, we tried some. Jones: Nope, just tastes like yogurt! Not buggy at all, in fact. Not that I would know what
that would taste like, but I’m really just getting
plain Greek yogurt taste.

What is an Insect?

What is an Insect?


Funtastic Hop Hop Creep Creep Crawl Crawl Fly Fly Fly, fly, fly! An insect has two antennae An insect has six legs An insect has a head An insect has a thorax An insect has an abdomen And so do I. An insect has two antennae An insect has six legs An insect has a head An insect has a thorax An insect has an abdomen And so do I Insects, insects Insects everywhere You see them in the park You see them in the grass You see them in the dark You can see them in the air Insects, insects Insects everywhere You hear them buzzing by You hear them hiss or squeak You hear the hum at night You hear them in your sleep Hop Hop Creep Creep Crawl Crawl Fly Fly Insects everywhere! Subscribe to our channel. And remember… Be Funtastic! We love you Bye Bye

COMIKAZE 2014: Insect Show and Tell with Nature Expressions

COMIKAZE 2014: Insect Show and Tell with Nature Expressions


It’s Jess with Everyday Science and I’m here at Stan Lee’s 2014 Comikaze Expo – check it out! It’s Molly Faulkner, I’m with Nature
Expressions these are my insects and arachnids – its
my artwork. I specialize in insects and
butterflies and arachnids for either television shows or students for school. a majority of my work is for
school – all the cases that I have are all openable so the kids can take them to
school and – let me give you an example here – so all the cases – the majority of kids actually have a show-and-tell you know no matter what age it’s
really nice so it’s easy it doesn’t have any
scent I spread em nice and big that they know
this is a rhinoceros beetle from Thailand it’s five horns – Jess: and where do you find them?
Molly: this one actually is from Thailand but when they are with them when they come to me
they are already dead and all scrunched together yes so you have different processes of opening these up, so, this for example it’s
easy you can just use a alcoholic and yeah have been relaxed and
then you spread em pin them all out when you have it about
maybe two weeks and it’ll dry – if it does not dry correctly and you put it in here gonna be all eaten by insects itself so we’ll have a lot of ants around–
Jess: It’s an insect eat insect world. exactly – hey Some of these things here – a majority of them are from Asia so we have I am for example I’ve got little sea life – these a little brittle stars you know from the Philippines Island so
these are all in muddy waters so you know that’s something that we can learn from but the majority of
these are actually being used for either scientific study or museums or you know a lot of these goes to schools. Jess: Very neat – and what got you into this? What kind of drove you to say: “I think I’m going to preserve insects now?” Well you know it it took a long
time – this is my – it’s been over 10 years. I started out when I went to school for biology and I wanted to be a veterinarian and obviously you learn
different things and one after another you end up having all these I’m hoping you know people or
young kids coming over saying “wow that’s really
nice”, and hopefully one day they’ll be a biologist! I’ve met a lot of people that are
now studying to be either a marine biologist or you know zoology Jess: Inspiring children and adults… Molly: Yeah, anything… Jess: Well thank you so much I appreciate you talking to us. Molly: You’re welcome. Thanks for coming.

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants


Now speaking of incredible workings happening
underground, there’s a new plot of soil in the Antiverse which houses a few creatures
that I am positive you guys will truly marvel at, creatures that I have yet to feature on
this channel, and I can’t wait to show our new incubating creatures. Please subscribe to my channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! AC Family, the utter beasts that lay hidden
within this container were unlike anything I have ever seen before in my life, gargatuans
creatures that I am certain will leave you in awe… either that, or make you grimmace
in disgust! Either way, I can’t wait to show you these
true natural wonders of the animal kingdom, so keep on watching until the end, as we uncover
the secret lives of these major players of the world’s forests. Khepri, Khepri, Ra, Ra, Ra
Soon to be this depicted god. In the soil, they wait and grow,
to become the creatures we all know, Make up more than a quarter,
of all we’ve discovered, In next week’s video,
they shall be uncovered. This was the riddle I left for you guys in
last week’s hidden video for anyone who wanted to take a stab at what our mystery creatures
were, featured in this week’s video, and turns out… Many of you hit the nail on the head, as I
knew AC Family would! Beetles as a group of insects, form the order
Coleoptera with about 400,000 species, making it the largest of all taxonomic orders, making
up a whopping 25% of all known animal life-forms we’ve ever discovered! Can you believe that of all the animals we’ve
ever documented, a quarter of them are beetles? If aliens were to study and survey the animals
of the planet Earth, it wouldn’t be surprising to me if they named Earth “Planet of the Beetles”. So, I’m pleased to announce that the newest
inhabitants of the Antiverse are beetles, but not just any beetles. They happen to be my favourite beetles in
the whole world: Scarab beetles! Scarab beetles, belonging to the family Scarabaeidae,
consists of over 30,000 species of beetles worldwide. Khepri, is an Egyptian god of creation with
the head of a scarab beetle. Chances are you’ve seen a scarab beetle at
least once in your life. Some of the well-known scarab beetles are
Japanese beetles, dung beetles, June beetles, rose chafers, Hercules beetles, and Goliath
beetles. But today, AC Family, the scarab beetles I’ll
be introducing to you are nothing less than epic! But first, the reason they’ve come to the
Antiverse! I opened my superworm farm last week and discovered
that it was empty. All that was left was an adult superworm,
a.k.a. a darkling beetle, but looking at the darkling beetle crawling across my hand, something
came to me. You see I had been thinking of what I could
possibly feed my ants for Canadian Thanksgiving which recently passed last weekend. I wanted to give them something other than
the ordinary superworms they were used to eating, something fatter and much more meatier. So I called up some beetle friends of mine,
and low and behold, so arrived this ominous container, which was allegedly full of fattened,
scarab beetle larvae collected from native forest soils, a beetle known to locals as
“salagubang”, the species: Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, the Siamese Rhinoceros beetle! These beetles can allegedly reach a whopping
length of 3.5–7 centimetres, which is massive. They are sexually dimorphic. The females are smaller, while males are larger
and have big rhino-like horns which can vary in size and shape, used to battle each other
for females and territory. I bet, the larvae of these Rhinoceros beetles
were just fat and juicy, the perfect Thanksgiving treats for my ants. Ahhh! I was so excited and nervous all at once to
peek inside! Upon arrival I immediately opened the container,
and saw the container was filled to the brim with digging medium. But, no… patience… I wasn’t going to harvest the beetle grubs
just yet. I promised myself to wait for Thanksgiving
Day before offering my ants, the fattened feasts they deserved. It was the morning of Canadian Thanksgiving,
and though I live in a completely different country on the opposite side of the planet,
I still celebrate Thanksgiving, and was eager to finally give my ants of the Antiverse their
fat, juicy turkeys, a.k.a. the scarab beetle grubs! But AC Family, I wasn’t ready to see what
I was about to see upon opening their container. Look! Mushrooms had sprouted in just two days since
the container’s arrival. And guys, it turns out those little black
pellets are the beetle grubs’ frass. Their droppings, which are super nutrient
rich for plants and I suppose mushrooms… hey! Did you guys see that movement? There must be a beetle grub now! I took my tweezers and tried to sift through
the soil for a beetle grub. Nothing. Alright, seriously though it’s time to dig
out these scarab beetle grubs! AC Family, let’s do this! I put on some gloves because I was told these
beetle grubs can bite with their powerful mandibles and it can hurt! I carefully sifted through the surface. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a bit
scared scraping through the soil like this! Suddenly, I hit something! A grub? No, a piece of wood. False alarm! Now, while digging, I decided to also collect
and store some of this frass-filled soil, because I could use it in the future as a
growing medium for terrariums and plants. In fact, you can buy insect frass in bags
for gardening. As mentioned, insect frass is jam-packed with
nutrients for plants. Comes to show you these beetles are super
essential in the forests they are part of as they recycle dead plants to nourish the
living plants. I continued to dig. I wasn’t sure how big these beetle grubs were
nor how many there were, but the whole time my heart was racing! Aside from the fear of being bitten, I’m also
mildly vermiphobic, and the sight of worms or anything worm-like, mini-snakes and legless
lizards excluded, make me shudder, and TBH, based on what I imagined these rhino beetle
larvae looked like, I knew I was going to initially be repulsed at first sight. But before I knew it, something shiny and
white caught my eye. We found one! OMG! Look at it! My jaw dropped to the floor. It was huge, fat, and curled up into a ball. Wow! Look at its body shape, and check out that
red head and massive mandibles. Indeed, it was unlike anything I’ve ever seen
before. I checked the back and underside of the beast. My ants were going to enjoy this giant morsel! It was time to prepare the ant turkey. I washed the grub clean with water, and it
flinched at every squirt, I held the creature in my hand. For such a big and scary beast, it sure didn’t
put up much of a fight. Alright, the grub was now ready for the execution
block. The first ant colony I planned on feeding
was my largest and hungriest of all, the Fire Nation. I knew this beetle grub would be enough to
feed my ravenous colony of fire ants for at least two days. I estimated that this fat larva had the equivalent
of at least two or three cockroaches. And as I do with all prey insects, I was to
put the creature out of its misery before feeding it to the ants. I took the execution scissors, still caked
with the dried blood and guts of previously killed prey insects. My plan was to split it in half so the ants
could easily get into the grub’s insides. Here we go… 1… 2… 3… Sorry, guys. 3! No…. I stood there motionless for a moment. My hand was frozen and defiant, unwilling
to close down. I watched the helpless beetle grub, curled
up in fetal position, awaiting its fate at the blades of my scissors. Ahhhh my heart… I couldn’t… I could not follow through with the execution. I withdrew my scissors and picked up beetle
grub with a heavy heart. I placed it back into the container. What was I going to do? It suddenly was no longer a vile beast to
my eyes, but in a strange way had become… well, cute! AC Family, how about you guys? Doesn’t it suddenly look real endearing to
you. The shift of perception was completely unexpected,
and with this new context, my plans had suddenly changed completely. They were to join our Antiverse as inhabitants. Behold, a simple container I bought from a
department store. It was to become the sacred home and growing
chamber of our rhinoceros beetles. Apparently, these grubs need at least 10 cm
x 10 cm x 10 cm of space, and it is allegedly better to keep the beetles singly because
they may fight and lethally puncture each other with their sharp mandibles. This container was perfect. I also modified the cover to create a much
more open top and airy sides. Next, I had to add the beetle larva’s food. Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, happen to
be notorious pests in coconut farms in the Philippines where I live, as they prey on
the wood and roots of coconut trees, living or decaying, and it just so happens that my
neighbourhood is abundant in coconut trees. So, I took a walk down the street, found a
pile of decaying coconut wood, and harvested this favoured rhino beetle larva food. I couldn’t wait to put our growing chamber
together, AC Family! I placed some decaying coconout wood at the
bottom of the chamber. It was amazing to think that these rhino beetle
larvae actually eat and grow into gigantic beetles, subsisting entirely on decaying wood. This blew my mind! It also meant that the larvae had within their
gut, the necessary microbiota to allow them to properly digest and acquire nutrition from
the cellulose in the wood, much like termites do! Many animals cannot digest this stuff! But these beetle larvae can. After this initial layer of decaying wood
was set in place, next I was going to add their main growing medium. This brick of coco peat, also purchased at
a department store, can be found in most home and gardening stores. It’s really cool, because all you need to
do is soak the brick in water and it instantly expands and becomes great growing medium for
epiphytic plants, and well in our case, rhinoceros beetles! I packed this coco peat into the growing chamber. The beetle larva may also very well, find
this coco peat to be a tasty food, as well. I then added another layer of decaying coconut
wood, then pack it off with another layer of coco peat. And volia our new rhino beetle larva growing
chamber – a dedicated, double food layered catacomb in which the beetle larva can grow
and develop into adulthood in peace. What do you guys think of it? I placed the modified cover back on and proceeded
to do the exact same thing, to prepare 10 other growing chambers. I returned to the container and set the growing
chamber on the ground, removed the cover, and carefully went to pick up the larva we
had found, and place it inside its new home. The larva lay motionless. I admired the neat auburn hairs that covered
the larva’s entire body, as well as those reddish spots running down the body, and that
rear end though, looking crazy extra-terrestrial to me! But it wasn’t long before our rhino beetle
baby began to move, and began to move the soil using its head, mandibles, and front
legs. But watching it burrow now, my initial thoughts
were that it didn’t seem like such an effective burrower. I mean, honestly at this pace, it seemed like
it would take at least a good half hour to get soil-deep! It even strangely began to burrow horizontally. What an ineffective burrower! Have a look! But AC Family, I was wrong! For when it finally found its preferred place
to really start digging, it quite effectively started using its legs, head, and powerful
body muscles to start excavating a nice tunnel downwards. Those hairs seemed pretty good at keeping
soil moved upwards in place, as it continued to dig deeper and deeper. In 5 minutes flat, the grub was completely
concealed deep within the soil. I had to move some soil aside to see it! AC Family, isn’t that incredible? What amazing subterrarean creatures, right? I proceeded to cover it up, placed the cover
back on, and continued to dig out the remaining beetle larvae! I carefully sifted through the soils, I didn’t
want to injure the delicate grubs during excavation. I felt as though their bodies could pop with
a single puncture. Wait! Yes, we found a second grub! I dug some more… a third grub! Alright! This was actually fun! It was like we were digging for gold! I hit something solid and pulled it out. It was a large piece of decaying wood. This was what the larvae were eating in here,
I guessed. I found a fourth grub and a fifth. Woah this one was huge! Could be a male, perhaps! I placed each grub in its own growing chamber,
and boy was it ever satisfying to set each grub in its own, special home we made for
them. Have a look! I felt like we were bees, placing our larvae
into cells in which they were to grow for their whole larval lives, until they emerge
as adults! Each one of these growing chambers had all
they needed to develop into adult rhinoceros beetles. All I needed to do was water them periodically. And look! One grub already blessed its chamber with
a frass pellet. How cute! I made sure to enjoy looking at the grubs
now that they were visible, because I knew that once they were below the surface feeding
on our decaying coconut wood, they would be completely concealed in the soil away from
view. Alright, it was time to keep digging! I wonder how many more were left. I dug, and I dug, and I dug, and managed to
pull out four more huge beetle grubs. Just look at those cute babies. Now I also realized that I should space them
out a bit when setting them down so they don’t bite each other. I placed them each into their own growing
cell. It kinda felt like I was planting a tree or
something. Haha! When I had found the final beetle grub, I
held the huge creature in my hand for a bit. I just couldn’t believe Nature had fashioned
such a spectacular and beautiful creature. I wanted to take a final and good look at
the larva before setting it into its growing chamber. I loved watching it move around. When I was ready, I picked it up. AC Family, I feel we made the right choice
by saving these beetle babies from becoming ant food. Alright, our baby is squirming now and just
wants to be buried. I placed it into its growing chamber and watched
it burrow into the soil. The process took 8 minutes. Eat well, our beloved beetle larva. I can’t wait to see what you look like when
you emerge. When all was settled, the growing chambers
were arranged neatly behind the Plateaus of Gaia. A total of 13 beetle larvae were collected,
so I had to create two more extra chambers. All the larvae had long burrowed deep into
their growing chambers and were nestled deep in darkness, where they would remain for the
next couple of months, feeding on the decaying coconut wood we had prepared for them. So it turns out the larvae are expected to
pupate and emerge as adult rhino beetles by Christmas! Oh man, won’t that be quite the Christmas
gift in the Antiverse?! I have decided to call these incubating beetle
catacombs, the Chambers of Sudan, as a tribute to Sudan, the last male northern white rhinoceros,
who died earlier this year on March the 20th. Though I realize, keeping carnivorous wild
animals like ants, as pets, often requires the killing of living prey animals like beetle
larvae and roaches, but having said that, I am happy we chose life for these beetle
grubs. For Thanksgiving, I just gave my ants some
extra roaches. So, what should we call these new beetles? Leave your name suggestions in the comments
and I will choose my top 5 favourites for us to vote on in a future video. The Chambers of Sudan are placed right next
to my closet, so I will make sure to check on our beetles every day, for on a random
day in December, we, the AC Family, shall be ready and waiting in celebration, for the
arrival of the great rhinoceros beetles into the Antiverse, and boy, do I have some epic
plans when they do! Yes, AC Family! Did you enjoy this week’s episode? I seriously can’t wait for the adults to emerge,
can you? Imagine seeing huge rhino beetles emerging
from the soil. So you know the drill! Hit that Subscribe button and bell icon now,
so you don’t miss out on their grand emergeance, and hit the Like button every single time,
including now. And hey, if you’re new to the channel, and
want to catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story
line playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so
you can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch extended play footage of the beetle larvae! They are incredible creatures to look at,
despite their scary demeanor! And before we proceed to the AC Question of
the Week, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel, daily vlogs which have become a full
out bird dad channel, as I am now raising a baby African Grey parrot! If you love birds, I’d love for you to meet
my new cute little bird! She’s quite the character, loves to cuddle,
is quite chatty, and is fun to watch grow up! Hope you can subscribe when you’re there. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What made it easier for
the ants in this video to dig more tunnels? Congratulations to Arnav Singh who correctly
answered: The moisture from the watering made
it easier for the ants in this video to dig more tunnels. Congratulations, Arnav, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why did we have to separate each beetle larva? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

For These Tiny Spiders, It’s Sing or Get Served | Deep Look


Behold a very small and rather cute spider. This is clypeatus. A jumping spider. He doesn’t spin webs. Instead he uses silk as a lifeline, reeling
it out as he hops from place to place. But right now, he’s looking for a mate. The thread of a female spider that he can
trace back to its source. Problem is, she may have other priorities. While he’ll jump on pretty much anything
that moves…She only mates once. She’s picky. So he’s going to make his case… on the
dancefloor. Male jumping spiders perform courtship displays
that would make Bob Fosse proud. Jazz hands, leg-lifts…they even shimmy their
pedipalps. But he needs a soundtrack. So, by beating together the front and back
halves of his body, he creates vibrations that travel through the ground. This is what her ears look like. Tiny membranes stretched across slits in her
legs. To study these jumping spider pulses, researchers
at the University of California Berkeley use a sophisticated laser vibrometer developed
for quality-testing cars and airplanes. It turns those vibrations into something we
can hear. And guess what? It’s a song. The first verse sounds like this. A fast heartbeat. Thump thump thump thump thump thump thump. Then, more thumping. Followed by something new. A “BOOM.” This is verse two. That pattern, over and over again. For verse three he adds a third element. Almost like he’s casting a spell, right? From species to species, and there are thousands
of different jumping spiders, the songs vary. But one thing never changes: Male jumping
spiders sing like their lives depend on it. Because they do. She may mate with him. She might refuse. But she might just eat him instead. When the Berkeley scientists prevented the
males from singing while they danced, the females were three times as likely to hunt
them as prey. So he needs to go big. The closer he gets to her, the more danger
he’s in. The dance and the song get more and more urgent. But even with all that… She’s still calling the shots. Hi, it’s Amy. If female spiders are picky, with males, the
bar is so, so low. He’ll do this courting song and dance with
pretty much anything. In the lab, scientists use frozen specimens
this one. A dead female spider! And he still tries to mate with her. While you’re here, subscribe to Deep Look,
and thanks for watching.

Chicago Adventure, Part Eight: How to be an Insect

Chicago Adventure, Part Eight: How to be an Insect


The Chicago Field Museum is one of the largest and most respected natural history museums in the world. Join me as we go behind the scenes! Dun dun dun! These are huge. They’re bigger than birds. They’re katydids from Papua New Guinea. It’s like a grasshopper in the order Orthoptera. In this order there are katydids, grasshoppers, and crickets. And katydids…
– So what abou- what’s a locust, then? Are they… A locust is a grasshopper, it’s-
– Okay. It’s a large grasshopper.
– I’m just trying to like put ’em all in the same thing. It’s a common name.
– So these are- Alright, yeah, yeah. Most people call cidadas locusts too, but they’re not.
– Okay, alright. It’s just the- the grasshoppers that are locusts.
– Mmkay. So, these are probably the largest katydids you’re gonna find. I mean, they’re gigantic! Yeah, ours are probably this big. The katydids in- in North America?
– Okay? Yeah, so this is over twice as long.
– Wow. With a huge wing. And they have a shield that looks like a leaf. So the whole thing is to mimic a leaf. I-d- it definitely looks like a giant leaf. Well, we have the mantids that- so these are clear mantids
– What? that look like leaves. And when an insect is going to copy a leaf, it’s usually a green leaf so it looks live, But…
– Exceptions to the rule. Yes.
– Whaaa- gluuuh- This is the top side, right?
– Yeah. And then when they’re at rest, they fold their wings and they look like a dead leaf. Now these guys took it to a whole new level. Not only do they have the vein of the leaf and the little minor veins, they have rust spots and diseases like a dead life.
– Wow. So they- they copied their host plant.
– How- How do you find these in the wild? Like, ho- what do you- how do you even know where to look for them? You wait till they fly.
-You- Really? Yeah, ’cause you’re not gonna notice that if it’s on a twig.
– No way. I would never, I mean you had to- I looked at these in here and I was like, well, you put some leaves in here for comparison, but obviously not. So this is the underside. Woaaahh!
– Isn’t that amazing? And lookit! Even the tails look like a stem.
– Yeah! Looking like a leaf is a good camouflage,
– Mmhmm. Bu- looking like sticks too.
– *Gasps* So this is the largest, this is the longest insect on the planet.
– This is huge! The giant walking stick. This one I think is from Malaysia. That is- huge!
– And we joke around a little bit here… In-s- yeah, it says “more than seven feet.” I’m like, even I think that’s a little implausible. A lot of people don’t catch that, they’re like “what?”
– Really? Th-These things can be bigger than seven feet?! You can- you have the credentials being in a museum, you could say anything and people would believe you.
– Yes, exactly. And, are these insects too? I can’t even see what’s in here. They look like tiny, tiny dots.
– Yeah, those are probably some of the smallest beetles you’re gonna find. They’re beetles?
– They’re called feather-winged beetles because their wing- This is their wing. It looks like a feather. We have a huge collection of these that Hank Dybas, he was one of our curators here, Mmhmm.
– um , he collected. How do you collect these? We use traps.
– Oh. And we get a lot- we get a bunch of everything.
– Mmhmm. And then we sort out what we call the target taxa, things that we want to study. That’s a death’s head moth over there! Sorry, I just saw that, too. Yeah, the Silence of the Lamb moth. It has a skull on the back of it. So why does it have a skull, like, impression? No, the actual thing that it’s supposed to be looking like
– Mmhmm. is a giant bumblebee.
– Ohhhhh. Because they go into the hives and they’re able to either give off a smell or make a sound that, um, the other bees are like, “Oh, okay, you’re- you’re a friend. Doo doo doo doo.”
– Okay. And then it starts eating the honey and it’s takes it out.
– Wow. The way to collect moths is you hang a sheet and you put a light behind it,
– Yeahh. And the moths come to the sheet. And they run into it and you photograph it. These guys, certain parts of the year, they like cover your sheets, like “go away, I want other stuff!” Ohh, they’re so cool.
– And they- they run into the sheet and they knock the little stuff off. Bullies. These are the tarantula hawks. So, some people are afraid of tarantulas, but they should really be afraid of Tarantula hawks. Yeah.
– the tarantula hawks. See the stinger? So that’s where the venom comes through.
*gasps*But he- but it doesn’t kill them right away. It paralyzes them, and they stay alive? Yeah, and then they’ll l- lay an egg inside.
– What!? And then the egg hatches, and then the larvae start eating the spider inside out. Kinda weird and gross and awesome. I mean I wouldn’t have my children that way,
– Well that’s one thing… but you know. To each his own.
– Insects are found everywhere, and they’re found in other insects too. We have a huge ectoparasite collection, so. Okay, ectoparasite meaning what for- If Bill collected a mammal, he can comb the fur and he’ll find fleas, and lice, and mites.
– Oh yeah! There’s a fly that lives on bats, called a- a bat fly. And many of them are wingless and they move like little crabs through the fur of the bats.
– Weird. And we collect them because, uh, Jim and his colleagues can identify them, and you can actually find how two different species of bats are related to each other based on the relationship of their ectoparasites. Weird!
– So as the ectoparasites evolve, and the relationships among different ectoparasites, reflects the relationship among the different hosts. So it’s a- it’s a- very, very
– It’s like networking, like social networking. Totally like networking.
– It’s like Facebook. Yeah.
– For parasites. Exactly.
– That’s great.

4K CC. Grasshoppers, Catching Insects In The USA, AZ UT CA NV NM Herping HD

4K CC. Grasshoppers, Catching Insects In The USA, AZ UT CA NV NM Herping HD


That’s a big…woah woah Big Grasshopper O where’d he go? He fell down Don’t worry I shall rescue you with my love Come here Mr Grasshopper No no no don’t go that way I love you and I wan’t to touch you Wow he’s a big one He seems to be a little clumsy tho He’s like backin away Woah woah woah Keep an eye on him boy’s Keep an eye on him Where’s he goin? Ok there he is there he is Keep an eye on him Come lets see Kid: He looks like a leaf Guy: Woah look at all these critters flying we are getting just raided Kid: Yeah we are Girl: There Moths Kid: Aahhh Guy: That is a big critter Kid 2: He’s Godzilla Guy: Uh he’s on the camera ( Flashlight in mouth) Kid: He’s on the camera Kid: Spikey oouch I want this guy Don’t…don’t think about it Bad Grasshoper! No noo bad Grasshopper Guy: Let your brother catch him Kid: He got him Guy: Phahaha Guy: Or let him jump on you Kid 2: Oh ow ow he is one Gahaha Kid: He bites He’s attacking him Kid: Keep your hands around him Guy: Is he hurt? Kid 2: Oh umm Kid: Uh Kid: 2 uh oh Guy: Open up your hand let’s get a look at him Let let your brother have him Kid: I’m the one who’s Kid 2: aahhh Kid: Oh ahhh Does he bite? Kid 2: He a no Guy: He claws Kid: Oh now he’s bitting he’s angry Guy: He’s trying to get out Kid 2: Woah he’s strong Kid: He Hurts? How strong is he? Ok we caught him He’s upside down Guy: Hand him to your brother Hand him to your brother Kid: You better not bite oh get back here Kid: Now dad gots him Guy: Ok now he’s got me Kid 2: He loves you Kid: K awesome Big fat Grasshopper Kid 2: Cricket kisses Guy: Ok Kid: What did you catch? Kid 2: Cactus ( In Pain) Kid: owwaaa Guy: hahahehe lol Kid: You sat in a cactus Everyone: Hahaheehee lol Guy: Oh My Girl: He sat in a Cactus? Guy: Oh my Kid: It’s right there! Guy: alright Let me…Ok Kid 2: I’m ok Guy: Oh Ok I got to turn off the camera Err ya know what What ever we’ll leave it on I can’t believe you sat in that Let me see your but Kid 2: Feels good Guy: I don’t know I don’t know I have never seen him before Yeah he bit matthew No don’t put your thumb up buddy You got to get him to crawl across Woah man what kind of species is this Hey quit biting me ( Bugs on my leg) I’m getting here gettin this Grasshopper and then some little tiny bug flies on me and starts nibbling me Wow He’s got some crazy colors Now there’s this one over here Get in the car k buddy K cause there is a really big bull right there who is just starting at us ok and If he really wants he can jump that fence You see that right? Wow We’ll go in 1 seconds just keep an eye on him Wow That almost looks like a toy It doesn’t even look like it’s real If I saw one of those things I would think Yeah that it wasn’t even real if I wasn’t out here looking at it my self I just…. woow Ok Go back to making more Grasshoppers Kinda crazy Catching a lot of Grasshoppers today These things are just exotic colors I didn’t even know we had Grasshoppers like this Alright Good job boys!!! Kid: Lets release them

The Nearsightedness Epidemic

The Nearsightedness Epidemic


When you hear about epidemics, it usually
has to do with some frightening virus like HIV or Ebola. So when scientists in the know start talking
about an epidemic of nearsightedness, it probably sounds … strange. I mean, how can something that isn’t infectious
or contagious become an epidemic? And yet: The prevalence of nearsightedness
in the US is pushing 40 to 50% among young people. And that’s nothing compared to parts of
East Asia — particularly Singapore, China, Japan, and Korea — where nearsightedness
among high-school-age children is at 80% or more. Is it because kids these days have too much
homework? Or is technology to blame? Are iPads ruining our children?! New research suggests the cause of nearsightedness
might not be peering too closely at your homework … but neither is it all up to genetics. And that might be a good thing, because there’s
a potential prevention out there that’s universal, and free. The antidote to nearsightedness might be good
old-fashioned sunlight. Nearsightedness, or myopia, is a condition
in which your eyeball is elongated. When light enters an eyeball that’s too
long, the lens focuses light in front of the retina instead of right on its surface. This creates an image that’s blurry if you’re
looking at anything farther away than your outstretched arm. Myopia is easily corrected with glasses, contacts,
or surgery. But in extreme cases, what eye doctors call high myopia, it carries a risk
of severe eye problems, like glaucoma, retinal detachment, and cataracts. Nearsightedness has always been around to
some extent. Astronomer Johannes Kepler blamed his near-sightedness
on all of the writing and calculations he did up close, and for centuries that’s been
the conventional wisdom. For a long time, peering too closely at written
material, termed near work, has been blamed as the cause of nearsightedness. Near work typically includes things like reading
and writing. Watching TV doesn’t count, because it’s far enough away, and even using
a computer isn’t as hard on your eyes. Things like smartphones and tablets are new
enough that it’s hard to say whether they should be included in the definition, but
nearsightedness has been on the rise since before they became mainstream, so they’re
probably not at fault either way. But while extensive studies have had a hard
time ruling out near work entirely, they also have a hard time establishing a firm link. So, most scientists no longer think near work
is directly responsible for nearsightedness. But In the 20th century, we learned that there’s
a certain amount of genetic influence on nearsightedness. If your parents are nearsighted, you might
be, too. But that genetic influence isn’t really
straightforward. It involves a few dozen genes, each of which only contributes a fraction
of the overall story. Plus, a study of an Inuit community in Alaska
back in 1969 showed that nearsightedness can spread way too fast for genetics to explain. At one point, only 2 out of 131 people in
that community were nearsighted — that’s one and a half percent. But the prevalence rose to nearly fifty percent
in their children and grandchildren! Genetics couldn’t possibly be responsible
for such a rapid spread. This led scientists to conclude that, while genes have some influence,
the main cause of nearsightedness must be something in our environments. And it must be something that’s dramatically
increased in recent times. While near work itself doesn’t seem to be
the culprit, there does seem to be a link between nearsightedness and education. One study, published in October 2015 by researchers
from Cardiff University in Wales, found that firstborns are more likely to be nearsighted
than later children. About 10% more likely, to be specific, which
certainly doesn’t account for the skyrocketing prevalence, but it might provide a clue. When the researchers adjusted the data to
account for how much education the participants had had, the effect diminished, which means
that it was the education of the subjects that made the difference. The scientists suggested it was a result of
so-called “parental investment.” First-time parents who make their oldest kid hit the
books might be a little more relaxed by the third one. As a result, firstborns who spent
more time studying ended up being more likely to be nearsighted. Another study, by researchers from Sun Yat-sen
University in China, compared the rates of nearsightedness in two neighboring Chinese
provinces. They looked at schoolchildren in Shaanxi,
a middle-income province, and comparatively poor Gansu province. The prevalence of myopia among kids from the
wealthy province was roughly twice that of the poor province. The researchers couldn’t
fully explain this difference, but higher math scores were associated with higher rates
of nearsightedness. So it certainly looks like education correlates
with nearsightedness, but how is this happening? And if it’s so easy to correct, why worry? Well the fact is, about 20% of people with
nearsightedness end up having high myopia. For example, more than 90% of 19-year-old
men in Seoul, South Korea have myopia. So that means nearly 20% of that population is
at risk for those serious complications we mentioned, which can lead to blindness. Having this many people at risk of serious
eye problems is a major public health concern. And eyeglasses will certainly help, so getting
glasses to kids who need them is a big priority — or, at least, should be — in these countries. But still that’s not going to address the
underlying problem. Why are so many people throughout the industrialized world nearsighted,
when our ancestors didn’t have this problem? And why is the situation especially dire in
Asia? The best guess anyone has is that it’s related
to the particular emphasis placed on education by many East Asian cultures. China has a do-or-die college entrance exam
that makes the SAT look like a walk in the park. Kids as young as 10 spend hours every
day doing homework. If education is a factor in nearsightedness,
that’s where it’s going to show up. To tease out the effect of cultural environment,
Australian researchers from the University of Sydney looked at 6 and 7 year old ethnic
Chinese children living in Sydney and Singapore. The kids’ parents had similar rates of nearsightedness–around
70%–in both study groups. But in the kids themselves, the difference
was stark. Only 3.3% of kids in the Australian group were nearsighted, compared to 29.1%
in Singapore. And the children in Sydney actually did more
near-work activities, like reading and homework, than the kids in Singapore, so that couldn’t
possibly be the cause. The only difference between the two groups
of children that could account for the difference in myopia was how much time they spent outside. The kids in Sydney spent more than 13 hours
a week outside, the kids in Singapore only 3. This seems almost hard to believe. Can sunlight
really prevent you from becoming nearsighted? Scientists and public health officials would
really like to know. But, nothing in epidemiology is ever simple. In order to figure out if natural light can
treat myopia, we need two things: Rigorous evidence that sunlight really works, and a
scientific reason–a mechanism–for it to have that effect. Fortunately, within the last few years, researchers
have made progress toward both. Experiments in animals, including chicks and
rhesus monkeys, have shown that light can protect against myopia. Researchers in Germany first tried to induce
myopia in a set of chicks using special goggles, so that all the other variables could be controlled.
Then they exposed two groups to different lighting conditions, with one group being
raised under bright light that was meant to simulate sunlight, and others under normal
laboratory lighting. Turns out, the onset of myopia was slowed
in the group raised under bright lights, by around 60%. Then the researchers focused their attention
on a substance produced by your own brain that’s known to influence proper eye development:
the neurotransmitter dopamine. In another experiment, the researchers injected
the chicks with a chemical that blocked dopamine. Without the dopamine, the protective effect
of sunlight disappeared. So it’s believed that dopamine is released
into your eyes as a result of bright light. This chemical is at least partly related to
your body’s day/night rhythm — it’s involved in the switch body undergoes from from low-light
nighttime vision to daytime vision. And it’s what lets bright, natural light signal to
your body that it’s daytime. So, researchers now think that this dopamine
cycle is needed for healthy eye development throughout childhood. If it’s disrupted, like by spending all
your time indoors in dim light, your eyeball starts to become elongated, and myopia results. This light-dopamine hypothesis is currently
the best theory for how sunlight can help your eyes develop. Best part is, sunlight is free, and it’s
an easy thing to try to see if it keeps kids from becoming nearsighted. A few studies have even looked into using
sunlight as preventive medicine. One of the biggest studies looked at primary
school children at 12 schools in Guangzhou, China. They were divided into two groups of
six schools each, with about 950 children in each bunch. The control schools didn’t change their
daily routine, but the other schools added a 40-minute outdoor activity period. Then
the researchers tracked the kids for three years. By the end of the trial, the incidence rate
of myopia in the group that spent more time outside was 30%, compared to 39.5% in the
control group. The reduction was actually less than what
the researchers expected. But still, preventing myopia in young kids is worthwhile, they say,
because the longer it progresses, the worse it gets. The most difficult thing about using sunlight
as medicine might just be convincing parents to send their kids outside more. In the Chinese study, the schools sent the
kids outside for an extra 40 minutes, but parents were also asked to send their kids
outside even more on their own time. But as far as the researchers could tell,
the parents kind of…didn’t do that. And they think more than 40 minutes is needed
to achieve the most beneficial effect. So, it seems like a victory for sunlight.
I mean, it isn’t established for sure — many studies have shown that vision quality benefits
simply from going outside, rather than bright light per se. So it could be that the effect comes from,
say, playing more sports rather than sunlight. But researchers are calling for more studies
to better establish the link, and the data so far look promising. In the meantime, fresh air and sunlight as
a clinical intervention is a pretty appealing idea. In the end, it doesn’t seem like video games
or smartphones are to blame for the nearsightedness epidemic. But neither are books and homework.
And, thankfully, it’s not a terrifying virus that’s causing the epidemic of nearsightedness. Rather, it might be an overwhelming cultural
tendency to stay indoors. So if you want to keep your kids from becoming
nearsighted, maybe sign them up for soccer. Sports: they’re good for you. Who knew? Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow,
which was brought to you by our patrons on Patreon, like Carsten Steckel and Glen Knowles!
Thank you both! If you want to help us make more content like this, just go to patreon.com/scishow.
And don’t forget to go to youtube.com/scishow and subscribe!

Fire Ants vs. Giant Spiders

Fire Ants vs. Giant Spiders


I noticed the next morning, the fire ants
had been busy cutting out their own path of resistance. The fluon barriers I had placed to ensure
the ants remained secure inside the Selva de Fuego had weak spots. Over night, the ants had figured out that
the corners were easier to cling on to despite the fluon barrier. Oh no! So far, it looked like they hadn’t yet figured
a way to cross the upside down lip. But that’s not all! What I spotted next, caused me great concern. The rains overnight had naturally cued some
guests to emerge from the nests, and there seen on one of the frog bit islands were full
grown male and female alates. We didn’t have the time I thought we had to
prepare. The fire ants were now starting to have mating
flights! What was going to do keep all these fire ants
inside? It was then that a tiny movement in the corner
caught my eye. A tiny spider was lassoing some of the ants
that managed to get too close. At first, I asked myself, how on Earth did
a spider get in here? It must have come in with the plants. But what was more important, was that it was
at that very moment, that a crazy idea came to me, which would offer a great solution
to both my fire ant escape problems. Oh boy, this was about to get interesting. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family. Enjoy! So AC Family, I know a lot of you out there
are arachnophobic as it is a very common phobia, but if you’ve read the comments on some of
the other videos of this channel, so many AC Family have expressed that these ant nature
videos helped them overcome their fear of ants, so if they can do it, so can you arachnophobes. If you are one of these arachnophobic people,
while watching this video, do take deep breaths in and out, feel free to press pause whenever
you need to, and grab someone’s arm to watch with you, especially at the ending, because
if you can get over the rather intense scene at the ending of this video, you can say that
you have officially conquered your spider fears. Now about the escaping ants, I know many of
you have mentioned, why not just add a mesh cover to the Selva de Fuego to keep the ants
in? Valid question, but the answer to this is
I can’t add a cover because these ants are small enough to fit through the space between
the glass edge and any cover I put on, and if I were to add some kind of sandwiched insulation
layer to block that space between where the cover meets the glass, the ants would be able
to chew through it and eventually get out. Plus, even with a tight fitting cover, what
about when I have to feed the ants, or do water changes and maintain the river? As soon as I would open that bad boy, the
ants would be ready to break loose. Basically, a cover was not an option, and
a barrier was the answer, even if it had to be a biological barrier. So AC Family, over the years a lot of you
have been asking and waiting for an episode like this, but never had I imagined I would
be in a situation that necessitated the meeting of two of my favourite invertebrates on the
planet in a single enclosure. But today, we were going to attempt the unimaginable. Spiders and ants couldn’t be any more different. Ants are insects, with six legs, they’re social
in nature living in huge groups, and they live in soil. Spiders are arachnids, with 8 legs, most species
of which live in solitude, in webs that they spin. For ants like these fire ants, a colony you
guys named the Fire Nation, their venom is injected from their stingers. Spiders inject their venom from fangs. Both fire ants and spiders however are notoriously
hated and feared by the world, and revered and loved by critter-lovers like us. Today, I needed a safe and ethical way, a
natural way, to keep my fire ants that have surprisingly managed to pass my barrier of
fluon in their newly created rainforest setup called the Selva de Fuego, from escaping into
my home. But it wasn’t only the crawling ants that
I had to worry about; it was also the flying ones. The Fire Nation’s army of reproductives called
alates, young queens and males produced by the main queen every mating season, were growing
in numbers now, ready to start their annual mating flights, to seed the next generation
of fire ants. I was surprised to discover last week that
the Selva de Fuego’s lush, humid, and rainy climate was the cue these reproductives were
waiting for to start these massive aerial breeding sessions. But I wasn’t going to let these fire ant nuptial
flights nor escapes happen. I was determined to use some special eight-armed
forces. My plan today was to release a team of hungry
spiders into the Selva de Fuego to hopefully serve as natural assassins of escaping ants
as well as air control for these flying reproductive ants! The plan was totally crazy, but at this point
I was willing to try anything. It was too late now to move the Fire Nation
back into their old setup. We needed our team of spiders now. So I waited for the dark of night to befall
the Selva de Fuego. Our aquatic creatures were retiring for their
slumber. Our wedded pair of ram cichlids, whom you
guys have officially named Romeo and Juliet, were snuggling with each other lovingly under
the moonlight. Our cleaning team of Corydoras catfish were
fast asleep. The Fire Nation’s night shift workers were
busy going about their various tasks around the kingdom. But what the Selva de Fuegans didn’t know
was that above them, awaited secret teams of skilled beasts preparing for what we will
call Operation: FEAR… Flying & Escaping Ant Regulation. Behold! Our eight-armed forces for the job. AC Family, here I have prepared two teams. Meet Team A, a group of four Neoscona punctigera,
orb weaver spiders. This was a stout team of female assassins
who create impressive orb webs in jungles, which are super effective at capturing prey. They were a perfect size because they were
not too big which meant they might be able to safely touch Selva de Fuego soils without
being noticed in case they need to secure webbing from ground attachments. They wore camo and could blend in perfectly
with any branch, leaf, or rock. Next, AC Family, I’d like you to meet Team
B, the brawn and muscle of our Operation. In the event of Team A failure, meaning death
at the mandibles and stings of the aggressive Fire Nation, or abandonment, or even death
by each other, the plan was to then send in these spiders of Team B. They were also orb
weavers, belonging to the widespread genus Argiope. Unlike the spiders of Team A, these ladies
were giants! And unlike Team A there was nothing discreet
about them. Shiny silver and yellow patterns adorned their
backs, designed to reflect sunlight to attract insects into their grand orb webs. They were scary-looking, except maybe this
one. It seems this spider came to me in the middle
of shedding and had hardened in a very distorted manner. The poor thing. I’m not too sure what I will do with her. All eight of these spiders, by the way were
recruits sent to me by local children here in the Philippines were I currently live. You see a long time popular activity for Filipino
kids for decades has been spider fighting, something my dad told me about as a kid, where
kids would go out and catch these spiders from the forests and keep them in match boxes
until they were ready to be put up against each other on sticks, to fight to the death,
sometimes betting money. These spiders hopefully won’t be killing each
other, though. I hope they will be preoccupied with picking
off the ants. There were however so many uncontrollable
variables I could foresee with Operation: FEAR. First, there was no way to control where the
spiders would build their webs. As a kid growing up in Canada, I used to release
an orb weaver spider at my window sill indoors and they would obediently build a web right
there on my window by morning, where I continued to feed them until they died by Fall. My hope was that if I released four of these
orb weaver spiders into the Selva de Fuego at all four corners of the territories, they
would each build their web on location, and take care of ants escaping at these corners. This was the best case scenario! Second, there was no way to tell if their
webs would be effective at catching all flying reproductive ants or even escaping ants. Third, nothing stopped the spiders from simply
crawling out of the Selva de Fuego and wandering off somewhere in my ant room or even out a
window. Fourth, I had no idea if these spiders would
be able to survive the wrath and blood-thirst of the Fire Nation. In fact, nothing has ever been able to survive
the Fire Nation. In other words, AC Family, this entire thing
was 100% experimental and unpredictable. But, again, I was willing to try it! Here we go. It’s time to release our four members of Team
A at their individual posts within the Selva de Fuego, but first we needed to give the
spiders a leading advantage at the space. We couldn’t have the spiders attempt web building
while fire ants were all around, so I reinforced the corners with baby powder mixed with alcohol
barrier, to keep the ants temporarily off so the spiders could web build undistracted
and in peace. Next, I prepared wire clips from which each
spider’s container would hang. Here we go, AC Family 1 -2 – 3! releasing
our first spider, and then our second. Third, and fourth. AC Family, let’s watch! The spiders immediately emerged from their
containers and began to wander the premise. This spider felt the need to release its built
up feces before embarking on its journey to who knows where. I watched as it came close to a nearby spider
but took another route above it, accessing our rain system. Another spider stationed herself in a discreet
spot along the edge of the tank, where fire ants came dangerously close but didn’t seem
to notice. This spider decided to hang out and clean
itself. Look at that webbing! Can we marvel at this creature for a second. Take a look at her. I find it just incredible that evolution has
created such an animal, living exclusively on webbing produced by spinnerets on the tip
of its abdomen. Spider webs start off as a liquid and solidifies
into a sticky substance when in contact with air. What’s amazing is that this spider can control
the types of silk webbing produced, depending on what the webbing is for. In this case, it’s a life line to hang from. Webbing used for wrapping prey is different
from the webbing used to build webs, which is different still from life line webbing,
like this spider’s here… woops! AC Family, get this! Spiders can create up to seven different types
of silk for different uses, including webbing for pheromonal trails, reproduction where
some spiders create sperm webs, prey immobilization where some spiders squirt and mix their venom
with their silk, guideline webbing to help spiders find their way back to a previous
location, and this awesome thing called ballooning where spiders will use their silk to catch
winds to actually fly them to other locations! Yes, many spiders can fly. Isn’t it mind-blowing to think about how evolution
has produced such a creature? Many ants also produce silk, not these fire
ants of the Fire Nation, but ants that create cocoons, like our Golden Empire, or that build
silk-glued leaf nests like the Black Dragons, but ant silk is nowhere near as versatile
as that of spiders. Humans are studying the chemical make up of
spider silk to better understand how we can improve human items like bullet proof vests. Anyway, this spider eventually went on to
join this stationed spider on the risky edge, to sleep soundly for the rest of the night. It seemed like these spiders were not too
aggressive to each other. The other two spiders kind of just chilled
and cleaned themselves all night, and seemed unphased when the rains came rolling in. I actually tried to stay up all night to watch
the spiders in hopes to film them building their orb webs, but I ended up falling asleep
on the floor. When I woke up, I instantly jumped to check
the Selva de Fuego to see if the spiders had built webs. To my dismay, there were no webs. I saw spider one, two, three, and spider four
was nowhere to be found… oh, never mind. There she is. She didn’t survive the night. Oh boy! This all was going to be tougher than I thought. Later that day, another spider went missing. She must have fallen prey to the Fire Nation,
as well. That afternoon, I decided it was time to send
in Team B. I summoned Team B’s most promising members, and placed them into the Selva de
Fuego. These spiders were absolute giants! I loved watching them for hours as they moved
around the top of the Selva de Fuego. The one thing I did notice though was that
they spent a lot of time, and I mean a lot of time, cleaning themselves. I had no idea spiders were such germaphobes! By night, I saw something really interesting. Check this out. It seemed one of the Team B spiders had set
up the framework for an orb web, but it seemed to be bouncing back and forth. When I looked down to where it had attached
its support line, there was a member of the Fire Nation trying to climb up the web to
get to the spider! You see how fearless the Fire Nation is? Man! Anyway, the spider seemed to be trying to
shake the fire ant off so it could continue with web-building. I was looking forward to finally seeing some
webs by morning. Morning came, and checking the Selva de Fuego,
I saw no webs, again. In fact, I saw no spiders at all, the only
place I did see webbing was outside my window! One of them had managed to find its way out
of my ant room. This unlucky streak continued when I tried
to release our third member of Team B, which I found later under a huge pile of Fire Nation
workers, and well, this deformed Team B member couldn’t even move properly, so I let it go. AC Family, this was the failure of Operation:
F.E.A.R. I felt terrible at all the arachnid lives
we had lost while trying, and what was worse: The Fire Nation had now found a way to cross
the upside down lip. The fire ants were now successful at officially
find their way out of the Selva de Fuego, and I had no way of stopping them now! I had placed a pane of glass I had laying
around, as a last resort at keeping them in, but I knew it would be no use. Soon these free ants would be going back to
the colony to tell them all about this new way out. I panicked and felt defeated. I couldn’t imagine the Fire Nation breaking
loose in my room! And then the unthinkable came to mind. Was I going to have to resort to exterminating
the Fire Nation myself with spray? No! Suddenly, clarity. It was then that I knew what to do, or rather
whom to visit. AC Family, who you’re about to meet now, is
someone absolutely legendary, someone none of you have ever met before, but whom I’ve
known since the beginning of time, well ant time anyway. In watching these ant videos, you’ve all come
to know the queens of this ant room, of our Antiverse, but what you guys don’t know, is
that before the Antiverse ever came to be, there existed the one, a goddess who ruled
this plane of existence. Actually, I’m surprised none of you ever asked
about what lay next to the Fire Nation, what laid beneath the Fire Palace. AC Family, it was time to visit, the goddess
of the Antiverse, who is surprisingly not even an ant. No, the goddess of the ant room is a spider. I approached the goddess’ lair with reverence
and caution. Opening the glass, and AC Family, brace yourselves,
as I present to you, in her splendid divinity, Imelda, the bird-eater tarantula, goddess
of the Antiverse. She has an 8 inch legspan and is a true behemoth. Just do as I say, AC Family and we will be
safe. No sudden movements. Every time I enter this sacred lair of Imelda,
I make sure to always show great respect and reverence in her presence, lest I lose my
fingers. Her water bowl, which I always make sure is
topped off and full, needed some cleaning. She telepathically commanded me now to make
it clean. As you wish, my goddess. I took a deep breath and with my hand slowly
made my way to her water bowl. Got it. Removing the bowl to wash it free of its stains. The next requirement of me was a peace offering
of some sort. I was not allowed to enter her lair without
bearing a gift, fit for a goddess. She waited patiently. I came with the fattest, most delectable cockroach
from my cockroach farm to offer as my appeasing sacrifice to goddess Imelda. I had hoped this gift would suffice. She always loved to eat the male roaches. I approached slowly and deliberately to give
her the cockroach. Oh man! Alright, it seems she’s not hungry at the
moment. I had fed her a few days ago, so I guess she
was still content food-wise. She’ll be eating our gift later, but the good
news is we had her blessing to remain here for a short time. So now, the reason I came here. I needed Imelda’s silk. Tarantulas like Imelda here cover their entire
living space with a thick carpet of silk. On some nights, I will catch Imelda meticulously
going over this entire terrarium with a fresh layer of silk. She blankets the decor, the ground, and even
the glass with this divine mattress. In fact, she refuses to dig tunnels like most
tarantulas and demands that she be kept in a big space like this to treat the entire
space as her cathedral of silk. I’ve kept her in different setups before in
the past, over the years, but she has shown me that she is most comfortable living in
this huge palace of webbing. The reason tarantulas lay down these carpets
of webbing, especially during feeding time is because in their natural habitat ants are
common nuisance, including fire ants. Imelda is also a South American species, and
the smell of feeding time easily attracts a barrage of various ants to her den. This silk makes it hard for ants to invade
and enter her territory, and I was in need of this godly material. I proceeded to harvest this webbing, and using
some glue, I attached it to the corners of the Selva de Fuego. And wanna hear something absolutely crazy? It worked. To my utter surprise, the Fire Ant escapes
stopped. The webbing made it hard for the fire ants
to cross! I couldn’t believe it worked! I resolved to continually harvest sections
of Imelda’s silk and attach it to the corners of the Fire Nation’s kingdom to ensure there
were no escaped ants. Now as for the flying reproductives, another
idea also came to me. Who needed teams of spiders when I had the
best teams for biological control – the ant colonies of the entire Antiverse. So my solution? Black lights set on at night to attract the
flying alates into the adjacent kingdoms of our other ants who would then proceed to have
a feast. I was completely elated that we found a solution
to our fire ant escape problems. It could have been so easy to resort to some
kind of chemical warfare to combat the Fire Nation, but deep inside, I just knew Mother
Nature had an eco-friendly solution to my problems somewhere. I just had to figure it out, and today I felt
as though I had cracked a grand code to a Mother Nature’s rubix cube! And as if Mother Nature was giving us a pat
on the back for all the great work, in the night I spotted something that filled my heart
with such joy and amazement. Romeo and Juliet, were engaging in the ancient
dance performed by ancestors millions of years before them. AC Family, they were spawning… It was absolutely beautiful to witness, and
also assuring because from my research, Ram Cichlids will mate when water conditions are
just perfect! AC Family, brace yourselves, it looks like
we were about to be witnesses to the great miracle of life. AC Family, things are looking bright for the
future of the Selva de Fuego, but honestly speaking next week’s episode was one of the
toughest episodes emotionally I’ve ever had to film on this channel. You will not expect what’s coming up, and
I most certainly didn’t! So trust me on this guys, you won’t want to
miss it, so hit that SUBSCRIBE button and bell icon now so you don’t miss out on this
epic ant story, and hit the LIKE button every single time, including now. AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, for more on the giant spiders in this video. They are just fascinating and awe-inspiring,
and will always be one of my favourite creatures on the planet! Also, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel. I upload daily vlogs of my travels around
the world and this particular vlog here is a complete vlog of how I built the Selva de
Fuego from scratch. Go check it out, and don’t forget to subscribe
while you’re there. Alright and now it’s time for the AC Question
of the Week! Last week, we asked: Why does the Fire Nation queen take her time
when moving out of an old nest and into a new one? Congratulations to Kyler Bentley who correctly
answered: The Fire Nation queen takes her time when
moving out into a new nest because she needs to make
sure she knows whether or not the new habitat is
safe. Congratulations Kyler, you just won a free
ant t-shirt from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Name three things spiders
use their silk webbing for. Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free e-book handbook from our shop. Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, & SUBSCRIBE
if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!