How to make a wasp trap from an energy drink


Here’s a
wasp trap
that I bought spiders, a moth but no wasps Here’s a better way first you need an empty can fill 1/3 with juice slide tab so that it partially covers the opening let wasps in but keep them from flying back out set outside and wait let’s see what we’ve caught

How Do Ants Find Food? | Animal Science for Kids


Squeaks and I just got back from a picnic
outside. We brought all of our favorite picnic foods:
sandwiches, fruit, and even some cookies for dessert. That’s true, we also got some unexpected
visitors! Some ants came to check out our picnic, too. They carried away some of our crumbs! The ants that came to our picnic were worker
ants, and it’s their job to collect food. See, ants live together in homes called anthills. If you’ve ever seen a little pile of sand
on the sidewalk with ants crawling all over it — that’s an anthill! The different ants that live in the anthill
have different jobs. There’s one big ant called the queen. Her job is to lay all of the eggs that will
hatch into baby ants. Then there are the males, all of the boy ants
that take care of the queen. The queen and the males hardly ever leave
the anthill. The rest of the ants are called workers. They do things like build the ant hill tunnels,
protect the anthill, and go out to find food to bring back for the queen and the males. The worker ants do have to work really hard,
Squeaks. They need to find enough food to feed themselves,
the queen, and the males, not to mention the baby ants. Luckily, the workers have some special skills
that help them to find plenty of food. When a worker ant is out looking for food,
she uses her great sense of smell to sniff out any food in the area. But instead of using a nose like us, she uses
her antennae, the two little things sitting on top of her head. An ant’s antennae are actually better at
smelling than a human’s nose. They can easily smell things that people can’t
smell at all. And when a worker ant’s antennae smell some
tasty food, like the fruit at our picnic, she can follow the smell until she finds the
food. Now that she knows where the food is, she
can use her eyes to look around at what’s near the food, like a tree or our bright picnic
blanket. If she needs to find the food again, she’ll
look for those familiar sights until she finds the food. And ants will eat just about anything. Most ants are omnivores, meaning that they’ll
eat plants, other animals, and all sorts of things. The different foods they like to eat all have
different smells, so the ant can smell out which one she wants to bring home today. Ants love sugar, so it makes sense that they
went after our cookie crumbs! They were really big pieces for one tiny ant
to carry, Squeaks. But ants are incredibly strong! They can carry something that’s up to 50
times heavier than they are. That would be like you picking up a small
car! But if something is too heavy even for an
ant, a bunch of other worker ants will come help her out. Squeaks, how do you think the other ants find
the first worker ant? That’s right, they use their antennae and
their sense of smell. When a worker ant is on the trail for some
tasty food, she can leave a smelly trail behind her, which the other ants can follow using
their antennae. When a whole group of ants is following a
trail like this, they form a line of helpers ready to use
some teamwork to move some big food. At our picnic, they even managed to move a
whole cookie together. One ant is pretty strong by herself, but by
working together, these ants are incredible. I’m glad they came to visit our picnic,
too! And I’m glad that the whole anthill will
have food now. What about you? Have you ever seen worker ants looking for
food? What would you look for if you had super-smeller
antennae? Grab a grownup to help you leave a comment
below, or send us an email at [email protected] We’ll see you next time, here at the fort.

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Honey bees – Natural History 2

Honey bees – Natural History 2


Bees are called social insects because they
live and work together as a community. Thousands of female bees, called worker bees, live together
in a hive with a queen bee. The queen bee is marked with a red dot so we can see her
better. The worker bees are all females, but they
almost never lay eggs. Worker bees do almost all the chores in the hive. They gather pollen
or nectar, guard the entrance, clean the hive, build the comb, make honey, tend the queen,
and feed the larvae. They even fan the hive with their wings to keep it cool on a hot
summer day. The queen bee is larger than the worker bees.
She lays about a thousand eggs each day! Watch the worker bees attending to the queen bee
and feeding her. The worker bees touch and lick her as they tend to her needs. They get
a substance from the queen that they carry around the hive, and when they touch and lick
other bees, this substance, or pheromone, tells them that the queen bee is alive and
well. Then all the worker bees keep doing their jobs. The queen bee walks from cell
to cell to lay a small white egg in each one. She lays all the eggs.
Inside the cells, the eggs hatch into larvae or grubs. The workers take care of all the
larvae, which include several queen bee larvae. The worker bees take pollen mixed with honey
to feed them. The larvae eat a lot, but the pupae do not
eat at all. When the larvae are ready to turn into pupae, the worker bees close off the
cell with wax. Inside, the grubs pupate and metamorphose into bees in about 12 days. Pupae
use the stored up fat and tissue from the larval stage to metamorphose into adult bees.
Honey bees undergo a complete metamorphosis. After the pupae have changed into adult bees,
they chew their way out of the cells and start working! Watch the young bee crawl out of
the cell! The cells are also used for storing nectar
and pollen. Honey is made inside cells. Adult bees also rest in them.
If a female larva is fed special food called royal jelly, she becomes a queen bee. If not,
she becomes a worker bee. A new queen goes on her nuptial, or wedding
flight, a flight to mate with drones. Only a few drones, or male bees, live in each
hive. Thousands of drones from many bee colonies gather in one place. Queens fly there, too.
The drones mate with a queen bee. After the young queen has mated, she heads to the colony
where she was raised and becomes the new queen. The old queen and approximately half of the
workers leave the hive as a swarm, to find a new nest site.

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

Honey Bee Observation Hive 8-Frame Setup How to Start Keeping Bees with a split!

Honey Bee Observation Hive 8-Frame Setup How to Start Keeping Bees with a split!


okay so today what I’m showing you is
something that I’ve always wanted to have and that’s an observation hive and
this is an observation hive I purchased as an already assembled kit it comes
with everything except the glazing so we have to do that ourselves but this is
called a swing view hive it holds eight deep frames and I’m gonna go
step-by-step how to set it up and I had a special order this plexiglass I got
the thick stuff so it’s a little over a quarter of an inch thick and it’s
clarity is perfect it’s acrylic and of course you have this paper on it that
you have to peel off and make sure that your dimensions are perfect because you
don’t want to have to cut the Plexiglas yourself and this particular company I
will give you a link for them but they do custom cutting for you and they were
within a sixteenth of an inch to my dimensions the next thing you have to do
is bed the glass in a hundred percent pure silicon that’s rated for all
weather conditions and that’s what we did we put this little can bead down and
now we’re gonna drop in the Plexiglas and remember you test fit it dry before
you put this in to make sure you don’t have any problems and now once it’s in I
go around the edges and I press it up to make sure that the silicon bead goes the
full width of the joint we don’t want any movement in this we definitely don’t
want bees and debris to get between the Plexiglas and the frames that came with
this observation hive and they mark the sides a and B and we’re looking at the
top there and that’s actually a feeder screen and this is the B side it’s all
framed up you can see that there’s a full bead of silicone there and you can
later come and cut it off with a razor blade if you want to take out that
excess I ended up just leaving it but make sure that you absolutely fill the
joint just for a lot of reasons with strength being the first so we have the
a side and the B side nice and strong you have the option of course to finish
these frames finish the woodwork the exterior of it I wouldn’t put any finish
inside or just leave it plain and I’m leaving it plain this is the silicon
tube that I used 100% silicone totally stable inert material once it’s dry you
want to make sure when you’re using this stuff that you have plenty of
ventilation going and then once you have put the Plexiglas bedded in the silicon
into these frames give them at least 24 hours and here we are at the shed that
I’ve decided to put the observation hive in and this is the included landing
board that goes with it and you have to drill a 2 inch diameter hole from the
inside before you of coarse screw this on here and they use two inch grey
electrical conduit the plastic stuff that’s rated for sun exposure and i had
to do some modifications on the inside here because I’m using 2×4 supports and
this shed was Amish built so the dimensional lumber is a fall like when
they say 2×4 it is four inches so I had to chisel some of that out and we’re
vertically mounting these two by fours so they’re glued and they’re screwed in
because it’s gonna hold quite a bit of weight remember this is an eighth frame
observation hive and that’s eight deep frames so let’s say at the outside 20
pounds per frame so you’re looking at yeah quite a bit of weight if the thing
actually filled up completely with honey we know that’s not likely but if it did
you want to definitely be able to support it and this is the swing view
mounting bracket that goes on the wall some people actually put this thing
inside their house I really didn’t want to do that I couldn’t think of a great
way that I wanted to keep it plus inside your house sometimes you have to tend to
that you’d have to pull the thing off and carry it outside and so that you
could access the bees and do some maintenance with your observation hive
so here I’m just eyeballing the again it’s electrical conduit that came with it
and you can see that it’s already cut out there that landing board has a
receiver for it that’s perfect I did not glue or do anything other than
friction set that and when you put the the plate on for
the wall it also has a recess that houses that tube that the bees will use
to go in and out and at the top there’s that threaded grommet so that you can
put the bolt through the top on the bottom which is where the bees go in and
out it has that nice piece of angled wood that supports it and then again a
little tail piece of electrical conduit sticks out and the swing view is
actually going to turn on that so what they want you to do is put down some
beeswax so that it can sit on that and that becomes the gliding surface and so
here we are showing you the frame again without the glazing yet and this is that
little piece I talked about and these are clumps of beeswax that I put down
there and we’re just going to use the weight of the swing view itself to smear
that around and of course beeswax is pretty stable here it is mounted now and
again you can see that the joints are cutout dedos or whatever you want to
call that that will accommodate the frames and I’m going to show you
step-by-step how I set it up and those are order 20 threaded studs that are
there that will hold the frames on so it looks pretty good stainless steel
screens and again little segments that have been cut off of electrical conduit
that act like spring clips they hold it in there so it’s easy to remove if you
have to get inside also if you needed to close off the entry and exit point there
is this little galvanized piece of Steel there and it comes with a screw so I
just pulled it out which opens it up so the bees can come and go and then I just
put that screw back in the hole there so I don’t lose it but if you ever have to
close off your observation hive for transportation that’s the plate that you
put in the other thing is I’m going with acorn plastic frames these are food
grade plastic frames that come with a heavy heavy coat of beeswax on them in
the past I’ve used Piergo and these are what I’ve gone to now so and the green
stuff is actually drone frame so you’ll see that the the cell size is much
larger and people use that to get drones to
develop and they use that as some kind of protection for varroa because I’ll
just pull out the drone and then here’s the white frames it comes in white
plastic or black I prefer the black because I’m a photographer and I’m
trying to get a look at egg development larvae development and a lot of things
that are going on which is why I have the observation hive to begin with the
green here I’m just showing it to you’re really close and they’re marked on the
top again is your acorn frames and I’ll put a link to that in the description
one X means it’s dipped once 2 X dip twice and 3 X triple dip or what they
call heavy wax coating the more wax you have on these frames the more readily
your bees will start to draw them out and make their their honeycomb on that
so we’re gonna get to see all of that and it’s one of the great things about
having an observation hive because we get to watch them draw out comb and
start to occupy the hive now if you want to put in wooden frames or
something like that go ahead because then you’ll be able to watch how they
draw out comb without foundation and that company I believe also sells
plastic frame foundation without the full frame but I just personally prefer
the full frames and we’re gonna have both in care so the top four frames will
be the new acorn variety which now I prefer they don’t flex in the middle and
they don’t distort as much as the Piergo frames which are going to be the
bottom four as much as those did and those were out
in my beehives so the next thing I have to do is bring in some frames of bees to
populate the hive so I’m going to a hive that has a lot of activity they’ve got
some brood in there and I’m going to light load the observation hive because
again I want to watch them expand so I’m gonna pull some frames that have some
brood and some resources on them and I want to put those inside the frame and
then I’ve mail ordered in this Weaver queen which is a survivor bee line
they’re varroa resistant they’re super hygienic
and she comes out of Texas and there are workers of course in there because the
Queen can’t feed herself and you’ll just put her on top of all the frames inside
the observation hive and then what I did later was I just pulled that gray clip
out and the stainless steel screen and then used forceps to withdraw the cage
so you want to make sure of course and pulled the plug on the sugar side and
now we’re doing something different here normally you’d be Re-Queening because the
queen would have died and you’d have a queenless hive that means that the bees
that would be in there would be looking for a new queen and would readily accept
a new queen that’s not gonna happen here because we’re pulling frames from hives
that have Queens and those bees have pheromone associated with the Queen in
the hive they’ve come from so again here’s my first frame we’re gonna put
that in there and again I don’t want fully drawn out frames I don’t want them
to be complete because part of the fun is in watching them draw out wax on
their own and watching the colony establish itself and you notice how calm
these bees are you also want to position them carefully you don’t want to put it
right up against the surface where the Plexiglas will be because you want to
maintain these space they’re thinking about where the comb will be and how far
drawn out it will be and then leave additional bee space 3/16 of an inch
roughly is good but remember that once you close it up you’re not gonna have
access to move these things around so positioning them carefully now will be
worth its weight in gold later so what I’m doing is I’m putting the
frames in one by one and going back back out to the apiary collecting other
frames now look at this one it’s absolutely loaded with pollen there’s
also capped honey there so these are resources that the bees are going to use
to expand their colony now I did have to put on some protective clothing
remember I’m getting into hives and I am taking away their brood if you
want to kick off a defensive response from a colony of bees pull some brood
frames and you’ll see that they will really want to get you away from those
resources much different than if you were just pulling honey supers so here
again I’m just being very careful in the alignment of these frames now these are
all worker bees most of them my target bees of course
are nurse bees bees that are still in there cleaning stages feeding stages for
larvae and those that would otherwise occupy brood frames and that’s
because they haven’t been outside of their hive yet they don’t know where
they live all of their experience in life has been inside the hive so that
means hopefully that they will be better prepared to occupy this hive and stay
where I put them because the hives that I’m pulling them from are within a
hundred feet actually of this observation hive in the shed that it’s
in also you get a glass jar with a tin cap on it that is your feet our jar goes
right on the top there and I’m putting of course 50/50 sugar water and I use
super filtered water and I heat it up and sanitize it carefully before I put
that on the hive and here it is all together an eighth frame swing view hive
and if you’ve been watching any many other videos that show macro video
close-ups of different behavior whether it be a queen laying eggs or whether it
be baby bees hatching or the development of larvae that has all been filmed in
this observation hive and because we’re in the shed and now you can see there
are larvae there very small ones to the left and again here’s the reason why I
like the black plastic frames and in this case from acorn is because the
contrast there lets me see eggs better and lets me see developing larvae and
here we have a collection of bees that aren’t doing a lot
now but what they are is forming a physical barrier around these larvae to
keep the cooler air from getting to them and here is what looks like the start of
a queen cell but what they actually did within days after installing these
frames is they they dismantled that they chewed it all apart and some of these
little areas here are packed now with pollen pollen varies widely in color it
could be cheeto yellow or it can be very pale green and in some cases almost just
off-white and look at this variety of pollen here as soon as a worker comes in
and unloads the pollen directly into the cell a worker bee then goes right in and
starts to mix that pollen and seal it up with a little bit of honey and actually
the pollen will ferment in these cells so if you can smell it if you open up a
pollen area that’s been there for 48 hours you start to smell that it is
fermenting and actually the two-day-old pollen that’s been stored is most
frequently used by those nurse bees so here we are again I want you to notice
this behavior here’s the Queen and her workers and they’re in this cage look at
the abdomen of the occupants of this colony right now they are trying as hard
as they can to sting through that screen see how they bend their abdomens towards
the occupants of this little queen cage they’re trying to kill off the occupants
and the reason is they perceive the pheromone of this Queen and these
workers as alien to the hive and they definitely don’t want them there so
we’re gonna get back to that later now we’re gonna show here that there are
resources see the pollen in the top and then we also have honey lower down all
around the brood that are currently hatching here and that’s a convenience
thing the nurse bees don’t have to go very far to get resources to feed these
baby bees of course once they’re capped they’re not eating anything so it’s only
during the larvae stage that they’re being fed and then they’ll come out of
there capping on their own these baby bees will go right to work
they turn into nurse bees themselves and will turn around and attend to those
other developing larvae now here we are back at the Queen this is 24 hours later
notice the body posture of the bees that are on that screen now their abdomens
are laid out straight and what they’re actually doing is sticking their heads
in and extending their tongues to make sure that that Queen has plenty of food
Queens do not feed themselves they’re only fed by nurse bees in the hive so
now it’s safe to pull the plug and release that Queen into this new colony and here again we’re just we’re actually
shooting this through the opposite screen there are vents left and right
top and bottom and here’s the Queen out on her own and she is fertile and she
set right about laying eggs the only thing that really held her back in this
new hive was the number of cells that were available for her to lay in she
laid an egg in every single cell that was not occupied it was a fantastic
experience now the observation hive is set up and
ready to go and now all we have to do is drink coffee and watch and learn about
what goes on inside a honey bee hive I hope you’ve enjoyed watching this and if
you want to see bees at your leisure protected from weather I suggest that
you get an observation hive of your own or maybe even build one thank you so
much for watching this video and thank you again for your interest and honey
bees I hope this was helpful see ya!

Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen – Kenny Coogan

Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen – Kenny Coogan


As the April sun rises
on a pile of firewood, something royal stirs inside. This wasp queen is one of thousands
who mated in late autumn and hibernated through the winter. Now she emerges into the spring air
to begin her reign. Most of her sisters weren’t so lucky. While hibernating in compost piles
and underground burrows, many sleeping queens
were eaten by spiders. Warm winters caused by climate change
led other queens to emerge early, only to find there was no available food. And some queens that survived the winter
fell victim to the threats of spring, such as carnivorous plants, birds,
and manmade pesticides. Our queen is the lone survivor
of her old hive, and now, she must become
the foundress of a new one. But first, breakfast. The queen heads for a citrus grove
full of honeybee hives. The bees can be dangerous if provoked, but right now they’re paralyzed
by the morning cold. Their hairy bodies are dripping
with sugar water from an earlier feeding, and the resourceful queen
licks them for a morning snack. Newly energized, our queen searches
for a safe nesting area. This tree hollow, safe from rain, wind,
and predators, is ideal. She chews the surrounding wood
and plant fibers to make a paper-like pulp. Then she builds around 50 brood cells
that comprise the beginning of her nest. Using sperm stored from last fall, the queen lays a fertilized egg
into each cell, producing as many as 12 in 20 minutes. Within a week,
these will hatch into female larva. But until then, the queen must hunt down
smaller insects to feed her brood, all while expanding the hive, laying eggs,
and defending against intruders. Fortunately, our queen is well prepared. Unlike bees, wasps can sting as many times
as they need to. With such a busy schedule,
the queen barely has time to feed herself. Luckily, she doesn’t have to. When she feeds an insect to her grubs, they digest the bug into a sugary
substance that sustains their mother. By the end of July, these first larva
have matured into adult workers, ready to take on foraging,
building, and defense. The queen can now lay eggs full-time, sustaining herself on her worker’s spoils
and their unfertilized eggs. Although each worker only lives
for roughly 3 weeks, the queen’s continuous egg-laying
swells their ranks. In just one summer,
the nest reaches the size of a basketball, supporting thousands of workers. Such a large population needs to eat, and the nearby garden
provides a veritable buffet. As the swarm descends,
alarmed humans try to swat them. They even fight back with pesticides
that purposefully poison wasps, and inadvertently impact
a wide-range of local wildlife. But the wasps are actually vital
to this ecosystem. Sitting at the top
of the local invertebrate food chain, these insects keep spiders, mites,
and centipedes, in check. Wasps consume crop-eating insects, making them particularly helpful
for farms and gardens. They even pollinate fruits and vegetables, and help winemakers
by biting into their grapes and jump-starting fermentation. This feast continues until autumn,
when the foundress changes course. She begins grooming some eggs
into a new generation of queens, while also laying unfertilized eggs that will mature into reproductive males
called drones. This new crop of queens and males
requires more food. But with summer over,
the usual sources run dry, and the foraging wasps
start taking more aggressive risks. By September,
the hive’s organization deteriorates. Hungry workers no longer clean the nest
and various scavengers move in. Just when it seems
the hive can no longer sustain itself, the fertile queens and their drones
depart in a massive swarm. As the days grow colder,
the workers starve, and our queen
reaches the end of her lifespan. But above, a swarm of reproductive wasps
has successfully mated. The males die off shortly after, but the newly fertilized queens are ready
to find shelter for their long sleep. And this woodpile looks like
the perfect place to spend the winter.

Flow Hive Honey Bee keeping  Update YES the Queen can lay eggs in the Flow-Frames

Flow Hive Honey Bee keeping Update YES the Queen can lay eggs in the Flow-Frames


okay so it’s been a while since we’ve talked about the honey bees and the flow supers out in my apiary so let’s do an update since we’ve come out of winter and we went through a full winter with Flow supers on the bee hives and in some cases I took the flow supers off and we’re going to see the comparison there’s another issue that’s come out that we’re going to talk about in the last half of this presentation so first we have the Flow super that was taken off of a beehive after the colony had used most of its resources and I’m going to show you what the stored flow frames looked like now whenever you’re taking a part a beehive always make sure to have a bucket or something nearby where you can take wax and propolis scrapings and put those in there there’s always somebody that wants beeswax or propolis now you can see they have emptied this out and what’s left is solidified honey so this is considered crystallized or solidified honey so you’re just looking at sugar crystals really and the bees do come back and consume these, this whole side was full of solidified honey and the bees took it out and of course I removed the super about midwinter because they had plenty of resources in the lower medium super for that colony so I just wanted to show physically what these flow frames go through and this is a nice close look at the cells they’re nice and clean and there’s nothing on this Flo frame at all except the leftovers from the honey that they once stored now this is not one of the flow hive supers that we drew honey off of in the past I left it all on for the bees and you can see that the propolis has really made it challenging to pull these frames out and there you have it even more solidified honey and when capping it and everything in this frame is partially liquid but definitely not usable and you could not operate the flow frame with this residue in this condition so there are a couple of options when it comes to cleaning this out and it’s a question that I often get, what would you do if the honey became candied inside these flow frames because of course it’s a mechanism that has to function in order to drain honey and you’ll notice too that the stainless-steel cords that hold the flow hive components together has been propolized primarily on top not so much on the underside and here is some where the center section if you can see the difference is still liquid honey and could be uncapped and extracted if you wanted to you can take a flow super although these flow frames are designed to drain the honey through the mechanism but if you needed to and you had some that was solidified and some that’s still liquid as this frame is you could un cap it put it in a spinner and spin it out traditionally of course that defeats the whole purpose of the flow hive mechanism and now this is as you know a robust colony of bees and I’m going to take this frame and I’m going to put the flow super on it and allow these bees to clean it out another clean-out option would be just to take the flow frames out and spray them out with a power washer and I have one of those but here I’d rather see how well the bees clean it out themselves all of the frames that you’re looking at here are a form of food grade plastic there is one wooden frame there but the black and the white are both Piergo designs and later on we’ll be talking in another video about the new triple wax-coated frames that are made by a company called Acorn and you can see that the population of this colony is really high and this is early in the spring one of the few warm days that we’ve had we’ve had really erratic weather conditions where we get very cold and then warm and then cold again and that took a huge toll on bee populations in apiaries across the state of Pennsylvania some longtime beekeepers have reported losses of 50% or even higher in some cases so now we’re going to put this is my original flow super that I did my original review on and it was exposed to the cold all year long it was just removed from the colony always make sure that all the components still work when you’re putting it back on a colony and that there won’t be any binding or problems and there isn’t this came through just fine all the plastic components are fine they’re unaffected by cold and the box is a little weathered and that’s expected I made my own inner covers for these things so that it would be thick enough that when you put a telescoping cover over the top it will not interact with the mechanisms that you need to remove in order to operate the flow frames and then just a standard telescoping top with a zinc coated tin cover just making sure that I can still access everything since we’re kicking off the new season here and what you’re looking at is one of our early warm days in fact probably one of the first times I can actually get out in the apiary and check things out so the bees are immediately right up in the frames and it shows this is of course the end frame which faces the east in my apiary and there’s a little logo embossed in that removable panel and it felt like you might need a chicken fix here for those who are looking for my chicken videos we’ll just show this rooster that happened to be walking by now this brings us to today and the reason I wanted to get this video out right away to those who are waiting for flow hive updates in the past I’ve had a lot of questions about why I don’t use queen excluders in my apiary and if you don’t use queen excluder would the bees go up into the flo super and in the flow frames and would the Queen actually lay her eggs in those mechanisms and that would be a bad thing if you’ve heard me talk before I’ve always said that I don’t use queen excluders in the apiary and that’s because it slows down honey production so much as some of the workers can’t get through those queen excluders well when it comes to the flow hive and that mechanism you’re about to see why putting a queen excluder in your flow hive system between the brood boxes and your actual flow supers is very important we did actually get brood in the flow frames and I’m going to show you that in a moment we have terrific weather right now we’ve come out of a lot of rain and just look at all the colors of pollen that’s coming in on the hind legs with these workers you’ll also notice that we have an abundance of drones and that means with this immediate buildup of numbers in this colony that we could be favoring swarm conditions here so for me that means it’s time to start thinking about splitting the colony down and making some new colonies for observation and you’ll notice too this is an upper entrance the upper entrance is much bigger than the lower landing board entrance and all of my bee hives have an upper and a lower landing board entrance now we’re looking at the frames of the one that I showed at the beginning of this video and they are cleaned out nicely now if you look, I get questions sometimes when people see you down in the corners of this viewing frame that it looks like the mechanism was partially activated or some of the cells look a little skewed that’s really a visual distortion and if you can look across the surface of these things they are properly aligned, what happens is the surface is irregular so they’re not drawn out even as it would be if this were straight wax and they’re just cleaning it out so all of the honey that you saw and the candied honey and the solidified sugar crystals that were in the cells before are now completely gone and this colony is really ramping up for our Spring nectar flow you notice there’s even a little humidity building up on the inside of this clear plastic panel and this is again just another view same colony and this is the one remember that the colony was not left on through winter so the numbers are very strong now we’re going to get into the colony that was benefiting from the flow frames throughout winter so they came up into this flow super and used up all the honey resources that were in it and this is a closeup to show you the cells are absolutely clean as a whistle and there’s something going on here that you wouldn’t notice just looking at the end frames and that is that we’ve actually had the Queen come up into this flow super which is near the top of this hive and she actually started laying in the cells that’s a question I get frequently what would you do if the Queen started laying in the cells well we made lots of excuses about that number one, the queen would be primarily active in the lower boxes we have two deeps on this colony so it was highly unlikely that she would come up into the flow supers and use these deep plastic cells which again are very deep and kind of unusual for a queen to be attracted to for laying but what we’re looking at right here is the eastern panel that is exposed now because we took the cover off and inside these flow supers the plastic cells are clean as a whistle except for those that have now developing brood in them and when we’re looking at this light yellow somewhat convex surface on these cells this is different from honey stored caps because those you would see would be slick somewhat shiny and somewhat concave when it comes to brood cells they’re always slightly convex and of course the material is more fibrous so that the developing brood can breathe through them and if you look top center here you’ll see what I call Michelin men and those are developing baby bees the little grubs that are in the cells so the Queen has been all the way up into the flo supers and she’s been laying in the mechanism all the cells are synthetic they’re nothing but plastic and the only thing that the bees are providing is the egg they sealed the frame, of course the Queen provides the egg and then the workers are putting royal jelly into the cells and some of them are really shiny you can see that they have those resources provided and they’re capping them off and these are workers so the Queen has taken over the flow super in this case and the plastic mechanized flow frames and is using them to lay eggs and raise brood so now what does that mean for me well I’m not into beekeeping for the honey but if you are doing this for honey of course it completely arrests the function of your flow frame so you will not be able to use his flow frame for honey extraction while it’s being used for brood the other thing that I was always commenting about is if they were going to go and lay in these frames I would allow it simply so we could observe it and see what happens and of course here we are over a year from my first purchase and installation of flow frames and they’re using them now keep in mind the reason that they’re using these for brood is because there is no queen excluder so what I’m telling you is to make sure that you do use the provided queen excluder above the brood boxes on your flow hives and below the flow supers that holds these mechanized flow frames otherwise you’ll have what I have in this case which right now is just a very expensive brood box and you can see the bees attending to those grubs in there so now this is the difference what we’re looking at is just in case it has anything to do with the way they’re organized on the colonies number four is the one that has brood in the flow frames and those flow frames are the third box from the bottom on the right so the activity at the landing board is normal keep in mind we have temperatures in the high 20s low 30s Fahrenheit still at night so my entry reducers are still on look at the activity on the upper entrance and then there’s the top box now this is the one that does not have brood in it and now we go to number four here and this is one, look, we have a deep the box with number four is the second deep so the third box up is the flow hive or the flow super and that’s the one with flow frames in it and that’s also the one that has now lots of brood being developed in those mechanized frames and then above that is a shallow super that also has honey in it already so lesson learned if you do not put the Queen excluder underneath your flow super it is possible that you could have the Queen up in your flow frames laying her eggs in those plastic cells for me it’s just a learning experience for you it could be catastrophic if you’re counting on getting honey from those flow frames and that is their purpose so I’m glad to share that with you and I’m also glad that now you have an opportunity to see that a queen can and will lay her eggs inside the plastic flow frames if there is no queen excluder beneath it thank you for watching and I hope you learned something through my demonstration here if you have a flow hive and a flow super make sure you put a queen excluder beneath it thanks for watching and I hope you’ll follow us as we do other honeybee videos

SciGirls 208: Bee Haven

SciGirls 208: Bee Haven


This is like, one of the coolest experiences
I have ever had. Bees play a major role
in pollinating our crops. We’re playing hide-and-seek
with the queen bee. Honey! Wow!
[SciGirls laugh] We’ll take this. (Izzie)
Major funding for “SciGirls” is provided by the National Science
Foundation– supporting education
and research across all fields
of science and engineering. The National
Science Foundation– where discoveries begin! (woman) Additional funding
provided by L’Oreal USA. For girls in science…
you can learn more at ForGirlsInScience.org And by PPG Industries
Foundation– committed to bringing positive
impact to our communities. (girls)
S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S (Izzie)
We need you (girls)
S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S (Izzie)
Come on! When I need help,
and I’ve got a question there’s a place
I go for inspiration Gotta get to the Web, check
the girls’ investigation What girls? (Izzie)
SciGirls! Whoo! (girls)
S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S (Izzie)
I need you! (girls)
S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S (Izzie)
Come on! You’ve gotta log on, post, upload, pitch in! Yeah! Wanna get inside a world
that’s fascinating? The time is right ’cause
SciGirls are waiting, (girls)
S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S (Izzie)
We need you! (girls)
S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S (Izzie)
SciGirls!! Um, is that a fruitcake? Oh, uh, yeah. It’s July. I know; surprisingly,
fruitcakes are very cheap this time of the year. What are you doing anyway? I’m lookin’
for a pet snack. Oh, something for Fang? Nope, I’m getting
a new pet. Oh, you talked
your mom into it? Well, not exactly. She said I could get a pet
if I keep it outside. That’s where this
comes in. Oh, what kind
of animal did you get? None yet, but I’m hoping
to use this steak to snag me a raccoon, or a bear. A bear would be
an awesome pet! Ho-ho, Jake! Why don’t we see
if the SciGirls have any ideas. On how to catch a bear? No! On what kind of outdoor pet
would be good for you. Let’s see, um… oh!
What about bees? What? Bees? That’s crazy talk. Who would be nuts enough to
want to have bees as a pet? Here beary, beary, beary. [chuckles] Here SciGirls… hello, here we go! Watch for the arrows!
They’re clues for the
“Pick’M,
Stick’M” game
on the website. (Briana)
Phoenix, it’s
pretty much desert. If you’re
to the weather at all, not used you’re going to be
very, very hot. I’m Briana, and I like to laugh,
just like to have fun. 1, 2, 3, SciGirls! For fun I like to read or draw
or just like listen to music. My name’s Monica, I’m 14,
and I live in Phoenix, Arizona. (Damaris)
I love being
with my friends and my family. I love playing basketball,
and I like to read. My name is Damaris. I’m a
people person, I always look
for the answer, and I’m not really satisfied
until I find it. (Briana)
Roosevelt Road
Growhouse is a
community garden. I think it’s a
really great idea to have more
gardening in
the city. Twist it, shake it. [laughs] I don’t know. (Damaris)
Every Sunday, the Growhouse has
volunteers that go work at the garden and the girls
and I, we decided to do it too. Can I put it in
since it was small? Yeah, sure, you can still
eat the leaves, you can eat the green part, even if
the root isn’t big enough. (Monica) Omayra is
a math professor at Arizona State University and
she was helping us volunteer. You’re going to do
one of these–push it in, then twist it up– we’re
trying to break up the soil. For health class
we made our first connection with the Growhouse, and we were
there learning about growing our own food
and eating healthy. (Omayra)
I love beets; these are
my most favorite vegetable. (Briana)
I’ve never tried them before.
(Monica) Me either. (man)
This looks great, good work! Well, this is great garden. Well, thank you. Kenny is the guy in charge of
this community garden, and he’s the guy who taught us
how to plant. You know the one thing
that we haven’t done that I’d really like to do? What? Get bees, yeah,
have a beehive. I know a professor at ASU
who maintains a bee lab, she might be able to help you
set up an urban beehive. Really?
(Omayra) Yeah,
right here at the Growhouse. Can we help? I would love for you to help. Awesome!
Great, let’s do it. All right! I’m bringing bees
to Growhouse. Gro? Yes… welcome. I’m Gro, or you can just call me
the bee queen. (Damaris) Gro is the bee queen. She is a bee researcher at
Arizona State University. So I hear you’re interested
in bees. (SciGirls) Yes! By our school we have
a community garden, and we were wondering if we
could keep a beehive there. You can, absolutely. People can keep bees
in the city? It’s a wonderful hobby. You need a home
for your bees. Gro helped us get started on our
beehive, which we got to paint. ♪
♪ So we painted the hive box
BioScience colors, which is purple and green. We all go to
BioScience High School, home of
the DoubleHelix Dragons. Roar! BioScience High School is
a school that prepares you for a career such as science,
medical, or engineering. (Damaris)
We had to have our bee suits
pinned and we had gloves, and it was like a big white suit
that had to be zipped up all around our neck
and everything. I’m excited;
I mean, I’m not really afraid
of them, but I feel safer. (Gro) Alright, so let’s go meet
the bees, are you ready?
(SciGirls) Yeah.
(Gro) All right. Hi, my name is Damaris, and not only am I a SciGirl, but I do
a lot of other things. This is our fashion show. (woman) Work it, Damaris! (Damaris)
My very first
fashion show at that. Another thing that’s really
important to me is the piano. This is
my family. Hello! Hello. Hi! [laughs] [laughs]
Thank you for watching. [drone of many bees buzzing] I think this is like, probably one of the coolest
experiences I have ever had. I mean, I totally love it
so far, it’s awesome. To meet bees, you need a couple
of things– a smoker, and a hive tool. And the smoke is
to calm them, so it’s like a little
forest fire that keeps, makes the bees think
of other things than us. So the first comb here
doesn’t have much bees, but it has a lot of honey! (Monica)
Inside the beehives,
there’s frames. Some of the frames have comb
or where they store the honey. Some other the frames
have unborn babies. (Gro)
Okay, so you see this one, we have different kinds of bees
in the hive. All of these are girls. (Damaris)
The different type
of bees in the hive, one is, of course,
the queen bee. She is bigger than everyone else
and lays all the babies. She is pretty much the leader. And here is actually a guy. Next are the drones,
which are the male bees. They’re kinda scarce
throughout the hive, but their main job is just to go out
and mate with other queens. Over here,
do you see this bee? It has pollen on her legs,
that’s a forager. She’s been out
collecting pollen. (Damaris)
Next there are the workers. They’re all women and they take
care of the babies and then there are the foragers,
which are also worker bees, but they specifically go out
and collect the food or pollen. (Gro)
These are doing much more
than just making honey. The pollen is often from crops. Every third bite of what we eat comes from crops
that bees pollinate. (Damaris)
Bees play a major role
in pollinating our crops. One of every third bite that we
have, we owe it to the bees, because of
pollinating everything
that we need to get our food. So bees are a lot more
than just honey. So we’re looking for a bee
with a white mark on her back. (Damaris) I found her!
(Gro) She’s the queen, oh, you have the queen,
we have the queen! (Briana)
Why does the queen
have a dot on her? (Gro)
Oh, we painted her;
it’s easier to tell her apart from the other bees.
(Briana) What’s she doing? (Gro)
Uh, the queen is looking
for a place to lay a new egg. So she needs to find a cell
where there’s no egg already, and she’ll lay an egg in there. (Damaris)
Do you know about how many eggs
she lays a day? (Gro)
A thousand, sometimes more. (Monica)
We can see a bee being born! (Damaris) Oh my gosh!
(Monica) Oh my gooossh! (Gro)
That’s a new bee. (Briana)
We saw a baby being born. It was really cute
because the little girl would go out
and then come back in. That’s so cute. (Gro)
You want to move this hive,
or “the colony,” over into your hive box. (Damaris)
We had to open up the hive box, and we were searching to make sure that we had a queen
in our hive. So we had to pull out
each individual frame and look for the queen bee. Hey, I think
this is her, right? Yeah, that’s her. (Gro)
Congratulations,
you have a queen! (Damaris)
Without the queen bee
the hive completely falls apart because she is the mother
of everyone and she is the one
that lays eggs. So the queen bee
is very important. Ta-da! [SciGirls laugh] This is beautiful;
take this, take this. Ummmm! That’s amazing. (Damaris)
The honey that we had, it was
like the greatest thing ever. It had so much more flavor than
just the honey that you get with the little bear bottle. We were told just stick
your finger in it, just slide, and so we did– it was great! In the back of the Growhouse,
there’s a very big open space and there is a perfect table
in the back of there, right by a beautiful vine,
and so we sat it there, ’cause the flowers on the vine
were purple, our box is purple–
it goes good. I’m like, really happy
with the fact that we contributed something new
to our community, especially bees–
that’s pretty different. (Briana) I hope the bees
actually come out. (Damaris) I guess we’ll
find out tomorrow. [buzzing] [Jake screams] Didn’t you watch
the SciGirls? Uh-huh. But bees are good! Yeah, I got that. So what’s the problem? (Jake)
Scared is the problem. You’re afraid of a bee,
but not of a bear? Do bees give bear hugs? No, they do not! Bear hugs are nice. Not when they’re
from actual bears! Bees are awesome
and so important! You see this flower? Only here because of bees! Honey– bees!
Watermelons– bees! Really? Maybe bees do have
socially redeeming values. Yeah, I can get into bees. I get to have my own queen!
[buzzing] Still, bears don’t swarm,
what if I get stung? Well, are you allergic? No, but these could be
mutant bees. They could be Hoboken bees. I bet those buggers
would be really mean! Go away! Hah!
Shoo! Go away, go away! Not helping! Ahhhh! I’m being attacked by
a mutant swarm of Hoboken bees. SciGirls, Jake really
needs some help here. [buzzing] (Omayra)
So how was your day yesterday? (Damaris) We had a lot of fun,
saw a baby bee being born.
(Omayra) Oh my gosh! (Monica)
Then Omayra came out and we
kinda showed her our beehives, and then we made a plan
to kind of figure out how many plants and food sources
are available for the bees. We want to look in the area
around the Growhouse, and we know that bees
tend to forage within a 3-kilometer radius
around their hive. But that’s a lot of area,
so let’s scale it down and look at a 1-kilometer area
around the Growhouse. We decided to see the diversity
of how many flowers, plants, trees there are and the number
of them for each block. I think it would be useful
if you girls used a chart, and you separate out
the residential blocks, the empty lot blocks,
the garden or park blocks and the industrial blocks, and
you look at the types of plants and you use that rating
from zero to 3. Our rating was between
zero to 3, and 3 meant that there was a lot
of varieties of plants, and zero meaning
that there was little to none. And you also look
at the number of plants, so that you collect these
2 types of data for each block. We’re going to count
each and every plant, or are we going
to estimate it? We’re going to
have to estimate. Counting each and every plant
would take us all day, maybe even all week.
You guys ready? Yeah! (Damaris)
We sampled 2 blocks
of each kind. There were residential,
industrial, park and garden, and empty lots. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 27, 8, 9. (Damaris)
The Growhouse flower beds
had too many flowers to count. So we measured a small section
of the flower bed, and then we counted how many
plants were in that little part, then we measured how big
the entire thing was and multiplied the two. So you think
that this residential block is very diverse,
and you’d rate it a 3 or it’s really not diverse at all
and you’d rate it a zero? I would say 3. Yeah, in comparison
to other blocks. (Briana) So we were counting
how many trees, bushes, plants, flowers, whatever
was there. (Damaris) Alright, from here,
all the trees back, that’s 54. For an empty lot, it has a lot
going on. (Briana) Yeah. What was surprising was
that for empty lots the diversity was close to zero because there was
only one type of plant. Hello ladies, how are you doin’? (Damaris)
Omayra helped us look
at our data and helped us kind of organize it
and put it all together. She helped us with some math–
her specialty. Did you get
some good data? We got some surprising data. Tell me about it. (Briana)
The residential average
for the number of plants was 1000 and 1.5.
(Omayra) Hm, that’s a lot. (Briana)
and the diverse was 2.75. A shocking one was empty,
it had 355 for the number and a diverse of .75. (Omayra) So not so diverse,
but still more plants
than you would expect. Yup. Yeah, it
beat parks and gardens. (Omayra) So empty lots have more
plants than business and industrial
blocks and parks and garden blocks. (Monica) The winner was by far
residential blocks. They had a lot more diversity
and number of plants. We’re going to use
this aerial satellite map to color in this map that has
the street names and everything. We took a map,
and we colored in the areas, the residential,
industrial, empty and so on. For the color-coding,
we went by the amount of plants and so residential got green, ’cause it was full
of a lot of plants, then after that, surprisingly,
was the empty lots. And so we colored that orange,
following the green color, and then industrial, we made
that like a peachish color. Last was the parks and garden; because they didn’t have a lot
of plants, we colored it gray. For the diversity
it got a 2.75, so we’re
going to put a big star. We put stars on the maps
for diversity. So like, for residential
there was a lot, so we put a big star on it. And then parks and gardens and industrial
actually got the medium size because they both
have the same diversity. And empty lots had
the smallest star because there was
little to no diversity. You know, in certain areas,
there’s like a lot of plants and then others
there’s not so much. I mean, I kinda feel
like maybe we could plant some more flowers
or stuff around. We wanted to get more plants
and flowers for the bees, because we feel that they are kind of limited
in certain areas. Well, what kind of plants
do you think we should pick? Like, do you think
it’ll be based on color? That led us back to Gro,
so we could figure out if they had a preference
for certain plants or colors. Hi, my name is Monica,
and not only am I a SciGirl, but I like to do a lot of other
things, come on, I’ll show you. This here is
what I have been painting. Of course, it’s not completed,
but it’s supposed to be a painting
from the downtown area. And here are my painting tools. I like reading books,
I have a lot to read from. This is my guitar. Well, that’s it for me, I have to go, so bye! Today we’re at the bee lab doing a color preference test
with Gro. To do a color test,
we need colors. For the test set-up
we have a yellow Petri dish
and a blue one. And in there I think it was about 65 milliliters
of sugar water. And we’re going to leave those
out for about 15 minutes, and we’re going to let
the bees fly around, and whichever one they land on
at first, we’re going to paint them the color dish
that they land on. And we’re going to record
if they stay faithful to that same color blue or if
they switch and go to yellow. You two will be putting
the actual mark on the bees. You would need to mark the bees
when they land and you just use
little sticks for that. We will need to
open up the paint, let the droplet color
on the stick, and you would just paint
the bee just behind its head. Just don’t paint her wings
or her head. (Briana)
Another blue, another blue. (Damaris) A blue is on yellow. (Monica)
Briana’s job was to mark them
with actual paint on their backs of the color that they visited
and to shout out if they came back to that color. Another bee returns
and another bee returns. (Damaris)
After the first
couple minutes or whatever, I kinda noticed they didn’t
really like the yellow. Can you mark her new for me?
(Monica) Yeah. (Damaris)
So I could kinda see
that they preferred the blue. (Monica) Time’s up.
[buzzer sounds] During the first 15 minutes
of the test, we found that 20 bees
went to the blue dish and 8 went to the yellow dish. Afterwards, we were
changing the location and we put the yellow dish where
the blue one was and vice versa. We wanted to see if they would
remain faithful to the color, or to the location. The second time
we didn’t paint at all, ’cause we weren’t marking
any more new bees, we just wanted to see the ones that were already previously
marked, where they would go. (Briana)
The bees, to me I think they found it more
important the color, because once we changed
the yellow over here, they all went back to the blue
over there. (Damaris)
So for the most part, the blues kept going to blue,
and yellows stayed with yellow. (Monica) Hi Gro!
(Gro) Hey, how did it go? (Monica) We actually just
finished. (Gro) Let’s have
a look at the data. (Monica)
For blue we had 20 new bees
coming into the blue Petri dish, and 52 of those blues
came back to their own color. And then a few yellows
strayed to the blue. And then after we changed
the location, a lot of the blues still came
back to its true color. (Gro)
Alright, so they stuck to it.
(Monica) Yup. Does the color
really matter? Bees are very adaptable,
they’re very flexible. They’re constantly looking
for new opportunities. So the most important thing
for bees is that they can find
something sweet, and I’m sure they can
in your garden. (Briana)
We decided to buy some plants
that we thought the bees might find attractive according
to the test we did. (Damaris)
Because we found out that
the bees might prefer blue, we were looking
for blue flowers. (Monica)
So what about these? (Damaris)
Whoop, one cool thing is,
I see some bees over here. We didn’t exactly find blue,
but we found purple. And at the store there were
already bees over it, so we could tell that the bees
would like them. And so we got some
lavender flowers. Yeah. We planted the flowers that
we bought by the fireplace. I think we’re good
with how deep it is. We just kind of dug in,
and we had to make sure it was wide enough and
deep enough for the plant. Then we just put it in,
and we covered it back up. (Kenny)
Come and get it,
honey-flavored ice cream. Okay! (Damaris)
We got to have honey ice cream,
which is pretty awesome. And then tragedy struck. This is good. I’m licking my fingers a lot. I took one lick and the whole
ice cream fell on the floor. Ice cream funeral. We had a little ice cream
funeral for it and everything, covered it up,
it was pretty funny. Cone cheer?
Don’t fall, don’t fall! (Monica)
We met up with Gro,
and we checked out beehive to see if our queen
was still there and if
our bees were progressing. (Damaris)
When we got over to the hive, the first thing we had to do
was smoke the bees. Okay. When we first opened it,
I noticed that there were
a lot more bees than before. Then we started
searching the frames
so we could find the queen. (Monica)
Can you guys see her?
(SciGirls) No. No. (Monica)
Can you guys spot her? (Gro)
We’re still fishing.
We’re queen seekers. We were playing hide-n-seek
with the queen bee. She would not
let us find her. (Briana)
Look, there she is,
there’s the queen! It took us a while, but we
found her and then we knew that the beehive was
still functioning. (Gro)
Oh, the bees have been useful. You see they have
started building? These are going to be new cells
for our baby bees or for honey. I was really shocked
because it’s been like, less than 4 days and they’re
already working on it. (Gro)
Congratulations, your hive is
happy and the queen is there. (SciGirls) Yea! (Damaris)
Thank you for everything Gro. It was such fun
doing this with you guys,
and keep me posted– you can always call the bee
queen if you get into trouble. All right, talk to you later. Thank you. (Damaris)
We decided to gather
our information and pictures and things and
put ’em kind of on a woodcut that would be outside, next to
our beehive at the Growhouse. (Briana)
We put a group picture of us,
pictures of a few bees, and then we put
our experiment that we did. We want people to know
the basics about the bees and the different
types of jobs they have
and like, random facts. All right! Yeah! This is our map, we went around,
and we calculated all the plants to see how diverse they were. This is our amazing photo, we
decided to title this “Buzzin’.” This is our color experiment, these are flyers that are
here at the Growhouse. And all of these
are random facts. All right, so this is
the beehive you guys will be taking care of,
it’s BioScience colors. We have “BHS” right here,
“Roar for the Dragon,” “Growhouse,”
“Kenny,” and our names. Omayra, Kenny, and Miss Krieger
our teacher from BioScience were at the presentation, and
we gave them their bee suits and the things that they would
need to take care of the hive. We’d actually like to show you
our presentation board, which is right
over there. Oh cool. We told them about some facts
and things that we learned. We wanted to see
what bees would prefer, and they preferred blue
over yellow. So we went around the blocks
and counted the plants. Did you find
that downtown Phoenix
was a good place for bees? Some areas
in downtown Phoenix were good, which is what made us want
to plant more for our bees. Miss Krieger wants
to incorporate the bees into a lesson plan next year. Really good. We had some honey
for our future bee troopers. They really enjoyed it. Me and the girls, we ate too,
it was pretty good. I’m just going to go
for seconds. [all laugh] The coolest thing for me
this week was that I got to be
so close to the bees. (Monica)
My favorite part of the week was
when we put on the suits and we went
to go check out the bees,
plus saw a baby bee being born. I feel like I had found
a new appreciation for bees, because I saw things
in a different way. People that are
afraid of them and running
and screaming from them, if they found out that we owe
a lot of our food to them, they would feel
a little different. Got your clues? Head on
over to the Web and play “Pick’M, Stick’M”
at pbskidsgo.org. Om… om… Hey look at you, you’re calm. I’m at one
with the bees. Plus I’ve named
all 500 of them. That’s Jakester, the third. O…kay. Once you name your pets,
they are yours. Hm, it looks good,
and your mom is happy? Yeah, you should taste the honey
we’re gettin’ outta that thing. Everything turned out great. I wanted one pet, I got a hive,
what could be bad? Uh, you not
getting rid of that steak. Really? Why?
[low, deep growl] (both) Bear!
Aaaaahh! What are you doing? Being crazy! Okay go! [SciGirls laugh and joke around] Whooo! Brake! We love biking
and we love ice cream. Eco-friendly ice cream maker
powered by your feet. We decided that if we
custom-built one, it’ll be more efficient and
better suited to our experiment. That is not ice cream.
Oh my gosh! It’s the future of ice cream
technology. A crime has been committed,
and it’s up to you to solve it. The mask for this camp is
missing. Urgent that we need to find it. You’re going to be doing the
testing on this evidence. Careful, careful, careful, we
need to preserve the evidence. It’s crunch time and we don’t
even know if we can find the mask.
SciGirls! (Izzie)
Major funding for “SciGirls” is provided by the National Science
Foundation– supporting education
and research across all fields
of science and engineering. The National
Science Foundation– where discoveries begin! (woman) Additional funding
provided by L’Oreal USA. For girls in science…
you can learn more at ForGirlsInScience.org And by PPG Industries
Foundation– committed to bringing positive
impact to our communities. Hey there! Hi! The SciGirls Website
is off the hook! You can set up a profile,
play games, create a page
for your science project, watch SciGirls videos,
and have fun! So come on– be a SciGirl
on pbskidsgo.org See you there! Bye! (girls) S-C-I-G-I-R-L-S CC–Armour Captioning & TPT