Slater – Wood Lice – Sow Bug – Pill Bug – Roly Poly – Woodlouse Insect | Short Documentary

Slater – Wood Lice – Sow Bug – Pill Bug – Roly Poly – Woodlouse Insect | Short Documentary


Living among the soil are slaters they are also known as woodlice, sowbugs, and pill bugs. Slaters are crustaceans that have adapted to living on land. They are related to aquatic and marine crabs, lobsters and prawns. They are scavengers feeding on decaying organic materials. Usually, they are considered beneficial although in recent times they have been considered as pests; among crops and pastures. Hey Guys, thanks for watching I hope you enjoyed the clip on slaters, if you did give us a thumbs up. Click the subscribe button so we can keep in touch and leave us a comment below. If you are a big fan of David Attenborough, like myself, please check out the links below in the description box. But for now take care and I will see you soon.

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look


Pill bugs…… roly polies….. potato bugs… whatever you want to call them, somehow there’s something less creepy about these guys than other insects. More loveable, or something. Maybe it’s because they’re not insects
at all. Pill bugs are actually crustaceans. They’re more closely related to shrimp and
lobsters than crickets or beetles. Pill bugs even taste like shellfish, if you
cook them right. Some adventurous foragers call them wood shrimp. As early as 300 million years ago, some intrepid
ancestor crawled out of the ocean, sensing there might be more to eat, or less competition,
on dry land.” But unlike lobsters, pillbugs can roll up
into a perfect little ball for protection. If you look closely you can see the evidence
of where these guys came from. Like their ocean-dwelling cousins, pill bugs
still use gills to breathe. True insects — like this cricket — use a
totally different system. See those tiny holes on this cricket’s abdomen? They’re called spiracles. They lead to a series of tubes that bring
fresh air directly to the insect’s cells. But pill bugs don’t have any of that. To survive on land, they had to adapt. Their gills, called pleopods, are modified
to work in air. Folds in the pleopod gills developed into
hollow branched structures, almost like tiny lungs. In a way, the pillbug is only halfway to becoming
a true land animal. Because… they’re still gills. They need to be kept moist in order to work. Which is why you usually find pill bugs in
moist places, like under damp, rotting logs. They can’t venture too far away. Sure, pill bugs look like the most ordinary
of bugs. But they’re much more than that: evidence
that over evolutionary time, species make big, life-changing leaps. And those stories are written on their bodies. Hey, while we’re on the subject of oddball
crustaceans… check out this episode about mantis shrimp. Their eyes see colors we can’t even
comprehend. Their punch is faster than Muhammad Ali’s. And while we have you: Subscribe. OK? Thank you! And see you next time.

ROLY POLY | Pillbugs aren’t bugs, and neither are a lot of other things for that matter

ROLY POLY | Pillbugs aren’t bugs, and neither are a lot of other things for that matter


hey guys it’s me I’m back in America now and guess what I made a friend I found this lady in my grandparents garden this is a roly poly or in my family we call these things roly polies although I know a lot of other people call them pill bugs but actually they aren’t bugs at all what they are is kind of cool so I thought I’d talk about it but instead of just telling you I thought I would show you how you can figure it out yourself so when you’re outside and you see something kind of small and crawly looking you can be pretty sure that it’s an arthropod arthropods have four basic types you’ve got your Flying type water type ground type and the burn it with fire type the best way to tell these four types apart is by counting how many legs they have insects always have three pairs of legs although there are some butterflies where it sort of looks like they only have two pairs but they do really have three and I’m pretty sure you know what a butterfly is anyway so I’m not going to worry about that spiders scorpions mites that whole nightmare fuel group they have six pairs of legs but the first two pairs are usually pretty different looking so it can seem like they only have four pairs next we have centipedes and millipedes which have a lot of legs that’s kind of their thing the numbers vary quite a bit but it’s always more than ten there is a type of millipede called a pill millipede which looks very similar to our friend here and it even rolls up just like a roly poly but it’s not a perfect sphere not to criticize but the rear end kind of sticks out a bit and these guys they have a butt ton of legs but if we flip our friend over you can see she only has seven pairs of legs which means by process of elimination that this is my crustacean yeah crustaceans have five or more pairs of legs usually under 10 and you can also tell that roly polies are crustaceans because they have gills inside and they like that damp dark soil where they can get a lot of moisture they’re basically land shrimp that crawled out of the water inter now living happily among us in the garden under flowerpots under rocks etc fun fact insects are also crustaceans but they crawled out onto land so long ago that a lot has changed for them since then so it can be a lot harder to tell where they came from anyway I named my friend shrimpy and if you’re wondering I can tell that she’s a lady because if you flip her over again sorry and look at this region right here you can see it’s sort of smooth looking whereas Mela Rolly pollies will have a little pointy bit not to get too explicit or anything um crustaceans are really cool they’ve got lots and lots of different forms like did you know that barnacles are also crustaceans they’re basically shrimp that glue themselves to rocks for their entire lives crazy anyway that’s all for today it’s really nice to be back in sunny sunny California I have officially graduated from into you and I’ll be moving to Massachusetts pretty soon where I’m going to get a PhD or try anyway a PhD in biology and I love it if you guys would come along for whatever adventures I have there so look here for occasional updates and I do mean occasional because as you probably guessed I’ve been pretty busy but when I have time I am going to make some more videos so look out for that and yeah thanks for watching guys see you next time bye

Organic Insect Control: Snails, Earwigs, Aphids, Woodlice & More

Organic Insect Control: Snails, Earwigs, Aphids, Woodlice & More


Hi I’m Tricia a California organic gardener My first vegetable garden ever I planted some curly spinach harvested it washed it three times made a
beautiful salad we all sat down out of the bowl crawled an earwig I was mortified and determined to get those critters early in the season from then on These young tender starts are like delectable morsels to earwigs and slugs and other crawling insects so a non invasive and effective way to
control these crawlies is to make periodic tours of your garden and pick off any that you might see if you have evidence that your plants are
being eaten but you’re not sure by what take a stroll of your garden at night and
you’ll find out who’s doing the damage You can also set out traps to catch sow bugs earwigs and slugs this slug saloon attracts them with a
bait that’s made of malted barley, rice, yeast
and sucrose harmless to humans but deadly to these
creatures if you’re problem persists you can put bait directly on the garden i like this “Sluggo Plus” because it kills
earwigs slugs and a whole bunch of other types of crawling insects its made out of iron phosphate a naturally
occurring soil element and spinosad which is derived from soil dwelling bacteria another option for destroying crawling
insects is diatomaceous earth this is made from a ground-up fossilized
material and it’s kind of like crawling through broken glass for the
insects it’s not effective if it gets wet so
don’t use it where you have overhead sprinklers So before Ginger moved in this was a pasture of tall grasses and I had a lot of grasshoppers eating my vegetables So I used Nolo bait which is a biological
control that kills grasshoppers Everyone knows how helpful ladybugs are
in controlling pests in the garden so make sure and plant plants that
attract them in fact heres one now What I have here is a little cocoon or egg case filled with two hundred praying mantid
eggs and when I was a little girl my Papa told me
that it was illegal to kill praying mantids and it probably should be because this beneficial insect will eat just about any pest you have in your garden I’m going to hang this little egg case right here on my grape vines and in a couple weeks they’re going to hatch and they’re
going to be hungry if you can’t wait for the beneficial
insects to take care of any problems with white flies, aphids, thrips the first line of defense is just to wash
the plant off with water It might be difficult for beneficial insects
to enter your greenhouse so a good alternative are these sticky traps
The yellow and blue color are attractive to different types of harmful pests simply hang the trap and expose the sticky side you can also attach lures to attract
and trap specific types of pets like cucumber beetles if your plants are still getting munched
there’s a variety of organic sprays that you can use for persistent pests one of them is insecticidal soaps these are made from potassium fatty
acids and they must be in contact in order to
kill They work best on soft bodied insects
like aphids, white flies, and thrips they’re relatively harmless to
beneficial insects like ladybug adults and bumble bees another category of organic sprays are oils and these smother the eggs and larva of pest
insects they also will control some soft bodied insects as well as some
scales and fungus Bacillus Thuringiensis commonly known as
bT is a biological control for caterpillars We have the Safer caterpillar killer
for home gardeners and the Dipel for commerical farmers The Neem tree is in the mahogany family and
its native to India, Pakistan and neighboring countries and they view it
as a wonder tree because of the oil that you can extract from it Neem oil is a broad spectrum insecticide
miticide and fungicide but you should use it only as a last
resort because it can kill your beneficial insects Neem also acts as a pest repellent so it will keep bugs out of your garden and of course read the label carefully follow directions to a T Wear your protective gear and usually
spraying less is better if you’re acommercial farmer make sure and check
with your county Ag department before spraying any of the commercial products So if you have any problem ID-ing what kind of pests are eating your plants just check out these pest ID cards
they’re great so here is to no more bugs in your
spinach salads and Grow Organic for Life!