STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Millipede vs Centipede!

Millipede vs Centipede!


– I’m Coyote Peterson, welcome
to the desert millipede versus the desert centipede. (upbeat adventure music) Venturing into the
nighttime desert is not for the faint of heart, as this cactus strewn ecosystem is laced with a plethora
of nocturnal predators. Whether it be
scorpions, spiders, that right there
is a black widow, solpugids, or vinegaroons, these arachnids are
certain to be on the prowl, as they use the
cover of darkness to silently hunt for their prey. Look at that. Does that thing not
look like an alien? All arachnids come
equipped with eight legs, and most are also armed
with a set of fangs or a venom injecting stinger. That is the most venomous
species of scorpion in the United States. And he’s on my hand. All right, this makes
me a little bit nervous. I wanna see if I can get
him to just sit still. However, if eight legs, fangs, and stingers aren’t
enough to scare you, Arizona’s Sonoran
Desert is also home to a subphylum of creatures with even more
legs, the myriapods, which consists of
centipedes and millipedes. At the end of the day, both of these animals do
their best to avoid humans, however, today we are going
to capture one of each so we can get them in
front of the cameras for an up close comparison. First, let’s talk about
the desert millipede. Now, millipede
means thousand feet. And each one of these
little body segments has two pairs of legs on it. Now there’s no way
that I’m going to get underneath this creature
and count its legs, but I can tell you from
it crawling across my arm, that there are a ton of
them tickling me right now. It feels like a bunch of
little tiny pieces of Velcro grabbing onto your arm hairs. Despite the name,
there isn’t actually a species of millipede
on the planet that has a thousand feet. On average they have around 400, with the record being 750, more than any other
animal in the world. These myriapods have
very poor eyesight. They have very
simple eyes up front, so they’re really using these
antenna to help them navigate through the environment. And you’ll see as he dances
up in the air like that, he’s basically looking
for what his next move is going to be. If he can’t feel anything
with those antenna, he’s kinda like, woah, woah, I’ve run out of road here. And until he bumps
into something that he can walk on, he’s just gonna stay
put until he can get those front legs planted. Now, the millipede doesn’t
have many predators, and that’s because
these little myriapods are actually poisonous. They do have glands that run
along the side of their body, and if they are really,
really threatened, they will secrete a
nasty orange fluid. And it absolutely stinks. I actually got it all over
my hands the other night. Now, if you get this
poison on your skin, all you need to do
is wash you hands with soap and water, and you’ll be just fine. Now I’m completely
comfortable with millipedes. They don’t bite. If it doesn’t bite, it
can crawl all over me all that it wants. But the centipede is a
whole different ball game. And we’re gonna get that
guy out in a second, and get a close look at that
venomous little desert dweller. The desert millipede is
virtually harmless to humans. And if you encounter
one in the wild, just admire it from
a safe distance. (breathes out) OK, now we’re
on to the part of the episode that I have been dreading. There is no good way to do this. You just have to plop
him out and go for it. All right, here we go, ready? Oh boy. Now he’s kinda like,
oh, I’m on the ground, and I’m on the move. Desert centipedes can
inflict a very painful and venomous bite, so I stress, never
attempt what I am doing. OK, there we go. Now that I have his
head under control, and more importantly,
those fangs, I feel a lot better
about this situation. Oh, look at how creepy that
little desert creature is. Now, what’s really interesting
is that the centipede means hundred feet. Each species of
centipede varies. There’s no way that this
one has a hundred feet, but as they continue to grow, and their body
segments elongate, they grow more legs. Now one major difference between the centipede and the millipede is that the centipede has
a very flattened body. This allows them to fit
into crevices between rocks, and allows them to
glide very quickly over the surface of the desert. Now, these are
voracious predators. They are out here right
now walking the washes and searching through the
rocks for other animals. They will eat bugs,
they will eat scorpions, they will eat lizards, and the ones that
grow to the size of the giant desert centipede, they will even take rodents. But the bite from a
centipede of even this size is gonna put you into
some incredible pain. That’s why I wanna be
as careful as possible while handling this myriapod. One really interesting
feature about all centipedes is that you see
the back end here? This rump? You have these two modified legs on the back end here which have little hooks in them. And this back end is
pretty much a false head. It’s the same color
as the head is. And these two little modified
feet on the back end here have hooks on them. So, let’s say you’re a predator, and you’re coming, and
you’re like, all right, I’m gonna get him, I’m gonna
bite his head right off. These little modified
feet go up in the air, boom, and you get pricked
with those little spikes, throws you off guard, the
centipede spins around, and that’s when you get a bite
from those venomous fangs. This is not a creature that
is very easy to consume. Centipede venom is not
considered deadly to humans, however, the pain has been
said to keep a full grown man on the ground and in
pain for several hours. Moral of the story, steer
clear of centipedes. I hope everybody
enjoyed this comparison. The desert centipede versus
the desert millipede. Both species are native
to the Sonoran Desert. And I’d suggest avoiding both because the
centipede is venomous and the millipede is poisonous. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. Both of these myriapods
play an important role in the ecosystem. And while they may be creepy and have a gazillion legs
as compared to you and me, always try to remember that they’re going to
use each and every one to run in the
opposite direction. If you thought that
comparison was cool, check out the alligator
snapping turtle versus the common
snapping turtle. And don’t forget subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Free Handling Bullet Ants?!

Free Handling Bullet Ants?!


– I’m going to
free-handle a bullet ant. – Oh, risky. Now you’re conquering
the bullet ant. – Well I do feel pretty
confident at this point that I’ve already taken a sting, it was a pretty bad sting. But, I’m pretty comfortable
just free-handling one of these ants. – Mark, are you ready? – Are you gonna do it?
– Is it possible? – Yeah.
– Ooh, ooh, ooh. – (Laughing) Be careful. (pounding jungle
music with drums) Well guys, it is
officially the end of 2016. I cannot believe
it, I’m still alive, gone through many crazy
episodes this past year. What I wanna do is to
actually bring the guys who are normally
behind the camera in front of the cameras with me. So Mark, Mario, come on
down here and join me. – [Mark] Woo, all right!
– Yeah. Ah!
– Mario, we’re on screen. (laughter and claps) – These guys, what a year, dude. – Yeah.
– My buddies right here. We could not bring you
guys all this content without these two guys
behind the camera. Now it’s been a wild year. It has been the year
of the bullet ant. – [Mark] Yeah it
has been actually. – And actually, I’ve
got one right here in this little container. – (Laughing) You brought one? – Yeah I did, and you know what? – Uh oh!
– What are you doing? – I’m going to
free-handle a bullet ant. – Oh, risky. Now you’re conquering
the bullet ant. – Look at that, well I
do feel pretty confident at this point, that I’ve
already taken a sting. It was a pretty bad sting. But, I’m pretty comfortable
just free-handling one of these ants.
– Mark, are you ready? – Is that possible?
– You gonna do it? You ready?
– Yeah, oh, oh, ooh. – Be careful.
(suspenseful drumbeats) – [Mark] I need a little help. – There you go.
– [Mario] There you go, Mark. – [Coyote] Look at that,
there’s the director of Brave Wilderness Shows
free-handling a bullet ant. A little nerve-wracking, huh? – A little bit.
– What’s that feel like? – [Mark] I try not to
think about it right now. – [Coyote] Now what
we need you to do. – [Mark] I’m trying to
stay as still as possible. – Is take a sting
and then present. – (laughing) Okay, I don’t
want to take your job, that’s your job. – [Coyote] Yeah, we already
cut, let’s do that again, Mark. – (Laughing) No, no. – [Coyote] All right,
let me get the ant back onto my hand,
okay there we go. – Woo!
(laughing) – Bullet ant back
in the container. Okay, let’s back it up. So the beginning
of the year started with the harvester ants.
– That’s right. – [Coyote] Then there
were the fire ants. – [Mark] That was bad,
that was a lot worse than we anticipated. – [Coyote] Yeah, the fire
ants were really, really bad. Then it went to
the alligator bite. – [Mark] Um, hm.
– That one was pretty gnarly. – [Mark] Yeah.
– Then it was. – [Mark] Leeches?
– The leeches, we did the leeches. There was the crab pinch. Then there was the
velvet ant sting. – [Mark] And the
tarantula hawk sting. – And the tarantula hawk sting, that was a rough one for me. And then we finally made
it here to Costa Rica where we faced the
bullet ant challenge, and that was crazy. The ant’s stinger actually
got lodged in my arm. I actually still have.
– You can still see it, yeah. – A scar right there.
– Right there. – Man, that was wild. And we’re at the end of our
Costa Rica trip right now and you may notice my
voice is pretty hoarse. – [Mark] Yeah,
we’ve been filming for the last 12 days straight. – 12 straight days
of power presenting in front of the camera. What are we coming
away with, 15 episodes? – 15 pieces, yeah. – 15 pieces of
content in 12 days. So looking back on
the whole year, Mario, which episode or location do
you think was your favorite? – Oh well, Alaska was such a
different environment for me. The animals are different,
the climate was different, everything about it. So I think that stands
out for me, Alaska, yeah. – Well definitely, I mean,
I think the craziest thing that happened to us in Alaska
was that bear encounter, where we ran into
that sow and her cubs on the side of river. I mean, talk about a real moment that you could never
plan to capture on camera that we got little
bits and pieces of and managed to put out that
episode, The Bear Scare. – Yeah I’ll never forget that. I remember hearing
you, that this is like, “Bear, bear.” And I’m like, “Am I getting
attacked by a bear?” (laughing) “Wait, is he getting
attacked by a bear?” – All right, so Mark what
was your favorite location or moment from this past year? – For me personally, it’s
actually unreleased video. You guys are gonna be
seeing it soon, the green and black poison frog has
been my favorite animal since I was nine years old. If Ms. Honeycutt’s out there,
I actually did a project in Science class on that frog. So getting to actually
be out here in Costa Rica and hold one, that’s
been a 23 year journey for that moment. So, for me that
was really special. So hopefully you guys
will like that episode, it’s gonna be coming soon,
but that’s my highlight. – Um hm, oh so many great
episodes are coming out of this trip here to Costa Rica. I probably have a favorite I
could pick out of this trip, but when I look back at
the year, I’d have to say that the wolverine
was my favorite. – [Mark] Um, hm, right, yeah. – As we expressed to you
guys in that episode, it has taken us so many
years to be able to get to Alaska, I got to
work with Steve Kroschel and get up close with
that amazing animal. It’s something I
will never forget and it was awesome. I mean, you talk about
our year on YouTube, the wolverine episode
premiered, trending as the number one video
the day after Thanksgiving. Which was amazing.
– Amazing. – A 30 minute video,
and that was you guys watching the video,
getting it to number one. I mean, we trended so
many times this past year and subscribers, all of you,
new members of the Coyote Pack. – Yeah.
– I mean Mark, what was the biggest day we had? – I think the velvet
ant sting day. – Yeah.
– I remember I was on a flight to Spain actually, and I was watching
our sub counter just
go ding, ding, ding. So, just so humbling that
that many people are jumping on board the Brave
Wilderness ship and watching all this great animal content. – And what was it? 342,000 new subscribers
in a single day? – In a single day. I think we got, there
was a million of you who joined in just a
period of three days. – Yeah, three days there
was 1.2 million new members of the Coyote Pack
in just three days. Now we do have some
cool stuff planned for you guys in 2017. First of all, we will
be traveling worldwide at this point. What’s our first location? – [Mark] We’re actually
going to be coming back to Costa Rica in January on
the west coast this time. So we’ll be bringing you
cool stuff from there. But what Mario and I are
really excited about, we’re going to Australia. So that’s.
– Oh man. Lots and lots of reptiles. – [Mark] Yeah,
it’s gonna be good. Lots of snakes, lots of lizards. – [Coyote] Lots of danger. – Lots of tide pools, all
kinds of cool, creepy crawlies to get in front of the camera.
– Yeah. – We’ve only explored
just one little part of the world so far.
– Yeah. – [Mario] I mean
the world is huge. – [Mark] North America. – [Mario] The animal
kingdom is huge. Like so many bizarre
creatures that we haven’t even come upon yet. – [Coyote] Um, hm.
– I’m excited. – Well I know, speaking
on behalf of myself and the entire crew,
both here in the field and in post production,
we couldn’t thank the audience more,
the Coyote Pack. You guys grow more and
more every single day. It inspires us to get
out here into the wild, take the risks that we
do, battling the elements of nature to get the
episodes right there in front of the lens,
and then eventually out to you guys on YouTube. And all I know is that
if we can come near to as close in 2017
as we did in 2016, it’s gonna be
another amazing year. You guys ready? – [Mario] Yeah.
– Let’s do it. – Let’s do it.
– All right. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you guys next year. – Woo!
– Woo, bullet ants! If you enjoyed our
end of the year video, make sure to go back and
watch my favorite episode of 2016, Phantom
of the Wilderness, featuring the wolverine. And don’t forget,
subscribe so you can join me and the crew on
our next location. No, no, no, no, no, no,
we’ve got meat and you, I need you to go this way. Go this way, okay I’ll
get behind the meat. (growling, crackling) (crashing pound, wolf howls) (birds chirp)

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

PINCHED! by a Giant Beetle!

PINCHED! by a Giant Beetle!


(playful music) – You guys see that? That’s a stag beetle. Right now I’m On
Location in Costa Rica, working on some of
my animal facts, because yes I do research
before I actually get on camera. I look over there at the balcony
railing, and what do I see. A giant stag beetle that must
have flown in last night, they’re attracted to lights, and he decided to make himself
a perch right over there. Now, I haven’t been bitten and stung by that many
things on this trip. I picked him up, and look
at that set of pinchers. And I said to myself, hmm, you know who would
love to see this? Everyone out there
in the coyote pack. I’m pretty curious as
to how hard this beetle can actually pinch. Now they don’t use those
pinchers to catch and kill prey, but they’re actually
used as defense and during mating displays
to attract the ladies. That is a mighty set of
pinchers right there. Let’s go for this. Are you ready? (adventurous music) Alright, so,
without further ado, let’s find how just how hard
the stag beetle can pinch. I’m going to let him
go for my pinky finger. Here we go, are you ready? I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to enter the
strike zone with a stag beetle. One… Two… Three. (pained gasp) Dang that hurt. – [Voiceover] Was it bad? – Yeah, he poked a little
hole in the top of my finger. And I think he popped a little
puncture on the other side. At least he didn’t pinch and, hold on, let’s try
it one more, ready? What I’m actually being chomped
by is a Mallodon Beetle, which is in the same
superfamily as the stag beetle, and with over 35,000 members, it’s tough to know
them all apart. – [Voiceover] Yeah, do
you want us to hold it? – [Voiceover] Be tight on him,
because he won’t expect it. – [Voiceover]
Alright, ready Coyote? What are we doing now? – Okay so now, I’m going to
be pinched by the stag beetle on my pinky finger,
of all places. – [Voiceover] How many times
have you been pinched already? – Four. – [Voiceover] Why are we
doing this a fifth time? – Because we haven’t
gotten the shot right. – [Voiceover] And why is that? – Because I’m scared
to get pinched again. (prolonged pained gasps) Can you see that? – [Voiceover] How was that bad? Was that really bad? Oh, yeah. He got you man. Good job Mario. (slow-motion pained gasps) – Well, I guess what we have
found out is the stag beetle… Has got quite the pinch! He popped holes in my pinky. Alright buddy, I know
that was a lot of stress, we’re going to let
you go now but, I guess we’ll add the stag
beetle to the list of creatures that have chomped, pinched,
stung, or mauled Coyote. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next location. (dramatic music) – [Voiceover] If you
thought getting pinched by the Mallodon
Beetle looked painful, check out my encounter
with the purple shore crab, and don’t forget, subscribe
to join me and the crew, on this season of
Breaking Trail.

KIDS REACT TO MOST PAINFUL INSECT STINGS (Brave Wilderness)

KIDS REACT TO MOST PAINFUL INSECT STINGS (Brave Wilderness)


– (children) Kids React to YouTube stars! This episode: Brave Wilderness! – I’m Coyote Peterson. – I’ve seen this guy. – (ecstatically) Oh my gosh,
it’s Coyote Peterson! – Oh, this is the video! Okay!
My brother showed this to me. – (Peterson) Today I’m gonna…
– I hate bugs. – (Peterson) …on the insect
sting pain index. And I’m going to be stung…
– He’s purposely getting stung. – (Peterson) I have a feeling
that this one is going to hurt. – Oh god.
– (Peterson) Oh boy. – Oh-ho. No, no, no, no, no. No, no, no, no, no! – (Peterson) …ranked on
the insect sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. – I like pain. – (Peterson) Well, I think
at this juncture, it is time for me
to actually take a sting. – No! – This guy’s crazy! He doesn’t
know what he’s doing. – (Peterson) And go. – R.I.P., dude. – Don’t do that. – I don’t want to see that. – I don’t want to see this! Oh my gosh! ♪ (suspenseful music) ♪ – Eww. – Look, it’s going… oh. Bam! – Aah! – Aah. Aah. Aah.
– (Peterson groaning in pain) (suppressed groans) (blows) Okay, let me get back here. – That must be painful. – (Peterson) It feels like
I’m getting stung over and over again.
– You can see his hand shaking. It’s like… – (Peterson) You can see the welt’s
starting to form on my arm. – This man is out of this world. – (Peterson) The reason
I was willing to take a sting from this insect was so that we could see
the effects of the venom. – Never do this. Never. – (gasps)
– (Peterson) Aah, my arm. – Oh my god. That huge swell,
oh my– that’s a huge swell. – (Peterson) Well, I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. – That looked really painful. – Oh my gosh! Why would he do that? – I’m glad he gave me history, but… I don’t want to see people
in pain. That’s not cool! – If the bullet ant is the grand finale in my quest to find the painful sting
in the insect kingdom… – Why does he do this?! – (Peterson) …the tarantula hawk
is definitely the last act. – Look at how big that thing– (wasp buzzing menacingly)
Ehh, no, no, no. – Oh god! Oh shoot, that’s so scary! – No, no, no, no. Please
chicken out. Please chicken out. – (Peterson) Now, they say that
the sting of the tarantula hawk is number two on
the insect sting pain index. – Why is he doing this? – (Peterson) It’s like being
stunned with a taser. And they say it puts you
into a state of paralysis for up to five minutes,
where all you can do is scream. – That sounds so bad. – (Peterson) …is scream. – He’s so stupid! – (Peterson) I’m Coyote Peterson.
– I don’t want to see this! This guy’s crazy! – (Peterson) And I’m about
to enter the sting zone with the tarantula hawk. – (crew member) Go for it. – (Peterson) One. – God, that’s huge. – (Peterson) Two. – Okay, I– aah! – No, god, no. I can’t watch.
I can’t look at it. – I don’t want to hear this.
Just tell me when it’s over. – (muffled) Oh! – No! No, I’m scared! I’m scared! I’m scared. I’m scare– aah.
– (Peterson) AAH! – Oh god! Oh god, oh god, oh god! – That looks VERY painful. – Why is he doing this?! – (crew member) You all right?
– (Peterson) Dah!! – Mark just says, “Are you okay?” No, he’s not okay! – (Peterson) I think I’m gonna cry. (manic chuckles) Coyote Peterson
doesn’t cry, though, right? – It’s okay to cry, dude! Oh my god, that thing was so huge. (Peterson groans) – (Mark) It looks like
your arm is swelling up. – He’s turning into the Hulk. – (Peterson) Aagh! Ugh!
Second wave of pain! – It’s almost painful to watch. Agh! – (Peterson) The sting from
the tarantula hawk is serious. – This is mad. He is mad. – (Peterson) That’s two
on the insect sting pain index. – What a man! – That was crazy. That was
exciting. That was thrilling. – You’re not showing me
another one, are you? – (Peterson) It is rumored
that just a single sting from this animal is so excruciating that it feels as if one has been shot…
– Yep. The bullet ant. – (Peterson) Two minutes away
from being stung by the insect that supposedly has the most
painful sting in the insect kingdom. I’m Coyote Peterson.
– And you’re going to die. – (Peterson) And I’m about to take on
the bullet ant challenge. Are you ready?
– (Mark) Let’s do it. – (Peterson) …the bullet ant
challenge. Are you ready? – (Mark) Let’s do it.
– Goodbye. – No. No.
– (Peterson) One. – No. No.
(Peterson exhales deeply) – (falls down) – (FBE) You okay?
– I fell back. Yeah, I fell back. – (shrieks) – How crazy is this guy? – (Peterson) Three. – Why is willing to do this? – Oh my gosh. This is crazy. – (Peterson) Dah! Ohh!
Oh, it’s stuck in my arm! Dah!
– D’oh! – (Peterson) Ohh!
– D’oh! D’oh my gosh. – (Peterson groaning) Stinger’s stuck in my arm! Look at that!
– (squeamishly) Ohh. (Peterson groaning)
– Oh my god. – Oh my god.
– (Peterson) Look at that! – You’re just getting more and more venom. – (Peterson) Okay,
it’s off, it’s off, it’s off. – (muffled scream)
– (Peterson) D’oh my gosh!! Oh my gosh!!
♪ (perilous music) ♪ – This is like the adult
Try Not to Look Away challenge. – (Peterson) …really bad! Oh my gosh, I think that has
the tarantula hawk topped. There is the sting insertion
point, right there. Oh my gosh! – I would not want to be him. – (Peterson groaning) It’s hot! Oh, I can feel the venom already!
– I want to call 911. – (Peterson) Ooh, I am
sweating bullets right now. It is humid, but my body is on fire. It’s been about…
– He’s actually sweating. – (Peterson) …since the sting,
and look at my arm. It feels like it was on fire
about up to my shoulder. – My gosh. I just want to watch more. – (Peterson) …thus far
on the insect sting pain index. – Oh my gosh! – He should have his own
show on Animal Planet. – (Peterson) There’s possibly
a more painful sting out there. The warrior wasp…
– Wha– the warrior wasp? – (Peterson) …may challenge
the bullet ant’s claim at the peak of the insect
sting pain index. Am I gonna be willing
to take on that challenge? – Did he do the wasp?
– (FBE) No. – Okay, phew. Phew! I don’t know if I could
handle more intense. – Now I’m scared of every single bug. – I wouldn’t think that someone
would go chasing after stings. I think someone would try to avoid stings. – This man is crazy! Why would he do that? He must be an alien. – He’s brave!! That’s why his channel’s
named Brave Wilderness. (clang!)
– (FBE) Truth! – (children) Question Time! – (FBE) So this is a series
by Coyote Peterson on the YouTube channel Brave Wilderness. So it’s intended to be an educational show informing the audience about what various creatures are capable of. So did you like it?
– No. You should never ever show me a bug video, ’cause I’m scared of all bugs. – No! I literally turned away. – No. Couldn’t you do something else? Why would you want go
and, like, get stung? – It’s a little scary. I don’t like seeing
the insects biting him. – I would say I liked it. It doesn’t really teach you much
to see how painful something is. But it’s kind of interesting
to see how bad it will be. – I know it’s bad to actually
want to watch someone in pain. But it’s just so thrilling. It makes your heart race. – It’s actually really
entertaining to watch. Sometimes he does adorable
videos like the ocelot. He found a little baby ocelot. And then it just went on his head,
went on his shoulder. It was adorable! – He likes to, like, play with other animals that are out in the wilderness and show us cool snakes and stuff and show us what to do
when you see a bear and stuff. He teaches us about animals. I mean, what’s not to like? – (FBE) Do you think that more people
would watch nature shows if all of the hosts hurt themselves? – Well, not all hosts
have to hurt themselves. – No, not necessarily. I don’t think they really need to do that: get attacked by a tiger for views. – He’s probably just doing this to get more subscribers or followers. – Some people just, like,
feed on people’s pain. – A lot of people are drawn into pain. Of course they would
definitely tune in more if he was getting hurt rather than just looking at the animal and stuff. – (FBE) Now that Coyote
has ended his quest to find the most painful insect sting, he’s continuing to make
more shows on the channel. So what types of animals or challenges
from the animal kingdom should he take on next?
– Getting hit by a rhinoceros. – Boxing with a kangaroo? – He should take on piranhas. He’s brave enough. – Put his face into an ant colony. A bullet ant colony. THAT would be pain. – Instead of stings, maybe like bites with the snapping turtle
and the baby alligator. – Take on black bears. Take on sharks.
Take on mountain lions. I really want to see him
take on a mountain lion. – (FBE) So finally, what would you do if we brought one of those
bullet ants out right now? – Okay. – You have one? – (scared) No, no, no. – No, no, no, no! – No, you wouldn’t.
You wouldn’t. I don’t believe it. – I’m scared, I’m scared. I’m scared. – Don’t show me a bug! – (FBE) We’re just kidding.
We don’t have anything. – Oh. Stop it!! – Aw, dang it. – I was really scared for a second. I thought you were gonna
put a bug on the table. – I feel so much better. Talking about the insects
is scary enough for me. – I wouldn’t believe you would
do that to a tiny little kid. I mean, maybe the teens. – Hey, guys. Thanks so much
for watching Kids React. – If you want to see more, subscribe! Don’t worry. We won’t bite. – Bye-bye! – Hey, guys. Kyle, a producer at FBE. Thanks so much for watching– (loud buzzing)
Whoa. Huh. Huh. Oh my– (gasping) Tarantula hawk!
(wasp buzzes) ♪ (theme music) ♪

Brain Freeze Challenge!

Brain Freeze Challenge!


– Oh, that hit me. That’s real bad.
That’s a bad bite. That’s a bad bite!
That was a bad bite. – Brain freeze! AGH! – [Mark] Don’t make me
laugh, it makes it worse! (Mark and Mario laughing) – So cold! (tropical jungle music) (guitar music) – Come with me. He thinks he’s
picking out his lunch. That’s not gonna be his lunch. – [Mark] There it is. Is that it? – [Mario] Yep. Original. Glorious Spam. Look
at that sandwich, it looks delicious,
don’t you think? Not so much. – [Mark] I want my Hawaiian ice. Alright so, easy access. – [Mark] Yep. – Peel it up. And a
little snack for Coyote. – [Mark] Gotta have
his lunch, right? – Yeah, he’s gotta eat the meat before he can have the desert. – [Mark] I agree. – Alright, let’s go. – [Mark] Alright. – Alright guys, so
Hawaii is famous for several different foods, But nothing more famous
than Hawaiian shaved ice. So today, what I’m
gonna do is try to eat as many cups of
shaved ice as I possibly can. Hope you guys are ready for
the brain freeze challenge. Oh look at this guys. Don’t feed the chickens. So right now, Mark and Mario are ordering my first
wave of shaved ice. This is actually
one eating challenge that I’m looking forward to. I absolutely love
Hawaiian shaved ice. – Uh oh. Here it comes. – [Coyote] Oh! The
first two! Here we go! – We have the local. – [Coyote] The local! – Strawberry, blue
vanilla, Li Hing Mui, and snow cap.
– Okay. – And piña colada is pineapple,
coconut, and snow caps. – [Mark] Thank you! – Alright, first
two. Here we go. Wow, those look incredible. – [Mark] Hold on, hold on,
hold on. Wait a second. – [Coyote] What? – [Mark] Those are for us. – [Girl] Here’s the third one. – [Coyote] Oh, this one’s mine. – [Girl] This is the Bomb. – Oh, the Bomb! – [Girl] Cherry on top,
root beer, and snow cap. – [Mark] Nope, nope, nope. Not yet, not yet, not yet. – What do you mean not yet? You gotta get shots
of them first? – [Mark] Mario and
I had our lunch and you haven’t eaten lunch yet. – [Coyote] This is my lunch. – [Mark] No, this is desert. – [Coyote] What? – [Mark] Clearly,
this is a desert. – [Coyote] I’d
consider it lunch. – [Mark] Um, how about that? Classic Hawaiian lunch. You can’t have your desert
until you eat your meat, right? – [Coyote] Spam? Glorious spam? Actually, I did know
that this is one of the most famous
foods here in Hawaii. And look at this little
Spam man inside of the can. You guys really
want me to eat Spam before I eat the shaved ice? – [Mark] Well, we’re
gonna eat these. – Well, what if I
puke from eating this? – I don’t think you’re
gonna puke, man. It’s– – You have to cook
it though, don’t you? – [Mark] No, no.
You can eat it raw. But it’s a Hawaiian delicacy,
just like pineapple. But it tastes like meat. Let’s go ahead and open this up. – Okay. I don’t know about this guys. – [Mark] It’s coming out. Holy!
– Oh my gosh. No, I’m not eating this. – [Mark] Alright well, our
Hawaiian ice is melting. – [Mario] Yeah man, hurry up. – Ugh. – [Mark] Wolf it down, man. We got melting ice here. – Pretty sure you’re
supposed to cook this. – [Mark] Eat, eat, eat. Come on. – Mhmm. – [Mark] I’m gonna sample this. No! No! – [Mario] Let me see,
how does it taste Mark? – Mmm.
– Good? – Pineapple. – This is awfully greasy. It’s like, salty Vaseline. – [Mario] Nope. More for me. – [Mark] Mmm, how
does that taste Mario? – [Mario] Really good. – [Mark] Mhmm. Yeah. (retching) Come on. At this rate, you’re
not getting any ice. – [Mario] Yeah, it’s
gonna melt, so… – Ugh.
(retching) – [Mark] Is it salty? Alright, if you
take one giant bite, I’ll let you have
some Hawaiian ice. – One big bite? – [Mark] One big bite and
I’ll let you start this one. So let’s see, there’s
your reward right there. One massive Hawaiian
sized bite of Spam. Come on. Get it down. (vomiting)
Oh no! (Mark laughing) Mario, he couldn’t eat the spam. What happened Mario? – Coyote just doesn’t
have the stomach. – I puked on the GoPro. – [Mark] Alright. Good
effort, good effort. So you don’t like Spam. – This wasn’t supposed
to be a puke video, guys. – [Mark] This one’s
called the Bomb. – This one is the Bomb. – [Mark] Or Da Bomb. – Mmm. So much better than Spam. Ah, that’s good. Mmm! My chest. – You having a heart attack? – It’s freezing up. – Is this the Spam? (laughs) – Mmm. Anybody getting
brain freeze yet? My chest is getting freeze. – Chest freeze? I think
that’s from the Spam, Mario. – A little too much
sodium for you, buddy. – (laughs) I think he’s
having a sodium heart attack. – How about your teeth?
Do your teeth hurt? – [Mark] No. – Come on. Let’s go. Alright, I think if
I take this down. – [Mark] Brain freeze? – Woo, my teeth! Nah. – It’s just really cold, I’m
not getting a brain freeze yet. – [Coyote] No brain freeze? – Not yet. I think it’s too hot out
here for a brain freeze. – It is hot out here. Really hot. (slurping) Mmm. That’s good. (Mario laughs) Alright. I think we’re
ready for round two. So which is this one? – [Girl] That is
mango, coconut, and– – [Mark] Ooh, that’s a good one. – This is lime, blue
raspberry, and grape. – [Mark] Ooh, that looks
like all you Mario. It’s got the coconut
on top, and everything. Oh, look at mine! – [Girl] This is rainbow. – I get the rainbow. It’s like the Hawaiian rainbow. Look at that. – [Coyote] Awesome. – [Mark] So whoever finishes
their Hawaiian ice first doesn’t have to
eat a bite of Spam. – Okay, I like that game. – [Mark] You like that? – Yeah, ready? One, two, three. Oh this one’s a lot harder. – Oh gosh. – Oh man. – [Mark] It’s really good. – I’m just gonna eat it. – Good tactic. – Oh this is bad. Uh oh. – Got a brain freeze? – Something’s happening. – Now a brain
freeze is caused by all of the arteries
that surround the outside of your
brain contracting. And they send
signals to your brain that this is too cold,
you need to slow down now! Or it’s only gonna get worse. And trust me, it does. I feel it the most
in my teeth though. And in your temples.
Teeth and the temples. – My face. I can barely talk. I don’t enjoy
shaved ice anymore. – How we doing? – [Mark] I’m halfway. – Can’t feel my lips. And actually, the way
to cure brain freeze is to actually just
press your tongue up against the
roof of your mouth, and the warmth from your tongue will warm up all of the
blood vessels and capillaries and will cause them to relax. – Hey guys. Look over
there. Look at that dog. – Hey! No cheating. – That was a dirty trick Mario. – What are you
guys talking about? You’ve got no proof. – Agh! That hit
me. That’s so bad. That was a bad bite.
That’s a bad bite. That was a bad bite. – Brain freeze! Agh! – [Mark] Don’t make me
laugh, it makes it worse. (Mark and Mario laughing) – So cold! I gotta go for
another rush, ready? I gotta power up. – [Mario] Mark won. – [Mark] Look at that.
Put them to shame. Put them to
absolute, Spam shame. – Ugh! – [Mark] You’re just like
turning into a spider monkey. – So cold! – [Mario] I don’t
know what’s happening. (Mark and Mario laughing) (slurping) – [Mark] Mario, you still
have to finish your food. – I can’t. – [Mark] You can do it. – You’re gonna have
to eat Spam, bro. (Mark laughing) Finished. Oh my gosh, my stomach
is freezing. Ugh! – [Mark] You know, I
know a way to warm it up. – [Coyote] No, I
ain’t eating Spam. – [Mark] Oh yeah, you lost. – No I didn’t. He
didn’t finish his. – [Mark] No, only the winner
doesn’t have to eat Spam. The two losers eat Spam. – I ain’t eating no more Spam. – [Mark] You’re gonna have
to eat a little bite of Spam, that was the deal. – All that’s coming back up. – [Mark] A bet’s a bet. – You guys wanna see what a
rainbow waterfall looks like. – [Mark] That counts. Yeah, mhmm. Your turn. – It’s about to be
a rainbow waterfall. – [Mario] Oh no. Here, wash it down with this. – I swallowed. – [Mark] Here, put that in. – Wash it down with that. (Mark laughing) – [Mark] That is a rainbow Spam. – I don’t think I can
eat anymore shaved ice. – Nah, see. This whole trip
we would finish a shoot and Coyote would be like, “let’s go get shaved ice!” Now you got it man. You got all
the shaved ice you can have. – We got one more
round, don’t we? – [Mark] Yep. One more round. – One more round. Alright guys, TV timeout. One more round coming. (upbeat relaxing music) Oooh. – [Girl] Liliko’i and coconut. And then a Caffeine
Monkey, coffee, and banana. – [Mark] Caffeine Monkey? Mario? – Alright, I think
I’m out of this round. It’s you and Coyote. – Yeah, there’s one
more coming out. – No, I think that’s it. – No, no, no. There’s
definitely one more. – I think there’s
one more coming. – These are the organic ones. These have all the fruits. This is like the healthy side. Gotta have these.
– Mmm. Smells good. Smells really good. Mario seems to think that he’s
not going to be getting one, but I think that he
is sorely mistaken. – Sunset, with mango. – [Mark] That one
has the mango, yeah! – Thank you! – Look at that one. – Oh man, my teeth hurt. – This one has caffeine in it. So it’s giving me like
a caffeine rush too. Mario, I wanna
try some of yours. – I think Coyote got
a major brain freeze. – [Mark] I got ice cream
in mine. What’s this? What’s this? I have ice cream. – You have ice cream?
– Mhmm. – That’s going to make
it harder for you to eat. Oh no, I have ice cream too. (dramatic music)
Oh no! This one’s actually really good. – Mmm, oh yeah. Ooh, the ice cream
is really cold. – My head hurts
so bad right now. It’s frozen. – [Mark] Mine’s pretty good. – Mine is too, I’m
trying to enjoy mine. – Mario, you didn’t
finish yours. Get back down there. – [Mario] Look who I’m
sitting next to, man. Maybe we should
just leave him to– – Delicious. – [Mario] It’s messier. – [Mark] Mario… (laughs) – Woo!
(loudly exhales) That’s a lot of
shaved ice, guys. – [Mark] Obviously
we had fun today, but Hawaiian shaved
ice is pretty amazing. – It is. Now, Wishing
Well Hawaiian shaved ice, here on the island of Hawaii
is absolutely phenomenal. If you guys can ever make
it here, try the shaved ice. There are nine different
flavors combinations, three of which are
completely organic. And I can tell you this much, if you’re gonna eat shaved ice, just take your time
and you won’t have to worry about brain freeze. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next location! – [Mark] Can brain
freeze kill you? – No, it can’t. If you thought
eating nine flavors of Hawaiian shaved
ice was entertaining, make sure to go back
and watch the episode where the crew
challenged me to eat one of the world’s stinkiest
fruits, the durian. And don’t forget, subscribe,
so you can join me and the crew on our next location! (bear roar)

HANDS get DESTROYED by Fire Ants!

HANDS get DESTROYED by Fire Ants!


– That’s just in case
anybody is wondering, a bottle of Coyote’s urine. – Yeah, but that’s my
own pee, so it’s okay. It’s okay if it’s your own pee. – No, it’s not. ♪ Fire ♪ ♪ A fire on the mountain ♪ – What’s going on, Coyote Pack? And welcome back to Base Camp, the not exactly adventurous
show, that we film here from our office in
Westerville, Ohio, where we dissect old videos and tell you exactly
how we made ’em. How are you guys feeling today? – I’m feeling great. Sunny day in the neighborhood, we got a good day
here in Columbus. Mario, how you feeling
about the sunshine? You’re used to it in Florida, but this is new for us.
– Yeah. – Today’s a great day
to be here in Base Camp, talking about adventures. – May not be an
outside adventure, but the inside adventures
can be just as fun and we have an awesome episode
planned for you guys today. But before we get into that, the Base Camp set is
really coming along and that’s because of you
guys out there watching. We asked you to send
in fan mail and boy, did you guys send in fan mail, didn’t they, Mark?
– Yeah, oh my goodness. So we got a call from the
post office the other day and they alerted us to the fact, that we are flooding
their mail rooms with all kinds of art
from around the world, so we did need to tell you
guys, keep up the good work. – Yes, the more fan
mail, the better and specifically artwork. Now today, we’re featuring
a letter from Kit Libby, now Kit, I did read your letter, you even wrote in
here, that you’re like, “You probably won’t
have time to read it,” I read all of the fan mail,
guys, believe it or not. But Kit also sent along
these amazing pictures, check that out.
– Wow, Kit is quite the artist.
– It’s a rat, – Whoa!
– it’s a cockroach, green tree frog, she’s even
got my favorite in here, the snapping turtle.
– Nice. – Clearly watches the videos, but I really wanted to focus on the Monarch butterfly,
– Nice. – which is Kit’s favorite
animal and Kit asked if we could do an episode
on Monarch butterflies. What do you guys think? – I think it’s a great idea. Mario, where should we do that? – We could go find
the migration routes of the Monarch butterflies.
– Hm-mm, yeah. – That would be pretty epic. Now, I don’t know when
we’ll get to do that, but we will put it
on the episode list. We’ve never done a
butterfly episode before, so I think it’d great
thing to feature. – Absolutely. – And the good news for me
is they don’t bite or sting. Alright, give me
those pictures back. – Hang on, I thought
we get to keep these. – Well you can have
them after the episode. I don’t want you to wrinkle
it during the taping. – You promise?
– I promise. – You heard that. – I know you, you’ll
put that in your pocket and you’ll wrinkle it up, we don’t wanna
wrinkle the artwork. Alright, guys, keep
sending in that artwork, we will keep featuring
different Coyote Pack members every week, sharing their art and encouraging you
guys to get artistic, when you’re not watching videos. So if you guys are ready, let’s plunge our hands into
a burning ring of fire ants. – Here we go.
– Oh! – [Coyote] You can see,
I’m already nervous, right from the beginning. I’m Coyote Peterson. This is a mountain of fire ants. Yes it is.
– Oh yeah. – I think we all know
where this is going. – [Mark] And there’s
your hands, pre-scars. – Well enough people had seen the harvester ant
video at this point to know that like,
oh, hands, ant mound, here we go.
Holy cow, that’s a lot of stings already! Argh! – Oh, Eeh.
– Hm-mm. – [Mark] This is already
bringing me back, man. – Oh yeah.
– what a bad idea this was. – Yeah, I warned ya.
– You did. – [Coyote] A lot of
people learned about
fire ants that day. – [Mark] We’re gonna talk
about that in a second, Mario. – [Mario] Yeah. – [Mark] Hold that right there. – Alright guys, so
when I was in Arizona, you saw me put my hands into
a mound of harvester ants. – [Mark] Not smart, not
something you wanna be doing. – I lasted 60 seconds. What’s funny is that
this is so far before a lot of these other
more painful stings, so you gotta keep in mind, that as we’re filming
the fire ants, like the bullet ant was so far
down the road at that point, like.
– Yeah. – We had not even really
seriously considered doing that. – No.
I’m sure that you’re looking at this pile of dirt,
thinking to yourselves, is that really an anthill?
– That’s interesting, – Yeah.
– so, these ant mounds are
all over in Florida. Mario, why don’t you tell
us a little bit about these. – Yeah, so fire ants are an
introduced species to the US and if you grow up in Florida,
you see one of those mounds, you know there’s trouble, okay? – Hm-mm.
– Hm-mm. – So they’re somewhat
inconspicuous, if you don’t know
what to look for. – Right.
– it just looks like a pile of sand.
– Yeah. – There’s no ants
on the outside. – Someone from Ohio, like these two guys,
– You guys. – we are walking
around sometimes in our sandals or bare
feet and we’re like, ooh, there’s some sand.
– I’m like no watch it. – Yeah.
– Yeah. – and you don’t know, ’cause there really aren’t
many ants around the mounds. – Sure, yeah, it’s
very deceiving, but
as you’re gonna see, once you pop a little hole, – [Coyote] Let’s see that, I
think it’s actually coming up. I promise you
there are thousands of these fiery little
ants beneath the surface. – [Mark] And are
there thousands. Mario, do you know about how
many ants live in a colony? – [Mario] Thousands. – [Coyote] Hundreds of
thousands, probably. – [Mario] Hundreds of thousands, yeah,
– Yeah. – [Coyote] ‘Cause it goes
deeper down in the ground too. Most people don’t realize, that just because we
disturbed that ant mound, they build those
mounds so quickly, that mound probably
would’ve been rebuilt by the next day.
– Absolutely, and once again, they are
invasive species, too. – [Mark] I imagine the
rain does a number. – [Coyote] Oh, yeah,
every time it rains, they probably flood out. Yeah, you have to imagine
that if you’re down in Florida and you’re on
vacation and thinking, “Oh, I’m gonna just
go out somewhere “and have a little picnic,” and you think to yourself, “Oh, look, this mound
is kind of sandy, “this might actually make
a good place to sit,” whoa, bad idea, these were
cool macro shots though, I mean, it’s tough
to really tell how small these creatures are, until you get, like, okay,
– Yeah, there you go. – There you go right there,
– let me get in a little bit, so you get a clear shot.
– that’s a great example. Like it was really hard to
hold on to one of these ants without, you know, not
wanting to injure them or anything like
that and you can see, if you would align these
things up vertically on the fingernail of a human, you could probably
pack five to eight ants on a single finger,
which is crazy. – Yeah, I’ll tell you what is
particularly impressive to me about fire ants, not only
what they did to you, but also the fact that
they’re able to sting, like they can actually
get through human skin, being so small. Mario, how is that
even possible? – Sure, well, they do
have a long stinger and you know, to Coyote’s
point, they’re small, but it’s numbers
that count, right? So unlike the harvester
ants, which are large and intimidating looking,
these guys are tiny – Hm-mm.
– and individually, you’re like, oh, that’s
not gonna do much harm, but they come at
you with a swarm. – Yeah.
– Yeah, with a force of swarm,
that’s like a tidal wave of fire and insanity
and dragons and chaos. Let’s keep rolling the video. – Oh no, Mario, I’ve
been stung by one or two and it’s still pretty bad.
– Yeah, it’ll still get ya. – [Mario] Yeah. – Now before I actually
go through with this. Here’s my arbitrary what
have become well known, selfie GoPro shots,
building suspense just before we get to it and I think we were just
learning at this point how to start to build that
suspense in these episodes to make the audience feel like, “Okay, we’re building
to that moment.” – Right. – And you can see here
might have that view and call that of what I learned, so back that up
just a touch there. Look at, yeah, look at, what I learned from
the harvester ants was tuck your pant
legs into your boots, roll up your sleeves tight, so that the ants can’t
get in your pants. – But you didn’t
learn your lesson about getting stung by ants. – Well no, but for the purpose
of the science experiment, I had to go through
with it, it was just let’s be a little more
intelligent about it this time around, trust me,
guys, fire ants in your pants would have been the
worst thing ever. – Ooh, for sure. – [Coyote] And
anyone who is stung. This not only
causes searing pain, but also causes the
sting zones to swell. – [Mark] Ooh, takes me back. This was just not smart. I was warning Coyote,
– Yeah, science at its finest. – Let’s talk about that,
– Okay. – real quick, so you know, here’s a little backstory,
that I think is important that everyone in the
Coyote Pack knows about, so Coyote–
– we, wait, we should call this
like Responsible Corner with Mark and Mario,
(laughing) where you guys talk about, Coyote’s like, I’m gonna
do this for science and you guys are like, “Let’s
talk about this responsibly,” – Yeah.
– Yeah. – so listen to these
two for a second. – Right, so everyone thinks
that maybe it’s Mario and I putting you up to these things, we actually ask him not to
do ’em, as a matter of fact, but in this circumstance,
it’s really interesting, because you don’t get
mosquito bite welts, so therefore I think you thought maybe you had some sort
of magical immunity to ant stings or
venom in general and I remember Mario
warning you, saying “Coyote, I’ve seen what happens, “when people get
swarmed by fire ants “and it is not
pretty, don’t do it,” and what did you say? – I said, I’m the ant man, didn’t you see the
harvester ant episode? I’m probably immune
to fire ant stings, yeah, they may sting me,
but nothing’s gonna happen, those little white pustular
things you were talking about, not me, buddy, don’t
get mosquito bite welts, don’t get bitten by deer flies,
horse flies, you name it, usually good to go, fire ants,
they’re tiny, not a problem. – Yeah, that’s right,
he was very confident and I kept giving
him the warnings, like dude, if you go
through with this, it’s not gonna be pretty.
– Mm, mm. – He insisted and well,
we’re gonna see the results. – Yeah, and not pretty is
an understatement, guys, just so you know. And boy, am I about to
get my fair share of them. You build yourself
up for these moments and then you–
– Oh, old GoPro. – [Coyote] Hm-mm, I think
that’s the Hero three, which was still encapsulated
inside of a plastic container, so we had to use your
camera to capture the audio, that was coming from this shot. – [Mark] Yeah, now you just
go do that by yourself, while Mario and I hang out. – Well, the Hero six
captures amazing audio. Don’t wanna go into
anaphylactic shock or anything, I did okay with the
harvester ants, so. – Pause it real quick.
– Okay. – So of course,
harvester ant venom and fire ant venom,
completely different. – Yep.
– Right? – Hm-mm. – And there’s a special
property in the fire ant venom, that’s gonna actually
give you some of those – Right,
– things, that you had. – So the harvester ants
that were just a swelling, whereas the fire ants were
going to attack my body completely differently. – Yeah, and we’re gonna see.
– Hm-mm. Alright, here we
go, are you ready? – [Mark] Alright,
go get in position, I’ll be there in a second.
– Alright, man. – [Coyote] Never under
any circumstances try to replicate what
you are about to witness. See, there’s a responsible
warning from me right there. – [Mark] Yeah,
don’t do this, guys. That’s a big one.
– Yeah, that’s a big mound. I’m about to enter
the strike zone with the fire ant,
are you guys ready? – Strike zone?
– It should have been the sting zone, I don’t know
what I was thinking there. – [Mario] I remember I told you, dude, why don’t
you put the GoPro in the mound itself.
– Hm-mm, yeah. – [Mark] Yeah,
look at it go boom. – Holy cow.
– Look at ’em swarming! – Let’s see that one
more time actually, I wanna go back to that. Look at the ant counter,
’cause we start the counter as soon as the GoPro
gets in position. – Right. – Look how quickly
the ants are on you. – [Mario] Yeah. – Boom,
– Fire ants, you’re– – three seconds,
boom, you’re covered. – Yeah, they’re voracious,
– Ow, ow, ow! – [Mario] way faster
than the harvester ants. – Much faster
– Yeah. – [Coyote] and they look
for soft spots in your skin, I feel like they can sense
in between the fingers was definitely the worst.
– Yep. – Guys, feel your skin in between your
fingers is much softer. Argh! At that point, I was like, man, we’ve only gone 20
seconds into this, I’ve gotta get my
hands out of here and I failed, I couldn’t
get it to 60 seconds, I mean, maybe I could have, but I could feel how bad
it was already getting. – I remember you going into
this being very confident, – Yeah, yeah.
– I think you did even mention at one point,
like, “Is 60 seconds enough? “Maybe I should do
like two minutes.” – He did say that.
– Yeah. – Well I thought
it was smaller ants and to one up the
harvester ants, ’cause harvester ants, I
did make it to 60 seconds and I was thinking, well,
everybody watching at home will be like, “Oh, come on, go
two minutes with fire ants.” Woo,
– Yeah. – Good thing I didn’t do that. – Deceiving, right,
’cause of the size? – Yeah. – [Mark] You alright? Made it 40 seconds, hey,
still very respectable. – Yeah.
– very respectable. – A lot of pain, oh,
oh, they’re still on me. Argh, my hands are
on fire right now. It was an interesting feeling. – So tell me some initial
thoughts right here, are you able to really
concentrate on the pain? Are you trying to not
concentrate on the pain? – I guess the
squeezing of my fists was more like just trying to contain and absorb
the pain in one spot, it was coming on like a
searing, that was building, so it was almost like imagine
putting your hands on a stove and turning them on and
as it begins to heat up, it’s getting more and
more and more painful as the onset takes hold. – Yeah.
– I know that feeling, I’ve been bit. – When a mound of fire
ants is disturbed, thousands of them instantly
swarm the invader. Man, if you were an
unsuspecting like lizard or frog or something like that, that has stumbled upon
a mound like this, you can see how
– Yeah. – it could kill an
animal very quickly. – Well, remember during
one of our croc segments, I told you fire ants actually
prey upon hatchlings, – Right.
– so they do kill – Hm-mm.
– large organisms. – Hm-mm. My pain tolerance
finally gave out as my brain was screaming, get your hands out
of that ant mound. I love these shots,
where the ants continue to go over the
lens of the GoPro, we sort of learned that through
the harvester ant episode, we were like, oh, we’ve
gotta get more GoPro shots of the ants moving
over the lens. – Now look, you can
kind of see here, – Yeah.
– You can see the welts forming, and I believe you thought
you were out of the woods, you were like, “That’s it?” – I was like, okay,
respect, fire ants, I have some respect, now
I at least have welts, this is more than a
mosquito’s ever done – Yeah.
– to me, and I was pretty much out
of the woods at this point. – Well, I told you that
the worst is yet to come. – Yeah. Let’s see what happens. It’s actually not too
bad at this point. Not too bad.
– At this point, this is like about
five minutes after having my hands in there,
so we cut for a second, you know, reset to get framed
up, get this outro shot. Now if you wanna know the
answer of which is worse, the harvester ants
or the fire ants. See, so this was
a good comparison. – [Mark] Yeah,
that’s a good shot. Look at the size difference,
– Hm-mm. – [Mark] it’s dramatic. – [Coyote] But
obviously the swarm was more impressive
with the fire ants. – Right.
– Right. – [Coyote] This is much
worse than harvester ants, argh! (laughing) Argh!
– It’s still good, see. – That’s my sasquatch
right there. – I think we may have
overdone it with the slo-mos. – No, it’s funny.
– You like it? – Yeah.
– I don’t know. – I don’t know, you guys tell
us, do you like the slo-mos? We haven’t used them in a while, but I thought they
were funny back then. – It cracks me up, I love ’em. – At the end of the day, the lesson that we’re
all taking away from this is that if you’re out in
nature and you’re exploring, always do your best to avoid
any and all ant mounds. – True statement.
– Look how happy you look right there. – [Coyote] Well, you know, I
seemed a little more jovial at this point, than I
probably should have been considering what is about
to happen to my hands. And for over a week, I
suffered through incredible– – Here it goes.
– Here it comes. – [Coyote] So that was a
little ways before we started– – There it is.
– Ooh! – There you go,
– look at that. – that’s the next morning. – So? – I was hideous, Mark, hideous. – Oh, I remember, I mean, I
have it burned into my memory, that morning, we went to
go get you for breakfast, Coyote, are you
ready for breakfast? The room was all dark
– Yeah. – and you’re like,
“Guys, I can’t,” and we’re like, why not? “My hands, look,” and this was what
you were covered in and we were like,
oh, my goodness. – I mean, it was
gross, I looked like I had contracted some
sort of crazy disease, I had to wear gloves
for six weeks, before the pustulates went away. Now, pause it for a second,
before we get to this next part, pause it, Mario, why do these
things form into putulates, what’s the science behind this? – Yeah, it’s a good question, you certainly didn’t get those from the harvester ant, right? So the venom of the fire ants
is actually not water soluble, so it doesn’t dissolve easily
throughout your system, so it actually stays at
the surface of your skin and creates those
little putulates, which as you realized
are very itchy and if you pop ’em, will
actually cause scarring. – Now I did pop some
of these putulates from just scratching, it
was so incredibly itchy and what I didn’t realize is
that they were gonna leave pock marks in my hands, which
then in turn became scars, which at this point are gone, I don’t have scars from
the fire ants anymore, but wow guys, it was
quite the aftermath. – And this was in the
summer, so you were wearing long-sleeved shirts
for weeks after this, I remember we would
go to the store and you’d go to
pay for something and you would roll
your sleeve up all over the tips
of your fingers, you were like, “Here you go,” – Yeah.
– and it was super weird, I remember I was like,
why are you doing this? And you would show people why. – Well, occasionally somebody,
like the grocery store, I’d go to buy a carton of milk and I’d give them my debit card and they’re like, “Oh, what
is, oh, what’s on your hand?” and I would be like,
hold on, let me explain and then I’d be like blah,
blah, blah, blah, blah, I do these bite and
sting things on YouTube and some people would be like, “Oh my gosh, you’re that guy!” I mean, this was real early, before we even had a million
subscribers on the channel, but they would be like, “Oh, I
guess that makes sense, ugh!” Like still, people
think it’s contageous, it’s not contagious, if
you’re stung by fire ants, you can’t like rub it on your
friend and be like, ha ha, now you’re gonna
have pustulates, it
doesn’t work like that, but they are very embarrassing. – Yeah. – The pustulates were
not the only gross thing about this video, you had
another trick up your sleeve or I should say
in your backpack, – That’s right.
– which was. – [Coyote] Do you know
the simplest remedy for neutralizing ant
stings in the field? If not, make sure
to click Watch Next. – Oh man.
– That’s, just in case anybody
is wondering, a bottle of Coyote’s urine. – Yeah, but that’s my
own pee, so it’s okay, it’s okay if it’s your own pee. – No, it’s not.
– Why not? – Gross.
– No. – Guys, that is gross, okay. – Well, there is
some science to this, is there not,
wildlife biologist? – As gross as it
seems and it is gross, there is some science to it,
urine and vinegar, for example, help neutralize
venoms and stings. – Vinegar, why did
you not bring vinegar? – There’s nothing
entertaining about vinegar, people want to see pee
being dumped on your hand. – Is that what you
guys wanna see? – I figured it would
work and this episode, the aftermath became
extremely successful, I mean, you had that
great thumbnail, that said 100% Pee
and gazillions of
people clicked on it. – Yeah, but are you
encouraging people to do that? – Well, in a worst
case scenario, if you stumble upon a fire
mound and you get stung, the best thing to do is
pee on it and in honesty, it did neutralize a lot of
the pain right from the start. Now here’s the backstory
on the pee, right, I did read about this
and that morning, I drank a bunch of
orange juice, right, so it was highly acidic
– Ugh! – and I could also make my pee a really nice, perfect,
pee yellow color, so it was hot pee
going into the bottle, then I put it in my backpack and walked around the
Everglades all day, so it heated up even more, so it was hot pee going
in, hot pee coming out and trust me, you
could smell it, couldn’t you, Mark?
– Oh, yeah. You know, in all actuality, I thought you were pulling
our leg on this one, I thought you had filled
up a water bottle, put a little bit of food
coloring, you’re like, “Oh guys, I’m gonna
pour pee on my arms,” so I made you open it,
– Yeah. – and I could smell
it immediately. – Well, I thought
it was apple juice and I was about to drink it. – That sounds like a
you problem, buddy. But let’s put it this way,
for me, it was a Godsend, because it immediately
neutralized all the burning in my hands,
but did it stop the pustulates? Not so much, so basically
I got two hands full of pee and no real, ultimate payoff.
– Yeah. – And you got to ride back
in the trunk of the truck. – Right, yeah,
– Yeah, I did. – he was not allowed to
ride up front with us. So I’ve been counting
and I believe there are three main
takeaways from this video, number one, apparently pee can neutralize the sting
of fire ants, gross, number two, look out for those
sand mounds in Florida, guys, those aren’t sand,
those are fire ants and number three,
Coyote Peterson is not immune to insect venom, right?
– Right. – Are you willing
to admit that now? – I still get pustulates
from fire ant stings, as will you.
(laughing) – And can I add in number four? – Sure. – I told you so.
– Ohh! – In all fairness, he’s right, anyone that’s stung by fire
ants will get pustulates, but what this little
science experiment did was educate a lot of people,
in fact, millions of people about what to look for
in the environment, when it comes to
avoiding fire ants and of course, if you’re stung, what to do to help
prevent some of that pain, what it also did for
us was begin to tee up the next rungs of the
insect sting pain index. Now, believe it or
not, the fire ant, for a small and mighty as it is, only ranks at about
a two on the scale, so that means we got
a long way to go, before we ultimately
hit the bullet ant. But the Coyote Pack
was cheering us on and they said, “Well, Coyote,
how about the cow killer?” Sure enough, that’s kind
of what came up next, but we won’t talk about
that in this episode, instead we’ll just
encourage you guys not to pee on each other, okay, it’s probably a good,
after school message or something like
that, isn’t it? – Sure. (laughs)
– Don’t, don’t. – Unless of course,
you’re stung by fire ants, right, maybe?
– Oh! – What if you
didn’t have to pee, would you have
allowed Mark to do it? – Let’s just wrap this up.
– That’s what I’m saying, – It’s time to end this one. – Let’s just go to the
outro at this point. I’m Coyote Peterson. – I’m Mark Laivins. – I’m Mario Aldecoa. – Be brave, – Stay wild.
– Stay wild. – We’ll see ya on the
next Base Camp adventure. – I gotta go pee. – You didn’t pee on yourself
on the other stings, did you? – I peed on myself
earlier by accident. Plunging my hands
into a burning ring of fire ants was
a horrible idea, but a good idea would be going
back to watch this episode, so you can see what happens, when I was swarmed by the
colony and stung over 300 times and don’t forget,
subscribe so you can join me and the crew on our
next big adventure. (light jungle music)