Termites Glendale AZ – First Inspection – Pest Control

Termites Glendale AZ – First Inspection – Pest Control


Pest Control in
Glendale First Inspection Glendale’s top choice for pest control is
First Inspection. For over 15 years First Inspection Termite & Pest Management has been
helping people just like you solve their Glendale pest control problems.  Exterminating pests
of all kinds from termites, roaches, ants and scorpions to rats, mice, and pigeons!

Have Bed Bugs, Carpenter Ants, Other Insects or Rodents? | Advantage Pest Control Inc.


Are bedbugs, carpenter ants, other insects
or rodents giving you a hard time? Advantage Pest Control is a forward thinking
company that puts an end to your pest problems. A family owned and operated business, we have
over 50 years of collective experience in the pest control business.
How are we different from other pest control companies?
We provide our customers with highly personalized service. We offer competitive guarantees and
pricing, and our environmentally responsible procedures are designed around children and
pets, as well as the highest health and safety standards needed for commercial establishments.
We respect you, your family, your home, possessions and time. We respect your business and customers.
Need discrete professional service? We arrive in unmarked vehicles.
More so, all of our technicians are fully licensed and skilled professionals who look
for cause and prevention, as well as elimination. Here at Advantage Pest Control we actively
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A Real Alien Invasion Is Coming to a Palm Tree Near You | Deep Look

A Real Alien Invasion Is Coming to a Palm Tree Near You | Deep Look


Aah, Southern California. Y’know, the whole “surf’s up, Tinseltown,
sun-soaked glamour” thing? Too bad this idyllic landscape is mostly make-believe. Take the palm trees. They’re not even real trees. They’re more closely related to grass. And they’re imported. Like this Canary Island date palm. It came halfway around the world to be one
of the more dazzling stars in the landscape. But this Hollywood success story is turning
into a horror movie. This little monster is the South American
palm weevil. Scientists first found it in San Diego in
2011. Weevils are just beetles… with snouts. This female uses hers as a drill, to get at
the palm’s apical meristem. It’s a bowl of juicy goodness at the top,
where the leaves sprout. She lays her eggs down in those tunnels. And her spawn eat the palm from the inside
out… starting with its heart. That’s right; it’s the same stuff you
can get at the supermarket. They’ll turn this palm’s healthy flesh
into a rotting mess that smells like a dumpster in the sun. Once they’re big enough, the larvae will
spin cigar-shaped cocoons from the leftover fibers they can’t eat. As the trees’ fronds starve and die, the
larvae hang out and gestate, morphing into pupae, and… Ew, that’s just, oh man… That’s gross. As adults, they burst out, take flight and
seek out a new host… leaving behind the dying, hollow shell of a once majestic palm. Mark Hoddle, at UC Riverside, is tracking
the weevil infestation. He puts them on a kind of aerial treadmill
in his lab to test their stamina. He’s trying to figure out how they got here,
whether they hitched a ride on imported palms, or made the trip themselves. Turns out they can fly up to 15 miles a day,
enough to hopscotch from palm to palm on their own. The only way to stop them: treat every palm
tree in their path with pesticides before the weevils get there. That’ll be tough to do. So these particular botanical icons could
be on the fast track to being just another Hollywood has-been. These weevils are pretty gnarly. So we asked Anna Rothschild from Gross Science
to do those animations for us. Thanks, Anna! ANNA: You’re welcome! It’s my pleasure. I love gross stuff. LAUREN: So there is one other way to manage
these larvae, sort of a biological control, which people do in some places, like Thailand,
Peru and Ghana. ANNA: Entomophagy! LAUREN: Eating bugs. Mmm. Tasty. ANNA: So hop over to my channel for a whole
episode about it. LAUREN: And thanks for watching this Deep
Look.

Pest Control Mesa AZ – (480) 778-1480 – Termites

Pest Control Mesa AZ – (480) 778-1480 – Termites


Pest Control in Mesa First Inspection Looking for termite
and pest control in Mesa? First Inspection
is your number one choice in exterminators. You can count on the professional and courteous service provided by the staff at First Inspection Termite and Pest Management. Our 4D Barrier Pest Defense System protects you and your home against common household pests like ants, scorpions, spiders, roaches, earwigs, silverfish, crickets, and more.

Does Bug Repellent Work on Bed Bugs – Bulwark Exterminating


I’m Thomas Ballantyne with Bulwark
Exterminating. This is A.J. Richards with K-9 Bed Bug Inspectors. Yes. And it s K-9BedBugInspectors.com.
We have in front of us live bed bugs. inspected yesterday.
A.J. actually does inspections for bed bugs with his dogs. His dogs have been trained
to sniff out bed bugs. He hasn’t been fed for two or three
weeks, and you’ve got to keep him alive so you can continue to train your dogs. Yep.
Yep. That’s what all these little vials are for. So, at any rate, I know when you go into
these houses, you’ve got to be a little freaked out, you know, thinking you might be able
to pick some of these up with your shoes Yeah. or what not. Yeah, always, always. So, I mean,
I’ve got to be very careful, not only myself, but my dogs Right. because they hide in their
fur, that kind of thing. So, we’ve got to be real cautious that we don’t take them
home. I’m, I’m, I can tell you that my wife wouldn’t
be satisfied with living conditions if I brought these guys to the house. *Laughs.*
You don t want to do a video on how fast a home gets infested. Right. So, in my infinite
wisdom, I decided to recommend to A.J. that he protect himself. And I believe this will
do it. This is bug repellent. Nothing fancy, but Over the counter, typical stuff. This one
doesn’t have any DEET in it. This is a fragrance-free, Picaridin is the active ingredient. So, what
We’re going to do, since this guyís ready to feed, typically if you put him on your
arm, he’d immediately begin to feed, Iím going
to spray my arm down with this, let it dry, and then we’re going to put it on my arm
and see if he actually will try to feed.
so we re going to put him right there, and he should go right to it. So, if he keeps
moving, then he’s probably trying to avoid the spray, I would say, because anytime I’ve
done it, instantly. And we’ll see on your other arm if that holds true. Yeah, he’s
not biting. Oh, oh! Oh, just kidding. *Laughs*
Nothing. Actually, when he bites, you can’t even feel it, right? Because they inject
their Right, the saliva on the tip of their little sucker has a little anticoagulant,
so the blood flows freely and an anesthetic so you don t feel it. Oooh, it kind of tickles
actually. Yeah. But, uh, yeah, it looks like he s trying to avoid, avoid your arm. Shall
we see what happens on the other one? Yeah. I, I’m pretty happy with not being bitten
right now, so speculation would be that they’re just avoiding it. Okay.
I really don’t want to do this right now. I really don’t want a little vampire stuck
in my arm. Look at that, dude. There you go. Ah! Seriously. Oh! Straight to eating. Straight
to eating. Uh! Okay, you can take him off now. Ah! You can’t even feel him. You got
I know! I know! Man, I just don’t like him sitting there. Thomas, you’ve got to let
him fill up.
No, look at that dude, this is gross! You Can’t, just think, its like a mosquito,
No! Yeah. You’ve got to let it I don’t like
mosquitoes. I’ll squash it right now. Can I slap it real
quick? No, I need him. Are you done? Okay. Yeah, I’m done. Dude, I was done five seconds
ago. Ah, come on! Thanks. That was pretty nasty. I didn’t like having that on my arm
one bit. I noticed. Alright, at any rate, I’m a happy camper. Go buy some
today. I think that’s a wrap. See you guys. That’s a wrap.
Check back in sometime.

Q&A – What is this insect?

Q&A – What is this insect?


“Can you identify
this flying insect?” And this is from Paul as you
can see there on the screen. Mr. Paul, this would be a
parasitoid wasp, alright. Very common in the garden,
Lee, as you well know. The thing about them is this. They have a unique
shaped abdomen. – (Lee)
You’re right. – Which is how you can identify
them as a parasitoid wasp. And of course, they
actually lay eggs either on or within their host. So it’s actually
beneficial, right? – That’s correct. – Don’t you think so? – They’re great to
have in the garden. – Yeah, and if you want to
have them in your garden, guess what you have to do? Not spray insecticides. – (Lee)
Correct. – ‘Cause if you sprayed
insecticide then the parasitoid wasp
is not gonna be there. But if you have some
good flowers there, some nice flowers,
some good blooms, they’ll come and they’ll help you
out in the garden. – They’re a good insect. – So Mr. Paul,
there you have it. A parasitoid wasp
is what that is. It’s our friend in the garden.

Why Do Stink Bugs Stink?

Why Do Stink Bugs Stink?


[♪♩INTRO] If you’ve ever made the mistake of squishing
a stink bug, you know exactly how they earned that name. If you haven’t, might I suggest keeping
it that way? Stink bugs give off an awful smell when they’re
attacked or squashed. It’s a defense mechanism… and a pretty
powerful one. There are several species of stink bugs, which
together make up the family Pentatomidae. But the most common type is the brown marmorated
stink bug, an otherwise banal, penny-sized insect that’s native to Asia, but has invaded
all over the world. Some call them “shield bugs” because of
their distinct trapezoidal shape. The hardened shell of their broad bodies acts
as a defensive armor, protecting them from predators and the elements. But their most recognizable defense is that
unmistakable odor — something like a cross between cilantro and skunk. The smell comes from a waxy liquid that contains
aldehydes, compounds that have a central carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen and single-bonded
to a hydrogen. They also tend to be very smelly. A common one is formaldehyde, which is used
for preserving tissues. If you’ve ever hung out in the back rooms
of a museum or biology lab, you might be familiar with that particular stench. But aldehyde aromas can also be found in your
kitchen, since they give some foods their smells — including, you guessed it, cilantro. The aldehydes found in stink bugs are contained
in specialized scent glands on the bottom side of the animals’ thorax, or middle body
part. And they’re highly concentrated, so even
a little bit causes a big stink very quickly. Some research suggests these aldehydes also
have antifungal and antibacterial properties, so they may be helping stink bugs fight diseases
at the same time. But as anyone who’s been sprayed by a skunk
can tell you, making a stink is a pretty good defense mechanism. So it’s not surprising that these bugs don’t
seem to have many natural predators. That’s what allowed them to go global—and
become a huge pest. They’re known to eat more than a hundred
types of plants, including valuable crops like apples, corn, and soybeans. In 2010, it was estimated that the mid-Atlantic
states in the US lost about $37 million from damages to apples alone. So finding ways to control their population
is important for agriculture. But they’re not just bugging farmers. When colder weather rolls in, stink bugs look
for a comfy place to over-winter—like your home. When one finds a cozy spot, it releases pheromones
that encourage others to join it. Other than offending your nose, stink bugs
are pretty harmless to humans. But if you don’t want them to snuggle into
your house for the winter, it’s best to keep your windows and doors sealed tight. If some get in anyway, whatever you do, just
don’t squish them unless your nose is prepared! Thanks for asking, and thanks as always to
our patrons on Patreon. If you want to suggest questions like this
for us to tackle, as well as gain access to a suite of awesome rewards, you can head over
to Patreon.com/SciShow. [♪♩OUTRO]

Houston Pest Control – Service Call  713-956-7822 ~ Houston Pest Control – Termites ~ Bugs – Rodents

Houston Pest Control – Service Call 713-956-7822 ~ Houston Pest Control – Termites ~ Bugs – Rodents


Houston Pest Control – http://www.technicalpestservices.com/
– Houston Pest Control – Call (713) 956-7822 Houston Pest Control ~ Termite Inspection
~ Exterminators The whole world is trying to go “Green”, in
fashion or another, and Houston Termite Control can be just as green if you want to take that
avenue. There are a couple of ways to kill wood eating insects, and the man made version
of the chemicals are just as effective, and really do not produce any long half life,
compared to a plastic diaper in a landfill. Pest control Houston service normally use
pre-made bait and poison combinations that are highly effect at what they do, and that
is to kill termites’ dead. Green Peace may be screaming “murderers”, but you let a Houston
homeowner decide between letting a carpenter ant, or termite chew on their home, or get
rid of them, guess what the answer will be in the end. Boric acid is the best natural or “organic”
method of getting rid of termites, and it is precisely the chemical that they use when
pre-treating lumber before it goes into the construction of a home or business. Boric
acid is also known for its fire prevention measures when used with wood as well. People
have been killing roaches with borates since the early 1920s, and if you are old enough,
you may remember seeing your parents by roach tables, or cockroach powder at hardware store
to kill them. This is chemical is from the earth and is
dug out of the desert in California, and for it to kill roaches it must first be mixed
with propylene glycol, a form of anti-freeze that is less toxic than what goes in today’s
modern automobile. It is then applied to the wood, and when it soaks into the fibers, it
creates a barrier of protection. The prevention of dry rotting in lumber can be attributed
to this solution as well. This acid is used in hundreds of products, and is safe for humans,
as there is even a home remedy for washing one’s eyes with the same chemical. Houston Pest Control Sure, you can go the organic method, but you
will also be missing out on the important part of termite prevention and treatment,
that the professional exterminator has from his or her experience. They know exactly where
to layout baits, and poison, and will see hard to notice areas where infestation may
be taking place on your property currently. Since your home is usually the biggest monetary
investment you will ever make it might be wise to preserve all the structures on your
land for the mere fact that will it will help maintain the value of your property. Technical Pest Services
4514 Katy Freeway Houston, TX 77007-2310
(713) 956-7822 ‎ http://www.technicalpestservices.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLIdnn1TjHk All Major Credit Cards Accepted ~ Cash ~ Check
Commercial and Residential Exterminators and Termite Control Houston Pest Control