The Jagged Ambush Bug – Secret Killer

The Jagged Ambush Bug – Secret Killer


Hey you guys doing? Chris Egnoto here, and you are watching Nature
Now! So, I know it’s the winter months, but I still
have some warmer weather topics to share with you guys. So without farther ado, here’s a cool little
creature I am sure will impress you. Let’s get started. Picture this: You are taking a slow and quiet
stroll through your local park. It’s a warm September afternoon accompanied
by a soft breeze, carrying with it the songs of some bird who’s name you do not know,
but his song is lovely. You happen upon a nice goldenrod meadow. This meadow is filled with all sorts of vibrant
colors. The greens of summer grasses, the fuchsia
of knapweed and numerous arching stems filled with pink and magenta from various flowers
ready to make their seeds. The meadow is dominated by the warm rich yellow
of the goldenrods. You see a honeybee going about it’s duties
and peak a little closer to appreciate all her hard work. Just as you get ready to snap a photo with
your phone POOF! something has happened. The bee is now on its side and moving rather….un
bee like. The flower has grabbed onto it. No This is no flower. It is some strange alien composed of greens
and yellows and maybe even a little pink. You are witnessing non other than the stealthy
and formidable ambush bug. The silent assassin of the summer meadow. These insects are members of a group of insects
known as Assassin bugs (family Reduviidae),and are among the few who can officially claim
the name “bug”. Such a lovely fright these creatures are! Not very large, having short, stout bodies
which makes them unique among the assassin bug group. To humans they can often be a beneficial insect
at times, but a nuisance at other times. While they feed on insects such as hoppers,
thrips and other insects that can harm garden plants and vegetables, they sometimes feed
on beneficial insects such as bees and even other assassin bugs. Although to humans, ambush bugs are not much
of a threat and are in fact, a welcome visiter to our gardens. Both the juveniles sporting their little wing
buds and THE adults are insect predators. I have never been bitten or pinched by one,
and I don’t fear that I ever will be. And they’re not actually that big reaching
about half an inch at most. Lets talk about their “tools of the trade”. Obviously, you may gather that their adornment
is their first weapon, and rightly so. They wear such impressive camouflage that
I have had trouble getting other people to see them while pointing directly at them. Like many assassin bugs they blend in so well
with the environment they inhabit that there is no need to improve this design. Along with their color, they have little projections
on their body, perhaps resembling the ends of maybe flower petals or leaf buds. There is even a species in the family that
wears the carcasses of its defeated prey on its back like some shroud or trophy of the
macabre, some day, I hope to have footage of THAT species. Once in a while, a little head bobbing might
catch your eye, but thats it. They will sit so still that a prey item might
even walk on their face or back and even then, the ambush bug will sit patiently still. Not until something tasty comes and entices
it, and everything lines up just right, do you see movement. This can occur in two ways. It might slowly approach its victim to within
striking distance, or more often than not, it might wait until its food source is directly
in front of its face. Then….with a flash! it snatches it up. With the speed of a kung fu guru, it lunges
out with its modified front legs and grasps its prey. The insect never saw it coming. These forelegs are wonderful hunting tools. The fore tibia (front half of the legs) are
thin, curved hooks, complete with tiny teeth or spines for gripping. The fore femora (the half of the leg closer
to the insects body) is swollen with muscles used to snatch and restrain their prey mercilessly. These legs resemble the forelegs of a more
popular insect known as the praying mantis or even the mantidfly and clearly show that
through necessity, evolution can often take on similar solutions to best suit the situation. That’s not all though. Now comes the true assassins weapon – a deadly
elixir. Ambush bugs (and most assassin bugs) harbor
a powerful venom for subduing their prey. After it has caught its food it will extend
its pointy “beak”, which when at rest, will be tucked into a groove under its face
and between the forelegs. It will pierce its victim with this beak and
inject a paralyzing concoction that often begins the digestive process before the bug
even starts to feed. The beak is, in essence, a straw. This “straw” will be used to suck the
insides out of the insect it has just hunted. When all is done, it just discards the hollow
husk a lot like a kid might do with an empty sandwich wrapper after lunch. The ambush bug, together with its combination
of stealth and cunning, powerfully adapted hooked front legs, and its immobilizing saliva
is an amazing addition to the hunters out there in the invertebrate world. I am so glad that ambush bugs are not something
us humans will ever have to look over our shoulders for. So, I really hope you guys like this video
and in the future I will probably have a more in depth video with more detail and stuff
but we will have to wait for that one. I hope you guys enjoyed this video and next
time you are in a meadow, keep your eyes open and maybe you will see an ambush bug for yourselves. Thanks a lot for watching, once again I am
Chris Egnoto; singing out. Thanks a lot for watching and remember if
you like this video, be sure to check out this video over here that YouTube has selected
specifically for YOU based on your watch time. And don’t forget to hit that SUBSCRIBE button
but you gotta click the bell icon, because if you don’t, YouTube will never let you know
when a new video of mine comes out. Remember passion inspires spirit!

How to Beat Bugs in Your Garden

How to Beat Bugs in Your Garden


[Music] Pests are an ever-present menace in the
vegetable garden. You can never escape the threat of an attack, but you can at least plan for one. The secret lies in attracting beneficial wildlife, arming
yourself with barriers, and working strategically to sidestep common pests. In this video we’ll show you how it’s done. A healthy plant is less likely to succumb to pests
than one that is weak or stressed. Make sure your crops are as healthy as possible by following good cultivation practices. Water soil in dry weather, keep
plants regularly weeded, and add organic fertilizers and organic
mulch (such as garden compost) where appropriate. Only grow crops that will thrive
in the space you can give them. Enlist the help of natural allies that
will dispatch pests for you. Predatory insects such as ladybirds (or lady bugs),
birds, toads and many other animals can eat or destroy pests before they
become a problem. Attract predatory insects into the garden
by planting the flowers that they will also feed on. Choose plants with a
single ring of petals, which normally contain greater amounts of
nectar and pollen. Good examples include calendula, an easy-to-grow annual that readily
sows itself from one year to the next, and fennel which is a favorite of hoverflies (or syrphid flies). Don’t forget flowers for early and late in the season
too. Spring bulbs such as crocuses are excellent early on, while ivy is a great
choice towards the end of the season. Often, leaving one or two biennial crops such
as onions and carrots in the ground ensures an early source of nectar. Several overwintering cover crops or green manures also provide early and
late flowers for beneficial insects. You can find a list of recommended flowers
to attract beneficial bugs to your garden in our Garden Planner. Incorporating them
into your plan is easy. We’re going to choose calendula, which is great near salad crops, so we’ll place it here, next to these lettuces. Use the corner handles if you
need to extend the row or expand it out into a block. Once your plan is complete, click the Plant List button
to see exactly how many you’ll need to plant in this area. Other ways to attract insects include installing
bought or homemade insect hotels, such as this one, allowing
patches of grass to grow a little longer, and leaving deadwood in corners of the garden
as breeding areas for beetles. A clump or two of nettles also draws in
plenty of beneficial bugs. Frogs and toads carry a healthy appetite for slugs and
many insects, making them perfect garden companions. Install a pond to
provide a breeding place for these amphibians. Even a small one, made by
sinking a watertight container into the ground, can lure them in. Water is also vital for birds, including insect eaters which will feast on the likes of aphids after quenching their thirst. Dont forget to include trees, shrubs and hedges to
the perimeter of your garden. These provide nesting sites and food, ensuring your feathered friends
will never be far from potential pests. Physical barriers such as netting,
insect mesh, fleece or row covers are highly effective at stopping
flying pests such as aphids and carrot fly. Set them into position before an
attack is likely. In many cases, for example to protect against carrot fly, that means laying covers onto the ground as soon as the seeds have been sown, and only removing them
to weed after wet weather. It often helps to group crops that require
the same type of protection together. For example, crops in the cabbage family such
as cauliflower, broccoli and kale may be grown next to each other in the same
bed. This means that all the plants can be covered with a single piece of
netting to prevent butterflies laying their eggs. Similarly, by growing fruit
bushes in one part of the garden, a fruit cage becomes more practical to
prevent birds from eating your harvest. You can also add barriers like this to a
garden plan. Start by selecting garden objects in the selection bar, then scroll
through to select what you need. This fruit cage is just the job for
these berries. There we go – safe and sound! Of course, to install defenses you need to
know which pests are heading your way. That’s where the Big Bug Hunt comes in. If you see any pests or beneficial insects in your garden, please head over to Big BugHunt.com and report them. We’re working with leading university
researchers to build a pest early-warning system to help gardeners around
the world save their hard-won harvests. Every bug reported
will help to make that system more accurate. Pests will always be synonymous with gardening, but exercise some precautions
and you’ll beat the bugs. Tell us how you prevent pests
by dropping us a comment below, and if you haven’t yet subscribed to our video
channel, well, now’s the perfect time to do so. I’ll catch you next time. [Music]

This Killer Fungus Turns Flies into Zombies | Deep Look


We like to think we’re in control … that
our minds are our own. But that’s not true for this fruit fly. Its brain has been hijacked by another organism
and it’s not going to end well. It all starts when the fly is innocently walking
around, sipping on overripe fruit. It picks up an invisible fungus spore, which
bores under its skin. For a few days, everything seems normal. But inside, the fungus is growing, feeding
on the fly’s fat … and infiltrating its mind. At dusk on the fourth or fifth day, the fly
gets a little erratic, wandering around. It climbs to a high place. Scientists call this behavior “summiting.” Then it starts twitching. The fungus is in control. The fly sticks out its mouthpart and spits
out a tiny drop of sticky liquid. That glues the fly down, sealing its fate. A few minutes later, its wings shoot up. And it dies. Now that the fungus has forced the fly into
this death pose … wings out of the way … nothing can stop it. It emerges. Tiny spore launchers burst out of the fly’s
skin. Hundreds of spores shoot out at high speed,
catching a breeze if the fly climbed high enough. They’re the next generation of killer fungus. It continues for hours, spores flying out. These flies are in the wrong place at the
wrong time. And if spores land on a wing, which they can’t
bore into, they shoot out a secondary spore to increase their chances of spreading. So how does a fungus take control of a brain? At Harvard, Carolyn Elya is trying to understand
that. She thinks the fungus secretes chemicals to
manipulate the fly’s neurons, maybe stimulating the ones that make flies climb. But don’t worry: The fungus can’t hurt
humans. Scientists have tried to harness its power
for our benefit, to kill flies in our kitchens and farms. They haven’t had any luck though. The deadly spores are actually pretty fragile
and short-lived. It turns out, this lethal puppet master does
only what it needs to for its *own* survival. Hi, it’s Lauren again. If you love Deep Look, why not help us grow
on Patreon? We’re raising funds to go on a filming expedition
to Oaxaca, Mexico. And for a limited time, we’re sweetening the
deal with a special gift. Link is in the description. And if you’re craving more spooky videos,
here’s a playlist of our scariest episodes. Don’t watch ‘em after midnight. See you soon.

How to Use Taurus SC Termiticide | DoMyOwn.com

How to Use Taurus SC Termiticide | DoMyOwn.com


Hey I’m Chris the Bug Guy from Domyownpestcontrol.com,
and today we are going to show you how to get rid of termites using Taurus SC. Taurus
SC is a non-repellent termiticide/insecticide with fipronil as the active ingredient. Many
professionals use Taurus SC because it is economical and kills termites quickly. Taurus
SC is a concentrate and is found in a 20 oz and 78 oz bottle. One 20 oz bottle will make
25 gallons and treat 60 lineal feet. The 78 oz bottle will make up to 100 gallons and
treat 250 lineal feet. Let’s go outside and we’re going to show you how to apply Taurus
SC in the trench around your house. Step 1 is digging the trench. The trench against
your house should be 6″ wide and 6″ deep. You can use a shovel or a pick axe, and the
trench will be directly against the foundation. Once you have dug the trench, it is 4 gallons
per 10 feet, 10 lineal feet, along the house. So you are going to mix in the termiticide,
make a line on the bucket if you need to for 4 gallons, and once it’s mixed we’re going
to evenly distribute it over the trench. So we have a 10′ section over here. You are going
to evenly distribute those 4 gallons over the 10′, and then move on to the next section.
By the time you get back around this should have dissipated into the soil. Now once you
have finished trenching and filling the trench with the termiticide, and it’s had time to
dissipate into the soil you need to put the back fill back into the trench. Now the dirt
right now is untreated. This is the dirt we took out of the trench, but you want to make
sure that you treat it before you put it back in because you don’t want a layer of untreated
soil on top of the treated soil. If termites happen to go right near the surface, they
are going to skip the termiticide you placed in the trench. So this is a lot easier with
two people. You want to mix some termiticide in a 1 gallon pump sprayer, and then you want
to have a shovel or a rake to push the dirt back in the trench. The person with the sprayer
is going to go ahead and start just wetting the dirt down, not so much that it is muddy,
but just start wetting the dirt down, and as you are pushing it back in with the shovel
or rake, the other person is going to wet it down. Just move on down the line. Let him
wet it down a little bit. As you shovel it back in they’re just going to wet down that
back fill and get it mixed well with the termiticide. Now your house is completely protected by
the professional termiticide. I hope you found this video useful. For more information click
here.

Is a Palmetto Bug Really Just a Cockroach?

Is a Palmetto Bug Really Just a Cockroach?


♪ The cockroach that most
commonly is gonna be called the Palmetto Bug is gonna be your
American cockroach and the Smoky Brown Cockroaches are
very similar one of the larger cockroaches we have in the
southeastern United States. So basically it is a polite way
of calling a cockroach another name. Hey it’s kind of a south
eastern colloquial name because Palmettos we have those in
our state and one of the common habitats for those roaches is
palmetto trees. Especially those old brown palmetto leaves fall
down to the ground. That’s a favorite hiding place for those.
So when people are cleaning up debris in their yard from those.
Trees they often see those and so that’s kind of one of the
reasons they get their name. So these are Madagascar hissing
cockroaches. So there were quite a bit
different from what you’re gonna find around here.
These are adults and you can see they do not have wings. Like
the American cockroaches and Smokie Browns that you’ll find
around here. As adults do have wings. So that’s one of the
major differences. The main benefit is that their
food source for other animals. So birds will eat them some
native lizard will also eat them so they are a food source
but obviously you do not want them into your house. People can
be allergic to roaches. So they can cause allergic reactions and asthma and things like that so that’s why people do not want roaches inisde thier houses.

How to Use Talstar P (Pro) One Insecticide

How to Use Talstar P (Pro) One Insecticide


Talstar P (previously Talstar One) is a powerful
and economical liquid insecticide concentrate that controls over 75 different types of common
household, lawn and ornamental pests – Perfect for most of your pest control needs both indoors
and out. Talstar P must always be diluted with water
and applied with a hand pump sprayer or similar pressurized spray equipment.. Depending on
the pest you are treating, use one half to one ounce of Talstar P in one gallon of water
to treat one thousand square feet. It is important to follow the label directions and not to
exceed one ounce per one gallon of water. Outdoors, use Talstar P to create an effective
barrier of control, spraying two feet up the exterior walls and two feet out from the foundation.
Also treat any possible entry points into the structure, like windows, pipes, and doorways. To control active infestations, or for prevention
and general maintenance of insect pests, apply Talstar P indoors as a coarse, low pressure
crack and crevice spray in areas where pests may hide. Pay special attention to baseboards,
corners, storage areas, window and door frames, behind and under appliances, cabinets, sinks,
and anywhere else you notice target pest activity. Talstar P should not be used as a broadcast
spray indoors. Talstar P is a long lasting product and may
only need to be applied once every few months for general pest control. Talstar should not
be applied more than once every seven days. Be sure to wait thirty minutes before allowing
pets and children into any treated areas so that your application has time to dry. Make
sure to read all labels and safety precautions to ensure a safe and effective application,
and you will have great success using Talstar P for your pest control needs.

How to Use BORA-CARE Borate Wood Treatment

How to Use BORA-CARE Borate Wood Treatment


Boracare is a unique borate-based product
that provides prevention and control for Termites, Carpenter Ants, Powderpost Beetles and Decay
Fungi. Boracare can be used on most unfinished or raw wood including plywood, particle board,
and wood structural components. Boracare can also be used to prevent subterranean termites
from forming tubes on surfaces such as concrete, block, brick, metals, and PVC plumbing pipes
found in structures. Boracare can be used at a 1 to 1 or 1 to 5
Boracare-to-water ratio depending on the job at hand. Please refer to the product label
for the correct usage rate for your specific needs. Boracare should be mixed with hot water
in a bucket until it is thoroughly dispersed in the water. Boracare should never be mixed
directly in sprayers as the product is very thick and will clog the sprayer if it is not
premixed with hot water. Boracare can be applied as a spray using a
hand pump sprayer, as a foam using a foamer and a foaming additive, or it can be painted
on with a roller when needed. Indoors, Boracare can be applied on infested
wood, wooden elements of furniture, wood floors, and stud walls. Apply Boracare until surfaces
are saturated, but not to the point of runoff. Use Boracare in a well-ventilated area, or
use a respirator during application in confined locations such as crawl spaces or attics. Outdoors, all raw wooden elements such as
fenceposts, decks and new wooden siding can be treated. Do not apply within 48 hours of
rain or snow. For elements that will be exposed to rain and sunlight, wait at least 48 hours
for Boracare to dry before painting, staining or sealing with a water-resistant product.
All exposed wood needs to be sealed within six weeks for Boracare to remain effective. And it’s that easy, with the expert help from
Do My Own Pest Control dot com! Make sure to subscribe to our channel for
more instructional and product videos!

GCTV11: GRDC’s Insect I.D. App

GCTV11: GRDC’s Insect I.D. App


GRDC YouTube – Insect I.D. App Thomas McCue: GRDC Manager Delivery Platforms
The GRDC has just launched its latest App insects ID, which is the second App in the
Ute Guide series. This version of the Ute Guide has had several
enhancements based on feedback that we have received from growers.
So the new App actually now focuses on enabling the user to upload new information as it comes
to hand. So in the App we have also included the Northern,
Southern and Western components which were traditionally available as individual Ute
Guides in the hard copy format. We are also looking at putting push notifications
into the Application so that important information whether that be an alert or a notification
in regards to insects or weeds can be pushed out through users of the App.
So part of the new Application enhancements include improvements to the search-ability
within the application including predictive search.
It is an App that is available on all formats and we encourage you to provide any feedback
to us so that we can only make them better for your needs.
You can download the app on the GRDC website or you can download it directly from the Apple
or Google Application websites.