STUNG by a YELLOW JACKET!

STUNG by a YELLOW JACKET!


(upbeat music) – [Coyote] Hold
on, oh it’s flying. Hold on let’s go back
towards the nest. No wait, wait, wait, don’t move. – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yes, yes. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the yellow jacket. Here we go. (yelling) (upbeat music) Today we are headed out
into the suburban wilds of Westerville, Ohio to search
for any species of paper wasp which can be carefully
caught and ultimately used to give me a good
series of stings. Welcome to another
day in the office for Coyote Peterson. – [Mark] Coyote, are we doing what I think we’re doing today? – Oh yes, today is
yellow jacket day. Now you guys may remember
a little episode called, “The Bullet Ant Challenge” where I was stung
by a bullet ant. (yelling) And then a subsequent
video called, “Bullet Ant Kryptonite” where I used a product
called Sting-Kill to help alleviate the
pain and the itching. A Sting-Kill absolutely
loved that video and then they came
to us and said, “We’d love to work with you
guys and do a sponsored video, but let’s get you stung by something a little
more commonplace.” You know, not many people
are running into bullet ants. So they said, “What if you
get stung by yellow jackets?” Now we all know that
yellow jackets can be found at your local park, maybe you
see them in your backyard, sometimes they even
get into the house. We know they’re angry, we
know they’re aggressive, and people are often
stung every single summer. So what we’re gonna do today is actually build a bug vacuum. (record scratches) – [Mark] A bug what? – [Coyote] A bug vacuum. Bear with me here for a second. So you see this? I found this online, right? – [Mark] Looks pretty cool. – Right, the Extreme Bug Vac. But unfortunately, I
have one opened up here. This is supposed to
have a lot of suction, Mark put your hand out. – Yeah, no. – Pretty sure that’s not
gonna catch us any hornets but what I love about this
is the plastic capsule. Check that out. It’s got this little
revolving door and you are supposed to be able to suck a bug in
there, close it up, look at it through
the magnifying glass and then of course it’s
go a little screen, so that the insect can breathe. What I wanna do,
is actually take this capsule from the bug vacuum and Macgyver something
with a real vacuum. (vacuum sucking) Check out that suction. – Oh yeah.
– Yeah. – [Mark] Suction power there. – Oh yeah, that’s
gonna catch a hornet. But what I need to do
is reconstruct this, where I’m gonna
actually cut the hose and duct tape the
capsule in between. Then I’ll be able to use
this end with the nozzle, which has great suction power. And then I think
we’re gonna be ready to go out and start searching
for some yellow jackets. Oh I almost forgot, I am gonna mount the
GoPro on it as well. – [Mark] So where are we today? We’re in Ohio, right? – We are in Ohio. We’re actually
right in my backyard here in Westerville, Ohio. And I actually put
in a phone call and email to a number of my
different friends in the area and I said, “Go out this
morning and look around near the eaves of your house.” You know where the gutter
attaches to the roof? “And let me know if you
see any wasps nests, hornet nests,
yellow jacket nests, anything that looks
like a stinging insect, let me know and we may
come and investigate it.” So we’re gonna kinda
go on a little bit of a field trip today guys, until we can find ourselves
some good stinging bugs. – [Mark] Are we testin’ it out? (vacuum sucking)
– Yep. (vacuum sucking)
– Yep. I think it’s gonna work. – Last step. (Mark laughing) Now it’s like a proton pack. (Mark laughing) Oh yeah, this thing is awesome. Alright, well if
you guys are ready, let’s go try to catch
some yellow jackets. – [Mark] Let’s do it. (Coyote cheering) – Alright, well we might as well check the park
that we started at. Great structures here
for us to invest. You see that all these
eaves and overhangs, perfect place for paper wasps. – [Mark] Now why do paper wasps
like these under hangs here? – Well because it’s a
great spot to build a nest. It’s out of the realm of
predators and the rain. See anything yet? (mysterious music) There are eight known species
of wasps that call Ohio home. And many of them
can be encountered right in your own backyard. However, unless they
are intentionally or accidentally provoked, your odds of being stung
are actually very slim. Let’s go this way. – [Mark] Come on Mario. – Well it’s a fun
day at the park. – [Mark] Yep. – On the weekend. – [Mark] Should’ve
brought a soccer ball. What do you see? – [Mario] Did you see
something fly out? – I did, I think it
was a honey bee though. Now honey bees, you often
times see on clover. Let me see, there’s
one right there. Look, look, look, look. That’s a honey bee. – [Mark] European honey bee. – Yep. Now that is
not what we’re after. honey bees actually have
fur all over their bodies, whereas yellow jackets
are completely bald. Bees also have barbs
on their stingers, so when you get stung by a
bee, it’s stinger gets removed. If you get stung
by a yellow jacket, no barbs, so it can sting
you over and over and over. If I was looking for honey
bees, we’d be in the right spot. But unfortunately, yellow
jackets do not pollinate clover. Alright, let’s keep lookin’. (mysterious music) – [Mark] So why are we
looking at the ground now? I thought we were looking up. – That’s a good
question actually. Oh. That could be perfect, I
see some ants in there. A lot of times yellow jackets will actually build
their nests underground. So if you see something
that looks like a mole hole, just respect it
from a safe distance because it’s possible
that yellow jackets have built a nest in there. A cavity in a tree like
this is also fair game. But there’s nothing
in this tree. Not sure we’re gonna find
anything in this park, guys. Might be time to
take a road trip, see where else we can
look for yellow jackets. You ready? – [Mark] The bug suckers
are hittin’ the road. – Oh yeah, vroom vroom. (upbeat music) Well it is 12:43, which means
it’s officially lunch time. And we have a new plan. – Searching for the
yellow jackets ourselves is not exactly
panning out very well. We found some nests
that were vacant, we found some honey bees,
and some bumblebees. But we haven’t found the
infamous yellow jacket. What we’re gonna do, bear
with me here for a second, is actually have a picnic. Because often times,
if you think about it, yellow jackets show up
when you’re at a picnic. So I’m thinking if we get some
soda pops and some ice cream, we hang out in the sun,
maybe these stinging insects will come to us and
we will then be able to use the Bug Sucker 5000 to
just sit there and just go, vroom, and suck ’em up. Give me this, I’m gonna go look
in the garbage can right now and see if there
are any hornets. Guys, we are really lookin’
hard for these hornets but you know what, they
empty their trash a lot. Check this out. There’s like nothin’ in there. Can’t exactly find hornets if there isn’t a bunch
of sticky stuff around. And what Mario did was, he put, look at that. Ice cream in the
grass on top of a lid. Maybe that will
bring in the hornets and the yellow
jackets, and the wasps. I don’t know, I guess
we’ll see what happens. – Mmm. – [Mark] Pretty good, huh Mario? I’m enjoying mine. – It’s a beautiful
day for a picnic. – I’ll see you
then, alright bye. – [Mark] No yellow
jackets though. – Guys. – [Mark] What’s up? – We might be in business. I just got off the phone
with my friend, Jasper. Now I know at the
beginning of the video, I kinda made a joke and said, “Yeah I sent an email and
texts to my friends that live “in the area and I
told ’em to go outside “and check around their houses “to see if any yellow
jackets were hanging out.” Sure enough, my
friend Jasper went out and he said right
on his back patio, there’s a little nest and
there are three yellow jackets. And I said, “You’re sure?” He said, “Well, they’re
yellow and they’re black “and they look like
they wanna sting.” So, I think we may
actually be able to put the Bug Sucker
5000 to the test. You guys ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it. And can we bring
our treats with us? – Oh of course. – Yeah. – Let’s catch some
yellow jackets. Alright guys, well we
are at Jasper’s house. Now he has asked to
not be on camera, because he’s not used
to being on YouTube. So you won’t get
to meet him today, but he has given us permission
to go out on his porch and scout for these
yellow jackets. If they’re there,
we’re gonna use the Bug Sucker
5000 to catch them and then go to a
controlled environment so that we can get me stung. You guys ready? – [Mark] Sounds like
a plan, let’s do it. – Gear up, you guys
grab the other cameras and we’ll be ready to go. – [Mark] You look happy. – [Coyote] See that
corner right there? – [Mark] Uh-huh. – That is a small nest and there are two
yellow jackets. Now Jasper has provided
us with a step stool. He was thinkin’ ahead. So I’m gonna use this step stool and get up close with
the Bug Sucker 5000. You guys ready? We’re gonna have
to do this quick ’cause I already see
that they’re on the alert with their wings
kind of propped out ready to swoop
down and sting us. So we really just
have one shot at this. Okay so what I’m gonna do,
I love my Ghostbuster pack, but to really make this
work I do have to take the Bug Sucker 5000 out. – [Mark] The moment we’ve
all been waiting for. – Let’s put it this way, it’s either gonna work, or
we’re all gonna get stung. (vacuum sucking) – [Mark] Move fast. (vacuum sucking) Did it work? – We got one of ’em in there. – [Mark] Oh there’s
still one on the nest. (vacuum sucking) – [Coyote] Get the net,
get the net, get the net. Oh it’s flying. Hold on, hold on let’s
go back towards the nest. Wait, wait, wait,
wait, don’t move. (vacuum sucking) – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yes, yes. – [Mark] Shut the
door, shut the door. (laughing) It totally worked.
– Look at that. Totally caught the
yellow jackets. Both of ’em, just like that. (cheering) The Bug Sucker 5000 pays off. Can you guys believe that? Holy mackerel, we caught ’em. Wow. That was crazy, the one
was actually climbed onto this thing and I was like, “Uh, oh. We’re gonna get stung.” I was like, “Get the
net, get the net.” But then it went
back up to the nest and sure enough, got it
inside of the capsule. – [Mark] So alright
Coyote, now we have to go to where we’re
gonna get you stung. Not at Jasper’s house. – Yeah, no we’re gonna go
to a controlled situation, and we’re gonna get
these yellow jackets out of the little
capsule and get me stung. But what I’m gonna
do for transport, is not take this hose apart. Now I’m actually just
gonna place it inside of the bug net just
in case they get out. And just like that,
we’re ready to go. – [Mark] Nice. – Awesome, high fives guys. (laughing)
– That totally worked. – That’s so cool
that that worked. – [Mark] That totally worked. Boom. – Alright guys, and we’re back. Now we do have the
yellow jackets on hand. But first let’s
talk about the kit that I have here on the table. Now as always, with
these sting episodes, I have my trusty
entomology forceps here. I’ll be using this
to actually hold one of the yellow
jackets against my
arm to induce a sting. And just in case something
goes horribly wrong, as always, the epinephrin pen. – [Mark] Now do you think you’re
in the clear at this point? You’ve been stung a bunch. – I have and you never know. Every single insect
sting is unique and you never know how
your body will react. Even a yellow jacket can force
you into anaphylactic shock. So I always have this just
as a safety precaution. And of course, the star of
today’s episode, Sting-Kill. Who probably is
sponsoring this episode. Now what we’re gonna
do after I’m stung, is try out both of these
products on the sting, to make sure that it can
relieve not only the pain, but also the itching that’s
gonna come after the fact. You guys ready to see
the yellow jackets? – [Mark] Let’s bring ’em out. – Alright, well they
did transport safely
inside of the net and still inside of
the little capsule. – [Mark] Pretty happy they
didn’t escape in the car. – Yeah that would’ve been a
bad situation, wouldn’t it? All of us in the car and then
yellow jackets flying around. And sure enough there they
are inside of the capsule. Now what I need to
do is actually remove the hose from the capsule so we just have
this individualized. And then I can carefully get one of those yellow
jackets out of there. Now here’s a really interesting
little fact to remember, all hornets are
technically wasps, but not all wasps are hornets. How about that? And anything that
is black and yellow is technically considered
a yellow jacket. – [Mark] So what do we
have, what did we find? – This I believe, is what’s
called a European paper wasp. But because it’s
yellow and black, we’re just generically
calling it a yellow jacket. – [Mark] And is this
what we find at picnics? Is this what’s swarming
us when we’re trying to eat our ice cream? – No, that is usually a hornet. Now a hornet has a much
stockier looking body, a thicker abdomen and
a narrower thorax. But these ones look
just like wasps. You see the very pointy wings,
if you kind of see there. Do you see where
the thorax leads into the abdomen right there? It’s very narrow and indicative
of being an actual wasp. But I think at this junction,
what we’re ready to do, is bring the bug
net back into this, place the capsule inside,
and work on getting one of these yellow jackets
out of the container. You ready for that? – [Mark] So what’s
the process here? You’re gonna let ’em
go inside the net and then grab them
with the forceps? – Yeah, here’s
what’s gonna happen. So I’m gonna place
the capsule down inside of the net like
this, keep it contained. I’m going to open the capsule, hopefully only let
one of them out, close it back up,
remove the capsule, and then go in there with
the entomology forceps, to pick it up, bring it out,
and place it on my forearm. (suspenseful music) I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with a
yellow jacket, here we go. One, (breathes), two, three. (suspenseful music) Ow. – [Mark] Did you get there? – [Coyote] Got me there, yeah. (suspenseful music) (yelling) – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yeah it got me twice. Ah. Here we go. (suspenseful music) (yelling) – [Mark] Was that the worst one? – [Coyote] Yeah that was
the worst one so far. – [Mark] Are you good? (yelling) – He got the stinger all the
way inserted into my arm. Oh my arm’s startin’
to hurt a little bit, hold on, let’s do this. We’re gonna get back
into the capsule. – [Mark] Gonna lay it back. (breathes) – Ah, yep there you have it. You see all those welts? I took several stings
all right in that area. And look at this, there’s
a lot of red coloration developing right near the veins. That is really
interesting looking. And it burns and it’s really
warm, really warm right now. Honestly, it’s hot
to the touch right? – [Mark] Yeah you can
definitely feel the swelling. – Yeah, now it was
not nearly as painful as any of the other
stings I’ve gone through. I was actually able to keep
the yellow jacket on my arm as it was inflicting stings. It did get me one time pretty
good right at the end there, and I had to let it go. Of course we got it safely back into the capsule, as
you can see there. There they both are, they’ll
be released here shortly. But what we wanna
do now, is actually use the Sting-Kill products to see if it will alleviate
some of the burning in my arm and of course the itching
that is almost certain to come if I don’t use the
Sting-Kill ointment. You guys ready for that? – [Mark] Let’s do it. – [Coyote] Okay. – [Mark] Well which
one do we want? Do you want the capsules
or do you want the? How about you take both. Let’s talk about both.
– We’re gonna give a shot at both. So this is the Sting-Kill wipe. Often times used for
anything from a bee sting or a wasp sting, even a
mosquito bite, even a jellyfish. If you guys are on the
beach and you’re swimming and you run into a jellyfish, this is perfect for that. So what I’m gonna do, is
I’m gonna open this up. I’ll tell you what, I keep
myself pretty well composed in a lot of this, but
now that the pain’s actually starting to
set in my arm, I do, I get a little bit light headed. So the Sting-Kill wipes
have a maximum strength mix of benzocaine and menthol and
I actually really like these. They’re neon green, looks
like Ninja Turtle Mutagen. Check that out. And wow that is a strong
smell right there. Alright I’m gonna put that
on the sting, are you ready? – [Mark] Yeah sure go ahead. – Oh wow, it’s cold. The menthol definitely
cools it immediately. (sighs) Yes.
(laughing) Wow that really does have a pretty incredible
cooling effect. Now similar to the bullet ant, I was in a lot of pain
after that and it did help, but of course the
bullet ant pain eventually did come back and
lasted for nearly 36 hours. I’m hoping that this
relieves much quicker. Now I do love the wipes. And I carry the wipes in my
pack, but this right here, the sting kill capsules.
– Those, I like those. – Yeah these are my
absolute favorite. Okay let me open one up for you. Now they are individually
wrapped, see this, very cool. And all you have to do is pop
the back end out like that. And inside here is a
little glass capsule within the plastic. So all you have to do, this
is my favorite part, ready? (glass breaks)
(laughing) Shatter the glass on the inside that has this
little cotton swab. – [Mark] It’s
strangely satisfying. – I know, it’s like, “Oh
here comes the ooze.” Yes, ah. (laughing) Oh that is my favorite. And that real thick
serum right there is literally
instantaneous relief. I personally love
to just do this, dab it right on the sting zone. Wow. And as you can see,
there is more liquid here than you get in the wipes. So if you have a
really bad sting, or you’re stung multiple times, I definitely recommend going
to the Sting-Kill capsules, ’cause as you can see, look
how much of the ointment is actually coming out there. – [Mark] Okay, so once again,
Sting-Kill saves the day. (breathes) – Yes. Sting-Kill
has saved the day. My arm feels a lot better. In fact, there’s also a little
bit of a numbing agent here, so I can’t feel any of
the pain at this point. Wow, arm is a little bit stiff, but hopefully this
formula will also reduce any potential itching that’s
gonna come down the road here. And I know you’re
thinking to yourselves, “Coyote, those were
simply yellow jackets. “And you’ve been stung
by tarantula hawks,
and bullet ants, “and hopefully soon
warrior wasps.” But keep in mind guys,
that the yellow jacket is something that is
right in your backyard. It’s something you
can easily come across and something you definitely
have the potential of being stung by. Now if you are
unfortunately stung, remember, Sting-Kill is
definitely gonna help you out when it comes to
alleviating that pain and any potential itching. Alright guys, well
I think it’s time to release the yellow
jackets back into the wild. But before we do,
I just want to give an extra special
thanks to Sting-Kill for supporting this episode and of course, for
keeping us kitted up with sting ointment, when
we’re out there in the field. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. It is not often that an
animal like a yellow jacket is safely relocated from an
urban setting to a wild one. As most human
encounters usually end with the insect being
sprayed and killed. I know this sounds strange, but
it truly made my heart happy to know that this
beautiful pair of wasps will now have the chance to continue building
their nest in the wild. No matter what, always
admire these insects from a safe distance. However if you are
stung, all you need to do is visit your local pharmacist, where you are likely to find
the Sting-Kill products. And whether you use the
sting wipes or the capsules, both are armed with
a maximum strength benzocaine and menthol formula that is certain to
provide fast relief to the pain and itching. For more information,
visit Sting-Kill’s website to connect with the
brand for special offers. If you thought
(yelling) getting stung by a yellow
jacket was intense, (yelling) make sure to go back
and watch the episode where I applied
Sting-Kill to help alleviate the searing pain
of the bullet ant’s sting. And don’t forget, subscribe. So you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. What I’m gonna do
is open this up, and let’s see if
the sting wipe helps (sighs) to cool off my arm. This is nice, these are perfect. This could fit right
in any hiking backpack. (coyote howling)

Red Velvet Ant or Cow Killer its really a Wasp! They look like big red and black ants.

Red Velvet Ant or Cow Killer its really a Wasp! They look like big red and black ants.


Welcome to Everyday Web Minutes! I heard a noise in my front yard today, very faint, but very familiar. The hairs stood up on the back of my neck. I looked all over, but could not find it. The sound had stopped. Now my front yard was a place to tread carefully!!! No going outside barefoot!!! You see, the sound that I heard was created by one of the most truly beautiful insects I’ve ever seen. Here in South Carolina they call them Velvet Ants. Sounds nice and sweet. Where I grew up in Oklahoma… We called them cow killers!!! These creatures are not ants at all! They are female wasp without wings! The male has wings but no stinger. So, I have nothing else to say about the male. The female though… she’s a sight to behold! She can be over an inch long. Covered in bright red and solid black striped velvet fur. At least the ones I have dealt with. They can also be a dirty yellow, and from what I understand, way out west near the southeast part of the Rockies, they’re black. So it’s a bug, so you step on it, and kill it, right??? Wrong!!! If you step on them on dirt or even rock-hard clay and turn your shoe back and forth… You’ll only just push them into the ground. I tried to step on one on a concrete driveway one time. Nope you won’t kill them. You just make them mad! They will play dead or scream at you. They have one of the toughest exoskeletons Mother Nature has to offer. I can tell you that a concrete driveway and a three pound hammer will fix your problem. I said, they would scream at you… Listen to this. This is a Velvet Ant… {Velvet Ant churping} That’s what I heard today. You see, they kill in ground bees and beetles they also lay one or two eggs by the bee eggs. When the wasp is born they eat all the bees… coming out of the ground full-grown… from what I understand. Their sting is one of the worst in the world! Thus, their Western nickname of “Cow Killers”… it hurts so bad, you think it would kill a cow! Hornet stings are nothing compared to these lady wasp! How do most people get stung? #1 Barefoot in a sandy area. Not beach sand… inland sand… where bees and yellowjackets can build in ground hives. #2 Oh…look at the pretty red and black ant that’s an inch long… Here, let me pick it up… and why would anyone pick up an ant that’s an INCH long??? Takes a special person! #3 They step on it… assume it’s dead… pick it up – look at the pretty bug… and bang… they get stung!!! So, now my friend, you know all you need to know, about the “Cow Killer” “Velvet Ant”!!!

Why Do Wasps Attack? – Reactions Q&A

Why Do Wasps Attack? – Reactions Q&A


We’ll folks, you asked and we’re answering. That’s right, we heard you. This, week we’re answering a burning
question that KJudera had for us. Why do wasp become more aggressive when you try to kill one of their “friends”? Well… here’s why. It’s not so much that you’ve killed
a wasp, but that you’ve threatened the other wasps or their wasp home. Both social wasps and honeybees use
what are called “alarm pheromones” to warn their buddies about nearby dangers. Pheromones are chemical messengers
that travel through the air and affect other animals’ behavior. So if a hive or nest is disturbed, guard wasps will send out these small molecules to rally the troops. Then the wasps will all swarm out
of the nest and attack the intruder. These “social insects” like bees
or wasps all have molecularly different alarm systems (Onscreen: Wasps pop up — we have ADT). The first molecule identified in
the honeybee mixture was  isopentyl acetate, also known as banana oil. Ask any beekeeper, and they’ll tell
you stressed-out bee colonies will often smell like bananas–a telltale sign
they’re ready to attack. So how can you break up the fight? Beekeepers often use smoke from a
special dispenser to disguise the pheromone smell and trick the bees into not attacking. But to avoid getting stung all
together, better to leave them alone, or if you must, call a professional. If you have any more quick questions
that you’re dying for us to cover, drop them in the comments section.

Bee Beard GONE WRONG!


– [Coyote] I am
getting nervous now. – [Chris] No turning
back now buddy. – [Cameraman] You alright? – I’m getting stung a lot. Alright, gotta get ’em off. – [Chris] Go ahead
and just jump. Real hard. – They’re all on my face. My eyes! – [Narrator] From high in
the sky, the Sonoran Desert looks like an endless
expanse of rocky terrain that is speckled with cacti. Hidden amongst this
unforgiving environment exists a world of animals, many of which can be
difficult to spot. However, today is going
to be a little different, as instead of looking
for the animals, they’re literally going to be
placed right in front of us. Or in my case,
directly on my skin. – That’s a lot of bees. – [Narrator] With the goal
to prove that honey bees are not just out to sting
you, or so I thought. The crew and I headed out
to Life’s Sweet Honey Farms where I will be
working alongside bee specialist, Chris Britton. Chris and his team
specialize in safely removing bee swarms from
residential areas, honey farming, and per my
special request, bee beards. – [Chris] This
the craziest thing you’ve done this
morning, Coyote? – [Coyote] Sure is. Other
than shave off my fur beard. – [Narrator] Ah yes, the beard. I’m sure you were wondering, Coyote, what in the world
happened to your fur beard? Well, the answer
to that question is that I shaved
it off to make room for the nearly 3,000
European honey bees that will soon be
swarming all over my face. Get ready for the newest trend in facial hair
fashion, the bee beard. The following scene was
filmed on private property and under the supervision
of bee specialists. A single sting has the
potential to be fatal. Never approach a bee
hive in the wild. – Okay well, we’re gonna
start the preparation here. Chris is actually going
to apply Vaseline, you said to my nose, and
my ears, and near my eyes, so that the bees don’t go into these holes
in my face, right? – Well, you’re either gonna
look homeless with a beard or we’re gonna look like
a nice manicured beard. So this is a pseudo-queen. This is basically a
queen pheromone lure. So this is what’s going
to push those bees to actually gather somewhere because they’re actually looking
for that queen pheromone. They’ve been
separated for a while, so this is what’s gonna
actually hold them on your face. Okay, so we’re gonna put
this underneath your chin. – [Cameraman] So this is
gonna be the attractant. – This is the attractant. – Alright guys. Well I think we have reached
the final moment here. It’s either back out
or get covered by bees, and I don’t think there’s any
backing out at this point. I have the pheromone
attached to my chin. Got a GoPro here,
GoPro on my shoulder, both of your cameras going. Now wait, wait, wait, wait. Before we go through with this,
how do I get the bees off? What if something goes wrong? What do I do? – Good luck, man. I’m just gonna drive away. (Coyote laughs) Nothing’s gonna go wrong when
it comes down to the bees. If they get to the point where they are
stinging excessively, you can just shake
off real quick. – Put these in your pocket. – Epinephrine pens. Just in case this
really goes wrong. I am getting nervous now. Now I’m getting nervous. I’m Coyote Peterson and
I’m about to take on the bee beard challenge. Are you ready? – [Chris] Yep. – Okay, let’s do this. – [Chris] No turning
back now buddy. Come on girls. Come on girls, up you go. – [Cameraman] How you
feeling now Coyote? – It’s a lot of bees. It’s tough to talk. – [Cameraman] There’s a
bee right on your nose. – I feel it. – [Cameraman] That’s
a lot of bees. Are you feeling nervous? Have you been stung yet? – No stings yet. – [Cameraman] That’s good. That
means you’re remaining calm. – My leg is shaking. Stung on the lip. – [Cameraman] It’s stuck on you. You alright? Be brave. – My neck is consumed. – [Cameraman] I’m gonna
take a couple steps back. I just got stung. Right in my hand. I didn’t realize we were getting swarmed by bees this morning. – There a lot of bees on me? – You got it. You got this. – Getting stung a lot. I’ve gotten stung
about six times. Ow, my neck is
getting stung again. – This is what we
start with right here. We just get more for the
bees to start on him. Then what they’re gonna do is they’re gonna
emit a pheromone, and it’s a location pheromone, and those bees are just gonna
start basically migrating. So now I can actually just
basically hold this right here and they’re gonna all
start marching up, watch. – Are all the bees out? – [Chris] No. – My lip is swelling up. – [Chris] You’re alright. – [Cameraman] You definitely
have a full neck of bees. – I can feel them all. – [Cameraman] Are you
still getting stung? – No, not right now. – [Cameraman] So what is Coyote- – It stung the lip again! Same spot. It’s really starting to hurt. – [Cameraman] Wow, Coyote there. You are just
covered in bees man. – It’s actually turning
out pretty well. – Lip! Alright, I think I
need to get them off. – Are you okay or
you want them off? – It’s a lot of pain. – [Cameraman] But
you’ve almost got it. You’re so close. – Go ahead. – [Cameraman] You
got it, you got it. Power through, you got this. You already got
stung, you can do it. – My eyes. I’m getting stung a lot. Alright, gotta get ’em off. – [Chris] Go ahead
and just jump. Real hard. You
just knock ’em off. – They’re all on my face. My eyes! – [Cameraman] You alright? – Smoke me, I’m
getting stung a lot. – [Chris] You got
stung quite a bit. – There’s one on my hand. – [Cameraman] Oh yeah. I guess
he just stung you big time. – [Chris] You got
stung a bunch bud. – Can I walk away? Oh man, my face hurts. – [Cameraman] You
should see the sting you have in your neck. – Oh my gosh. – [Cameraman] Are you okay? – Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. – [Cameraman] Is your
tongue swelling up? The tongue is the indicator. – No, not yet, but
my face is on fire. – [Cameraman] Oh man, okay. I think we’re good now. It’s only a couple bees
and they’re just following the pheromone on your face. Hold on, you still got
stingers all in your ears. Oh my gosh. Let me see if I
can get them out. – Dude, I got stung
like so many times. All of a sudden, all at once
they started stinging my face. And on my ears. – [Cameraman] I wanna get
the stinger out of your ear. – [Chris] You okay bud? – Sorry, I was just
getting a lot of stings. – No, it’s fine buddy. You got ’em through your
shirt and everything. For some odd reason,
all of the sudden, they started just absolutely
going to town on you. You can see, look
at that right there. That actually literally… – [Cameraman] It drew blood. – [Chris] Yeah, it got
blood to the surface. You just got stung like 40
times in the face by honey bees. – [Cameraman] 40! I don’t think that was
supposed to happen Chris. – [Chris] I don’t know why. I wasn’t getting all blasted up. I mean, I got stung
like once or twice but he was literally
just getting beat up. – Oh my gosh. Dude, my face is in so
much pain right now. – [Cameraman] You alright? How’s the tongue? – Really, really painful. My tongue is not
swollen but my entire, my lips, I can’t feel my lips. – [Cameraman] Where’s Mario at? – [Chris] He’s
over there filming. – [Cameraman] Hey, tell
him to come over here. – [Chris] Hey Mario. – [Cameraman] Mario! – [Chris] He’s probably
covered up by bee sounds still. – [Cameraman] Come over here. Was it worth it? – Oh man, I can see
my lip in the lens. – [Cameraman] You don’t wanna
look at yourself right now. You don’t wanna look
in a mirror right now. – Well, I guess I better
give you some sort of outro of where I can’t talk
’cause I find that my lips are not working
properly at the moment. – [Cameraman] Alright,
I’m gonna try to be calm. Alright, go for it. – I’m gonna be calm. I think based on
the look on my face, the bee beard is not
the new fashion trend. I lasted for about
a minute and a half with my face covered
in around 3,000 bees. Once they started stinging my
lips, it got really painful. They were swarming
around my eyes. I was getting stung on my hands, on my arms, on my
forehead, on my ears, but it was definitely the lips as you can see from how
swollen they are right now that were the worst. I’d definitely say
that the bee beard was an experience
worth experiencing. So far I haven’t had any major
adverse allergic reactions other than just this
localized swelling on my hands and on my face. – [Cameraman] (laughing)
You can hardly tell. – You think this looks okay? – [Cameraman] You
can hardly tell. – I can tell you guys are
having a real hard time not laughing while we’re
trying to get this outro. We counted around two dozen
stings on my body at this point. My lips are swelling up. My eyes swelling up. As you see, the drool’s
coming out of my mouth. But I’m Coyote Peterson,
and that was the bee beard. Be brave. Stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Oh, that’s painful. – [Narrator] When it
was all said and done, we counted a total of 32 stings that spanned my face,
lips, ears, neck, and arms. The neurotoxin of the
European honey bee is very specialized
and is notorious for causing extreme
localized swelling. For me, this began immediately, and despite the
disfigured, lumpy, baked potato look of my face, I actually handled the
venom very positively, and within 48 hours, was
completely back to normal. – Now the guys have
their bee suits on and they’re gonna put the
bees back into their hives. So far, about 30
minutes have gone by. No anaphylactic shock
so I should be just fine other than the fact that my face looks like the face
of the elephant man. Now I can see in the
reflection of your glasses, it is not pretty. It is not pretty. – [Narrator] If you were
wondering how this compared to the single sting
from a bullet ant, I can honestly say it was worse. As compared to the warrior wasp, I guess we will just
have to wait and see. If you thought wearing a beard of European honey
bees was intense, wait until you see what happens when we go up against a
swarm of 30,000 killer bees to extract some wild honey. Don’t forget, subscribe so
you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

When Executioner Wasps Attack

When Executioner Wasps Attack


From their feeding habits to their tissue-damaging
venom, here are 8 stinging facts about the executioner wasp Number 8 It’s native to South and Central
America The executioner wasp is a large, yellow, and
brown insect that can be found in countries ranging from Mexico to northern Argentina. These insects belong to the order hymenoptera,
which also includes other species of wasps, bees, ants and sawflies. They tend to prefer coastal and humid locations
and are prevalent in tropical forests. This species doesn’t seem to be particularly
territorial, as their hives have often been found near other nests housing Polybia and
Mischocyttarus wasps. Since they prefer tropical weather, the females
hibernate during the winter. They become plumper and fuller during autumn,
in order to withstand this period of stillness. The executioner wasp feeds mainly on caterpillars
and nectar, but will prey on other small insects as well. Today’s video was requested by goated2kplayer9990. If you have any other topics you’d like to
learn about subscribe and let us know in the comments section below. Number 7 It can sting more than once Unlike bees, the executioner wasp and all
other similar species, have no fixed limit of times they might sting their prey and perceived
enemies. Bees must carefully choose when to use their
prime defense mechanism as they end up losing both their stingers and a great portion of
their digestive tract. This leads to the bee perishing soon after
the attack. The wasp, however, merely runs out of venom,
and must simply wait for it to be replenished. They’re capable of portioning the venom
they release in each sting, and their poison gland is in charge of renewing it. There’s nothing that prevents them from
continuing to sting once the venom is drained, though. This makes them far more likely to attack
on demand, and makes them especially dangerous, as they can continue to assault their victims
until they no longer feel threatened or annoyed. The executioner wasp is not a particularly
territorial insect, but it won’t hesitate to attack when it believes its hive’s integrity
is in danger. Before we continue with our list, answer this
question. How many queens are usually found in an executioner
wasp’s nest? Is it: a. More than 10
b. Five
c. One
d. None Let us know what you think in the comments
section below and stay tuned to find out the right answer. Number 6 Their nests are often small and underpopulated Though most wasp nests usually house up to
6000 individuals during the peak of summer, executioner wasps prefer to keep their groups
small and tight-knit. These hives tend to be around 3.5 inches in
diameter and accept groups of 4 to 13 individuals. This particular type of wasp is sociable by
nature, and their nests usually include several horizontal cells where their offspring are
kept apart from the rest of the group. The young are also protected from possible
predators and dangers. In urban areas the executioner wasp’s hive
hangs from the edges of roofs in cities and towns, where they can find protection from
the wind and the rain, while also remaining hidden. In the wild, they’ll choose low branches
of spiky trees instead, with a preference for areas close to swamps. Their hives may be small but executioners
are actually the largest among the neotropical wasp species. Even though it owns an incredibly painful
sting, this insect is surprisingly nonaggressive. That is, of course, unless it’s provoked. Number 5 Only female wasps have stingers There are many differences between male and
female wasps. Not only are the males of the species usually
smaller and thinner, but they actually have no stinger at all! If you’re stung by an executioner wasp,
there’s no doubt that a female was the culprit. These significant differences occur because
the female’s anatomy has evolved in accordance to the extra weight and space required to
carry the eggs, making their abdomen larger and more prominent. The reason they carry a stinger while males
don’t, is related to their reproductive system. The ovipositor allows them to deposit the
eggs to be fertilized and in turn, grants them their greatest defense mechanism. Even though a male wasp can’t actually sting
you, sometimes they’ll mimic this act while defending themselves purely out of instinct. Number 4 It has spiky mandibles The executioner wasp has short yet wide jaws
outside their actual mouths, which they rely on for practical use during their daily chores. Working as tongs, these mandibles allow the
wasp to cut pieces of vegetation, grab small objects or even dig sections of their hives
while constructing them. It also works as a terrifying way of seizing
a tiny insect and killing it, usually by decapitation, in order to get a quick meal. In addition to these appendixes, the executioner
wasp also owns large teeth, with the third one usually being considerably larger than
those of other species, making it a terrifying predator for bugs living near their nests. They are notorious for their long lifespans,
managing to survive for 6 to 18 months, which is far more than other wasp species. Number 3 The pain of being stung by one can
last over 24 hours! In 2015, a YouTube personality known as Coyote
Peterson decided to conduct an experiment to test the physical effects that being stung
by different venomous insects had on the human body. He uploaded several videos to his channel,
comparing different stings and the pain they produced. During the fall of 2018, Peterson decided
to get stung by the Executioner wasp, which he claimed would be the last video he uploaded
from this series. Apparently, not only was the sting incredibly
painful, but the discomfort didn’t subside for almost 36 hours! Not only that but he claimed that the residual
effects, though far milder, lasted for another whole week. The YouTuber stated that this particular sting
had been far more severe than the Japanese giant hornet’s and the bullet ant’s attacks,
which are described as two of the most painful stings in the world. He thus dubbed the executioner as the “king
of the sting”. Number 2 Its sting doesn’t appear in the
Schmidt sting pain index Justin Schmidt was an entomologist born in
the late 1940s, who won a Nobel Prize for physiology back in 2015. He created a sting pain index, in which the
distress caused by hymenopteran attacks was analyzed and classified into four distinct
classes. Schmidt claims to have been stung by the majority
of Hymenoptera insects. Pain level one is the mildest and includes
insects like the southern fire ant and most normal beetles. Level four, on the other side of the index,
is reserved for the most critical levels of pain, only for the worst possible stings. The bullet ant and warrior wasp can be found
at this level. In fact, the bullet ant was the only insect
to be given a rating of 4+. At the time Schmidt created his classification,
the executioner wasp hadn’t been discovered yet, and thus it doesn’t have a real position
in the index. Peterson, who we’ve previously mentioned
on this list, claims it was, without a doubt, the worst sting he’d experienced during
his experiments. So, how many queens can usually be found in
an executioner wasp’s nest? The right
answer was c, just one queen per hive! The worker wasps will not tolerate more than
a single monarch, and if several queen wasps are born in a certain colony, the original
one will murder the would-be-usurpers. This is meant to avoid creating confusion
within the hive. Number 1 Its venom can cause tissue necrosis Not only can the executioner’s sting be
excruciatingly painful for those suffering from their attack, but it can also leave behind
permanent scars. Since it’s a relatively small insect, the
effect its venom has on an adult human being won’t be long-lasting, but the marks it
leaves behind may very well be. Not only will it cause inflammation in the
affected area, which can last up to a few days, but it can also tear the tissue surrounding
it, creating small indentations or holes in the skin. This can produce a permanent scar in an adult. If it can inflict this level of damage on
mammalian skin just imagine the harm its venom would cause a small insect! Thanks for watching! Would you rather try to outrun a group of
bees and risk getting caught by all of them, or allow a single executioner wasp to sting
youw on the nose? Let us know in the comments section below!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Most PAINFUL Insect Stings In The World!

Most PAINFUL Insect Stings In The World!


From nasty ants to giant evil wasps, here
are 10 of the most painful insect stings…. 10. Yellow Jacket Wasp Yellow Jacket Wasps are the number one cause
of stings on humans in the US as a whole. Variations can be found in countries around
the world, with some being bold, aggressive, and able to sting their targets repeatedly. Chances are that you’ve experienced a sting
by a Yellow Jacket yourself, and it can be a nasty sensation. The pain, which lasts for about 10 minutes,
is caused by a venom that’s injected through the puncture in the skin and can cause swelling
and redness within a few hours. The effects of the sting are rated as a level
2 on the Schmidt pain sting index, the measure that’s used to describe how painful insect
stings are. Justin O. Schmidt, the creator of the index,
is retired entomologist from the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center in Arizona. He organizes the pain felt by an insect sting
from 1-4, with 4 being the most painful. Fire ant stings are just a 1…so….yeah… He assigned Yellow jacket wasp stings a 2
to give a reference to everyone of how painful stings and bites at higher levels can be. He describes the yellow jacket’s sting as
being ‘hot and smoky, almost irreverent. Imagine W.C Fields extinguishing a cigar on
your tongue’. Schmidt has been stung thousands of times,
most times on purpose, to analyze different stings and has compiled his experiences and
rankings in his book called “The Sting of the Wild”. Contrary to what you might think, he’s not
a masochist, but he was trying to understand the evolution of social behavior for insects
such as wasps, bees, and ants. Guess what he found out?? The more a colony has to lose and the more
risk, the more pain the insects inflict and the more toxic its venom. A sting is like a bazooka!! 9. Trap-Jaw Ant The Trap Jaw ant is a type of carnivorous
ant that lives in Central and South America, as well as Asia, Australia, and Africa. There are more than 1000 different species
of Trap Jaw ant, each of which has the telltale giant jaws that can snap shut quicker than
the blink of an eye- sometimes as fast as in one-tenth of a millisecond. Being bitten by a spring-loaded jaw like this
is, understandably, rather painful- so much so that it was given a 2.5 on the Schmidt
pain index. The pain experienced is described as ‘Instantaneous
and excruciating. A rat trap snaps your index fingernail.’ Those who are stung by the Trap Jaw ant can
expect to experience this pain for up to 10 minutes. The ants don’t just use their incredible bites
to attack predators or prey. They have also been seen using it to simply
eject intruders from their nests, or even to fling themselves backwards to get out of
harm’s way. 8. Paper Wasp Paper wasps are found in North America, mainly
throughout the Southern Midwest and the South. Unlike other wasp species, they are known
to share nests with others and even return to the same nest for multiple seasons. Paper Wasps are the most common type of sting
encountered by people in the Southern US and have longer and more slender bodies than yellow
jackets. They love to set up their nests in trees and
gardens so many an unsuspecting gardener has accidentally trimmed around the nest, making
them angry!! Their colonies are small, typically consisting
of up to 100 individuals, and they rarely sting far away from the nest. The males aren’t able to sting at all, so
it’s only the females that you need to be careful around- particularly later in the
fall when they are looking for hibernation sites. The sting itself injects venom into the victim,
and the searing pain can last for around 10 minutes. Schmidt describes the pain as “caustic and
burning. Distinctly bitter aftertaste. Like spilling a beaker of hydrochloric acid
on a paper cut.” Yikes!! If it makes you feel any better, everyone
except the fertilized queen will die in the winter. And then the process will start all over again
in a new hive. 7. Maricopa Harvester Ant The Maricopa Harvester Ant is commonly found
in Arizona and other southern US states. They tend to build their nests in mounds of
rocks and gravel, but can also create cemented caps on the tops of nests that are built in
softer areas. While they may look no different to other
types of ants, these ones pack a punch with their bite. Their venom is often said to be the most toxic
insect venom of any in the world, more than 20 times the strength of that of a honey bee—luckily,
they only release it in small doses! Schmidt, specifically mentioned the Maricopa
Harvester Ant at level 3, and described the pain as, ‘After eight unrelenting hours
of drilling into that ingrown toenail, you find the drill wedged into the toe’. Wow, that is really descriptive and makes
me really want to NEVER be bitten by one of these!! The pain can last for up to four hours, but
its attack method compounds this feeling. The ant will grip on with its mandibles, and
writhe about into different positions, releasing further doses of venom as it does so. This is incredibly effective against vertebrate
predators, such as horned lizards, and sure to make you regret getting too close to one! 6. Giant Bull Ant Giant Bull ants are one of the largest types
of ant in the world, and can grow up to 40 mm in length (1.57 inches). They are very recognizable both by their huge
size and their giant mandibles. Of course these giant ants with potent venom
are native to…..Australia!! Obviously!! Their colonies are quite small for ant species,
with only about a few hundred or so in each one, but they defend them aggressively. Hikers and campers often encounter them in
the bush and have experienced the extreme pain they can inflict. The ants have excellent eyesight, which allows
them to detect intruders no matter the light levels, and they have no hesitation to attack. Most who fall victim to the Bull Ant think
that it’s the giant mandibles that have bitten them but, in fact, it’s a sting in the abdomen
that causes it. The venom that the sting injects is capable
of causing pain for a number of DAYS after the encounter, yes, DAYS, and the ants are
able to sting repeatedly; Enabling them to effectively defend themselves against aggressors
and also to capture insect prey. Despite their gigantic jaws, the adult bull
ants feed on nectar. But their larvae however are fed with dead
and paralyzed insects that are then eaten alive. 5. Velvet Ant Velvet ants are actually a family of more
than 3,000 different species of wasp. (Their name is very misleading)! The females are wingless and, therefore, resemble
furry ants running around. They can be any of a range of colors, such
as orange, red, or gold, and are found throughout the world- with 400 species in the American
Southwest alone! I saw a big, fuzzy white one running around
while I was visiting family in New Mexico! While they may look cute, the velvet ant sting
packs a punch- so much so that they are also called ‘cow killer ants’ because it’s rumored
to be strong enough to kill a cow!! Velvet ants will only sting in defensive scenarios,
but if you are unfortunate enough to anger one, the searing pain will last for up to
half an hour. They are solitary animals, which means you
can easily come across one without any sign of a larger colony. Females will even dig into the nesting chambers
of other species of bees and wasps, and lay their eggs on the larvae- which serve as a
food source for the young velvet ants when they are born. If you see a male, though, there’s no need
for concern. They have wings, so are able to feed on the
nectar of flowers.. but this comes at a trade-off… they have no stingers! 4. Warrior Wasp The Warrior Wasp is a species endemic to Central
and South America. It’s a large paper wasp that builds complex
colonies to combat the large number of predators it faces in the region. The species swarms when moving from nest to
nest, and can be highly aggressive. It does, of course, have a powerful defense
method with its sting- one that’s ranked at the top level of a number of pain measures,
and is said to be traumatically painful. In writing his pain index, Schmidt described
the Warrior Wasp’s sting as ‘Torture. You are chained in the flow of an active volcano. Why did I start this list?’ Hes talking about his index. Upon being stung, the pain can last at this
extreme level of intensity for 150 minutes and usually requires medical attention to
try and relieve the symptoms. The problem with the warrior wasp is that,
due to its swarming nature, single stings are rare, and those that come into contact
with them will be subjected to multiple stings. Beyond the severe pain that you would experience,
further health complications would inevitably follow. It’s not called a Warrior for nothin!!! 3. Tarantula Hawk Is it a bird? Is it a spider? It’s the tarantula hawk!! They are actually a type of spider wasp and
get their name from their fondness for hunting tarantulas. Reaching up to 4.5 inches in length (11.43
cm), there are 133 known species of tarantula hawks across South and Central America, along
with the southern US. The spiders are much larger than them, but
the wasps have an arsenal that’s more than enough to take on a tarantula, with researchers
never having seen a spider win in a confrontation. The males get their nutrition from nectar,
and it’s the females that hunt tarantulas to provide food for their offspring. They sting them with their sharp, curved,
stinger that can be up to 7mm long… and the venom permanently paralyzes their prey
but keeps them alive. The wasp then lays an egg on the spider, which
becomes a meal ready in waiting. For the sting to have this kind of effect,
you know it has to be powerful. Most predators stay well clear of tarantula
hawks, but roadrunners do enjoy eating them if they can catch them. On a human, the sting is rated on the top
level of the Schmidt pain index, with Shmidt himself describing the sting as ‘Blinding,
fierce, shockingly electric. A running hairdryer has just been dropped
in your bubble bath’. Luckily the pain doesn’t last for very long,
rarely more than 5 minutes, but you’ll be left with swelling and redness for up to a
week. 2. Bullet Ant Bullet ants are found in the tropical forests
of central and South America, and are identifiable by their red and black coloration, along with
their large pincers and a visible stinger. They can grow from 18-30 mm (0.7-1.2 in),
and build colonies of a few hundred individuals around the bases of trees. They mainly feast on nectar and small animals,
like butterflies, and they are not aggressive unless provoked. If they do decide to attack, though, they
can inflict one of the most painful stings of any insect, because it will make you feel
like you’ve been hit by a bullet. It’s indigenous name translates to mean ‘the
one who wounds deeply’. A sting from a single bullet ant injects a
neurotoxin into the body, and leads to severe pain for 24 hours, along with other side effects
such as blood in feces, a pulsing heart rate, muscle spasms, and the accumulation of fluid
in the stung area. Shmidt described the pain as ‘Pure, intense,
brilliant pain. Like walking over flaming charcoal with a
3-inch nail embedded in your heel’. Others have reported it feels like waves of
pain as if you were getting hit by a red hot poker for at least a day. If that sounds bad enough, it gets worse. When a bullet ant stings, it releases chemicals
that attract other ants to join the attack and sting repeatedly. If you aren’t able to get away from this
onslaught you will most likely be in and out of consciousness for at least a few hours. Good news is that there are little to no lasting
effects after 24 hours, although many people say they don’t know how they made it. These ants are used in tribal initiation rites
where the Satere-Mawe of Brazil make teenage boys wear gloves filled with bullet ants that
are sewn in pointing inward so they repeatedly sting the boy’s hands. These boys repeat this ritual about 20 times
and then, they become warriors. 1. Executioner Wasp Executioner wasps are found in Central and
South America, where locals do everything they can to avoid contact with the species. It’s a large species of paper wasp, with vivid
yellow and brown colorations, and can be identified by their large wings and mandibles, and almost
futuristic looking design. The wasp has a hidden secret, though, as its
stinger only protrudes when it’s planning to use it. Schmidt didn’t test an executioner wasp
sting when creating his index, but others have described the sensation as far worse
than that from a bullet ant, and with longer lasting effects. The searing pain lasts for a long time, and
can even cause tissue necrosis, where fluid fills the region around the sting site, and
flesh can begin to die and rot away if not treated properly. Coyote Peterson who worked his way through
various painful stings, said that the executioner wasp sting was way more painful The strength of their sting seems overkill
for their preferred prey of caterpillars, but it is certainly an effective defense method,
with other animals doing everything they can to avoid crossing paths with one of these
wasps. If you ever find yourself in the jungle regions
where they live, be very careful!! Of everything!! Thanks for watching!! I hope you never experience these stings for
yourself. If you have let us know your story in the
comments below!! Would love to hear it!! Be sure to subscribe and see you soon!! Byee

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.