Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)


Hello everyone, this is a new antsite video In this episode we are going to rebuild an ant city. Keep watching until the end – i promise it will be super exciting… This is an old formicarium A thriving weaver ant colony lived in it before. You can saw this colony in some previous videos, or even personally on terraristic exhibitions. This colony lived 2, 2 and half year long in this formicarium. So the goal is to populate again this formicarium with a thriving ant colony. We have chance now to rebuild this system, so why don’t we upgrade a bit this whole formicarium to be more spectacular? You know i have plenty of creativity, so i find out a cylinder shape instead of the previous brick. This is more elegant and even more spectacular. Then I want something more in my mind.. If the weaver ants can get an own tower, why don’t they get an own city instead? This is the story how comes the idea to build an ant city. The structure build up from three different towers, with three outside gallery between them. There are three escape-prevent edge, and three openable ventilation grid on the top of the towers. There are more ventilation grids on two place at the sides, for the better breezing. There are many carcase laying on the floor of the old formicarium. Also can find tainted, unhatched larvae somewhere. The diameter of the biggest cylinder was planned for the size of the old bonsai tree. Meanwhile we get a big family of weaver ants so they will move into the new place. You can see what a massive nest they built in their previous home. They weaved almost everything for nest in the left formicarium, and there are many of workers in the left formicarium also. The ant city looks much amazing after the furnish. The old bonsai tree also looks epic in it, and i put another, smaller bonsai tree inside. Ants can hide between it’s roots. The ant city looks like a real metropolis after the ants have moved in. Every ants working on it’s own task busily. Some of them are building new home and others throwing out the garbage from the old nest. Every ants run fast to their work on the busy trails. After the settlement the ants moved in the old nest at the top of the tree immediately, and they start to throwing out the old larvaes and garbage from it. I didn’t record video from the settlement, because I have put them through almost one by one during an afternoon. It wasn’t too interesting for a video you can believe. An now let’s see the freshly building new nest. One day after the settlement some ants gathered spectacularly between the roots. At that time we could guess what they planning, and a few times later the first strings just appear. The ants just start to weaving their new nest. Catch their larvae in their mouth and working busy on the building operations, so they pass so much with the building on the first day! A few days later the new nest starts to equal to it’s final form. The walls became more stronger as the ants wave more and more layers on it. They use every kind of building material, this reason there are black and green threads in the walls which comes from the fake grass which covers the floor. Meanwhile they start to renew the old nest at the top of the tree. They have repaired the entrances, and they start to build together the nest with the wall of the cylinder. Can see well the fresh silks with brighter color than the old weaves. We can see inside the nest through the formicarium wall. There are many of workers and larvae working hard inside. That workers who don’t work, they guarding in a typical position on the most important strategy places. Sometimes we can notice winged males (drones) in the colony. The smallest, sloping tower still empty, because I give them food and water here. I put a test tube with full of water here, and they start to use it ardently. Hopefully they won’t drown in the open water, if this happens i have to find out another method for watering. There is a build in thermometer at the side of the formicarium. The back of the thermometer have to cover with grid, to avoid them to move inside it. Those areas where the ants feel the ventilation of the air, they try to discover new places. They stick out their antennae often through the dish to find out what is at the other side. A few workers waiting standby on the only door where no any escape-prevent oil around. But don’t worry, i never open this door. If they thirsty or hungry many workers start to raiding in their territory to find food or water. But of course their activity depends from the temperature and light also, in cooler temperature they goes inside the nest instead. And it seems they try to reach the lighter places – i think this could be some escaping instinct. It is such a catching sight, as these tiny insects organizing their society and living their everyday. We can admire them for hours, and can observe more and more interesting ant-things, but unfortunately our video is ending now, hope see you again next time! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and hit the 🔔 icon to get notifications for our new videos! 🙂

Wasp Nests and Bee Hives

Wasp Nests and Bee Hives


[INTRO] It’s summer! And there you are, exploring
the great outdoors and suddenly you hear a buzz, see a flash of yellow and black
and–yeah! You’ve been stung! Was it a bee or wasp or a yellow jacket or hornet? If you didn’t get a good look at the tiny attacker,
you could always try following a home, You know, carefully. Because you can learn a lot about
certain kinds of stinging insects by looking at their nests. First up you should know that all wasps and bees belong to the Hymenoptera Order of insects. And bees actually evolved from wasps sometime
around a hundred and thirty million years ago. This probably happened when a solitary
female wasp somehow, maybe even accidentally, introduced pollen to her
personal nest while, bringing insect prey back for her larva. Pollen, is full of protein and could have
been a nutritious food source especially when prey insects were scarce. So,
scientists think that some wasps might have started actively collecting pollen
and eventually gave up hunting entirely. Trading their smooth, elongated bodies
with big mandibles, for bodies that were adapted to collect pollen and mouth
parts to slurp up nectar. In other words, they evolved into the first solitary
bees. Lots of differences we see between wasps and bees today reflect these food
choices. Whether they nest alone or are social types that live in colonies. Some
solitary female wasps just lay eggs in paralyzed pray, but others create a small
nest to store the bodies by reusing holes and wood made by other insects,
building it out of mud or digging it into the ground. Solitary bees bring back
pollen and nectar to a wood or dirt chamber. Sometimes lining their nests with
different materials depending on the species. For example, Mason Bees use mud,
Carpenter Bees use saw dust and Leaf- Cutter Bees, well, you get the picture. They use tiny leaf pieces. But what about the
colonies? Those big old nests you see in trees or on the corner your garage? Most
social wasps, which include Yellow Jackets and Hornets, are in the family
Vespidae, and make their nests out of paper. They come in different shapes and
sizes depending on what kind of wasp is building. If you’re looking at a big umbrella
shaped nest, tucked under the eaves of your house and you can see hexagonal
cells then, probably that’s a home to some Paper Wasps. If it’s a football-shaped
nest with smooth walls hanging from say, a tree
branch, you’re probably standing next to a colony of Hornets. If you see a stream
of wasps zipping into a hole in the ground or the walls of a building, you’re probably watching Yellow Jackets
duck into their hidden home. Each spring, a Queen wasp starts
constructing her new colony in her preferred location by gathering wood
pulp. Scraping her mandibles against things like tree branches, fence posts,
and even cardboard boxes. She mixes this pulp with saliva to make a fibery-goo
that dries into a solid, paper structure. She’ll then lay some eggs that will grow
into female workers, who will help expand and defend the nest. Most wasp
colonies tend to be pretty small. Some Paper Wasp nests have fewer than a
hundred individuals while, some Yellow Jacket nests hold up to a couple
thousand. And aside from the Queen these wasps may only live for a few weeks. So
especially in temperate areas their nests really only need to provide
shelter for a season’s worth of offspring before their abandoned and
left to degrade. Everyone dies, besides any fertilized Queens, and even they
abandon ship to find a safe place to hibernate for the cold winter before
starting the whole cycle over again. But social bees in the family Apidae, like
Bumble Bees and Honey Bees, they do things kind of different. Bumble Bees still have pretty small nests
holding up to a few hundred bees and they build them in all kinds of
protected places: abandoned rodent dens thick grass, sheds or in trees. Their
Queens operate on yearly cycles as well. Hibernating over the winter then
emerging in the spring to gather food. But bees lack the proper mouth parts to
make their hives out of paper so, instead they secrete a durable, waxy substance
from their abdomens to construct nectar pots and start a small colony. Honey Bees
on the other hand, carefully select the perfect hive location as a group.
Favoring protected areas like, inside the hollow of tree cavities, within walls or
in artificial beekeeper boxes. Honey Bee hives are sturdy. Constructed
out of organized hexagonal honeycomb cells that they used to store honey, pollen and raise larvae. Their colonies
are huge, supporting tens of thousands of members, who live up to a couple months.
And these hives are built to last through the winter since, these bees
store around 60 pounds of honey for food and huddle together for warmth. So we all
know bees are essential for their role in pollination and you might hate social
wasps for setting up camp in your garage but, they do help to
keep pests insect populations down and their homes are perfectly suited for
their lifestyles. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow, which is brought
to you in part by Audible. Right now Audible is offering SciShow viewers a
free 30-day trial membership. Check out audible.com / scishow where you can
choose from over a hundred and eighty thousand audio programs and titles. Such
as, Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation by Tammy Horn. Go to
audible.com / scishow for a free 30-day trial and download your free title today. The science of how and why this happened
isn’t entirely settled but, one thing is certain, royal jelly plays a large role. Worker Bees produce royal jelly from …

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát – 3-6/B. rész

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát – 3-6/B. rész


antsite.eu presents: How to raise an ant colony? – part: 3/B If the colony grows out the test tube, and it gets dirty, we possibly keep them in an open test tube. This is a “velvety tree ant” colony with hundreds of workers. Normally it’s a bad idea to open this test tube, but i show you a technique which we can use this time. Temporarily we can use a simple container box for it, but the best will be the formicarium – i will tell you later why. As first step we should put on some escape-prevent oil to the top of the container. This will prevent the ants to run away. Oiling only a few, otherwise the oil will leak down, and the ants will stick in it. Put the colony into the container, and open the test tube carefully. Ants will flooding out immediately, but they can’t run out from the box. Much easy to feeding such a big colony in this box than in the test tube. Even the ants have more space, and they can react if someting goes wrong in the test tube. In a closed test tube the water can flooding the ants, but with this open test-tube keeping method the whole colony can escape out from the tube. Put tinfoil on a clean test tube setup. Put this into the box and the ants will moving into this one later from the old and dirty test tube. They do it because they feels the darker and cleaner test tube more safety and comfortable. We can hurry them if we tip them out from the test tube, but this species spray formic-acid during stress so we don’t want as many ants to be suicide. Carefully get out the wool-pieces. The ants find the honey immediately – they really need enough food now. Throw some cutted worms also to give them protein. You can see the workers not really successfull on the escap-prevent oil. They can’t walk on this oiled surface. Few days later the ants has moved to the new test tube, so we can get out the old one. But make sure to tip out all of the workers from it. If we check them closer, we can see they moved all the brood with eggs and larvae to the new test tube. So this is a really effective method for moving a colony. The ants did it themselves, we only has to give the ideal conditions for them. Now let’s see the detriments: The escape-prevent oil will disappear from the top of the container within a few weeks. It goes dry or the ants put some dust on it, or somehow fight themselves through. So time to time we should put some fresh oil on it, and could be a good idea to close the container with a cap. But now i have to say another problem! If the box hasn’t got enough ventilation the colony inside can be suicide during stress with their formic-acid, or can choke without enough fresh air. Better ventilation or some soil could help on this, but the best final solution if we keep the ants in a formicarium. In this the ventilation optimal for sure, and we can observe the nest much better than in a test tube. So if we have a bigger formicarium we can use the arena-part similarly like the container before. But first we have to close the nest-part to prevent the ants to move in too early. Then put the test tube in the arena-part. We can use test-tube holder to prevent the rolling. Now open the test tube and let the spotters out. We put the food in the arena not into the test tube anymore. Can feed in small bowls or just simply on the ground of the arena, because acrylic formicariums are easy to clean. We can put in different kind of foods, and we can learn the ants to find the food themselves everywhere in the arena. If the test tube gets dirty or goes dry we can put in a new, clean test tube near the old, and the ants can move themselves within some days. If they don’t want to move Just tip them out from the old test tube and let the new one inside the arena, so they have to move into the new one. But with this method we will loss some brood, because some of the eggs and larvae will stick into the test tube, so we have to put them back carefully with a brush. So better if the ants move themselves. Our colony number will raising because of the more space and more food. It could happen some weeks or some months later – depends of the species. When they have enough workers to find every food in the arena the ants are ready to move in the formicarium’s nest-part. Important to wait until they have enough workers, because if we let them in too early the colony could move in, but maybe they won’t have enough workers to go out searching for food. It could emerge a crisis in the colony because they don’t have enough food to grow workers, but even don’t have enough workers to find food. The recommend worker number to open the nest is different – depends of the species. It could around 30-50 workers with a smaller species, but with a bigger species maybe 20 can be enough. After we open the nest-part the spotters will scout their new territory. If they find it suitable the whole colony will move in. Sometimes needs days for the moving – it depends from the colony number. Bigger colonies has more workers so they find the new place faster and moves themselves faster. After that we only have to feed and drink the colony, so we can observe as they grow more and more workers, and our ant-society grows up slowly. Don’t forget to like and subscribe, and hit the bell 🔔 icon! Click for the next episode!

A simple way to tell insects apart – Anika Hazra

A simple way to tell insects apart – Anika Hazra


A whip-like straw. Powerful, crushing blades. A pointed, piercing tube. There are nearly a million
known insect species in the world, but most have one of just
five common types of mouthparts. And that’s extremely useful to scientists because when they encounter
an unfamiliar insect in the wild, they can learn a lot about it
just by examining how it eats. Scientific classification, or taxonomy, is used to organize all
living things into seven levels: kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species. The features of an insect’s mouthparts can
help identify which order it belongs to, while also providing clues about how
it evolved and what it feeds on. The chewing mouthpart is the most common. It’s also the most primitive— all other mouthparts are thought to have
started out looking like this one before evolving into something different. It features a pair
of jaws called mandibles with toothed inner edges that cut up
and crush solid foods, like leaves or other insects. You can find this mouthpart
on ants from the Hymenoptera order, grasshoppers and crickets
of the Orthoptera order, dragonflies of the Odonata order, and beetles of the Coleoptera order. The piercing-sucking mouthpart consists of
a long, tube-like structure called a beak. This beak can pierce plant
or animal tissue to suck up liquids like sap or blood. It can also secrete saliva
with digestive enzymes that liquefy food for easier sucking. Insects in the Hemiptera order
have piercing-sucking mouthparts and include bed bugs, cicadas, aphids, and leafhoppers. The siphoning mouthpart, a friendlier version
of the piercing and sucking beak, also consists of a long, tube-like
structure called a proboscis that works like a straw
to suck up nectar from flowers. Insects of the Lepidoptera order— butterflies and moths— keep their proboscises rolled
up tightly beneath their heads when they’re not feeding and unfurl them when
they come across some sweet nectar. With the sponging mouthpart,
there’s yet another tube, this time ending in two spongy lobes that contain many finer
tubes called pseudotracheae. The pseudotracheae secrete
enzyme-filled saliva and soak up fluids
and dissolved foods by capillary action. House flies, fruit flies, and the other non-biting
members of the Diptera order are the only insects
that use this technique. But, there’s a catch. Biting flies within Diptera, like mosquitoes, horse flies, and deer flies, have a piercing-sucking mouthpart
instead of the sponging mouthpart. And finally, the chewing-lapping mouthpart
is a combination of mandibles and a proboscis with a tongue-like
structure at its tip for lapping up nectar. On this type of mouthpart, the mandibles themselves
are not actually used for eating. For bees and wasps,
members of the Hymenoptera order, they serve instead as tools
for pollen-collecting and wax-molding. Of course, in nature, there are always
exceptions to the rules. The juvenile stages of some insects,
for example, have completely different kinds
of mouths than their adult versions, like caterpillars, which use chewing
mouthparts to devour leaves before metamorphosing into
butterflies and moths with siphoning mouthparts. Still, mouthpart identification can,
for the most part, help scientists—and you
—categorize insects. So why not break out a magnifying lens and learn a little more about
who’s nibbling your vegetable garden, biting your arm, or just flying by your ear.