Oklahoma’s Female Prison Population Is Reaching Epidemic Levels | NBC Left Field

Oklahoma’s Female Prison Population Is Reaching Epidemic Levels | NBC Left Field


My dad got me hooked on methamphetamines
by giving me an IV shot. We was at one of his friend’s house and
I walked in on him getting high, told him I wanted to try it,
and that’s how it started. I got pregnant when I was 19,
20, I had my daughter in prison. The last few days before I was released
from prison I had a lot of anxiety and dealing with the guilt and not relapsing.>>This is Aliea. She’s well acquainted with
Oklahoma’s criminal justice system. During her most recent interaction,
she spent one year in prison.>>Walking out of prison,
it was amazing, I felt free, you know? Being able to walk out those gates and
not have to look back. My case managers were there to pick me up. But you wanna walk out and your family
be there, especially your children, but it wasn’t happening like that.>>Branch 15 is a transitional living
house, this is where I will be living for the next year.>>This is going to be your room.>>I’m really nervous about everything, about the other people,
about messing up or not. I’m just nervous about everything.>>Since childhood, Aliea’s been
entangled in a cycle of drug addiction, unstable family life, and incarceration. And now, she wants nothing
more than to break that cycle.>>When I first started getting in
trouble with the law was when I was 12, that’s when I started my addiction. My mother had left me,
my father was in and out of my life. My dad started me on drugs. I remember that day like it was yesterday,
I was 12 years old, you know? I was stripped from my childhood. It was one thing, one thing after
another just to get that drug.>>This ought to be
right here an easy job.>>My dad got sent to prison because
of drugs, he was cooking meth. I thought he was cool cuz he
went to prison, he was bad.>>And I know you have a lot of guilt too. I have a lot of guilt, but
I don’t judge you for it. I don’t hold it against you at all.>>My life, it went downhill. I was in and out of lockup. And then when I turned 17,
I was put in Oklahoma County Jail. I stayed there for a year,
and started all over again, started my addiction all over again.>>Pregnant by age 20,
Aliea was high when she found out, and once again she was in trouble for drugs. The cycle starts again, but
this time she ended up in prison, terrified about what might
happen to her unborn child.>>It was embarrassing,
it was real embarrassing. Here I am, young, pregnant with my
first child, I’m a drug addict. They race me to the hospital. I was there going
through labor for 18 hours. I was shackled to the bed, and
we were pushing her out, and I just started crying, like I was bawling. I don’t know it was tears of joy or tears of fixing to have my
daughter stripped from me. They put her in my arms in the bed for
a couple hours, and then they took her. I was in prison for two years.>>During that time, Aliea’s
grandmother took care of her child. But when she was finally released.>>I tried to bond with her, but
every time I would pick her up, she would scream and cry, and
want my grandmother, so I felt rejected. It was hard, it was real hard.>>Unable to be the mother she never had,
Aliea went back to what she knew, drugs. When her grandmother eventually died, she found herself ill prepared
to raise her own daughter.>>My daughter told me she hated me and
I just let go.>>The fact is Aliea’s story
isn’t unique in Oklahoma. The state has the highest rate of
female incarceration in the country and there’s no signs of it
slowing down any time soon. In 2015, 64 out of every 100,000
women in the US were in prison. Oklahoma more than doubled that
with 151 women for every 100,000. Experts point to the state’s harsh
drug laws and longer prison terms, which are some of the most
aggressive in the country. Oklahoma uses prison over alternatives
more often than other states, with female incarceration projected to
grow by 60% over the next ten years. Similar to Aliea, 61% of female offenders
that entered prison in 2013 were assessed with the need for
substance abuse treatment. The cycle starts yet again.>>In 2012, I was arrested,
my daughter was put in foster care.>>For years, she tried to get her
daughter back, but was denied. A year ago, she caught her latest
charge and ended up behind bars. Aliea has since found out
that her daughter doesn’t want a relationship with her. I worry about my daughter following
in my footsteps a lot because I followed my dad’s footsteps. September 12th, she’ll be 12, and
that’s when my life went out of control. I want to do whatever
I can to prevent that. If I could break the cycle with her,
it would be amazing. I get scared because I couldn’t
imagine my daughter being in prison. This time is different because I
know what I need to do to break that cycle with my daughter. I wanna be a family.

Escaping Oklahoma’s Female Prison Epidemic: NBC Left Field

Escaping Oklahoma’s Female Prison Epidemic: NBC Left Field


My dad got me hooked on methamphetamines
by giving me an IV shot. We was at one of his friend’s house and
I walked in on him getting high, told him I wanted to try it,
and that’s how it started. I got pregnant when I was 19,
20, I had my daughter in prison. The last few days before I was released
from prison I had a lot of anxiety and dealing with the guilt and not relapsing.>>This is Aliea. She’s well acquainted with
Oklahoma’s criminal justice system. During her most recent interaction,
she spent one year in prison.>>Walking out of prison,
it was amazing, I felt free, you know? Being able to walk out those gates and
not have to look back. My case managers were there to pick me up. But you wanna walk out and your family
be there, especially your children, but it wasn’t happening like that.>>Branch 15 is a transitional living
house, this is where I will be living for the next year.>>This is going to be your room.>>I’m really nervous about everything, about the other people,
about messing up or not. I’m just nervous about everything.>>Since childhood, Aliea’s been
entangled in a cycle of drug addiction, unstable family life, and incarceration. And now, she wants nothing
more than to break that cycle.>>When I first started getting in
trouble with the law was when I was 12, that’s when I started my addiction. My mother had left me,
my father was in and out of my life. My dad started me on drugs. I remember that day like it was yesterday,
I was 12 years old, you know? I was stripped from my childhood. It was one thing, one thing after
another just to get that drug.>>This ought to be
right here an easy job.>>My dad got sent to prison because
of drugs, he was cooking meth. I thought he was cool cuz he
went to prison, he was bad.>>And I know you have a lot of guilt too. I have a lot of guilt, but
I don’t judge you for it. I don’t hold it against you at all.>>My life, it went downhill. I was in and out of lockup. And then when I turned 17,
I was put in Oklahoma County Jail. I stayed there for a year,
and started all over again, started my addiction all over again.>>Pregnant by age 20,
Aliea was high when she found out, and once again she was in trouble for drugs. The cycle starts again, but
this time she ended up in prison, terrified about what might
happen to her unborn child.>>It was embarrassing,
it was real embarrassing. Here I am, young, pregnant with my
first child, I’m a drug addict. They race me to the hospital. I was there going
through labor for 18 hours. I was shackled to the bed, and
we were pushing her out, and I just started crying, like I was bawling. I don’t know it was tears of joy or tears of fixing to have my
daughter stripped from me. They put her in my arms in the bed for
a couple hours, and then they took her. I was in prison for two years.>>During that time, Aliea’s
grandmother took care of her child. But when she was finally released.>>I tried to bond with her, but
every time I would pick her up, she would scream and cry, and
want my grandmother, so I felt rejected. It was hard, it was real hard.>>Unable to be the mother she never had,
Aliea went back to what she knew, drugs. When her grandmother eventually died, she found herself ill prepared
to raise her own daughter.>>My daughter told me she hated me and
I just let go.>>The fact is Aliea’s story
isn’t unique in Oklahoma. The state has the highest rate of
female incarceration in the country and there’s no signs of it
slowing down any time soon. In 2015, 64 out of every 100,000
women in the US were in prison. Oklahoma more than doubled that
with 151 women for every 100,000. Experts point to the state’s harsh
drug laws and longer prison terms, which are some of the most
aggressive in the country. Oklahoma uses prison over alternatives
more often than other states, with female incarceration projected to
grow by 60% over the next ten years. Similar to Aliea, 61% of female offenders
that entered prison in 2013 were assessed with the need for
substance abuse treatment. The cycle starts yet again.>>In 2012, I was arrested,
my daughter was put in foster care.>>For years, she tried to get her
daughter back, but was denied. A year ago, she caught her latest
charge and ended up behind bars. Aliea has since found out
that her daughter doesn’t want a relationship with her. I worry about my daughter following
in my footsteps a lot because I followed my dad’s footsteps. September 12th, she’ll be 12, and
that’s when my life went out of control. I want to do whatever
I can to prevent that. If I could break the cycle with her,
it would be amazing. I get scared because I couldn’t
imagine my daughter being in prison. This time is different because I
know what I need to do to break that cycle with my daughter. I wanna be a family.

AIDS: From Ryan White to Today’s Silent Epidemic | Retro Report on PBS

AIDS: From Ryan White to Today’s Silent Epidemic | Retro Report on PBS


♪♪ Jupiter Adams is part
of a silent epidemic. -My very first HIV test
came back positive. It was hell. Like, the first two months, I couldn’t talk to nobody. I couldn’t do anything. I didn’t hear about HIV. First time I heard about it
was in a history class where they were talking
about the ACT UP movement, so I told everybody I thought
it was like the Bubonic Plague. I thought it came, it left,
so I didn’t worry about it. -“Public awareness
about HIV has faded, and that’s contributing
to a health crisis today,” says Dr. Larry Mass, an AIDS activist
for nearly four decades. -I wish they could go on
indefinitely, thinking, “Oh, those old guys
and then all that old stuff, we don’t have to deal
with that.” This history
is not just history. It’s them, and it’s situations
that they’re facing today. -That history goes back to
the early days of the epidemic in the 1980s, when the public often
reacted with prejudice, if they acknowledged
the disease at all. -The setup was that this
disease was something striking almost totally undesirables. -It appeared a year ago
in New York’s gay community. -Investigators have examined
the habits of homosexuals for clues. -To some traditionalists,
AIDS is a gay plague. -Gays, drug addicts, injection,
heroin addicts… -At the very least,
there should be a quarantine of all homosexuals,
drug abusers, and prostitutes. -This is their disease. Ordinary, everyday
heterosexuals, normal people, have nothing to worry about. -Scientists believe AIDS
is not likely to spread beyond these groups, but it is still
a deadly epidemic. -It was the dark years.
It was terrible. People were dying
at a very high rate. The hospice facilities
were filled with people. We had no therapy at all,
so it was, like, unfortunately, putting Band-Aids
on hemorrhages. -More than 1,500 cases
have been discovered so far, and most experts believe
there will be more than 3,000 by the end of the year. -People were very secretive because it was
extremely stigmatizing. -I’ve had friends tell me
to go and die, “Just get away and go and die.” -Although federal health
authorities found no evidence
of transmission through casual contact, public concern remained high. And as the epidemic spread,
so did the fear. -40,000 Americans will get AIDS
this year and next. -One out of seven people
polled said they would favor
tattooing all AIDS victims, better than half said
they should be quarantined, and nearly as many would require
anyone who tests positive for AIDS antibodies
to carry an ID card. -Then in 1985, AIDS came to a small
Indiana town. -It was last Christmas
that Ryan White, a hemophiliac, learned that because
of a blood transfusion, he had contracted AIDS. -Ryan was just playful,
silly, loved skateboarding
and pretty carefree, and he was very well aware that his life was going
to be cut short. He just wanted to attend school
and be with his friends like everybody else does. -But local school officials
barred the 13-year-old from returning to middle school, and some concerned parents
fought to keep him out. Lawyer David Rosselot
represented them. -People were very panicked. We don’t know anything
about this disease. The only thing we know
that if you have it, you’re gonna die.
-I think we have to prove that there’s beyond a shadow
of a doubt that my child is not gonna be
infected with this. -Ryan had no control
over getting AIDS, and we’ve just had to fight
for it seems like everything, and now we’ll just have
to keep on fighting. -When a court eventually ruled
in Ryan’s favor, some protests turned ugly. -There were, like,
a picket line at school — It’s the only way
I can describe it — of people in scrubs and Halloween masks and signs, like, telling him to die. Just hurling insults, screaming at him and his family. -But the coverage of his story
turned Ryan White into a symbol of resilience. -And finally this evening,
our Person of the Week — the young boy who learned,
when he was 13, that he had a terminal illness. -Ryan was singled out
by the governor of the state as a model of courage
and inner strength. -Every time you’d turn
on the TV, you turn the news on,
there’s a picture Ryan. It just seemed like everywhere
you looked, there were celebrities
that were speaking out. -I don’t think he wanted
the role that he was put in, but at the same time that he saw how much people
needed to be educated. -Ryan’s success at reaching
the public highlighted how much
other voices had been ignored. -Ryan White was a figure who,
in fairly short order, began to elicit public sympathy. It was difficult to just say,
“Those nasty faggots.” Ryan White was
the innocent victim. Well, does that imply that
the others were the guilty, deserving recipients? -Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Ronald Reagan’s got to go!
Hey, hey! -Activists from the gay
community, including members
of the ACT UP movement, had been pressing
the Reagan administration to help those
with the disease. -The fact that it has taken
the president five years to begin to even address this
problem publicly demonstrates that this
administration hasn’t given it the level of commitment
that it deserves. -As more people went public
with their stories of contracting AIDS, Americans’ understanding
of the crisis was broadening, a door Ryan White
had helped open. -You know, people just
aren’t listening, and we have to make them listen. -You had a young boy
who turned the knob a bit to get people to say,
“The enemy here is the virus. The enemy is not the person
who has been infected.” -When Ryan died in 1990, more than 1,500 mourners
attended his funeral, including David Rosselot, the lawyer who had fought
to keep him out of school. -I knew I had to say goodbye, if for no other reason than to be able to say,
you know, “This wasn’t about you.
I hope you forgive me.” -The story of AIDS
began to change. Congress pushed through
the Ryan White Care Act, bipartisan legislation aimed
at providing care for people with HIV and AIDS, and soon, new drug regimens
offered a sense of hope. -It was when we got
the effective drugs that it was really
a transformation — I mean, completely
a transformation in how we looked at HIV. -People are gonna live
longer, healthier, more productive lives and be able to live with HIV. -As the years went by, we had better and better drugs. We have now drugs
which will bring the virus down to below detectable level, which not only saves
the life of the person, but makes it
essentially impossible for that person to transmit
the virus to a sexual partner. -And for those at risk
of getting HIV, there’s a daily medication
called “Pre-exposure Prophylaxis,” or “PrEP.” -PrEP has been clearly shown, if you take a single pill
once a day, you decrease the likelihood that
you would acquire HIV infection. So if you put those two things
together, you could theoretically essentially end
the epidemic quickly. -But despite these
medical advances, HIV infections have
continued to spread. -The fact is that HIV is not
an equal-opportunity virus. Everyone can get infected, but everyone
is not getting infected. -Just like in the early days
of the epidemic, it’s striking populations
who are often overlooked, this time —
communities of color, particularly across
the Deep South. “And once again,” Dr. Mass says, “the public
isn’t paying attention.” -There’s a tendency to look
at these Black and Hispanic rural communities
in the South as marginal. It’s the same kind of thinking
that we had early on. The thing is when you don’t deal with marginalized communities
or issues, they have a way
of becoming forefront. -The places where the epidemic
is growing are in those communities where people of color
typically have not had access to resources,
where poverty sits. -Cindy Watson works
with LBGTQ Youth in Jacksonville, Florida, which has one of the highest
rates of new HIV diagnoses in the country. -We have these pills, but if people can’t get
access to them, if their lives are not stable
and in a place where they can continue
to take them over time, they don’t have the benefit
of the medication and of living
with a chronic illness. And they’re also infectious. -Watson and colleagues
help young people navigate the medical system and get access to costly drugs for HIV treatment
and prevention. -Given my own identity
as a queer person of color, I know the turbulence
that comes with people trying to navigate systems,
so many systems. -While access the testing
and medication is vital, Jackson says continued education
is also needed to counteract deep-seated stigma
and misinformation. -I just think what’s passed
down for generations what’s passed down from,
like, stereotypes and myths. That has a more
lasting effect, unfortunately. But the more education
that we push, the more that we’re able
to flip the script and change the narrative. -We have the tools to do things that we never imagined
we could do before. Are we implementing
these tools to the maximum? We’ve gone from being
in the dark and a terrible,
terrible disease to now being
able to not only save lives, but to actually end
this terrible scourge. -Like it’s never really
a wrong time to have the conversation…
-“Ending the epidemic,” Dr. Fauci says,
“will also require a new generation of activists.” People like Jupiter Adams. -I was once inside of that
position, where I didn’t know — where I didn’t know
it was an epidemic. The only thing I can do
is do what I would have wanted someone to do with me. I want to save as many people
as I can. Me and my status, we have
an understanding that we are going
to go very far together. ♪♪

Rooster Teeth Animated Adventures – Godzilla vs the Human Bugs


BURNIE: We were talking about like Godzilla, like – people are scared shitless of bugs, so what if Godzilla was like exactly like a person, and when it saw humans it was like: “WUHHHUHUHULLUHHH!”
[laughter] GUS: He’s like knocking down buildings – “Get it off, get it off!” BURNIE: “Where’d it go, where’d it go?” JACK: Godzilla has like an aerosol can – he like shakes and sprays all the people on the ground… GAVIN: He finally smashes a human and then looks at it, and he’s just like, “Glughh!”
[laughter] BURNIE: Fucking tank – the tank rolls up, and Godzilla takes it and puts a cup over it…
[laughter] GUS: …and he’s like “I’ll deal with that later.”
[laughter] BURNIE: I would pay great money if that was the first scene in the new Godzilla. He comes out of the ocean, and a fucking jet flies by him and he goes: “EEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!”.
[laughter] He goes up to other giant monsters –
“Is it on me? Is it on me?” [laughter]