ANT ATTACK & ECHIDNA (GRAPHIC Content) with Andrew Ucles

ANT ATTACK & ECHIDNA (GRAPHIC Content) with Andrew Ucles


[music with drums]

Continue… Production details>>
UCLES [music with drums] Continues…. Yeah
Jedge yeah
Judge yeah
Judge a All right We’re out here in Australia On the Australian landscape JUdge a all right here a Strap on Strap on the Australian landscape, and We are looking for echidnas also known as the Australia echidnas now these guys here are a small solitary mammal thats’s what we covered in Slacks they’re not venomous be little bit of a prick to catch Yeah its funny because you look at this land scaping well they must be a like a thousand and one places to hide and there literally is but there is a bit of a technique in finding them all it takes is a little bit of intelligence hectates in sixe population numbers in areas rich in dietary sources Territorial but there home ranges often Defined the ant nests now regardless Mission to try and find one try walking around in note the diggings on the ant-man having Target speces if you understand awesome Over 60,000 and in just the one nest and in just 10 minutes of concentrating the killer consumed over 200grams of pure protein by theway he also has to enjoy the rrelentless but but i’ll get to this a little bit later and as the max the kingdom was lined uo the mother mother of monsters in Greek mythology as it was believed to about the tributes of reptiles and mammals so they get good and the mammals so they get good good and mammals so they get good good so good so long all right now just got here is a famous trying to get not yeah for now all right now this is pretty typical i dont have small one you say exactly what he’s doing and is a defense stratgy that you can i will do so soon as i come across a prduct will fox i could be it could be a think i could a dog colud galinha thus is excactly what i’ll start to dig now if you’re going in your backyard easiest way to get one here is like this ready- I up so i you thinking down with his front paws will like this i’ll get my hands down here and start didding I’M trying my hand and that andthat and that come on i dont comin and i flip and under such a soft underneath dont ask me to do this and ready 321 like being cake you ready 321 likebeing cake you are now the echindna right get this now this guy he is a moderate rain you figured what size i like the top of my back or something but now i am on the train is an egg-laying mammal Just like that Platypus the we have here in Australia as well I;Ve there sounds like killing it has been pretty hot tonigh so these egg-laying Mammals right generally what happens is the females oh and covered in stuff is the females a month after mating wwll actually deposit an egg into their patch like a livey leg one and what will happen is 10 days later it’ll hatch if you think of the word pretty quick right but then what wll happen is over the course of about fifty days the yound ones would be suckling from milk pause in patch yeah doesn’t everything now 50 days comes and then guess what she kicks the map and she diggz – she diggz a whole she’s like i have been in whole or worn at your place the younf and then the young ones who stay there from the seven months where you located watch over and if weighing them as well isn’t that right now i’m actually going to be putting putting myself idea you say the kids and got a very long stickly toungue it come with a big advantage when they are fading you know i can go for things like ants and termites which consists largely of their diet but probably thinking how would it be to get DR.Martin it because ican leaving some pretty hard places to get so today i’m going to be seen whats asticky situation i’m goingto get myself into whats a sticky situation i’m going to get myself into so going to get myself into so ar for our try to stick it out for 10 minutes on a ness to give me some sense of an idea of what feeding time is actually a lot for the kidnap with some more place he bar i was ready to take on the challenge i was ready to take on the challenge up ah ahhh ahh ah hhahh ahhhhhhh lots of paaain ouaaahhhhhhh ahhh ahhhh running wildly jumps into water splassshhhh short aahhhh *the ants in the pants* wahahahehehe *blurbs incoherently in content

Millipede vs Centipede!

Millipede vs Centipede!


– I’m Coyote Peterson, welcome
to the desert millipede versus the desert centipede. (upbeat adventure music) Venturing into the
nighttime desert is not for the faint of heart, as this cactus strewn ecosystem is laced with a plethora
of nocturnal predators. Whether it be
scorpions, spiders, that right there
is a black widow, solpugids, or vinegaroons, these arachnids are
certain to be on the prowl, as they use the
cover of darkness to silently hunt for their prey. Look at that. Does that thing not
look like an alien? All arachnids come
equipped with eight legs, and most are also armed
with a set of fangs or a venom injecting stinger. That is the most venomous
species of scorpion in the United States. And he’s on my hand. All right, this makes
me a little bit nervous. I wanna see if I can get
him to just sit still. However, if eight legs, fangs, and stingers aren’t
enough to scare you, Arizona’s Sonoran
Desert is also home to a subphylum of creatures with even more
legs, the myriapods, which consists of
centipedes and millipedes. At the end of the day, both of these animals do
their best to avoid humans, however, today we are going
to capture one of each so we can get them in
front of the cameras for an up close comparison. First, let’s talk about
the desert millipede. Now, millipede
means thousand feet. And each one of these
little body segments has two pairs of legs on it. Now there’s no way
that I’m going to get underneath this creature
and count its legs, but I can tell you from
it crawling across my arm, that there are a ton of
them tickling me right now. It feels like a bunch of
little tiny pieces of Velcro grabbing onto your arm hairs. Despite the name,
there isn’t actually a species of millipede
on the planet that has a thousand feet. On average they have around 400, with the record being 750, more than any other
animal in the world. These myriapods have
very poor eyesight. They have very
simple eyes up front, so they’re really using these
antenna to help them navigate through the environment. And you’ll see as he dances
up in the air like that, he’s basically looking
for what his next move is going to be. If he can’t feel anything
with those antenna, he’s kinda like, woah, woah, I’ve run out of road here. And until he bumps
into something that he can walk on, he’s just gonna stay
put until he can get those front legs planted. Now, the millipede doesn’t
have many predators, and that’s because
these little myriapods are actually poisonous. They do have glands that run
along the side of their body, and if they are really,
really threatened, they will secrete a
nasty orange fluid. And it absolutely stinks. I actually got it all over
my hands the other night. Now, if you get this
poison on your skin, all you need to do
is wash you hands with soap and water, and you’ll be just fine. Now I’m completely
comfortable with millipedes. They don’t bite. If it doesn’t bite, it
can crawl all over me all that it wants. But the centipede is a
whole different ball game. And we’re gonna get that
guy out in a second, and get a close look at that
venomous little desert dweller. The desert millipede is
virtually harmless to humans. And if you encounter
one in the wild, just admire it from
a safe distance. (breathes out) OK, now we’re
on to the part of the episode that I have been dreading. There is no good way to do this. You just have to plop
him out and go for it. All right, here we go, ready? Oh boy. Now he’s kinda like,
oh, I’m on the ground, and I’m on the move. Desert centipedes can
inflict a very painful and venomous bite, so I stress, never
attempt what I am doing. OK, there we go. Now that I have his
head under control, and more importantly,
those fangs, I feel a lot better
about this situation. Oh, look at how creepy that
little desert creature is. Now, what’s really interesting
is that the centipede means hundred feet. Each species of
centipede varies. There’s no way that this
one has a hundred feet, but as they continue to grow, and their body
segments elongate, they grow more legs. Now one major difference between the centipede and the millipede is that the centipede has
a very flattened body. This allows them to fit
into crevices between rocks, and allows them to
glide very quickly over the surface of the desert. Now, these are
voracious predators. They are out here right
now walking the washes and searching through the
rocks for other animals. They will eat bugs,
they will eat scorpions, they will eat lizards, and the ones that
grow to the size of the giant desert centipede, they will even take rodents. But the bite from a
centipede of even this size is gonna put you into
some incredible pain. That’s why I wanna be
as careful as possible while handling this myriapod. One really interesting
feature about all centipedes is that you see
the back end here? This rump? You have these two modified legs on the back end here which have little hooks in them. And this back end is
pretty much a false head. It’s the same color
as the head is. And these two little modified
feet on the back end here have hooks on them. So, let’s say you’re a predator, and you’re coming, and
you’re like, all right, I’m gonna get him, I’m gonna
bite his head right off. These little modified
feet go up in the air, boom, and you get pricked
with those little spikes, throws you off guard, the
centipede spins around, and that’s when you get a bite
from those venomous fangs. This is not a creature that
is very easy to consume. Centipede venom is not
considered deadly to humans, however, the pain has been
said to keep a full grown man on the ground and in
pain for several hours. Moral of the story, steer
clear of centipedes. I hope everybody
enjoyed this comparison. The desert centipede versus
the desert millipede. Both species are native
to the Sonoran Desert. And I’d suggest avoiding both because the
centipede is venomous and the millipede is poisonous. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. Both of these myriapods
play an important role in the ecosystem. And while they may be creepy and have a gazillion legs
as compared to you and me, always try to remember that they’re going to
use each and every one to run in the
opposite direction. If you thought that
comparison was cool, check out the alligator
snapping turtle versus the common
snapping turtle. And don’t forget subscribe
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Killer Insect | Full information of killer insect | Is killer insect Truly exist or not?

Killer Insect | Full information of killer insect | Is killer insect Truly exist or not?


nowadays an insect is getting viral
which is called killer insect and it’s found in India some people say never
this insect or never try to kill your bared hands because it can spread the
virus to your full body in minutes but there is an argument about this killer
insect is it true or fake different people have different opinions about it
some people say it’s true and some says it’s fake so I personally research on
Google about it to know more information finally the result came out it seems to
me faq news because this picture can be edited by Photoshop but sometimes the
comments of people made me feel this might be true but however besides all
the arguments if you think this killer insect exists then share this video to
your friends and family to alert them to stay away from this insect if they see
also tell them don’t touch it with bare hands as you know it’s able to circulate
the entire human system in minutes whatever if you have any more
information about the killer insect please share the information in the
comment as you know thanks for watching the video

Army Ant 🐜 | Amazing Animals

Army Ant 🐜 | Amazing Animals


NARRATOR: AND NOW IT’S
TIME FOR SOME MORE… “AMAZING ANIMALS!” NUMBER 6,098… THE AMAZING ARMY ANT! SO CALLED BECAUSE THEY UM, WEAR CUTE LITTLE
HATS AND BOOTS… DRILL SGT ANT:
NO WE DO NOT, YOU WILL ADDRESS
US WITH RESPECT! NARRATOR: AH SORRY… DRILL SGT ANT: SIR! NARRATOR: I MEAN SIR! ARMY ANTS MARCH OVER
THE JUNGLE FLOOR KILLING EVERYTHING IN THEIR PATH. GRASSHOPPER: I SHOULD HAVE
TAKEN THE OTHER PATH, OH! NARRATOR: YOU’LL FIND THEM
IN TROPICAL RAINFORESTS WHERE THEY’RE VERY IMPORTANT
FOR THE ECOSYSTEM. BUT THEY DON’T BUILD
PERMANENT NESTS. ANT: OOH, NO WONDER
WE’RE FEELING SO “ANTSY.” [ANTS LAUGHING]. NARRATOR: EACH COLONY HAS
DIFFERENT ANTS WITH DIFFERENT JOBS: OHH HERE’S A
NASTY ONE, THE SOLDIER ANT! SOLDIER ANT: GET OFF
OUR PATH HUMAN WEIRDO! NARRATOR: THANK YOU! AND THE FORAGER ANT WHO
BASICALLY LOOKS FOR FOOD. DRILL SGT ANT: WHAT
ARE YOU DOING?? ANTS: SIMON’S GOT
HIS HEAD STUCK. DRILL SGT ANT: STOP DOING
THAT AND FINISH LIQUEFYING THAT GRASSHOPPER
SO WE CAN EAT IT! AND WILL YOU PLEASE
STOP KISSING ME! ANT: SORRY! NARRATOR: AND THESE
ARE NURSERY ANTS, THEY LOOK AFTER THE
LITTLE, TINY BABIES, AWW. LAST BUT NOT LEAST,
HER MAJESTY, THE QUEEN! EVERYTHING REVOLVES
AROUND HER. QUEEN ANT: EXACTLY,
NOW OFF WITH HIS HEAD! NARRATOR: EACH ANT KNOWS
EXACTLY WHAT THEY HAVE TO DO. THEY TALK TO EACH OTHER
BY LEAVING CHEMICAL TRAILS. [ANT FLATULENCE]. ANT: PEWW, I’M NOT
FOLLOWING THAT! NARRATOR: THESE TRAILS HELP
THEM TO JOIN TOGETHER USING THEIR OWN BODIES TO
BUILD THEIR GIANT NEST! THEY KEEP IT TOGETHER UNTIL
THE QUEEN LAYS HER EGGS AND THEN THEY BREAK IT
DOWN AND MOVE ON. ANT: OH WE JUST BUILT THIS. [ANTS GROANING]. NARRATOR: THEY MIGHT GIVE
YOU THE ‘CREEPY CRAWLIES BUT THE ARMY ANT IS
QUITE THE AMAZING ANIMAL!

Meet the Ant Man and his Empire of 100,000 ants | Extraordinary Oddities

Meet the Ant Man and his Empire of 100,000 ants | Extraordinary Oddities


[Quirky music playing] Ants are powerful in their ways. Given the facts that ants outlived the dinosaurs (this) tells us that they are adaptable. They (have) evolved to a higher stage. It made me realise (something) about the universe about nature about life You cannot put (this feeling) into words. There are so many things to learn from them. I’m Zat Low and I keep ants [Quirky music continues] [Crickets chirping] Actually, the ants saved my life. My past was pretty messed up. My top choice wasn’t to do ant-related businesses. Honestly right, it was doing something else. But ants showed me the way to live. I thought it was going to be the end of me. People from my past we have a lot of ego, pride. So when things start to go bad and we couldn’t take the blow we will try a lot of devastating ways (to cope) like commiting suicide. But a queen ant flew into my mouth and rescued me. It changed the way I used to be. My perspective on life and my character. There were a lot of times when I felt like giving up. Coincidentally, I will see one ant strolling (past) or some ants crawling onto me. These kind of signs that prompt me that I should go further. [Playful music playing] [Car reversing sound] I do not consider myself to be a scientist. No accolades, how to be a scientist? [In English] I consider myself as a naturalist. Somebody who observes nature and everything about it. I’m trying to seek knowledge solutions or even peace. I have about hundred over (ant) colonies. They are like a civilisation. There are some intelligent and some stupid ants. [Chuckle] Some ants are very sensitive to danger. For example, when you place the oil barrier some will dump themselves into it. Some will know that, “Oh, I shouldn’t go any further.” Isn’t it the same as society? [Joking] Stupid people die first. [Playful music continues] To build a formicarium for your ants you have to understand what species you are keeping. The best formicarium must be sustainable for the colony to live inside. It’s something close to like (the job of) an architect. The ones that I build some people call it ‘overly extravagant’. But they are like gods in a temple. Because the ants are worth that kind of work. [Playful music continues] The difficulties of setting up this exhibition Wow! Thousands of difficulties. From building the formicariums transporting them sustaining them. The crowd. Who might come, who might not come. It’s pretty much an ongoing thing. [Snoring sounds] [Upbeat music playing] [Murmuring] Because Singapore doesn’t have any myrmecologists (study of ants) I hope there’s going to be some upcoming myrmecologist. Because I’m not qualified. [Chuckles] There’s many people who judges (me) but I understand where they are coming from. Because everyone fears something that they do not understand. I think that I’m the only person who believes that setting up this exhibition will work and I really, truly believe that it will work. Because if you look at ants they are very small but yet they achieve big things. So I think that all these negative comments it doesn’t affect me. There’s a lot of things that we do not understand about ants even for me. There’s some things that I want to know, why and how. With regards to science and knowledge I admire them.

Robert Wood: Robotic Insects | Nat Geo Live

Robert Wood: Robotic Insects | Nat Geo Live


( intro music ) ( applause ) Robert: I’m going to
start off with a bold and probably
unsubstantiated claim which is that robotics
is the next internet. What I mean by that is
it’s the next big thing to impact our lives whether it’s biomedical applications, whether it’s automating
our daily lives. Before I get into what I
think are the big topics, the hot topics in
some of our research, I want to give you
a little bit of history. Robotics as a term was
coined actually back in the 1920’s by
a Czech playwright in a play called “Rossum’s
Universal Robots.” Apparently, the play wasn’t
very good but nonetheless, it brought the word robots
to the English language. In fact, the word
initially meant the use of mechanized labor. Basically, doing things
that we didn’t wanna do, automating our lives. The next example I’ll give is
from Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” which I’m sure most of
you have seen or if not, have seen some of the iconic
art work from this film. Another example progressing
on in terms of time is Asimov’s robot series. I won’t keep going
on forward through Terminator movies
and Star Wars movies and that sort of thing. You’ll notice a theme
in these examples is the robot uprising
and the dystopic view of what robots will
do to the world. To depart from that, I’d
like to give an example of what I think are my two
favorite robots in history. Voyager 1 was a robot. It was a teleoperated
robot but it took one of the most
profound pictures, I’m sure you now
agree, of earth. This is back in 1990. The second photo that I
think is very telling about not just robots
but human curiosity and the advances of technology
is what I would think is one of the
first robot selfies which is the Curiosity
rover on Mars. These are two of
my favorite images and what I find the
most powerful and moving photographs that I’ve ever seen. Okay, that said and
if you think about these examples and
you think about all the science fiction
movies that you’ve seen that have robots in them,
you could be asking, “Where are all the robots? Why are there no robots
that are making me dinner, and folding my
clothes et cetera?” The answer is that there’s
a lot of big challenges. There’s a lot of difficulty in bringing these
things to real life. I’ll show you just
a couple brief examples of where these
things actually exist in modern life and technology. One is the things that
are welding the doors on your cars in
the assembly line. These are big, bulky,
very precise fast things. One of the things
you’ll notice in this is that there’s no humans
anywhere near these because they’re very dangerous. Thinking about adopting
these technologies to more household
or everyday use, there’s some challenges there. Perhaps, you have one
of these in your house. Here’s what might be the
first useful, accessible robotic technology
that you can use. The obligatory bullet points to
tell you what we are working on and our view of the world in terms of the
opportunities in robotics. The opportunities
to get these things to be more useful, more
ubiquitous, cheaper, et cetera, we focus on a couple of things. One is… I guess they can be
collectively combined into where we get
our inspiration. The first one is
inspiration from nature. For a lot of the
different functions that we might to
achieve with our robots there is likely
a biologic analog. We work with
biologists extensively to try to extract
out those principles and try to embody them
in our engineered systems. The second one is
non-traditional places. That’ll become a little bit
more clear in a few slides when I show you some
of the ways that we actually
build these robots. What I’m going to talk about is one example, I guess
a couple of examples, but one example in particular
of bioinspired robots and to do this, we have
to answer questions in new manufacturing,
new materials in ways of building
these systems. Okay so to phrase this question, let’s watch these video. This is a carpenter bee. As an engineer,
I can look at this and start to ask some
really well-posed questions that drives some
of our research. How are the wings moving? How are the wings
interacting with the air and generating vortices that it’s then manipulating
through its wings? What is the thoracic mechanics that is moving the wings about? What is the muscular that’s
driving thoracic mechanics? What are the metabolic processes that are driving the muscles, that are driving the mechanics, that are driving the wings? What is the flight mode? What are the sensors
that it’s using? What are the control
methodologies? What is the neurobiology? All these really
interesting questions… ( audience laughing ) …that we as engineers
can start to sort of boil down into the topics that
we have to work on if we wanted to actually
make one of these. This is the… one prototype
of our robotic insects. I’m not going to pass it around. I’d be happy to show
it to you afterwards. Questions about if we’re
going to make something that operates like this, this is just an
animation of a hoverfly. If we’re going to make something
in an engineered system that works something like this, how do we do it? What are the answers
to those questions that I just posed
that are derived from these natural systems? One of the biggest ones
is how do you make it? The first question that I had is how would I piece together
the components for this? I would argue that I don’t
want to do it this way. I don’t want to take
hundreds or even thousands of very complex
geometrical components and piece them together
under a microscope. That would my drive my
graduate students crazy. That wouldn’t work. We had to come up with
alternative solutions. I’m contradicting myself
because this is actually an attempt to sort of a
nuts and bolts approach, to actually piece
together components. This is the old way before
we had the discovery which I’ll show you in a minute. This is literally
what it looks like. You’re actually piecing together
all the different components and I won’t get into the
details what these things are. There are the motors. There are the wings. There are the little mechanisms that cause the thing
to move properly and that sort of thing. If we want to get around that, how do we do this? Well, it turns out we
took inspiration from, I guess in hindsight, is
a nontraditional place, my son’s library. My son at the time,
a couple of years ago, was really into pop-up books. If you think about
a pop-up book, I think about it as
fantastically complicated structures
and mechanisms that are created by
extremely unskilled users. I’m not talking about the
people that made the book. I’m talking about the kids
that operate the books. You open up the books. You do something very
simple like opening a page or pulling something and out of this page comes
these fantastic structures. We do something very similar. We call this process
pop-up book MEMS. It goes as follows. You basically build all of
the components that you want. Like I said, the motors,
the wings, et cetera. You also build
a scaffold around it. That’s what this sort of
surrounding area is here. Then by proper design of all
the individual components in this quasi
two-dimensional composite. If it’s designed right
and constructed properly, which of course I’m not
getting much into the details, then all I’d have
to do is push on it and that’s we’ll
show in this video. All you have to do is push on it and out pops the
device that I want because all of the
trajectories that are associated with the
assembly of this device are controlled by
the mechanisms that are built into this
pop-up structure. This allows us to build our
computational origami friends. This is a real thing. Actually, you can prove that
you can make anything you want in terms of any
geometric complexity, any mechanism that
you want to build can be done in this way. We can make things
arbitrarily complicated. We can make things with
any material combination, metals, composites, polymer,
ceramics, doesn’t matter. We can do this very quickly. We’re experimental robotics, we know actually very
little about the physics of the devices that we make. Not for lack of trying
but just because it’s complex, fluid
structure interactions, all these difficult things. What we do then is
we build and test, build and test, and
often test to failure as I’ll show you in a moment. This is a resulting device. You’ll notice that every device that I show you
will look different. That’s just because
we learn something and change the design
and reiterate on that. I should mention the way
that we’re building things, this concept of a scaffold building all the
components for you. We like to think in some way fulfills Richard
Feynman’s prophecy about small robots
building small robots. That’s the way that
we think about this. We can build things in
bulk just by the fact that this is inherently
parallelizable process. Bulk, for us, is only
a few but that’s okay. We plugged these things in. We test them. Flap wings around, do some
system identification, all sorts of interesting things to try to understand how
this thing actually works. Then plug it in, turn it on. This has sped down by
a factor of one eighth and this is what happens… ( audience laughing ) …every time. In fact, if you look at it in
real time, this is very fast. This is just a consequence of
the dynamics of this system. Insects are very unlike
the airplanes that we ride in. The 747s of the world are
designed to be passively stable. If the engines turn off, it
should glide down to safety without the presence
of active control. Insects are not that way. They’re unstable and this
leads to the maneuverability that you’ve experienced if
you ever try to swat them. ( audience laughing ) What I’m saying is they’re
the fighter jets of the world. If we can properly
stabilize these systems then they become
quite maneuverable. After plenty of trial and error, again this has sped
down one eighth time. We are able to control
the flight of these things. One of the first
demonstrations that we had, which we were very excited about a couple of years ago,
was just hover. It turns out that’s one of
the more difficult things that we can try to do. We can also take advantage of
some of these fast dynamics that I was alluding
to and also some of the physics of scaling to
allow these things to perch. Once we have these
things working, we’re doing all sorts
of cute demonstrations of how they can behave
like the insects that
we try to mimic. I just want to wrap up with
a couple of other topics and other broad
statements of course. We also make a host of
other bioinspired robots. I’m showing you these not just
because they’re cool or creepy but because they actually
represent one of our big pushes which is all of our bioinspired
work takes cues from nature and tries to instantiate
that in robots. We’re actually seeing that
arrow of bioinspiration reverse because now we can
start to build robots which mimics some of the
features of natural systems that we can test our
hypothesis on natural systems and I say us, our
biologist colleagues, in ways that would be difficult
to do with the actual animal. This is really exciting for us. We also make little
cockroach-like robots. This is in real time. I’m just showing you this
because we can make claims that these things are actually some of the fastest
robots in the world if you normalize the body
length which of course a caveat. In fact, twice as fast
as Usain Bolt. Okay. I often get the questions so
I will preemptively answer it which is what would you
do with these things? Why are you doing this? The main thing that
gets us excited is that it’s a basic
research topic that all of these topics
in fluid mechanics and microfabrication and
bioengineering, et cetera are what really drive us. The technology fallout
that comes from this meaning technology fallout
like I have a former student that started a company
that’s trying to find commercial
applications for the way that we build things. We also have prototypes
for making little, minimally invasive surgical
tools using the same techniques. But you can also use these
things in the future, 10-20 years down the road
when they’re working for things like search
and rescue where a firefighter might have a
thousand of these things onsite that flies through a building
looking for human survivors, or even hazardous
environment explorations, space exploration, et cetera. These are the common
themes that are the longer term goals of this. Lastly, I’ll say that
these things turn out to be extremely useful
for education purposes. We go from school to school, and also festivals,
local and national to try to get kids excited
in STEM. It turns out and I
mean no disrespect to our theoretical
physicist colleagues that this is much more
likely to get kids interested in science and engineering
than string theories. I apologize if that’s your area. With that, I will stop and
I’ll thank you for listening. Thank you. ( applause ) ( outro music )

How to Build an ANT FARM AT HOME

How to Build an ANT FARM AT HOME


Hi guys! Look what we have here! We’ve decided to get ourselves new pets! Little ants this time! Ants are incredible creatures! It’s so interesting to watch them! We’ve purchased a whole house for them. An ant farm. But we need to assemble it first! Are we going to be antsologists? No, Sam. Ants are studied by myrmecologists! And we’ll be just keeping the ants at home. Let’s see what’s inside… Here are all the parts. I think I need to remove this protective layer. Hehheh… cool! Give a thumbs up if you like removing protective layers from devices! Right, like this. Til the last strip. All the parts are clean! And here we have paths for our ants. We need to assemble them in a certain order. Here’s their running ground. Next, we’ll need this blue sponge. Let’s soak it in warm water. Squeeze the water out. And place it into this cavity. The sponge will create humidity, without which the ants will die. Let’s pull the sponge through this opening. Now we’ll take these five plastic frames. And put them together neatly. And secure them with screws. And another one… Now let’s insert the screws into the openings, like this. We need to insert screws into each empty opening. And now let’s connect a side wall. This will be the entrance for the ants. Now we’ll screw everything in place. But not too tight or the plastic will crack. Done! Let’s set this aside. We’ll take the base and attach transparent walls to it. And.. the right wall. Let’s take the third wall and attach it carefully. And now comes an exciting moment! We’re connecting the rooms to the house! I feel like an ant builder! To make the walls hold, we’ll fix them with rubber bands! Oh I love this! It’s sooo relaxing, guys! And on the other side. We’re done with the walls, now let’s secure the bottom. The walls are secure, so now it’s time for the roof! Tada! The roof should’t have any holes. To fix that, we’ll use these two parts that will make the cover. And this net! Bees?! Again?! No, Sammy. This won’t let the ants escape. Phew… I’ve inserted the net between two parts. Now let’s secure them with the screws. And on the other side. Let’s cover our roof. And plug the back door, to make sure the ants stay inside. We’ll have the front door on the other side, where our friends will enter the house. Here we have a tube that we need to fill with water. And here’s a sponge plug. Let’s insert it into a special opening. The moisture will gradually fill all the rooms of the formicarium. The house is moisturized. Now we only need to add these steps at the entrance. A kind of a porch! Dinner is served! Awesome, Sammy. Let the ants iiiin! Here are our residents. Let’s take the cotton ball out. Here we have a special tunnel, which we’ll insert quickly and insert the other end into the house. Yay! The first resident! Haha! Here comes the second one! We really hope our ants will be comfortable in this house. Our ants are called Cataglyphis Aenescens – runner ants, which live mostly in grasslands, but also in semi-deserts and deserts. Actually, there are so many ants on Earth, that currently there are one million ants per human being! The common worker ant lives from 90 days to 3 years. And the ant queen can reign for up to 30 years! Look, look, it’s lifting something! Ants can carry weights 5000 times heavier than their own weight! Can you imagine that?! Our ants are called runners because they are incredibly fast. They run faster than any other species of ant, because they can lift their abdomen in a special way! Ants don’t have ears – how can they hear?! Ants ‘hear’ with their knees and feet. They sense vibrations from their surroundings! They are always in a hurry! No wonder ants are a symbol of hard work! Get inspired while looking at them, Sammy! I’m already so inspired! And I’m ready to do something useful! Really? Like what? Like… come up with the name for our new ant farm! Oh, no, Sammy… I’ll give you another task if you’re feeling so inspired. Because we’ll ask our viewers to come up with the name for our ant house! Yes! Write the names in the comments! We’ll select the most interesting one! Bye bye! See you soon! We’ll keep you updated! Guys, give a thumbs up if you liked the ant video! If we get it to 5000 thumbs up, we promise to shoot another video about them!

Meet the Dust Mites, Tiny Roommates That Feast On Your Skin  |  Deep Look

Meet the Dust Mites, Tiny Roommates That Feast On Your Skin | Deep Look


Long ago — around the time we started growing
our own food – humans settled down. We went home, inside. We built permanent shelters to protect us
from the elements… and keep the wild animals at bay. Or so we thought. Surprise! The animals were right there with us. They
still are. This is dust. Zoom in and you find an ecosystem almost as
elaborate as the one we left outside. But small enough for us to forget it exists. Dust is pretty much anything small. But the most important ingredient of dust
— at least for the purposes of this story — is skin. Your skin. Her skin. His skin. Tiny flakes that fall off our bodies.. all
day long. Researchers at The California Academy of Sciences
in San Francisco collect and study house dust to find out what, exactly makes up this micro-universe. Even the cleanest homes are teeming with tiny,
almost invisible roommates. — and even more so if you have pets or kids
or live on the ground floor. Most homes have over 100 species – no matter
how often you vacuum. Not just these guys,
but these and these. Most of these microscopic roommates are harmless. Just freeloaders, basically. But one can cause real trouble: the house
dust mite. This is like the roommate who leaves his crap
around and makes you sick. Dust mites don’t bite people. They don’t need
to. We feed them. Constantly. Skin flakes are hard to digest. It’s like eating hair or feathers. So dust mites have powerful digestive enzymes
to break the skin down. Those enzymes turn up in dust mite poop. And let’s just say you probably don’t want
to know how much dust mite poop is in your house.. When people breathe dust, they breathe in
the poop — and the enzymes, too — which irritate the lungs and can aggravate asthma,
especially in kids. Like us humans, dust mites haven’t always
lived inside either. These tiny relatives of spiders and scorpions
once lived in birds nests. But then, some intrepid dust mites made the
jump… from bird’s homes, to ours.. And as our society thrived and grew, so did theirs. Hi – this is Amy. So while you marvel at this lovely pyroglyphid,
I have a favor to ask. Our partner PBS Digital Studios wants to hear
from you. It’s a survey, so we can make even better
shows. It’ll take a few minutes, but, a few lucky
people will get a free PBS Digital Studios T-shirt. Just click the link below. Thanks, and thanks for watching.

MONSTER BUG WARS | Channel Trailer


עולם החרקים הוא ללא רחמים בכל פינה יש יצורים מבחילים אל תהיו שוטים, אלו הם רוצחים ורוצחים שכירים שמשליטים אימה מעל ומעבר לכל דימיון היא תזריק נוזל שממיס בשר לתוך החור ותמצוץ ממנו את החיים שלו בעולם המבחיל של מפלצות חרקים אתם תצעדו בזהירות או שזה יהיה הצעד האחרון שלכם

Zombie Parasites | Nat Geo Live

Zombie Parasites | Nat Geo Live


( intro music )Parasites are not degenerates,they’re actually maybe the most
successful life form on earth.
And they do all sorts of
amazing things.
They were using their hostsfor all sorts of
nefarious purposes
to get what they needed.If you see a ladybug huddled
over some little bit of fluff,
you’re looking at a
zombie bodyguard.
( applause ) So originally when they were
organizing this talk, they were trying to
convince us to, dress up and I wasn’t quite
willing to do that. But, I did bring
my favorite T-shirt, so… If you can’t tell,
that’s a schistosome there. ( audience laughing ) So, my goal in this in photographing these
creatures was to… get past this visceral aversion
we all have towards parasites, and try to show how amazing
these creatures really are! So, if I’m going to try to
convince you that parasites are cool, I’m going to start with
the star of the show.So this is a ladybugstanding guard over
the cocoon of a wasp
and the way this works,
is that wasp lays an egg,
it injects an egg
into that ladybug
and the egg hatches and
it grows inside the ladybug and the larval wasp inside
actually knows to avoid the vital organs
of that ladybug because if it chews
on those vital organs it will kill the ladybug and
it will die too. So it avoids the vital organs
and when it’s ready to come out, it pushes its way out of the
abdomen of that ladybug and it spins its cocoon.
And the problem is this cocoon is a
very vulnerable stage in the lifecycle of this wasp.
It’s just sitting there immobile ready to be eaten by
any predator that walks by. So, that’s why it’s gotten this
ladybug to stand guard over it.And the amazing thing is
this ladybug will sit there
twitching for days over this,
this wasp
and if it’s able to survive
the seven days that the wasp takes to
develop into an adult the ladybug can
actually recover. The mind control can wear off and that ladybug can go to
re-grow its internal organs and go on to reproduce.This is the wasp
that’s responsible for that,
this is
Dinocampus coccinellae,
it’s, she’s barely
a centimeter long
and I can tell
she’s a female, both
because she’s got this
ovipositor at the end,
the stinger
that she uses
to inject the eggs
and also because this species
is parthenogenetic, which means it doesn’t need to fertilize
its eggs to reproduce, it can clone itself, and so it injects an egg
into the ladybug, It does not need to be
fertilized, and all of those eggs will
develop to be more females. The entire species is female. Actually there has been
four or five males that has been identified
over the course of studying this creature and frankly I don’t know
how that really works, I don’t know how
parthenogenesis works.
It’s crazy. and it will have to be the topic
of another discussion. Now ladybugs are
not the only ones that get turned into
bodyguards. There’s another wasp
in this family Braconidae that infects caterpillarsand in this case it injects
several dozen eggs
at the same time.Those eggs hatch
inside the caterpillar
and just like the ladybugthey know to avoid
the internal organs
of the caterpillar,
just like the ladybug
they have a virus that
helps them. It’s a different kind of virus but in this case the virus
tricks the immune system of the caterpillar to protect,
to hide these invaders and the virus actually
changes the metabolism of the caterpillar
so that it gorges itself and it prevents the caterpillar from transforming
into an adult, so the virus turns
the caterpillar into a feeding machine
for these wasp larva.So this is a video of this
process. It starts with the
adult wasp stinging and
injecting those eggs
into a newly hatched
caterpillar. Those caterpillars
then go about their normal life
for the next week
feeding and growingand waiting for those
wasp larva to emerge.
When they are ready
they chew their way
through the skin
of the caterpillar.
And they come out
by the dozens.
So they actually
spin their cocoon
as they are emerging
from the caterpillar.
The amazing thing
about this process is that
the caterpillar survives,
it wakes up,
it crawls on the top of the pile
of cocoons and it spins that
additional layer
of protective silk.
And the reason for this,the entire purpose
of the protection
is to prevent this.This is a hyperparasitoid waspinjecting its egg
into the parasitic wasp
that just emerged
from the caterpillar.
So an additional layer
of parasitism
above the
mind controlling one. It’s pretty cool. So this theme of
trying to protect that delicate larval stage…
that pupation, that’s a common theme. And there’s another wasp
in different groupthat uses a different approach
than the bodyguard style.
What it does is,
it catches the spider
and lays an egg on its back.So this is a spider
that lives in the
palm plantations of Costa Ricaand it’s got a wasp larva
hanging on its back.
This is one that
has hatched out
and it’s feeding on hemolymph,
the blood of that spider.
And what it does
when it’s ready to pupate, instead of turning that spider
into a bodyguard, it gets the spider to build
a special kind of web. And so normally webs are
designed to catch insects, this web is designed to support the weight
of the cocoon. And so the wasp larva waits until the spider’s done
building this web, it then kills it and
then hangs its cocoon safely off the floor
of the forest.So this is the stagewhere the spider has just
finished building that web
and the wasp returns the favorby killing it
and eating it.
And this is that
specialized web.
And you can tell
what the spiders built
because
the spider silk is white
and wasp silk is yellow.So this is a video
starting with,
after the spider
has been killed.
That wasp larva is feeding on
every last drop
of the spider’s blood in order
to store up enough energy
to transform into an adult.And then when it’s ready
to transform,
it’s finished digesting
that spider
it then drops its own silk
off of the spider web
and spins its cocoon.And you can actually see
how it uses its head
to hollow out the cavity
inside of that cocoon.
These… these wasps
have figured out this mind control thing
pretty well. And the, the queen of
all mind controlling wasps isthe emerald cockroach wasp.So this is a wasp that hunts
cockroaches to feed its young
And it is more cunning
and sophisticated
than your typical predator like
a lion or a shark. So what it does is, it starts
by paralyzing the cockroach.It stings it
right behind its head,
paralysis the cockroach
and then it snakes
its stinger into the brain
of the cockroach
where it has special censorsso that it can grope
around the brain
and find exactly the part
that is responsible
for generating the motivation
for movement.
And it disables that part.
And what that means is the cockroach is
fully functional, all of its muscles work but it cannot generate
the will to move on its own. Instead it takes its queues
from the wasp. So the wasp comes back,it holds the antenna of that
cockroach,
with its mouth
and it leads it
as if walking a dog
to its burrow,
where it lays an egg
on its belly and buries it to be
eaten alive by its babies. And those wasp larva
just like the others they know how to avoid
the internal organs they can keep it fresh
as long as possible and on top of that, they actually smear this
disinfecting substance on the inside of the cockroach
to keep it from rotting.This is a
horsehair worm,
it’s using its host as bothhousing and transportation.
So in this case,
the worm grows up
inside the cricket
and once it gets
a little cramped in there,
it wants to come out.
And really this worm has a free living part
of its life stage. It doesn’t live his whole life
in the cricket. But the problem is
where it comes out, it has to be wet,
it’s an aquatic worm when it comes out. So if it came out in dry land
it would dry up and die. So it makes the cricket
go find water so that it can jump in,
commit suicide and that worm can go on
to continue its life cycle. So, in that pond
or in that stream the worm will go find a mate,
it will lay a bunch of eggs, those eggs hatch and they
burrow into mosquito larva. And they insist themselves
in a mosquito larva, so when the mosquitoes emerge
and they fly out, their cysts are still there and that mosquito lives
its normal life, it dies on land and
it gets eaten by a cricket. And the worm cyst
actually knows when it’s inside of a cricket
and that’s when it knows, it can start developing. That’s
how the life cycle continues.This is an ant
that has been infected by
‘Ophiocordyceps’.And this fungus,
it gets the ant
to crawl up
the stalk of a plant
out till the end of a leaf
and it kills the ant there
so that when the fungus sendsits reproductive
structures out
those spores are
better able to disperse
onto the forest floor.This is actually a really
diverse group of fungi and each species of fungus
has its own host and it gets its host
to clampdown in different parts
of the plant. Some of them are
at the tip of the leaf, some of them are
on the underside, some of them are
at the base of a tree and it’s thought that they
are manipulating their host to maximize the ability
to disperse on to more ants. And so they’ve actually shown
there are places where the fungus is
getting the ant to die above the foraging lines
of its colony. So that when those
spores come out, they’re more likely
to get in contact with more ants.And actually the white eye
you see here,
that’s fungus as well.So what the fungus does is,it hollows out
the entire inside of that ant
and it just so happens
that the exoskeleton
right in front of eye,
it’s thin enough
that you can see
the fungal tissue
through the eye membrane.So this is a video of an antthis is a
different species of ant.
That’s also been
infected by this
cordyceps fungus–
Ophiocordyceps fungus.
It’s in its last hour of life.It’s just twitching thereand the fungus has forced it to
bite down on edge of this leaf.
And what happens is that
first night
after that fungus
kills the ant
it bursts through,
the weaker joints
of the exoskeleton
and spends the next week,
growing a reproductive stockout of the back
of the ant’s head.
Now… my favorite parasite
that I photographed is the Rhizocephala.The Rhizocephala is a
tiny little parasitic barnacle
that infects sheep crabs.
This is a sheep crab here.
And what it does is it
gets into the sheep crab
and if the sheep crab
started off as a male it turns it into a female.
It feminizes the crab and that’s because
only female crabs have this structure
that can house eggs. And so the parasite waits
for this feminized male to grow this egg chamber,
it lays its own eggs in that egg chamber
and then it activates the maternal care instinct
of this crab so that it thinks
it’s pregnant and it will care for
the eggs of the parasite. Then every two weeks, those eggs mature
and they hatch out and they go on to infect
more crabs. So what you see here isevery little speck
in this photo
is a newly hatched
parasitic barnacle
that is going out to infect
a new crab.
So let me, let me back up
and tell little more about
where the story came from,
where the idea came from.
So I was working
with my editor Todd James and you know, he just said
look we got to figure out a fresh approach to this, it’s got to be
something different. And you know, I agreed,
the pictures of parasites I had seen to that point
were like jars of leeches or a worm getting pulled out of
somebody’s eye and its like– They were very successful
in grossing you out, but they really failed
in getting you to appreciate how incredible
these creatures are. But then there’s also
the sake of this, this problem of okay, what,
how do I light these creatures, these parasites in a new way. Because up until that point,
macro photography for me was find a cool bug,
shine some light on it, take a picture. You know, you could make it
a sharp light, you could make it soft light, you could light if from
this way or that way, that’s about it.
I mean how do I, how do I take this
to a next level? How I find a
more interesting way to light these creatures? And I had this idea
while I was sitting in my friend Stacy’s apartment
in Oakland. And I don’t remember
what we’re talking about because I was distracted by the quality of light
on her face. She was sitting
in front of a window.This is Stacy in front of
her window in Oakland
and the window light was
coming around her head,
lighting the sides of her
cheeks and her nose
and showing
the topography in a way,
that I never really
thought about before.
I thought how do
I scale this down to a parasite level. Can I use this
to light parasites and show the shape and
contours in a new way? And so I had my Stacy light,
I had my volcano light I had this idea of how to
light backgrounds to emphasize the drama and action going on, but you know,
what does that really look like to implement in the field. Well, let me show you.Most of the work was done
in hotel rooms.
So this is a hotel room
in Costa Rica,
where I’m trying to
photograph this
spider being parasitized
by a wasp
there’s buckets of spiders
everywhere
that I’m trying to hide from
the housekeeping staff
so they won’t throw them out.And then, you know,hotel rooms really aren’t
well-designed for photography,
so there is a lot of
moving furniture around
and in this case,
what I’m trying to do is
I’m trying to set up
a time lapse
of these fungus flowers
in South Dakota, growing,
and I borrowed this light
that had been confiscated
from an illegal marijuana
growing operation in Spearfish
( laughter ) And had been
donated to the University
who then lent it to me.
And after all this effort,
it totally failed.
It was not useful at all.And I ended up building
a lot of my own contraptions,
lighting contraptions
in this case
I was trying to use this
fiber-optic linelight
to build a makeshift scanner,
to scan this plant
because there’s a
beautiful quality of light
that flatbed scanners
produce on flowers
and I wanted to try to
make that and it
again totally failed.
It was
a pain in the butt to use,
it didn’t really workout.
This is the setup
I used to photograph the cover
in a lab in Montréal.And so I was able to set up
in some research labs,
which has some advantages
and disadvantages.
The main disadvantage
is sometimes
you don’t have a lot of space,this is in Boulder
at P. Johnson’s lab
where I’m trying to photograph
this deformed frog.
Of all of these creatures,
though, the most difficult
to photograph was actually that cricket, and I visited this lab
in New Mexico, a couple of times
where Ben Hanelt had these infected crickets
in his lab. And the first time
they all died the night before I got there,
the second time they weren’t ready
the worms took too long to, to mature
so they weren’t ready when I got there
and I just said you know what, forgot this
and I packed them into my bag and I flew back with them
to California. And so my housemates
at this point are used to this
kind of nonsense and one of them is a
documentary film maker and so he filmed me, photographing these
crickets, so…I kept them in the,in the hot water
heater room,
where they would stay warm.
This is my kitchen.
And the thing about these
crickets and the worms
is that you can actually tellwhen the worms are
ready to come out.
They actually turn dark brown,and you can see them
coiled up
inside the belly
of these crickets.
And so I’m setting up
my fiber-optic lights
and getting ready to
photograph these things.
Not my best hair day.( laughter )Most of this stuff happensat 2 o’clock in
the morning and so I
sort of didn’t remember that
he was filming me that day.
And so, I’m actually putting
a layer of Rain X
down on the glass
and so that
beads up the water nicely.
And then I put the crickets
in the fridge,
for a few minutes
to cool them down
so they wouldn’t hop
all over the place.
And the liquid that I’m using
is not actually water,
it’s called cricket saline,
it’s a solution that mimics
the internal chemistry
of the cricket.
So, that when the worms
come out they don’t freak out.
They think they’re still
inside the cricket.
So that picture took me abouttwenty-three days
to figure out.
Now, a lot of that I did at
home and so it was not like
I was working on it,
24 hours a day, some days it was only
a couple of hours, but all the tricks with the Rain X,
with the fridge, with the cricket saline.
These are not things that I knew about
ahead of time. There are things that
I just had to work out on the fly, through one
iteration after the next. And you figure out a problem,
or, you come across a problem you just have to
figure out a solution. The cricket’s too jumpy,
the worm’s freaking out, the water
doesn’t look right and you just have to take what,
what you’ve solved and build on that. And so there was a point
early on in the story where my editor, Todd
wanted to see my… my progress on
the story and… you know, he didn’t really
have time to look through all my pictures,
he wanted to send me– he wanted me to send him
a small selection. And really I wanted him to see
all my pictures because I wanted to show him all the
different variations I did. I assumed
he was going to tell me, oh, go back and shoot that
from another angle and I wanted to be
able to tell him, ‘look man,
I tried all the angles.’ So, but he asked for,
he asked for a limited selection and so I was scanning
through these pictures, it was late at night
I was listening to some electronic music
to keep me awake. And all of a sudden this,
this images on my screen started to sync up with the music
I was listening to and I had this idea that
‘wait a minute!’ If I can just take
all of these images and I can create
a stop motion by playing them all
at 15 frames a second. That way in five minutes Todd can see every image
I have taken and all the iterations
and variations I did in between
and I just threw the layer of music on top
just for, for kicks. By the end of the story
I had 33,000 pictures and even at
15 frames a second, that’s a very long video so I cut that down and
here is the edited version of that original… Dubstep parasite music video.
( laughter ) ( dubstep music ) ( applause ) ( outro music )