Group recruitment in golden tail sugar ant

Group recruitment in golden tail sugar ant


Hey I have finally been able to take a video
of my favorite behavior of one of my favorite ant species that you can find here in Australia
in Sydney its name is Camponotus aeneopilosus also known as the Golden tail sugar ant. And you can see on this video that there is
one first ant a small one that is leading a group of workers, so if you count there
are about seven workers only following that first ant the ant leading that group is called
a scout. It forages quite randomely around the nest
and as soon as it finds something it comes back straight to the nest, start bumping into
other workers, and when it feels that other workers are motivated to join her on a new
trip to the food source it stats running away from the nest leaving a very light pheromone
trail that does not last long behind, and the other workers try to follow that scout
using visual informations, so by looking at this ant and using of course the light pheromone
trails that the first worker leaves behind. This behavior is very interesting and it allows
these ants to recruit other foragers very very quickly which is of course very useful
when the resources are scarce. Another advantage of this technique of recruitment
is that by not leaving strong pheromone trails behind them, the other ants cannot use the
trails left by this species to find the same food source. Of course it sometimes happens that the leader
loose a few workers on the way, but they are able to go to the food source very quickly
and that is the essential part for the colony, so it is not such a big loss. In that case, the food source was not very
glamorous, sorry about that, it was hum… bird droppings. It is a quite common food source for ants. As you can see on this video the Camponotus
were not the first one on that food source and you can see the small black ants that
are everywhere here. They are probably Iridomyrmex or Tapinoma
ants. They are very very efficient foragers, which
also explains why it is important for ants like Camponotus to find ways to recruit other
workers very quickly. Thank you for watching I hope you enjoyed
this video.

MY GREATEST ANT COLONY DIED | RIP FIRE NATION

MY GREATEST ANT COLONY DIED | RIP FIRE NATION


Last week, during our full ant room tour update
video, we fed my biggest ant colony in the Ant Room, our OG fire ant colony, we call
the Fire Nation, some sweet jelly and an entire cockroach. This was actually the first time I offered
them food on this open rock platform in quite awhile, just so we could see them for filming. Ordinarily, I’d drop their food directly
into the thick vegetation around their mothernest where the ants would finish off their meals
in private. But this feeding would be different, and it
wasn’t long before I noticed something quite strange. This was what the feeding site looked like
several hours later. Usually, the fire ants would be swarming all
over this food, but here as you can see, there were only a few ants. Where did all my fire ants go? And what I saw a few hours after that, brought
a sick feeling to the pit of my stomach. There! Did you see it? Wild feral black crazy ants and ghost ants
were inside the Fire Nation’s territory. This never happens! The territorial pheromones of the fire ants
were enough to scare all feral ants in my home from coming anywhere near this tank. Now, they were seen inside! Something was terribly wrong. What happened to the Fire Nation? Where was my most beloved and biggest pet
ant colony of my entire collection? There was only one way to find out. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL ICON. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! I couldn’t believe what I was seeing! Ghost ants and black crazy ants entering the
Selva de Fuego, the Fire Nation’s massive paludarium kingdom. I even spotted one black crazy ant making
away with a dead fire ant worker! What had happened here? Well, I got to the bottom of it all and I
explain what I believe happened so keep on watching until the end. I couldn’t believe that just a few months
ago the colony looked like this. Millions of ants, swarming above ground, in
celebration of their annual nuptial flight event, where reproductive males and females
hope to mate with those of other fire ant colonies. Of course, seeing as I don’t have any other
fire ant colonies in my room, all the reproductive queen hopefuls and males, ended up not mating
with anyone and dying out within the territories like they do every year at this time. It was shocking to see a colony which I’ve
had for over 4 yrs go from millions to just a few. This fire ant colony was definitely the most
popular ant colony on this channel, and I would say was responsible for taking this
channel and all of us AC Family, where we are toda y. The Fire Nation has accumulated over 153M
views collectively. Their first break out viral video My Fire
Ants Are Planning an Escape currently has over 39 million views. Shortly after, they showed us the savage side
of nature in the video Cockroach Giving Birth While Being Devoured by Fire Ants, which was
featured on Nat Geo and Discovery Channel. Together we watched as the Fire Nation devoured
Donald Trump & Hillary Clinton during US elections season, and showed us the miracle of how they
survive floods by literally creating air chambers using their bodies and by floating on water. They showed us how they amazingly could walk
a tight-rope to get to food across my room. When the channel hit 1 million subscribers,
I tested my luck by placing my honey-covered hand into their nest, at which of course they
riddled me with stings. On Christmas, we gave them a glittering cockroach
christmas tree which they devoured lovingly. Eventually they moved from their formicarium
to this enormous half land – half water simulation of the Amazon River and rainforest which they
dominated and ruled for two very epic years! We marveled at the Fire Nation’s display
of blood and flesh-lust as they tore apart a bird-eating tarantula, a chicken head, a
mouse, a monitor lizard, and even compete with an army of maggots for a decaying turkey
head! They even gave me battle scars on occasion
to remind me that they were an ant colony to be respected. A super organism and force of nature that
wasn’t playing around! We’ve also been lucky to spot, her royal
highness a few times, the Queen of the Fire Nation, whose name is Queen Solis, sole egg-layer
of the colony, birther of this ant army of millions, who once even narrated an episode. There’s no denying that this ant colony,
though the most challenging ants I’ve ever kept, always keeping me on my toes, was also
one of the most amazing collection of animals, I’ve ever had the honour of caring for. And so it was time to get to the bottom of
what had happened to the Fire Nation. It pained my heart to put on my gloves, knowing
that this could possibly be the last time, I’d be arming myself to go into the Selva
de Fuego, the kingdom I had built with my own hands just for them. My heart raced as I stared down at the location
of their mothernest. If the Fire Nation was still alive, they for
sure would be in here somewhere. My mind started to come up with possibilities. Perhaps they had eaten a lot and weren’t
so hungry. But no, that had never happened before ever! AC Family, it was time to get our answers. I went in and removed the driftwood that formed
their mothernest. I looked for fire ants which ordinarily would
be swarming right now as they did the last time I worked in here. And AC Family, what I saw next shocked me
to the core, as the entire life of the Fire Nation flashed before my eyes. Nothing. The Fire Nation was nowhere to be found in
the location of the mothernest. I could see empty chambers which once held
teams of fire ants, brood, and formed the passageways frequented by queen and male alates,
as well as Queen Solis. They were empty now and ghost tunnels. But then a movement caught my eye. It was a lone supermajor crawling around in
the soil. I also spotted a minor worker crawling around
in the empty dirt. The truth made me so sad, but I had to accept
it. AC Family, I’m sorry to say that I believe
the Fire Nation was on its final days. Our Queen Solis, the sole egg layer of the
entire colony must have died and these ants here were the last remaining ants of her final
batch of eggs. I’m so sorry, AC Family. I’ll be honest, I don’t think I ever felt
such sadness over the loss of a colony like I do now. Now that you guys know how epic the entire
four year journey was with this amazing ant colony, you can probably understand why I
cried when I realized I had lost these amazing, amazing creatures. I know, crying over ants. It sounds so weird to new ears but it’s
just one of those things where you need to be there on the whole journey with them to
understand. I felt this was the end of an era for the
entire Antiverse, the end of the most amazing ant colony in the world in my heart. I placed the driftwood piece back in its spot
and left the Selva de Fuego to allow the final workers to live out their final days in peace. The Fire Nation was about five years old,
and though I’ve been saying on this channel that though the workers only live for a couple
months and that ant queens live for up to 30 yrs, I think I failed to clarify that this
was assumed by the ant keeping community seeing as it was recorded in a German laboratory
that a Lasius niger queen lived that long, but the truth of the matter is, there are
thousands of species of ants and we haven’t kept every ant species in captivity long enough
to be able to tell and verify how long the queens of each ant species actually lives. I think the passing of the Fire Nation, assuming
they didn’t die out from some freak disease, has taught us that the queens of Solenopsis
geminata, red tropical fire ants, live for about 5 yrs before passing away. Queen Solis must have died, some time in November. In a typical fire ant queen’s life, during
those five fruitful years she lays millions of ants, spawning hundreds of generations
of workers, creating hundreds of thousands of reproductive ants during nuptial flight
season every year which go on to mate with those of other fire ant colonies and continue
on the species, to complete the circle of life. The Fire Nation’s passing was such a tough
reminder that the Circle of Life is indeed a full circle, and our once booming fire ant
colony was inevitably destined to come to an end and eventually die. Though the passing of the OG ant colony of
the channel was sad, I also realized that we had learned so much from them over the
years, and that they had not lived in vain. Some of the footage and discoveries we made
of their intriguing, secret lives in the soil and water, during the course of the four years
we’ve followed them on this channel, have not been documented by science. By providing the Fire Nation the best possible
care we could give them to live out their best lives, they rewarded us back with such
a wealth of info, discovery, and heart-stopping and adventurous moments, and that to me is
the essence of what ant keeping is all about. I have been contemplating for a long time
about what to do with the Selva de Fuego, now that it was devoid of an ant colony, other
than these feral ants which by the way we need to discourage from being here, so I was
hoping to get your opinions AC Council. Should we get rid of the Selva de Fuego and
rehome all the aquatic life, or move in another of our ant colonies in here like the Golden
Empire or the Titans? Or should I try to find a brand new fledgling
fire ant colony to start all over again from scratch, to be the Fire Nation’s successors,
a Fire Nation 2.0 of sorts. Let me know in this ipoll here. AC Family, this week, I lit a candle on our
behalf to celebrate the life and death of one of the most amazing ant colonies in the
world. Rest in peace to the Fire Nation. Goodbye, my beloved fire ant colony. I’ll miss you greatly. AC Family, it was a tough two weeks for me
when I first noticed the Fire Nation population had dwindled and then later discovered they
had died out, but I suppose it’s all part of the hobby. So much is in store ahead so if you haven’t
yet, SMASH that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON now and hit ALL so you get notified at
every upload, because I believe notifications seem to be broken but the Youtube support
team is on it. Also don’t forget to hit the LIKE button
every single time including now. It would really mean a lot to me. Thank you, guys! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of some of my favourite
memories of the Fire Nation. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: Which was your favourite creature featured
in today’s full pet ant tour? Congratulations to Alexander Churchill who
answered: I love Jabba the Hutt, the Surinam Horned
Frog. Congratulations Alexander, you just won a
free Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: Which was your favourite memory of the Fire
Nation? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen – Walter R. Tschinkel


It’s June, just after a heavy rainfall, and the sky is filling with creatures
we wouldn’t normally expect to find there. At first glance,
this might be a disturbing sight. But for the lucky males and females
of Solenopsis invicta, otherwise known as fire ants,
it’s a day of romance. This is the nuptial flight, when thousands of reproduction-capable
male and female ants, called alates,
take wing for the first and last time. But even for successful males
who manage to avoid winged predators, this mating frenzy will prove lethal. And for a successfully mated female,
her work is only beginning. Having secured a lifetime supply of sperm
from her departed mate, our new queen must now single-handedly
start an entire colony. Descending to the ground, she searches for a suitable spot
to build her nest. Ideally, she can find somewhere
with loose, easy-to-dig soil— like farmland
already disturbed by human activity. Once she finds the perfect spot,
she breaks off her wings— creating the stubs
that establish her royal status. Then, she starts digging
a descending tunnel ending in a chamber. Here the queen begins laying her eggs,
about ten per day, and the first larvae hatch within a week. Over the next three weeks, the new queen relies on a separate batch
of unfertilized eggs to nourish both herself and her brood, losing half her body weight
in the process. Thankfully, after about 20 days, these larvae grow
into the first generation of workers, ready to forage for food
and sustain their shrunken queen. Her daughters
will have to work quickly though— returning their mother
to good health is urgent. In the surrounding area, dozens of neighboring queens
are building their own ant armies. These colonies
have peacefully coexisted so far, but once workers appear, a phenomenon known as brood-raiding
begins. Workers from nests
up to several meters away begin to steal offspring
from our queen. Our colony retaliates, but new waves of raiders
from even further away overwhelm the workers. Within hours, the raiders have taken
our queen’s entire brood supply to the largest nearby nest— and the queen’s surviving daughters
abandon her. Chasing her last chance of survival, the queen follows the raiding trail
to the winning nest. She fends off other losing queens
and the defending nest’s workers, fighting her way
to the top of the brood pile. Her daughters help their mother succeed
where other queens fail— defeating the reigning monarch,
and usurping the brood pile. Eventually,
all the remaining challengers fail, until only one queen—
and one brood pile— remains. Now presiding over several hundred workers
in the neighborhood’s largest nest, our victorious queen begins
aiding her colony in its primary goal: reproduction. For the next several years,
the colony only produces sterile workers. But once their population
exceeds about 23,000, it changes course. From now on, every spring, the colony will produce
fertile alate males and females. The colony spawns these larger ants
throughout the early summer, and returns to worker production
in the fall. After heavy rainfalls,
these alates take to the skies, and spread their queen’s genes
up to a couple hundred meters downwind. But to contribute
to this annual mating frenzy, the colony must continue to thrive
as one massive super-organism. Every day, younger ants feed the queen
and tend to the brood, while older workers
forage for food and defend the nest. When intruders strike, these older warriors fend them off
using poisonous venom. After rainfalls,
the colony comes together, using the wet dirt to expand their nest. And when a disastrous flood
drowns their home, the sisters band together
into a massive living raft— carrying their queen to safety. But no matter how resilient, the life of a colony must come to an end. After about 8 years,
our queen runs out of sperm and can no longer replace dying workers. The nest’s population dwindles,
and eventually, they’re taken over
by a neighboring colony. Our queen’s reign is over,
but her genetic legacy lives on.

Ants in Madagascar! | Ants & Canopy Bootcamp 2019

Ants in Madagascar! | Ants & Canopy Bootcamp 2019


Jacob: yeah that was first time I’d used a hand
saw in the tree. They hauled it up to me on the rope and I used that to
cut out a big Camponotus colony. Kind of close to the ground but it’s still
pretty cool. Brian: people go into the forest and they think
“wow, what a beautiful forest” because they see the trees but actually what lives in
the trees just like this amazingly complicated question. It’s a
three-dimensional space there’s insects up there, there’s birds,
there’s lemurs, and we want to know what ants live up there. Why ants? Well, it’s
because they’re one the most dominant organisms in a forest, especially a
rainforest like here in Madagascar, but there are a few people that actually
know how to get up there, so we decided for the first time ever to organize the
training of Malagasy scientists and international scientists to go into the
canopy and explore and discover what ants live up there. Miles: in the summer of 2019
an international team of ant researchers organized an expedition into
Madagascar’s Western dry forests. Their goal: to survey ant diversity high in the
forest canopy while teaching the next generation of scientists. Camille: Madagascar is
home to a tremendous amount of biodiversity with ecosystems ranging
from the montane tropical rainforest to dry spiny thickets
however Madagascar’s unique biodiversity is really threatened by
anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation and biological invasions.
Miles: after arriving in Madagascar the students begin lessons in ant morphology
they also discuss special field collection techniques. The first week
concludes with intensive training with tree climbing experts. Camile: so especially in
islands with such high levels of endemism it’s really important to
protect the biodiversity and create nuanced and informed management schemes
and in order to do that we really need to understand the diversity and the
various ecosystems of Madagascar especially looking into canopy
ecosystems which are typically really understudied but harbor a lot of
biodiversity. It’s really cool for our work to be able to understand the
diversity and abundance of various ant species in the dry forests of Ankarafantsika. Miles: Once their preparations are complete
the team leaves the capital city and heads into the island’s dry western
landscape. Bonnie: The reason we’re trying to assess canopy and diversity is that we
currently only have three sites in Madagascar sampled for ants in the canopy
but we have over a thousand samples for ants on the ground, so the ground nesting
ant fauna is it’s pretty well sampled and described by my colleague Brian
Fisher’s work but the canopy has been neglected so far so our studies
in Ankarafantsika National Park is one of the few that is looking for canopy
ants specifically. Brian: Madagascar is like a continent upon itself there is the dry
forest, the wet forest, the desert – and more so even within a habitat like the dry
forest, almost every forest patch is different we don’t really know what
we’re gonna find maybe we’ll find even something spectacular new but the first
step is just getting to that habitat. We’ll be testing different methods. By
the end of this we’ll probably have a good protocol for how to sample canopy
ants in Madagascar in the dry forest Jen: my name is Jen Schlauch and I’m an ant researcher and
I’m currently quite a few meters up from the forest floor looking for ants.
So I’ve already climbed the tree and I’m attached to this rope here – this is
how I’ll get down – and I’m up here and I’m breaking sticks. I’m looking for ant nests inside.
It’s pretty easy to overestimate how high you are up in the tree so we have
this convenient rope that’s got markings about every meter and I’m gonna lower it
so you can see how high we are. We’re going to start collecting in this tree
at about 17 meters. Bonnie: so at each tree we had one person climb the tree and search
for ant nests in the trees and collect every single ant they find in the tree
so either collect foragers, workers that are just looking for food in the tree or
ant nests so looking for ant nests and dead branches or dead twigs or on the bark.
Jen: a lot of the ants nest inside the dead twigs of the tree. The reason they
wouldn’t nest inside the living twigs is they often still have a lot of sap and liquid
inside them so they can’t nest inside. This is called an aspirator and it works like a
little handheld vacuum. You use your mouth to suck up the ants. Normally this is a
really good collecting method for ants but the ants that live on trees are used to
climbing up vertical surfaces so they have really good grip so these little
featherweight forceps work better than collecting the ants in the aspirator. They’re a little different from normal
forceps because they’re really delicate so it keeps you from squishing the ant when you pick them up Anne: So I’m one of the climbing instructors and I’m up here with Jen
who’s doing her sampling and she is using a lanyard technique to move
herself around the tree and to position herself to be able to break twigs and
look for ants or look for bark. See this green rope that’s attached to me is
going up to my higher anchor point and this is the rope that I move up and down
on but sometimes that rope doesn’t orient you the way that you want to go
to reach a branch or to take a sample so we have a lanyard that we use and the
lanyard can help us twist different ways or move us across to different branches
where we may want to be. And then I was in a really secure position here I can lean
back and I’m right next to the trunk and I could easily sample
things. Brian: Well, the technique is how to go up into the canopy using ropes in a safe
way and then not just get up there but actually to go from branch to branch – you
know like a like a lemur does Jen: So here I have a really tiny yellow ant,
they had a little foraging trail so they would collect a few of them and they’re
so small we’ll need the dissection scope back at the camp to identify them.
Once I collect the ants I put them in this vial filled with ethanol that
immediately kills them. I record where on the tree I found it, whether it was at a
branch or directly off the trunk and how high up I am. Besides ants you can find a lot of other
things up here like spiders just under the bark and little cockroaches and
sweat bees these are in family Halictidae and they like to suck the sweat off your body.
This tree had a couple of different genera of ants. There was the little
yellow one and Tetraponera and maybe two more genera that I couldn’t identify up
here and this is pretty different from some of the other ant communities we’ve
been seeing on other tree species and one thing this project is aiming to do
is compare the different ant communities between the different trees. Miles: While Jen
and the other climbers tackle the canopy students on the ground search for ants
in the undergrowth. Bonnie: We had one person at the same time sampling for ant nests and
ant foragers in the understory. We defined the understory as around a tree
in a radius of about two meters Miles: Additionally they use beat sheets to
collect insects in a wide radius around the tree by striking plants insects fall
onto the sheets and into the collection cups. Bonnie: And then we also baited for ants
and this was done as as a team usually so the students were placing little
sardine baits tied onto a cord that was then hoisted in the canopy and left for
two to three hours and then the baits were recollected and the ants collected
from the baits. Miles: Between the canopy sampling, ground collections, and tree
baiting, the teams collect hundreds of ants each day. They work into the night processing the new specimens. After 10
days the vials are full and the team travels back to the capital city to
begin the next phase of the project. So when the students come back from the
field with all these ant samples that we collected in the field they have a lot
of work to do. So first of all we need to make sure that every sample is accounted
for in our database. The students were taking notes – so-called collection notes –
while they were collecting the ants so they have to type up their collection
notes first and then we merge these into a joint database. Miles: each sample is assigned
a code linking it to a specific tree, collection time, microhabitat, and other
information called metadata. Students also learn about geographic information
systems which they use to map the ant diversity in the park. Miles: once I’m satisfied
with the accuracy of the database and we start on actually mounting and preparing
one ant per collection – that means glued to a tiny little paper point unless it’s
a colony collection then we would also mount the males and the queens and then
they need to identify every ant to genus and hopefully to species if we
have time. So they have a bunch of work to do over the next few days Michelle: It’s really frustrating to pin really tiny
ants especially when they’re like fractions of a millimeter long because
actually the point that you mount the ant on the piece of paper is bigger than
the ant itself sometimes. There’s a genus called Plagiolepis which I think
everyone struggled with. We decapitated some. It was a struggle but we got
through it! Michelle: This week went well. We pinned and
mounted over 600 ants and that encompasses like 16 genera at least.
Camille: Even though studying and understanding ants in Madagascar is incredibly
important for promoting conservation throughout the island, another really
cool feature that this bootcamp has is training the next generation of
conservationists. So it’s really amazing to foster these collaborations with U.S.
and Malagasy students alike and really be inspired by and build upon these
connections to position us well to make conservation impacts no matter what
field we enter in the future. [music]

Ants in Madagascar! | Ants & Canopy Bootcamp 2019


Jacob: yeah that was first time I’d used a hand
saw in the tree. They hauled it up to me on the rope and I used that to
cut out a big Camponotus colony. Kind of close to the ground but it’s still
pretty cool. Brian: people go into the forest and they think
“wow, what a beautiful forest” because they see the trees but actually what lives in
the trees just like this amazingly complicated question. It’s a
three-dimensional space there’s insects up there, there’s birds,
there’s lemurs, and we want to know what ants live up there. Why ants? Well, it’s
because they’re one the most dominant organisms in a forest, especially a
rainforest like here in Madagascar, but there are a few people that actually
know how to get up there, so we decided for the first time ever to organize the
training of Malagasy scientists and international scientists to go into the
canopy and explore and discover what ants live up there. Miles: in the summer of 2019
an international team of ant researchers organized an expedition into
Madagascar’s Western dry forests. Their goal: to survey ant diversity high in the
forest canopy while teaching the next generation of scientists. Camille: Madagascar is
home to a tremendous amount of biodiversity with ecosystems ranging
from the montane tropical rainforest to dry spiny thickets
however Madagascar’s unique biodiversity is really threatened by
anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation and biological invasions.
Miles: after arriving in Madagascar the students begin lessons in ant morphology
they also discuss special field collection techniques. The first week
concludes with intensive training with tree climbing experts. Camile: so especially in
islands with such high levels of endemism it’s really important to
protect the biodiversity and create nuanced and informed management schemes
and in order to do that we really need to understand the diversity and the
various ecosystems of Madagascar especially looking into canopy
ecosystems which are typically really understudied but harbor a lot of
biodiversity. It’s really cool for our work to be able to understand the
diversity and abundance of various ant species in the dry forests of Ankarafantsika. Miles: Once their preparations are complete
the team leaves the capital city and heads into the island’s dry western
landscape. Bonnie: The reason we’re trying to assess canopy and diversity is that we
currently only have three sites in Madagascar sampled for ants in the canopy
but we have over a thousand samples for ants on the ground, so the ground nesting
ant fauna is it’s pretty well sampled and described by my colleague Brian
Fisher’s work but the canopy has been neglected so far so our studies
in Ankarafantsika National Park is one of the few that is looking for canopy
ants specifically. Brian: Madagascar is like a continent upon itself there is the dry
forest, the wet forest, the desert – and more so even within a habitat like the dry
forest, almost every forest patch is different we don’t really know what
we’re gonna find maybe we’ll find even something spectacular new but the first
step is just getting to that habitat. We’ll be testing different methods. By
the end of this we’ll probably have a good protocol for how to sample canopy
ants in Madagascar in the dry forest Jen: my name is Jen Schlauch and I’m an ant researcher and
I’m currently quite a few meters up from the forest floor looking for ants.
So I’ve already climbed the tree and I’m attached to this rope here – this is
how I’ll get down – and I’m up here and I’m breaking sticks. I’m looking for ant nests inside.
It’s pretty easy to overestimate how high you are up in the tree so we have
this convenient rope that’s got markings about every meter and I’m gonna lower it
so you can see how high we are. We’re going to start collecting in this tree
at about 17 meters. Bonnie: so at each tree we had one person climb the tree and search
for ant nests in the trees and collect every single ant they find in the tree
so either collect foragers, workers that are just looking for food in the tree or
ant nests so looking for ant nests and dead branches or dead twigs or on the bark.
Jen: a lot of the ants nest inside the dead twigs of the tree. The reason they
wouldn’t nest inside the living twigs is they often still have a lot of sap and liquid
inside them so they can’t nest inside. This is called an aspirator and it works like a
little handheld vacuum. You use your mouth to suck up the ants. Normally this is a
really good collecting method for ants but the ants that live on trees are used to
climbing up vertical surfaces so they have really good grip so these little
featherweight forceps work better than collecting the ants in the aspirator. They’re a little different from normal
forceps because they’re really delicate so it keeps you from squishing the ant when you pick them up Anne: So I’m one of the climbing instructors and I’m up here with Jen
who’s doing her sampling and she is using a lanyard technique to move
herself around the tree and to position herself to be able to break twigs and
look for ants or look for bark. See this green rope that’s attached to me is
going up to my higher anchor point and this is the rope that I move up and down
on but sometimes that rope doesn’t orient you the way that you want to go
to reach a branch or to take a sample so we have a lanyard that we use and the
lanyard can help us twist different ways or move us across to different branches
where we may want to be. And then I was in a really secure position here I can lean
back and I’m right next to the trunk and I could easily sample
things. Brian: Well, the technique is how to go up into the canopy using ropes in a safe
way and then not just get up there but actually to go from branch to branch – you
know like a like a lemur does Jen: So here I have a really tiny yellow ant,
they had a little foraging trail so they would collect a few of them and they’re
so small we’ll need the dissection scope back at the camp to identify them.
Once I collect the ants I put them in this vial filled with ethanol that
immediately kills them. I record where on the tree I found it, whether it was at a
branch or directly off the trunk and how high up I am. Besides ants you can find a lot of other
things up here like spiders just under the bark and little cockroaches and
sweat bees these are in family Halictidae and they like to suck the sweat off your body.
This tree had a couple of different genera of ants. There was the little
yellow one and Tetraponera and maybe two more genera that I couldn’t identify up
here and this is pretty different from some of the other ant communities we’ve
been seeing on other tree species and one thing this project is aiming to do
is compare the different ant communities between the different trees. Miles: While Jen
and the other climbers tackle the canopy students on the ground search for ants
in the undergrowth. Bonnie: We had one person at the same time sampling for ant nests and
ant foragers in the understory. We defined the understory as around a tree
in a radius of about two meters Miles: Additionally they use beat sheets to
collect insects in a wide radius around the tree by striking plants insects fall
onto the sheets and into the collection cups. Bonnie: And then we also baited for ants
and this was done as as a team usually so the students were placing little
sardine baits tied onto a cord that was then hoisted in the canopy and left for
two to three hours and then the baits were recollected and the ants collected
from the baits. Miles: Between the canopy sampling, ground collections, and tree
baiting, the teams collect hundreds of ants each day. They work into the night processing the new specimens. After 10
days the vials are full and the team travels back to the capital city to
begin the next phase of the project. So when the students come back from the
field with all these ant samples that we collected in the field they have a lot
of work to do. So first of all we need to make sure that every sample is accounted
for in our database. The students were taking notes – so-called collection notes –
while they were collecting the ants so they have to type up their collection
notes first and then we merge these into a joint database. Miles: each sample is assigned
a code linking it to a specific tree, collection time, microhabitat, and other
information called metadata. Students also learn about geographic information
systems which they use to map the ant diversity in the park. Miles: once I’m satisfied
with the accuracy of the database and we start on actually mounting and preparing
one ant per collection – that means glued to a tiny little paper point unless it’s
a colony collection then we would also mount the males and the queens and then
they need to identify every ant to genus and hopefully to species if we
have time. So they have a bunch of work to do over the next few days Michelle: It’s really frustrating to pin really tiny
ants especially when they’re like fractions of a millimeter long because
actually the point that you mount the ant on the piece of paper is bigger than
the ant itself sometimes. There’s a genus called Plagiolepis which I think
everyone struggled with. We decapitated some. It was a struggle but we got
through it! Michelle: This week went well. We pinned and
mounted over 600 ants and that encompasses like 16 genera at least.
Camille: Even though studying and understanding ants in Madagascar is incredibly
important for promoting conservation throughout the island, another really
cool feature that this bootcamp has is training the next generation of
conservationists. So it’s really amazing to foster these collaborations with U.S.
and Malagasy students alike and really be inspired by and build upon these
connections to position us well to make conservation impacts no matter what
field we enter in the future. [music]

My Cockroach Farm

My Cockroach Farm


Greetings, AC Family! Welcome to the AntsCanada Ant Channel. If you have a fascination for nature, you’re
in the right place. On this channel, we take a look at the amazing
world of ants, and even explore pet ant keeping, as a hobby. But did you know that a big part of keeping
pet ant colonies, for most people, also involves keeping colonies of other insects? Today, for a change, we will turn our attention
from the ant colonies we all love on this channel, and turn our inquiring eyes toward
the colonies of insects our ants depend on for food. This week, we go from ants, to cockroaches! Feeder cockroaches, that is! Cockroaches, though repulsive to many people
throughout the world, are our ants’ favourite protein food source, and are actually quite
fascinating creatures in their own right. Today we take a look at the two species of
feeder roaches that I breed as food to our 4 ant colonies on this channel, and explore
what their cockroach societies are like. They happen to be two of the most popular
feeder cockroaches for ant colonies and other insect-eating exotic pets. You won’t want to miss all of this amazing
cockroach info ahead, so keep watching until the end. Ladies and gentlemen, let’s put away that
bug spray and explore why cockroaches are also some of the coolest of insects, not just
as ant food, in this episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel! And hit the bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Cockroaches, they’re perhaps the most notorious
and hated of all domestic insect pests, even more so than ants. They’re associated with being avid carriers
of germs, disease, bacteria, and more. But you may be surprised to know that cockroaches
which belong to the order called Blattodea, are comprised of about 4,600 species and only
30 of these 4,600 species of cockroaches are human house pests. The rest live out in forests, jungles, and
other habitats away from human homes. The two species of cockroaches that I feed
to my ants, which we will look at today, are examples of such non-pest cockroach species. First, presenting my Dubia Roach colony, scientific
name Blaptica dubia. These large cockroaches grow to about 4 to
4.5 cm in length. Their exoskeletons are strong, and the ants
aren’t able to eat them. You can tell the adult males and females apart
because adult males have huge wings while females have what are called tegmina, which
are small wing stubs. Though the males have fully developed wings
as adults, they rarely ever fly. If dropped from a high altitude they could
use the wings to direct their landing but don’t actually take off like most true flying
insects do. Juveniles, as seen here, have a mottled brown
colour. These roaches love to eat fruits. I offer a variety of different juicy fruits. The cockroaches are able to acquire all the
moisture they need from these juicy fruits. I do my best to offer them a variety, because
as you know, your pets are what their food eats, and any nutrients the cockroaches take
in through their diet, ultimately ends up in the bellies of our ants, so gut-loading
the cockroaches using a varied diet is a must. Now, one of the annoying things, we here in
the tropics need to deal with though, are wild ants mooching off the cockroaches’ food
supplies. If you look carefully you will see wild ghost
ants drinking from this orange slice. Hmmm… And here you’ll find a wild black crazy ant. Perhaps I should try applying baby powder
on the outside of these cockroach enclosures. Check out the pattern and colours of the undersides
of these Dubia roaches! I find they’re actually quite attractive up
close. I love watching them eat. If you look carefully at their faces, you’ll
notice that their eyes actually wrap around the entire side of their head. This helps them avoid predators. As a lover of all insects, it is always hard
for me to feed these guys to the ants, but I do know the ants do acquire some great protein
from them. I just make sure to crush them swiftly prior
to feeding to lessen their suffering. Some of you who have seen our previous videos
involving feedings may notice that the cockroaches still move despite being pre-crushed and this
is because nervous cells called ganglia run along the center of their body, which is why
even if you completely decapitate a roach, they are still capable of movement. I usually feed these adults to the Fire Nation,
as the fire ants are able to benefit from their high meat content, as well as penetrate
their exoskeletons effectively. The Fire Nation can fully consume the meat
of 1 adult Dubia roach in a matter of a few hours. One of the most viewed videos on this channel
involved the Fire Nation consuming an adult female cockroach that gave birth while it
was being devoured. In that video you see the babies being born,
and they’re stark white in colour. Newborn Dubia roaches are white, like these
nymphs here. These must have just been born a few hours
ago. Aren’t they cute? What’s interesting about Dubia roaches is
that they are live bearers. A female Dubia roach will give birth to an
egg sack and then pull this egg sack back inside herself and incubate the eggs until
babies emerge, a process called ovoviviparity. A female can give birth to 20-40 live young
at a time. These young shed their skin 7 times, growing
25% each time before reaching adulthood. This sub-adult here is whitish in colour because
it had just molted. As the exoskeleton hardens, it will darken
to its normal brownish cryptic colour. What’s amazing is these roaches can live up
to 2 yrs! They actually make interesting pets, but I
do my best not to get too attached, because after all, they are our ant colonies’ beef! Guys, should we name them? Leave your suggestions in the comments section! Or would giving them an official name make
them harder to feed to our ants. Haha! Now while these large Dubia roaches here are
live bearing cockroaches, and don’t lay eggs, our next colony of roaches actually do lay
egg sacs. Meet Blatta lateralis, Turkistan Cockroaches,
often called red runners due to their quick speed. In the pet trade, they are simply known as
“lats”. These are a smaller species of cockroach. Adult males have wings, just like the Dubias,
but unlike the Dubias, the males are known to actively fly. The females are wingless and are a gorgeous
crimson brown colour. Females lay an egg sac known as an ootheca. Look at these Oothecae laying here. From these will hatch little tiny cockroach
nymphs. I was lucky enough to catch one female in
the process of birthing an ootheca. Check it out! You can actually see her as she contracts
her abdomen muscles to lay the eggs into the open end of the ootheca. This process of depositing eggs into the ootheca
will continue over several hours and she will continue to carry this ootheca with her for
awhile afterwards, until she zips up the open end and drops it. I find the ootheca to look kind of like a
purse. Soon when the babies are ready to emerge,
the ootheca much like a purse will open up from the top and the baby lats will be born. I feed these lats to the Golden Empire, the
Dark Knights, and our new trap-jaw ant colony, the Jawbreakers. Their exoskeletons are a bit softer and are
easier to get into than the Dubias. So what do you say? What should we name this roach colony? Leave your answer in the comments section! Now the only thing I don’t like about this
species of cockroach is they expel a very pungent and gross defensive odour when alarmed
and at times it can be pretty strong. I just hold my breath every time I have to
reach into their enclosure to feed them to our ants. As far as housing goes for both species, I
keep them in a plastic bin full of egg cartons and toilet paper rolls. The environments must be kept relatively dry
to keep mold from growing. I feed them a mix of veggies and fruit and
also offer them dog kibble. Their enclosures must be kept clean at all
times because they can get messy especially when the droppings collect. I feel cockroaches are pretty fantastic creatures
and the more you get to know them, the less disgusting they seem, and the more fascinating
they become. Some people keep these, as well as other cockroach
species as pets. So what do you think? Do you think keeping cockroaches are as cool
as keeping pet ants? If you decide to keep pet ants, perhaps you
might consider feeder roaches, too, as an alternative to crickets, mealworms, and superworms? They also happen to be more nutritious for
ants than those aforementioned. Hope you enjoyed this week’s video AC Family! It’s ant love, and just for this week, roach
love forever! AC Family, were you grossed out or did you
find these cockroaches to be cool? For you AC Inner Colony members, I’ve placed
a hidden cookie for you here, if you would just like to watch the cockroaches in this
video doing their thing with less narration. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
week. In last week’s AC Question of the Week, we
asked: What does “pantropical” mean? Congratulations to Omar Salloum who correctly
answered: pantropical means: distributed throughout
the tropics Congratulations Omar you just won a free ebook
handbook from our shop! For this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is the technical term
for a cockroach’s egg sac? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free ant t-shirt from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel, give
it a thumbs up, share, and leave me a comment if you liked this video. Remember that we release a new ant video every
single Saturday at 8 AM EST. So what do you say? Join our growing AC Family and hit that SUBSCRIBE
button. Why? ‘Cause it’s ant love forever!

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)


Hello everyone, this is a new antsite video In this episode we are going to rebuild an ant city. Keep watching until the end – i promise it will be super exciting… This is an old formicarium A thriving weaver ant colony lived in it before. You can saw this colony in some previous videos, or even personally on terraristic exhibitions. This colony lived 2, 2 and half year long in this formicarium. So the goal is to populate again this formicarium with a thriving ant colony. We have chance now to rebuild this system, so why don’t we upgrade a bit this whole formicarium to be more spectacular? You know i have plenty of creativity, so i find out a cylinder shape instead of the previous brick. This is more elegant and even more spectacular. Then I want something more in my mind.. If the weaver ants can get an own tower, why don’t they get an own city instead? This is the story how comes the idea to build an ant city. The structure build up from three different towers, with three outside gallery between them. There are three escape-prevent edge, and three openable ventilation grid on the top of the towers. There are more ventilation grids on two place at the sides, for the better breezing. There are many carcase laying on the floor of the old formicarium. Also can find tainted, unhatched larvae somewhere. The diameter of the biggest cylinder was planned for the size of the old bonsai tree. Meanwhile we get a big family of weaver ants so they will move into the new place. You can see what a massive nest they built in their previous home. They weaved almost everything for nest in the left formicarium, and there are many of workers in the left formicarium also. The ant city looks much amazing after the furnish. The old bonsai tree also looks epic in it, and i put another, smaller bonsai tree inside. Ants can hide between it’s roots. The ant city looks like a real metropolis after the ants have moved in. Every ants working on it’s own task busily. Some of them are building new home and others throwing out the garbage from the old nest. Every ants run fast to their work on the busy trails. After the settlement the ants moved in the old nest at the top of the tree immediately, and they start to throwing out the old larvaes and garbage from it. I didn’t record video from the settlement, because I have put them through almost one by one during an afternoon. It wasn’t too interesting for a video you can believe. An now let’s see the freshly building new nest. One day after the settlement some ants gathered spectacularly between the roots. At that time we could guess what they planning, and a few times later the first strings just appear. The ants just start to weaving their new nest. Catch their larvae in their mouth and working busy on the building operations, so they pass so much with the building on the first day! A few days later the new nest starts to equal to it’s final form. The walls became more stronger as the ants wave more and more layers on it. They use every kind of building material, this reason there are black and green threads in the walls which comes from the fake grass which covers the floor. Meanwhile they start to renew the old nest at the top of the tree. They have repaired the entrances, and they start to build together the nest with the wall of the cylinder. Can see well the fresh silks with brighter color than the old weaves. We can see inside the nest through the formicarium wall. There are many of workers and larvae working hard inside. That workers who don’t work, they guarding in a typical position on the most important strategy places. Sometimes we can notice winged males (drones) in the colony. The smallest, sloping tower still empty, because I give them food and water here. I put a test tube with full of water here, and they start to use it ardently. Hopefully they won’t drown in the open water, if this happens i have to find out another method for watering. There is a build in thermometer at the side of the formicarium. The back of the thermometer have to cover with grid, to avoid them to move inside it. Those areas where the ants feel the ventilation of the air, they try to discover new places. They stick out their antennae often through the dish to find out what is at the other side. A few workers waiting standby on the only door where no any escape-prevent oil around. But don’t worry, i never open this door. If they thirsty or hungry many workers start to raiding in their territory to find food or water. But of course their activity depends from the temperature and light also, in cooler temperature they goes inside the nest instead. And it seems they try to reach the lighter places – i think this could be some escaping instinct. It is such a catching sight, as these tiny insects organizing their society and living their everyday. We can admire them for hours, and can observe more and more interesting ant-things, but unfortunately our video is ending now, hope see you again next time! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and hit the 🔔 icon to get notifications for our new videos! 🙂

FULL ANT & PET TOUR | Millions of Ants, Tarantulas, Reptiles, Amphibians, Birds, Fish, Terrariums

FULL ANT & PET TOUR | Millions of Ants, Tarantulas, Reptiles, Amphibians, Birds, Fish, Terrariums


Greetings, ant lovers, and happy new year
and new decade 2020! The whole world is starting a fresh new page,
and indeed so is our great collection of ants, creatures, and vivarium kingdoms we’ve all
come to love on this channel. So to start off the year right, I asked if
you guys wanted a full pet and Ant Room tour so that all you watching whether you be a
returning AC Family, or a newcomer could be caught up on all the awesome, beautiful, frightening,
and bizarre creatures living with me under my care. It’s also an update video on all of your
favourite ant colonies that you might not have heard from in awhile, as well as arachnids,
reptiles, amphibians, and birds that have appeared on the channel before, and just a
spoiler, there are even several creatures you guys don’t know about yet! There are also some ant colonies that sadly
are no longer with us, and issues with some that I need to talk to you about! We’ve got a lot of work to do today, and
this episode is full of surprises, familiar faces, and all the nature you guys love in
our usual 4K UHD footage, so grab some popcorn, sit back, and let’s get started with our
exclusive 2020 AC tour of the animals and biological worlds of our Antiverse, here on
the AntsCanada ant channel! Please SUBSCRIBE to the channel and hit the
BELL icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Starting from the extreme left of the Ant
Room, we begin our tour with one of the coolest of ant worlds, I’ve ever created for one
of the oldest ant colonies on the channel. Behold the kingdom of the Dark Knights, our
OG super colony of black crazy ants. So for those of you who haven’t seen the
Dark Knight’s new terrarium here yet, it’s a multi-species terrarium with millipedes,
spiders, bagworms, and other creatures inside that all depend on each other. The Dark Knights love this vivarium and have
set up their nest within this driftwood hollow. This colony which I’ve owned for about 4
yrs now is unique in that it can self perpetuate pretty much forever, with the colony creating
hundreds of queens which can mate with their male siblings safely without the dangers of
genetic inbreeding happening. They’re an awesome colony that I look forward
to keeping for decades and decades to come! By the way, you guys officially voted and
named this kingdom of the Dark Knights the Dark Forest. Now speaking of multiple queens, we move on
now to the grand palace known as Olympus, home to the Titans, my multi-queen colony
of Asian Marauder ants. These ants are definitely one of my favourites
due to the size of their supermajors which are just massive! The Titans are doing well and have since changed
the landscape and killed off a few plants during renovations. They come to the surface is huge numbers to
feed. I’m thinking of possibly rehoming these
powerful ants into something larger soon. Now let’s move on to one of the newest members
of the Antiverse whom some of you may or may have not seen in a recent video. Welcome to Cerulean Hallow, home of our new
Sapphire Gooty Tarantula. She’s loving her new home and we’ll have
a look at her in a second. The plants within her territories are thriving
well, but she’s killed the ones on the wall. I can tell she’s been busy because she’s
webbed up the entire entrance of her hallow. From the back, we see her there crawled up
snuggly at the bottom. By the way, guys, she needs an official name
so grab your voting fingers and click on this icard here to vote for her official name. Thank you AC Council for your input! Next is a creature I’ve owned for about
2 yrs now but haven’t told you guys about. Sorry, but I was waiting for just the right
time! AC Family, meet my young Mexican Fireleg Tarantula,
known scientifically as Brachypelma boehmei. She’s actually been in the background of
many episodes on this channel and I’m surprised you guys never asked about her. She’s 3 inches long and has a huge appetite! Let’s feed her this superworm now, shall
we? There you go! She’ll grow to a hefty 6+ inches. Though she’s been a silent resident of the
Ant Room for years, she still doesn’t have a name, as well. What should we name her? Leave your name suggestions in the comments. And now moving on to what is arguably the
most famous ant colony on this channel, the Fire Nation, my savage colony of fire ants. I can easily say these stinging aggressive
ants have been the most challenging and fulfilling ants I’ve ever kept through the years. This paludarium created to simulate the Amazon
is called La Selva de Fuego and is full of thick tropical foliage and a river which is
home to a colony of cherry shrimp, snails, mosquito rasbora fish, and even vampire crabs. Mosses have started to grow and attach in
several places! Somewhere beneath all the vegetation the Fire
Nation lives. Today, they dine on sweet jelly and this dead
giant Madagascar hissing cockroach. Now this dead roach came from my new Madagascar
Hissing cockroach colony, yes, yet another colony of critters I haven’t yet shown you
guys on the channel. I’ve owned this roach colony for the past
couple of months now and they’re housed in this simple plastic critter crawler, where
they eat a variety of veggies and fruits. These giant roaches are not to be confused
with my Dubia roaches, which I’ve been using as feeders for years. These roaches don’t have wings, not even
the males. I plan on making them a naturalistic setup
just like Roachella, but perhaps a bit more lavish seeing as I plan on keeping these roaches
more as pets, and perhaps only feed dead members off. Would you guys like to see a video on these
neat hissing cockroaches soon? Next, a couple weeks ago we made this Ant
Terrarium in a Bottle, and as expected the ants have remodeled our masterpiece to make
it fit for an ant colony. The Trap-jaw ants inside are doing super well
and I just love them! This terrarium was the product of a challenge
collab with another Youtuber friend Serpadesign that we decided to do for charity. You guys won’t believe how much the top
bidder donated for this terrarium, and just a hint, it’s about the cost of a car! AC Family, you guys are so generous and make
me proud to have such an amazing caring community! Anyway, watch that video here! Now here’s another thing I haven’t shown
you guys! This is my bog terrarium full of living mosses,
a native tree lichen, vein plants, and Hydrocotyle tripartita plants. This is basically just a plant propagation
tank for my moss, lichen, tripartita, and vein plants. Nothing inside, just plants. I love watching the fogging machine keep the
territories damp. Beside the bog terrarium we have another newcomer,
our massive but docile Chaco golden-knee tarantula. This beautiful tarantula here was a gift exchange
collab with another youtuber friend Exoticslair. She’s been quite busy covering her whole
territory with silk. I can understand why they make such great
beginner tarantula species. She loves being outside in the open and is
pretty friendly. By the way, she too needs a name! Please vote here! Moving on to yet another tarantula, we have
the goddess of the Antiverse, Azula, our Green-bottle Blue tarantula. She’s covered her entire palace now with
a thick blanket of silk where she resides in a back tunnel. When she first came to us sadly, she had a
problem shedding her top carapace giving her a double face look. It eventually fell off, but guys, unfortunately,
it happened again. During her last shed, she failed to shed off
this head piece, but I’m not worried. Like last time, it will likely fall off on
its own. Now moving on to Skull Island, home of our
ghost ants which we acquired for our recent Halloween episode. They come out to feed and boy are there a
lot of them! The ghost ants are trapped on their driftwood
skull island by a moat which contains a snail and shrimp. The tank has been cycling now for many weeks
and is ready to accommodate a water beast. You guys voted for a betta fish to be added
here, so that’s coming up soon! There were also baby tarantulas on the island
which I’m sure are still there somewhere. I just haven’t seen them. Let’s now look at one of the most beloved
ant supercolonies of the channel, the OG Golden Empire, our recovering supercolony of yellow
crazy ants. Now let me be the bearer of the best news
for the year! The Golden Empire is thriving and just exploding
in population now. In case you’re new, they’re actually recovering
from a near fatal infection of blood sucking mites, but I’m happy to announce that there
has been an explosion of eggs, larvae, and pupae. I expect this colony will reach the millions
in numbers they once were in just a few more months. I’ve been thinking though, do you think
we should continue to keep them in an ant farm setup like this so we can still see their
in-nest activities or move them to a terrarium and just watch them above ground? Let me know in this icard here. I like that I can monitor them in their current
setup and they seem to love their formicariums. Speaking of formicariums, we now move on to
my recently returned Asian Bullet Ants. I’ve got two colonies of these, Team 1 which
is doing amazing in their AC Hybrid Nest. As you can see there is a tonne of brood and
a crew of new workers. And check this out! I’ve never seen this species do this before,
but the workers have covered this larvae with soil debris to help give it a lattice work
to spin its silk for the creation of its cocoon. When it’s done, the ants will remove the
soil debris, revealing the finished smooth dark cocoon, like these others here. I had no idea these ants did this! And here you’ll see Team 2, living in their
AC Ant Tower. By the way, about these colonies, I think
I failed to explain in their last video how my plan to keep these ants going would work. The plan was to have these two ant colonies
cross breed so they can continue living on forever, but a lot of you guys brought up
the fact that after a couple generations the colonies would be related and there would
be no more mating. My issue, which I failed to explain properly,
was not so much that the males were unwilling to mate with related females, but that they
were unwilling to mate with females from the same colony, with the same colony scent. That is why I decided a cross-over setup,
where males could cross over to the other side to mate, might actually work at getting
males to mate with females, so long as the colonies stay distinct colonies. Hope that clarifies things better and yes,
a lot of you were correct in saying they would be genetically related after the next generation,
but I think that should be fine, as long as after awhile I add a third colony in the mix
to diversify the genepool. Man, three asian bullet ant colonies? That will be something. Now we move on to the great Hacienda Del Dorado,
which was recently remade into a pineapple beach paludarium. It’s home to our resident trap-jaw ants
named the Jawbreakers and vampire crabs, which hang out in the marsh area. The trap-jaw ants are shy but come out to
feed. I suspect they are mostly nesting here by
the moist marsh. The waters still contain its perpetuating
colony of cherry shrimp, microrasbora fish, and snails. Nearing the end of the Ant Room now, we have
the Triple Island of Avista, the glassless open-concept ant setup of the Bobbleheads,
our super colony of big-headed ants. I love this cute colony! The Bobbleheads are still going strong with
a great appetite, as you can see here where they dine on some chopped up superworm. Check out those supermajors! The plants of the three islands that make
up their archipelago are also growing well! Finally, we come to the Canopy of Vortexia,
the tree top kingdom of my epic, arboreal colony of Asian Weaver Ants we call the Emerald
Empire. These ants of course create their famous hanging
leaf nests which they glue together using silk from their larvae. The Emerald Empire is doing really well, eating
a lot, and they recently built some new leaf nests. The Dubia roaches sharing their territories
are also doing quite well and reproducing on their own, and the weaver ants hunt the
weakest roaches and carry them up to their leaf nests to consume, like they would in
the wild. And guys look! I noticed this week that they’ve begun to
produce male alates. They’re preparing for nuptial flight season! Now you wanna hear something super cool that
I recently discovered? I was surprised to notice an active and thriving
colony of ants living on the forest floor of Vortexia. No, they weren’t pharaoh ants, thank goodness. Now I couldn’t figure out where they came
from, but then after looking closer at the ants, I realized, Hey, these ants are familiar! So guys, remember the colony of free-roaming
ants that lived within the hydration chambers of one of my Hybrid Nests? Well, last I reported they had disappeared
one day. I highly suspect that these ants here are
them! Tracing back I believe the free-roam ants,
moved from their Hybrid Nest hydration chamber, down into my old termite tank, and then when
my termites were murdered off by a terrible invasion of pharaoh ants (and yes, in case
you were asking about the termites, I cover the death of our Terminators in a previous
video), I packed up the soil from the termite tank for future use, eventually using it for
Vortexia, and low and behold, they’re Vortexians now. I suppose they eating the scraps left behind
by the weaver ants and dead roaches. It’s cool that they are like the bottom feeders
of the territories and don’t really bother the weaver ants so much. Amazing right? OK and that concludes the Ant Room, so let’s
move downstairs now… Yup, there’s more! I swear I’m not a hoarder, right? Here of course is my tropical, planted, freshwater
community fish tank. It’s about 5 yrs old now. It contains angelfish, dwarf rainbowfish,
rummynose tetras, Otocinclus catfish, and others. The vegetation is quite lush and I don’t really
do much maintenance on plant grooming. I kind of like the chaotic, wild growth look. I often harvest this big mass of java moss
here attached to this driftwood for my terrariums. Now here’s a couple a lot of you guys have
been asking about: my pair of axolotls living in Axolotland. I’m happy to report, they’re bigger, fatter,
and doing great! I have been hoping they would breed but it
hasn’t happened yet. I also plan on moving them to a larger tank
very soon. They’ve been such problem-free pets! Last week, of course, we saw Carnivora, my
awesome Carnivorous Plant Tank containing pitcher plants, venus fly traps, and some
moss. But it is now undergoing a hibernation period
until March or April. Beside it is Jabba the Hutt, our cute and
fat Surinam Horned Frog. He’s still a bright green colour and eats
a lot! I love how he will croak randomly when he
hears my voice nearby. I’m also thinking of making him a new terrarium
soon. Here’s the Nucleus, which has proven useful
for the creation of new terrariums. It’s my official composter for leftover
fruit peels and organics and breeding chamber for springtails and other soil creatures. I’ve since gotten accustomed to seeing the
earthworms but they still repulse me, but what’s cool is I’ve begun to find populations
of some really neat creatures inside, like these small red critters. I’m not sure what they are. Do you guys know? FInally, we have Ligaya, my dragon aka African
Grey Parrot, a pretty awesome bird, super smart, and can copy messenger sounds now. Haha! Check it out! Also, meet Hope my broiler chicken. So get this: she was supposed to be for a
feeding video for the Fire Nation called Fire Ants vs. dead chick, and my request from the
chicken farmer was to give me a dead chick from his batch so I could feed it to my fire
ants, but there must have been a miscommunication because what arrived at my place was a living,
squeaking chick. Of course, I wasn’t about to kill it so I
kept it and she’s huge now. These types of meat chickens sadly don’t live
long but I’ve been doing some research to try to prolong its lifespan so it can move
in with me on a farm I’m moving to in a year or so. Let’s hope Hope makes it! Here’s Valentino my 5 yr old sorong green
tree python, a stunning snake and super healthy! He is my miracle snake because he came to
me with a severe upper respiratory illness but after medicating him by hand for several
weeks he survived despite the vets saying he had a 10% chance of living. I love him! Finally, here is Crayola, my female veiled
chameleon. She’s about a year old soon and I’ve relocated
her out of my Ant Room and to my balcony where she can get some nice morning sun. She’s much happier here now and appreciates
the breeze and height. And that, AC Family is my complete pet and
ant room tour. Some of you guys may have questions about
what happened to some of the other creatures like the rhino beetles. Well, they sadly passed away of old age as
they don’t live very long. As for the Lumberjacks, my teleporting carpenter
ants, they were doing ok but sadly must have caught an illness somewhere because they stopped
eating and eventually died. For you fans of the Platinum Dragons, I did
my very best to try to grow them in different setups and offer them various diets but they
remained the same size for months. I finally ended up releasing them this week
because I was clearly missing something from their care. Perhaps the species feeds exclusively on the
nectar of a specific type of flower for instance, or must have honeydew from mealybugs. Not sure, but perhaps I’ll try keeping another
species of Polyrhachis again in the future. Unfortunately, die offs and ants that don’t
adapt well to captivity are part of the hobby and though it’s sad, it helps us learn how
to better care for the pets we love. If you’ve been with the channel for awhile,
you know that I always commit 100% to go the extra mile to give my pets more than they
need to live out their best lives. I also have a few people in my life, who help
me with maintenance of all these animals. Without my helpful pet team, I definitely
would not be able to keep all these creatures, and I don’t recommend any of you guys have
this many pets if you don’t have the support for maintenance either. But I think we can all agree that life with
animals, whether tiny or big, is awesome wouldn’t you say?! Do you guys have any pets? Let me know your full pet list in the comments. Now that you guys know all the creatures,
territories, and beasts of my Antiverse, together we are all caught up now and we can start
the channel with a fresh new page! Thank you guys for watching, and be sure to
subscribe to my channel, so you can continue to follow more of the real life stories of
all these inhabitants of our ever-growing Antiverse! It’s Ant Love Forever! Alright, AC Family, once again a HAPPY NEW
YEAR 2020 to you all. After creating this full ant and pet tour
I realized I’m pretty much a zookeeper at this point! But it means a lot to me that you guys love
nature as much as I do and continue to watch my weekly videos. So if you haven’t yet, please do subscribe
to the channel, and hit the bell icon for notifications now, and choose ALL, so you
get notified every time I release these high quality nature videos. Also please remember to hit the LIKE button
every single time! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch some extended play footage of all the creatures
you saw in today’s episode. And now it’s time for the AC Question of
the Week. Last week, we asked: What type of water do our carnivorous plants
need? Congratulations to The Incarnation of Boredom
who correctly answered: They need distilled or rain water. Congratulations The Incarnation of Boredom,
you just won a free Ultimate Ant Keeping handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week we
ask: Which was your favourite creature featured
in today’s full pet tour? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free ebook handbook from our shop! Hope you could subscribe to our channel as
we upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video, to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

What Queen Ants To Look Out For Right Now (May 30th, 2018)

What Queen Ants To Look Out For Right Now (May 30th, 2018)


Welcome, AC Family to ANT BITE WEDNESDAYS,
covering the world of ants as they relate to global news, social media, and ant keeping. I’m here to fill you in on what queen ants
to look out for right now if you’re living in North America. If you’re not from North America, stay tuned
I’ll also let you know how to find out what is flying in your continent. This past weekend, I was shocked to meet so
many of you AC Family in Ontario, Canada at our first AntsCanada meet & greet, hence my
hoarse voice today. The ant love was incredible! You came in with ant shirts, test tubes, and
ant costumes! You even brought in queen ants of your own
and were eager to chat about the happenings of the Antiverse. This opened my eyes as to how many of you
actually are into ant keeping and not just watching videos about ants. So, if this is you and you’re a starting ant
keeper, head outside now in the afternoons and keep your eyes on the ground! Right now is the ultimate season for Camponotus
ants, also known as carpenter ants! When you spot a queen ant, place her into
a proper test tube setup, keep her in the dark, and she should start laying eggs for
you in a few days. So many of you have been tweeting me photos
of queen ants you’ve captured asking for an ID and indeed 95% of them are Camponotus ants. I love Camponotus ants because they are large
so they’re quite easy to observe with the naked eye, polymorphic, meaning they have
super majors after about the hundredth worker point, and they are relatively easy to keep. The one downside of this genus though is that
they are slow-growing. Instead of the four week development from
egg to adult worker, it takes 8 weeks, and the queen takes periodic egg-laying breaks. It usually takes two years before you start
to see impressive numbers, but as is essential to ant keeping, patience is a virtue! Be sure to watch our Camponotus Care tutorial
here, with a more in depth look at the genus and their care. In fact, that is an entire playlist to all
my ant tutorials with a full range of helpful ant keeping tips. For those of you who don’t live in North America,
this video will also show you guys in Europe, Australia, and Asia, what ants may be flying
right now in your area! Depending on your location, there are other
species of ants also commonly flying now in North America other than Camponotus, and I
list them there in that video. Did you manage to catch a queen ant yet? If so, let us know in the comments section
the species and your location, so the rest of us AC Family near you, can keep our eyes
peeled! Especially for those of you in South America
and Africa, as I don’t have much data on nuptial flights in these continents! Just a reminder that we also have a tonne
of ant keeping gear at AntsCanada.com for you guys to check out, including specially
made test tubes for queen ants, and a complete e-book handbook guide on ant keeping. And that is today’s Ant Bite Wednesday. See you guys again for this Saturday’s big
episode featuring some alien colonists! It’s ant love forever! Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family!

What If ANTS Were BIGGER?


Greetings, AC Family! Welcome to another mid-week episode of the
AntsCanada Ant Channel! On this channel, I’ve had the opportunity
to take some truly stunning high quality footage of ants and other creatures, and I quite frequently
find myself getting lost in their micro worlds, almost forgetting they are so small when seeing
them so big on screen! And it made me wonder, what would happen if
ants were bigger? Say, human-sized? Well, from an ant nerd’s perspective, I
think I have a pretty good idea as to what theoretically might happen, as there could
be a few outcomes, some of which may surprise you, like can you imagine ants giving us body
massages? I’ll explain how this could happen, and
more in a bit, so before we get into that, be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button with the
BELL icon set on ALL to join the AC Family, and hit LIKE if you enjoyed this video. No let’s get to it! So, check out this super macro footage of
Asian bullet ants, Diacamma rugosum from a recent video. They’re truly magnificent this close, right? Well, imagine you were their size or they
were our size. The first and most obvious answer is, we’d
all be doomed! If ants were human-sized they’d be strong
enough to lift things the size of entire houses, and take down animals the size of a brontosaurus. They’d definitely be preying on our soft
tender bodies, and something tells me our military forces would have to really up our
social protection against the ant beasts sharing the planet with us. Life would be quite different! We’d be hunted, advanced upon by organized
raids, our houses and buildings broken into, and picked off one by one by swaths of these
beasts, who would sting us to death, spray us with formic acid to death, or just stretch
us out by our limbs and take us back to the colony to be consumed alive by their young. Or this might surprise you: they might not
kill us, but instead form a symbiotic relationship with us, where our coexistence can benefit
both ants and humans. Imagine we humans find a sustainable way to
turn their garbage, feces, or leftover meals into edible human food, so having us around
thereby helps keep their nests clean, much like springtails, isopods, and silverfish
do. And in return they, not only NOT kill us,
but they allow us to live with them in their massive mountain-sized, protected underground
kingdoms. Or perhaps we become their hygienists. Imagine if we could pick off body mites from
hard-to-reach places on the ants, in the same way predatory Hypoaspis mites protect our
Golden Empire, yellow crazy ant colony from parasitic blood-sucking mites. Now here’s something way crazy! Imagine ants found our feces or urine delicious…
highly unlikely due to the composition of our wastes, but imagine you’re something
like a mealybug for a sec, who excretes a bi-product ants just love called “honeydew”,
and upon discovering us, the ants start to protect us 24-7, never leaving us alone, ensuring
we breed and multiply okay, relocating us to better living environments if needed, and
even giving us body massages so we eliminate more often, all because they find our pee
or poop delicious. Mealybugs live the high life right? Yes, perhaps all of these are a stretch, but
one thing’s for sure: when you remove scale, and have a look at these incredible creatures
with a more intimate lens, you’ll discover that ants are truly some of the most magnificent
creatures on the planet, worthy of awe and respect. If you aren’t convinced by now, then just
watch a few more videos on this channel. The world of ants will truly blow your mind! Right, AC Family? Thank you guys for watching! It’s ant love forever! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday and possibly Wednesdays now if you guys keep waiting these mid-week
videos, at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to jelp us keep making more, It’s ant love forever!