Inside One Of London’s Busiest Sexual Health Clinics | Sex Map Of Britain

Inside One Of London’s Busiest Sexual Health Clinics | Sex Map Of Britain


Feet on the edge. Fantastic.
Legs nice and relaxed. I’m just going to move the skin to see if everything
looks all right. I think you’ve got a bit of thrush
going on down here. Just going to feel on your groin to
see if you’ve got any swelling. Is that ticklish? Yes. Sorry! When you take it out, I always say
you want it to look like a Santa hat or a sombrero. If you see it that
way, it’s more like a Smurf hat. Oh, God. No disasters,
but there’s always a drama. Barnaby? I’m Joel,
I’m one of the doctors. Nice to meet you. I understand the reason
you’re here today is because of some sex
over the weekend. Yeah, on Sunday. Is that the first time
you’d had sex with them? Yeah. Did you use any drugs at all? Yeah. What drugs do you use? OK. OK. You lose a lot of your inhibitions
when you’re having chemsex. And you’ll do things that
you really wouldn’t do sober. When I get high enough,
you can sleep with, like, six or seven people in one night,
in rotation. I think I’ve had four injections
for gonorrhoea. Maybe chlamydia three times. Having lost my virginity at 18,
in four years, that’s not so bad. Hopefully. Now, this is telling us
your HIV status six weeks ago, so it’s not telling us anything
about yesterday, also not telling us anything about
any other sex in the last six weeks. CREW MEMBER: How do you feel about
doing this test? Absolutely fine, I’ve done it
quite a few times. And you were bottom without condoms,
is that right? Yeah. I feel very embarrassed,
for some reason, asking somebody to put a condom on. So I think I’ve just got into
the habit of not using one. Some people are more vulnerable to
getting infections, because they’re more vulnerable
as people. And it’s harder for them to
negotiate the kind of sex they want and it’s harder for them
to insist on using condoms. OK, I can see, Barney,
there’s just one dot there, which means it’s a negative test. It’s what they use to freeze
the warts. Sorry. That’s OK! Ooft! Sexual infections are kind of like
Russian roulette – you can be lucky and have sex
with loads of people and not get anything, or you can have sex with one person
and catch something. Charles? Hi, good morning,
how are you? All right, so, you’re here for
some condoms and an STI screening? Yeah. That’s all it is. I was with a long-time girlfriend
for a long time. And once that kind of ended,
you know, I just went all out. Not really
thinking about the consequences. CREW MEMBER: What are we talking? It’s not triple figures yet,
but it’s not far off. And, obviously, with all
the online stuff, Tinder, it’s so easy and accessible to
meet people. Sex is pretty available
if you want it. And that is the worry, as well,
the people you’re meeting, you don’t really know them
that well. And I’m not even asking
whether not they’re on the pill or what their contraception is,
it’s just kind of happening. And regretting it after, to be fair. There’s a lot of times after
I’ve just regretted it completely. But I seem to keep going back to it. Let me write the number down
so I can register you online. Are you worried? Yeah. You are worried.
I’m worried, yeah. I’ve been putting it off
for a long time. I like to think
I’ve got away with it so far. But this week is going to be
nervous for me. I can’t wait to call them up
and get the results, yeah. I’ve been with my partner
for about four, five months now. And we both decided we don’t want to
use condoms anymore. And so…I’ve been having
some discharge. We ask everyone, did you had sex
with anybody else? No! It can’t be me,
I haven’t done nothing! I mean, no, yeah, it can’t be me. I think he’s gone and messed around,
and he’s come back to me, and I’ve been given something… Ugh! It sucks, it really sucks. So, this is for the chlamydia
and gonorrhoea swab. Just pop this inside your vagina
and rotate it. Inside, OK? I’ll close
the curtain for you. Things like chlamydia,
Trichomoniasis, gonorrhoea – it’s treatable, but when you have
a positive result, it can have a really big impact
on that relationship. It could potentially break
a relationship. Sharp scratch. He’s probably walking out right now,
thinking he’s a free man, no-one knows nothing. While I’m sitting here
getting myself checked out. That’s the reality of it,
do you know what I mean? But someone’s misbehaved. So someone’s going to get
kicked to the curb. Yeah, look, the results are back,
it’s not great. She’s got a box in her hands. I know what that means. It’s thrush. So you have some candida, OK? Thrush?! Yeah. No way! You’ll be pleased to know. Thrush?! Oh, yeah, I’m very pleased
to know that. It’s not sexually transmitted. He’s cool, he’s all right. It’s thrush. Due to…tight panties, probably. Got to get some new ones. Patient number 68. There’s a lot of patients that will
come in and recognise me and be like, “Hi,
you had me last time.” But when you do see a regular, you’re thinking, “Oh, my God.” You start checking,
“When did I see him,” or, “When did I see her?” Hi, how are you? Good, thanks.
And you? I finally managed to get in contact
with him this afternoon, and, erm… he was saying
that he was HIV-positive, and then that it was 50% my fault, because I didn’t say to
use a condom. I can see where with the shame that
comes with it, why he may not say. I mean, he should have, but I should
have used a condom as well, so. Going to get those results by phone, and they should be ready on Friday. People can come with all sorts of problems
to the sexual health clinic. Sometimes it’s not related to
a sexually transmitted infection. I’ve got a young woman
in the consultation room, she thinks she might be pregnant,
but it doesn’t sound great, she’s in some pain. I went over to A&E
and they told me to come over here. My doctor hasn’t got an appointment
for another two weeks, and I just wondered if there is
anything you could do for me to help me?
Because I am in so much pain. OK. I got pregnant
when I was 17, miscarried. It kind of feels like the last time. I can feel it specifically
on one side my tummy as well, and I had to leave work today because I was just doubled over
in pain, it was just ridiculous. Yeah. I’ve been with my partner
for about a year and a half. I do try to come in round about
every six months anyway. And when did you last have sex? Erm… Maybe last week, Thursday? OK. And was that with your partner? Yeah. And was that with condom
or without condoms? Without condoms,
but I’ve been taking my pill, so I was like, wahey! And then, going back from him, when was the last time you had sex
with someone other than him? Oh, Jesus Christ. When I was, like, 17? OK. WHISPERING: Is she? Is she pregnant?
Yeah. So, the thing we’re worried about
is pregnancy outside of the womb. So I’m going to go and explain that
to her. Poor girl. So, we’ve just done the pregnancy
test… Go on. ..and it’s positive. If it’s OK with you,
I’m going to get that scan. Absolutely. So, your appointment
is booked for tomorrow at 4pm. Mmm-hmm. Any questions? No, I’m done. I’m going home to
probably cry. I’m upset about the fact
that I’m in so much pain, and I know I’m probably
going to miscarry again. Whoa! Shit! Ugh. I’m about to have a fag. Judge me at your will. I’m not bothered right now. Hi, Mum. I’m pregnant. I’m pregnant. I don’t know, I’ve got an
appointment tomorrow, scan. Because there’s chance I
could miscarry again. Erm, I’m kind of afraid at
the moment. Don’t really… Yeah. As long as you’re there, that’s all
I need. Love you too, Mum, bye. Patient number 73. PHONE DIALS Hello? Hello. Hi, is that Selina? Hi, speaking. Oh, hi, it’s Joe calling from
Homerton Hospital. Are you able to talk at the moment? I am. OK. The test for
trichomonas or TV, was positive. So we need you to come back into the
clinic and get treatment for that. No! OK. This is fucking bullshit. It’s frustrating, I know. It didn’t show up on the test you
had done on Thursday, possibly because you had thrush
at the time. Yeah. It might have got in the way
and just stopped us from being able to see
the trichomonas. So we need to give you
some treatment, and also to give your partner some
treatment as well. Yeah. Ugh! I’m so pissed off. This is hard, you know, because… This is actually hard, like. This is fucking hard, because
fucking hell, like… You can’t trust many people, and
then you trust someone
and they break it. I can’t never go back with him. And I really liked him. I’ve had a sleepless night, still in
a lot of pain, but I’m pretty much just worried
about the baby at this point. Oh, there’s going to be cold and
jelly, ain’t it? Yeah, cold jelly. I’ve done this before. I’ve got me mum with me this time,
so, makes everything so much better. There’s the beginnings of the
pregnancy in there, called a yolk sac. But it’s too early to see a baby
with a heartbeat, all right? So you are going to need another
scan in a couple of weeks’ time. But we know it’s in the right place,
that’s the main thing, OK? That’s what we expect to see at five
weeks and two days. Are you happy with this
pregnancy, or…? I’ve got no idea. No idea. So you’re going to think about what
you want to do. Just time to digest it all. Once you have a kid, your whole
life is… Not down the drain, but your whole
life is for them, you know what I mean? Just the thought of a baby, someone
that’s dependent on me. I mean, I’m just learning how to be
independent myself. Please don’t, because I’ll
start crying! Bowel pain, because Danielle’s had
diarrhoea and upset stomach over the last four weeks. It’s more likely to
be bowel spasms. Eat little and often, lots
of fluids, and it will settle
itself down. Five weeks and two days. I’m not upset. I’m a responsible adult. Sort of girlfriend I liked the most,
I ended it, because I wanted to have sex with
other people. And since I’ve ended it, slept with
other people, I’ve regretted it. So, for me, getting tested is a time
for me to move on and, yeah, refresh and settle down
properly sometime. Do you want her back? Yeah, I do, yeah. I do want her back, yeah. Couldn’t really sleep last night,
to be fair. If it is clear, I’ll be very lucky.
Very lucky. RINGING TONE So, my ID number is 107629. That’s great. Thank you
for your help. Bye. I’m really pleased with that. I can’t hide it.
I can’t hide it. It’s really, really pleasing
to hear. Wow. Yes. I can’t believe it! I can’t believe it. I know people who’ve gone on holiday
for a week and had one one-night stand, they’ve got chlamydia
or something. Why have I got so lucky? Reaching a point where you’re really
worried about having an infection, can sometimes be a bit of a
reality check. But, for some people, it doesn’t make as much of
an impression on how important it is for them to change the type of sex
they’re having, or their behaviour in the future. You look happy. Hmm? You look happy.
Yeah, it’s a relief. Just effort, scheduling and working
around STIs. Nobody really wants to do it. So it’s more the inconvenience to
life than anything else at the moment? Yeah, that’s
literally it. I don’t want to alarm you, but I don’t think I would have been
that upset at all. It, like, it’s… I guess I’ve been in a lot of
situations where the risk of HIV is quite big. And that feeling of, for a month and not knowing whether
you have it on whether you don’t, it’s a very hollow feeling. I hope that it’s only a
matter of time before I start being more
practical about using protection. Because I think it’s just a matter
of having the confidence to ask somebody to put a condom on. But it’s not really something that
you bear in mind when you’re having chemsex.

Symptoms Of Yeast Infection | SymptomsOfYeastInfection.Biz

Symptoms Of Yeast Infection | SymptomsOfYeastInfection.Biz


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We need to talk about male suicide | Steph Slack | TEDxFolkestone

We need to talk about male suicide | Steph Slack | TEDxFolkestone


Translator: Leonardo Silva
Reviewer: David DeRuwe Did you know that
by the end of this event, three men in the UK
will have died by suicide? I can still remember exactly where I was when my dad called me to tell me
that they’d found my uncle. He had taken his life, and it had taken three weeks
to find his body. Richard was 47. He was a doctor, super smart,
creative, autistic, he spoke new languages with ease,
he played and wrote music and he understood science and math
like no one else I knew. He was the kind of kid
you’d really hate at school, right? He saved people’s lives for a living, and yet, he decided to take his own. I’d like to take you back to 2010. I was at my new flat in Brighton,
having dinner with a friend, about to start my third year
of university, when my dad calls me to tell me
that they’d found my uncle. That feeling, that sinking feeling in your stomach
when your heart drops all the way down, and all you can think is, “What could I have done
to stop that from happening?” that feeling is not something
I wish anyone ever has to experience. Men are facing a crisis. How many men do you think
die by suicide each day in the UK? Have a guess. Raise your hand
if you think it’s under five. Raise your hands. Under five? Under 10? It’s 12. That’s one man every two hours. While we’re all enjoying our day, we’re going to lose 12 men
to suicide today. In my work, we talk a lot about the fact
that 76% of all suicides are male and that this silent killer is claiming
the lives of more men under 45 than anything else. And I can’t help but find myself
asking, “Why is that?” Doesn’t that trouble you? Because it troubles me. These are our brothers, fathers,
uncles, partners, sons – these are our friends, and they decide to die. I think there are some hard questions
we need to ask about male suicide. I don’t believe there’s anything wrong
with men having suicidal thoughts, but is there something wrong with how
we react to suicide being thought about? Let me explain. We’ll all die at one point
or another, right? Our bodies will fail us,
and we’ll die of disease or old age. Or we’ll have our lives taken from us,
maybe in a tragic accident. So, isn’t it perfectly normal to consider being in control
of our own death? Yes, suicide is intentional, but does that automatically make it wrong? I believe suicide is preventable, and I believe we should do
everything in our power to prevent it, but I also believe
there’s nothing inherently wrong in thinking about our own death. I’ve considered what it’s like to die. I’d like to ask you all
to close your eyes just for a minute. I promise nothing scary will happen
if you close your eyes. Now raise your hands
if you’ve ever had a really bad day that’s left you feeling
maybe stressed or upset. Okay. Keep your eyes closed
and keep your hands raised if that bad day or bad week or bad month has ever led you
to think about harming yourself or taking your own life. Thank you; put your hands down
and then open your eyes. That was about half of this room. I invite you to consider
what might be different if we didn’t see having
suicidal thoughts as wrong, and what that might mean for the men
in our lives thinking of suicide. Let’s go back to my uncle Richard. For most of his life, he experienced
what was most likely bipolar, and he’d had suicidal thoughts
on more than one occasion. In fact, six years before his death,
he attempted to take his life. The sad fact was
that Richard lived in a time where suicide wasn’t considered
something that you spoke about. It was swept under the carpet
and a cause of shame amongst families. There was something wrong with it. I mean, it was only in 1961
that we stopped making suicide a crime. Richard’s parents were medics –
an anesthetist and a nurse – and they didn’t understand suicide either. They didn’t think that it was real, and I think they were probably in denial
about what was happening with Richard. What happened to my uncle
isn’t my grandparents’ fault. Suicide is complex and rarely
attributed to any one factor. But, when I reflect
on Richard’s experience and on how we still struggle
to speak about suicide today, nothing’s really changed. We still struggle to talk about it. We label it as abnormal or unusual, and we make men wrong
for having suicidal thoughts. We say that they’re unwell,
or that they need to get better. And because we think of it this way, it stops us from being able
to talk about it, and we stay silent instead. And suicide remains
shrouded in this stigma. That stigma is only perpetuated by irresponsible
and sensationalized journalism that happens in the cases
of celebrity suicide. Just look at some of the reporting
around Anthony Bourdain’s recent death. When I was thinking about
how best to explain this point, it made me think about
sex and sex education. Stick with me, okay? (Chuckles) It’s really uncomfortable for us
to talk to kids about sex. It’s so tempting to think if we don’t talk about it,
it won’t happen, our kids won’t have sex. But we know that teenage pregnancy
and STIs are the risks if we don’t have that conversation, and we take those risks seriously. We introduced sex education into schools, and it’s now compulsory across the UK. And, I mean, it’s far from perfect, but what it has been shown to do is to improve positive attitudes
towards safe sex, to delay sex and to reduce teenage pregnancy
when used alongside other methods. With suicide, we know it’s a myth that talking about it will plant
that idea in someone’s head. And if suicide is claiming the lives
of more men under 45 than anything else, isn’t it time we just start accepting that suicidal thoughts
are something that happen, and instead start talking openly
and responsibly about it? I don’t think there’s anything wrong
with men having suicidal thoughts. But perhaps there is something wrong
with our expectations of men in society that lead them to have those thoughts. Let’s think about that. What does it mean to be masculine? What does it mean to be a man? Society tells us men should
be strong, dependable, and able to provide for their family. There’s very little research
into the reasons why men suicide, but the recent research that does exist speaks about how men’s high suicide rates
are linked to risk factors such as history
of being abused as a child, single status or relationship breakdown, and financial difficulty or unemployment. So that means that if you’re a man
and you’ve had a troubled childhood, you’re still searching for the one
or you’re worried about money, you’re at risk of suicide! How many of us know men in that situation? I mean, I’ve definitely
just described Richard, and I’ve probably described
half of millennial men in the UK. Unsurprisingly, these risk factors are linked to those
traditional notions of masculinity, of being strong, dependable,
and able to provide for your family. It seems as though when men feel
they can’t meet those expectations, they make themselves wrong for that. The research backs this up too. Just last year, there was a paper
confirming that there is a link between men feeling unable to fulfill the stereotypical
characteristics of masculinity and suicidal thoughts. Now, I imagine a lot of us in this room
don’t agree with those stereotypes, but some of us probably do,
or at least know someone who does. How many of us have been guilty of saying
“Man up!” at some point in our lives? I know I have. The conversation is starting to change. There are great campaigns
like BBC Three’s Real Men Do Cry and CALM’s L’eau de Chris, that are trying to shift those perceptions
of men and masculinity and encourage them
to be more open and vulnerable. But is it just men who are perpetuating
these outdated stereotypes of what it means to be a man and making themselves wrong for that? I don’t think so. I’d like us to consider
what our role is as women. Just last month, I was chatting
to a female friend of mine who described the guy she was dating
as “a sponge” and “too sensitive” because he opened up to her about some of the anxieties
he was facing in the relationship and how that was
making him feel vulnerable. I cannot begin to describe
the look I see on some women’s faces when I speak about how men I know
have broken down in tears in front of me. It’s somewhere between
discomfort and disdain. Men are already making themselves wrong for not living up
to these masculine ideals of being strong, dependable,
and able to provide for their families. They’re already
shaming themselves for that. But we’re compounding the problem
by making them wrong and shaming them for demonstrating
those open and vulnerable behaviors that we say we want them to show us. And we’re making them wrong for breaking out
of these rigid stereotypes and for just being fully human. To the women in the room, I’m not saying that male suicide
is our responsibility. I absolutely acknowledge that men have a huge role to play
in breaking down these stereotypes. But as a woman, I can only speak
to my experience and how I do see our role. What I’m inviting all of us to do,
regardless of our gender, is to reconsider the expectations
that we have of men in society and reconsider how we view men who have the courage
to show us their vulnerability. I’m inviting us to ask the men
in our lives how they’re really doing and if they’re struggling with anything
they haven’t told us about. And can we think about
how we respond to that? How we might choose
to empathize with their pain? Can we hold space for men
and listen to them, without trying to fix things, tell them that we love them and that it’s okay for them
to feel however they’re feeling? I’d like to tell you
about another guy I know. He’s a really good friend of mine;
I used to work with him, actually. His name’s Billy – he’s super smart, he’s genuine, authentic, kind, generous – he’s just the kind of guy
you really want to spend time with. So, imagine how I felt when Billy called me at 11:30 a.m.
on a Friday morning, three years ago, to tell that he’d spent
the night in hospital because the night before,
he’d tried to take his own life. He was 24. You’re probably thinking I felt shocked, panicked, uncomfortable. Actually, I felt honored. I felt honored that Billy felt
that he could talk to me about his suicide attempt
and how he’d been feeling. I thought back to my uncle, and I knew that I had a chance
to respond differently to Billy. I met him with compassion
and understanding, and a safe space to talk about
how he was feeling, without judgment. I didn’t make him wrong
for feeling the way that he felt or for attempting to take his life. I didn’t try to label him as suicidal
or as someone who needed to get better. I simply gave him a space
to talk about whatever he needed to. I saw what he told me
as incredibly courageous, and not something
he should ever be ashamed of. I can’t help but wonder
if this can make a difference. When I reflect on how my response
to Billy was entirely different to the response my uncle used to receive
when he spoke about suicide, I can’t help but wonder what would happen if we had different expectations
of men in society, if we had a different reaction to men who have the courage
to show us their vulnerability, and a different reaction to men
who have suicidal thoughts. Would men feel differently about suicide? I don’t have the answers, but I am inviting you
to consider the questions. Because I don’t believe there is anything
wrong with men having suicidal thoughts, but perhaps there is something wrong
with how we react to that and our expectations of men in society. So, what would happen if we all
have the courage to go home tonight and have conversations
with the men in our lives about how they’re feeling
and what they’re thinking, including their suicidal thoughts? Yeah, it’s going to be uncomfortable, I get that, but we do it with sex! Every parent dreads having
that conversation with their kids about how babies are made. But we know it’s important
to keep our kids safe, so we do it anyway,
no matter how uncomfortable we feel. I wish I could have had
a conversation with my uncle like the one I had with Billy. I wish I could have told him, “There is nothing wrong with you. There is nothing wrong with how
you’re feeling or what you’re thinking. It’s okay. I’m here to listen to whatever
you need to say or talk about because your feelings are important. You’re important, and you don’t have to do this alone.” Thank you. (Applause) (Cheers)

Study Shows 11 Million Men Are Infected With Cancer-Linked HPV And Don’t Know It | NBC Nightly News

Study Shows 11 Million Men Are Infected With Cancer-Linked HPV And Don’t Know It | NBC Nightly News


RISK FACTORS AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO PREVENT IT.>>Reporter: WHEN MARRIED FATHER OF THREE JASON MENDELSOHNN FELT A STRANGE LUMP ON HIS NECK A FEW YEARS AGO, HE GOT IT CHECKED OUT RIGHT AWAY.>>WHEN I GOT DIAGNOSED ARE STAGE-FOUR HPV-RELATED ORAL CANCER, MY LIFE STOPPED. ALL OF A SUDDEN, I HAD TO WORRY ABOUT WHO WAS GOING TO TAKE CARE OF MY WIFE AND KIDS.>>Reporter: JASON’S CANCER WAS CAUSED BY HPV. THE HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS. MOST COMMONLY LINKED TO CERVICAL CANCER IN WOMEN. A NEW STUDY VEELS MEN ARE INCREASING — REVEALS MEN ARE INCREASINGLY INFECTED WITH THE VIRUS. MORE THAN 11 MILLION MEN HAVE ORAL HPV, AND LIKE JASON, DON’T EVEN KNOW IT.>>WHEN WE HAVE HPV INFECTIONS, WHETHER THEY’RE GENITAL INFECTIONS OR INFECTIONS IN THE THROAT, THE INFECTION ITSELF WITH THE VIRUS DOESN’T CAUSE SYMPTOMS.>>Reporter: IN SOME PEOPLE, THE VIRUS CAN PROGRESS TO ORAL CANCER YEARS LATER. RICK FACTORS FOR ORAL HPV MAY INCLUDE THE NUMBER OF SEXUAL PARTNERS, PERFORMING ORAL SEX, AND SMOKING CIGARETTES OR MARIJUANA. JASON HAS SINCE RECOVERED FROM HIS CANCER AND IS DETERMINED TO RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT THE VIRUS.>>LET ME TELL YOU WHY I LOVE YOUR MOTHER –>>Reporter: HE’S GOTTEN HIS KIDS VACCINATED AND WANTS EVERYONE TO KNOW IT IS PREVENTABLE. DOCTORS SAY BOYS AND GIRLS SHOULD BE VACCINATED STARTING AT ABOUT 11-YEARS-OLD. THEY SHOULD GET TWO DOSES AT LEAST SIX MONTHS APART. THOSE WHO GET THE SHOT AFTER AGE 14 NEED THREE DOSES. AFTER AGE 26, DOCTORS SAY IT’S TOO LATE.>>LET’S TALK ABOUT ADULTS RIGHT NOW WHO THINK THEY MAY HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH THIS VIRUS. ANYTHING THEY CAN DO?>>AND UNLIKE PAP SMEARS FOR CERVICAL CANCER, THERE IS NO GOOD TEST FOR ORAL HPV NOW.