What is an Insect?

What is an Insect?


Funtastic Hop Hop Creep Creep Crawl Crawl Fly Fly Fly, fly, fly! An insect has two antennae An insect has six legs An insect has a head An insect has a thorax An insect has an abdomen And so do I. An insect has two antennae An insect has six legs An insect has a head An insect has a thorax An insect has an abdomen And so do I Insects, insects Insects everywhere You see them in the park You see them in the grass You see them in the dark You can see them in the air Insects, insects Insects everywhere You hear them buzzing by You hear them hiss or squeak You hear the hum at night You hear them in your sleep Hop Hop Creep Creep Crawl Crawl Fly Fly Insects everywhere! Subscribe to our channel. And remember… Be Funtastic! We love you Bye Bye

[Fabre’s Book of Insects]  Ep 23 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics

[Fabre’s Book of Insects] Ep 23 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics


It is neither a stream nor a sandy beach. The place where the cabbage butterfly that looked for the place to lay eggs is different It was a ‘cabbage farm’ nearby.
And ~! Other kids besides you are here
You’ve got a lot! These butterflies are in my field
Go away! This guy!
Go somewhere else! old lady! What are you doing now? Do not you see? I’m chasing butterflies. Ah! I know that.
Why are you chasing a butterfly without any guilt? There is no fault! What do you know? Their larvae eat my crops
It makes you tattered. Then I cannot sell it at the right price and I’ve got nothing left!
Do you understand? She is not wrong.
huh! It is a ‘cabbage worm’ They do nothing but eat crops. She can be angry, too. .
Go away!
Go away! What? What are you doing there? The egg is placed on the back of the cabbage leaf, just like a line. Hey! What are you doing there? Ah! No. nothing… . If you leave this egg here She will take it all away. So that’s the only way. Alley-oop! No! Hey! Why are you picking on someone else’s cabbage? Madame! This cabbage … . How much? Take this to your house and put it in a pot! Hopefully I can figure out the process from eggs to butterflies! I ended up planting cabbages in pots.
I do not think so. Anyway! I’ll check to see if the eggs are safe. The number of eggs attached to cabbage leaves is about 200
It seemed to be lined with yellowish elongated rice grains. You! I’ll take good care of you.
You must grow up to be a butterfly. OK? I carefully observed the eggs of cabbage butterfly.
I took care of them. And in case the larvae are born
To be a fresh food I also took care of cabbage. A few days after that … . Oh~! Today is a refreshing morning! Well, I am happy today
Let’s observe the eggs of cabbage butterfly! What? What is that flying over cabbage? Is it the fly bugs? I made the biggest mistake that day.
Wait a moment ~. The guys who I thought they were fly bugs are.
I’ll move on to the sunshine.
It was nothing other than the egg parasitoids. Egg parasitoids are small insects of about 0.4mm in size, and lay eggs where the eggs of cabbage butterflies are gathered.
It was the guy who parasitized his caterpillar. I did not know it at all, but I found out after the caterpillar had woken up in the eggs of cabbage butterfly. Because of egg parasitoid.
More than half of the dead eggs are not even born as larvae. I’m sorry, guys. If I had known beforehand
It could have been born more than this. Newborn larvae eat the shells of their eggs. After eating the eggshells, the larvae start to eat cabbage leaves in earnest. There’s a guy eating from the edge of the leaf.
There is a guy who eats from the center. It looks like eating food according to eating habits … Because they come from a close place to eat a lot. So let’s find out what they look like.

Centipede Attack! Nerf Battle with Wild Toy Bug Vs. Ethan and Cole in the Woods!


(door clicks) – We finally made it to the lake house! – Yeah, it was such a long trip. – Let’s go check out that view. We’re really high up. – This is a nice view. – I wanna go explore. – I’m gonna take a rest
for a little bit first. – Come on, let’s go explore. – Maybe later. – Come on, Cole. – Have fun exploring, I’m
gonna stay right here. – Whatever. Hey, Dad, I wanna go explore. – Alright, buddy, have fun,
just be careful out there. – Okay. Bye. (peaceful guitar music) – Let’s do this! (peaceful guitar music) Cool. I bet I could climb this. This is awesome! (centipede clicks) What was that? (centipede hisses) Oh well. Whoa, that’s huge pipe. Oh my god. Hello, hello? Hey, what’s that! It can’t be. Gold, there’s gold in this river? We’re gonna be rich! I have to go get Cole! Cole, Cole, Cole…! Cole, Cole, Cole, where are you Cole? Cole, Cole, Cole…look what I found! – Is that gold? – Yeah, there’s gold in that river. – We’re gonna be rich! – I know, let’s go find some more! – Let’s get our gear. – Let’s go, someone else
is gonna find the gold. – I’m just getting our gear ready. – We won’t need that, let’s just go! – There’s animals in the mountains. – I’m a tough mountain man,
I don’t need any weapons. – Are you sure? – I got weapons right here. – Mm. – I got water, let’s go. – I don’t know about this. – I heard something out there,
but I think we’ll be alright. – What you mean by that? – I may have heard something in the bushes by down by the small river. – What do you mean something? – Don’t worry about the little river. We’re gonna go to the big
river, where the big gold is. – Big gold? – Yeah, there’s big chunks
of gold in that big river. – I think we should
bring weapons, but okay. – Let’s go! This is where I found
the first gold nugget, in this little river. – Where’s the big river? – We need to follow this
little river to the big river. – Okay, but we should’ve brought weapons. – This way. We’re gonna be so rich
when we find all that gold. (centipede hissing) Well, we found the river. – Where’s the gold? – Let’s check over there. (animal caws) – What was that? – Probably nothing. – I’m gonna go check it out. – Whatever. (centipede hisses) Wait, no way! Gold! Look at the size of this one! (animal caws) (Cole gasps and screams) Cole! (Cole screams) – Cole, cole, ahh! Not my gold! – We gotta get out of here
there’s something in the bushes. – What about my gold? – Forget it, let’s go get your backpack. – I’m coming back for the gold. I can’t believe you made me
leave the gold in that river. – I saved your life, there
was something in the bushes. – Well, you know what,
I’m gonna go get my gold. (centipede hisses) – You’re gonna be sorry. – Not today I won’t. – Well, good luck. – You’re not coming? – No, there’s something big out there. – Ugh! – Watch out for Big Foot. – I’m not scared of Big Foot. I’m not scared of anything, I’m tough! (Ethan screams) (gun bangs) – Why are you screaming? – There’s a fat, huge,
like snake bug over there. – What? – Go get your weapon, he’s right there! (Cole screams) – Where’d it go? – I’m not sure, but I think
it’s in the kitchen, let’s go. (Mom screams) What is it? – There’s a giant centipede
over by that bed, good luck! (centipede hisses) – There! (guns bang) Where’d it go? (dramatic music) Where is it? – There! (centipede hisses) Get it! (guns bang) It’s going into the living room. – Don’t let it get away! Where’d it go? Look on the back porch, the door’s open. – Go. (centipede hisses) Do you see it? (centipede hisses) Ugh! Whoa! It just jumped over the edge. – It’s gone. – Good, now I can go get my gold. Now I’m gonna go get my
gold, with or without you. – Without me. – Fine, be that way. I told everyone I’d get my gold back. I wonder what Cole was so
scared about in these woods. (animal barks) Huh? (bear roars) (Ethan screams) – Hi guys, today’s comment of the week comes from Brian Payne. Hey guys, your videos rock,
I think a creepy clown video. How old are you, it’s hard to tell. I’m eight. – And I’m five. – And we’ve seen a lot of other YouTubers doing creepy clowns. Do you think we should do it? Let us know in the comments. – Give us a thumbs up. – Check out our Facebook page. – And our Instagram page. – Click on our faces to subscribe and look outside, a big fat crow. Oh well, he’s gone, I heard him though. Okay, bye guys, thanks for watching.

Insect Collection Organization Basics for Kids (Ep 5)

Insect Collection Organization Basics for Kids (Ep 5)


Here lie the trophies of some of the great hunter’s of the past. They walk beneath our feet fly above our heads and cross our paths if one desires to find these treasures he need not look far, but right in front of him. He shall cast in his net and become and become an insect hunter. Titus here. On today’s episode of the insect hunter we’re going to put the finishing touches on our collection by organizing and labeling our specimens. First off in our show today, we’re going to have Hattie Hash Tag teach us why we need to label our insects. After that Rocket is going to teach us how to create labels. Hattie: “Anyways I am so excited to be here with my Dad today. Hashtag Father Daughter Time Father: “Honey, what is this?” Uh, that is very glittery. Hashtag Glitter Phone Hattie: “Anyways tell us Dad.” Yeah, uh, no I’ll tell you. Do I have to talk into this? Hashtag Yes Ok, um, well, Thankyou for …. Hashtag Gratitude Yeah thankyou for letting me be on your show today. Hash tag show time I want to tell everyone out there why it is important to label your insects. Hashtag eww, Hashtag gross. Uh huh, yeah it’s important to label your insects because you need to document where you find them. Hashtag doctormentation. Is that even a word? Um so yeah we need to label them so we know where to find them again because if you ever discovered a new species of bug Hashtag Discovery you are going to want to be able to find it again and other scientists are also going to want to be able Hashtag Scienterrific are going to want to find out where Hashtag I want it that way. are going to want to find out where that bug was too. Ok! Hashtag who what where. Because it is a new species and it would be really exciting to see that bug. Hashtag excitement Ok no, we’re done. We’re done! You, take your glitter and you go to your room! Alright!? we’re done. No more tweets! No more facebook! No more selfies! No more food, pictures of your selfies. You’re done! Ok? This camera is coming off!! Now that we know why we label our insects The first thing we’re going to do is get some paper. Then we’re going to cut it into some thin strips. You can look below if you want to see the dimensions. You can do your labels in two ways. You can either do them by hand or you can do them on the computer. When you do them on the computer you want to have your font close to 3.5. Whether you do your labels by hand or on the computer, you can look in the description and you’ll find some links that will lead you to the formats to help you print your labels. Now there are many ways to label your insects, but I recommend you do the following. The first thing you want to put on your label is the location The first part of this is the state and then you got to have the county and then you are going to have a more specific location. Sometimes you’ll even put GPS coordinates if you want to be technical. The second thing that you need is the date that you collected the insect. Make sure that you put it in a form that cannot be misinterpreted. Start with the date and then write the month as a roman numeral, and then you are going to finish with the year Next you are going to add the name of the person who collected the insect. If you really want to be thorough you can add the method used to collect the insect at the end of your label. Now, you are ready to go out and label your insects. Make sure and use the resources in the description to help you get the format down and save you some work. After you’ve completed your labels, now you are going to put a pin through it with your insect on it. Raise that label as shown here up to about a quarter of an inch below the insect so we can still see the label and the insect when it’s in the collection. Now, David is going to explain to us how to organize our collection. We’re here at a museum at Rexburg Idaho where people come to learn about animals and see magnificent displays of animals. Behind me we have an exhibit about Africa, where the animals are organized by where they are from. When we’re organizing an insect collection we want to organize our insects by relatedeness like these examples here in the museum. For example we have our moose, elk and deer close to each other on this wall over here. We also have some closely related birds near to each other, such as this kestrel or this hawk or these owls. We’re trying to organize everything by relatedness and we want to get as close and as specific as we can. For example, in here, if we were going to reorganize this we would put all of the mammals together in a certain section and then we would put those that are closely related into different subsections of that section. So for example all the bears together, the wolfs together and other carnivores. If you look here in my collection, we’ll look at the beetles. There’s all sorts of beetles, but not all of them are as closely related as others. For example these beetles are much more closely related to each other than these beetles, but they are all still beetles. When you are doing your collection, you will want to go down to the family classification level. In the description, there will be some links to some guide books you can use which will help you to identify your insects and organize them according to their relatedness. We need to have everything organized by relatedness. If you look at this hover fly, you might think that is actually a bee, but in reality it is not. Often times insects will use deception, just like other creatures. So you have to pay particular attention to what the identification guidebook says so you know exactly how closely the insects are related. Make sure when you are moving your insects around to organize them that you are very careful. Their body parts are quite fragile and they could easily break if you are not careful. To wrap up the show I want to show you a couple quick examples of some collections made by 4-H youth in Indiana. As you can see they have been quite creative and added their own personal flare. No matter what you do for your collection, make sure your collection looks neat and well organized.. Thanks for watching another episode of the Insect Hunter. If you enjoyed this video, make sure and like and subscribe by going up here. After you have subscribed maybe you want to check out some other videos by clicking here on the lock. That will take you to a new series I have been working on called Insect Lockdown. It teaches about Insect Pest Management and how to deal with insects at home and other settings. And check out these channels over here of some of the people that helped contribute to this video. They’ve got some good videos and fun things going on so check those out! Thanks for watching and as always happy hunting!

Viewer Mail! – How Do Bugs Hang Upside-Down?


♪Intro♪ One of the best parts of our day here at the
Fort is checking our email. We get so many awesome science questions! Even though we can’t answer them all, today
Squeaks and I wanted to answer some of them! Okay, our first question is from Kelsey. Kelsey wants to know, “Why is it harder
to run uphill and easier to run downhill?” Interesting question, Kelsey! It’s easier to run down a hill than up a
hill because of gravity, which is a force that pulls you — and everything else on
the planet — toward the ground. Forces are the pushes and pulls that happen
to us and all around us every day. When you push a block along the floor or roll
a ball, you’re putting a force on it! Gravity is a force, too, and it’s pulling
on us all the time, even though we can’t see it. But we sure can feel what gravity does! Like, when I jump into the air … like that … I don’t stay up for very long because gravity
pulls me right back down to the ground. The reason I was able to be in the air for
even a little bit is because of another force: the push I made against the floor with my
legs. I pushed down with my legs hard enough to
overcome gravity, but only for a second. Now, if I push down harder … I can jump higher … But it takes more work. The same kind of thing happens when we run
up a hill. Our legs are trying to push our bodies up,
while gravity is pulling us /down/. We have to work hard to fight the pull of
gravity, and more work means we get tired faster! The opposite happens when we run down the
hill. This time, we get a little help from gravity,
since gravity is pulling us down — the same direction that we want to go. We’re not fighting against the gravity,
so it doesn’t feel like we’re working as hard. Thanks for your question, Kelsey! Our second question today is from Matty. Matty asked us, “How can insects climb walls
and be upside down?” That’s an awesome question! If I tried to climb a wall, gravity would
pull me right back down! So how do flies and other insects do it? Gravity pulls on everything — even the tiniest
fly! Well, some insects have special body parts
that help them to climb up walls and across ceilings. Because a wall or ceiling that looks or even
feels pretty smooth to us, really isn’t. If we could look at a wall really closely,
we’d see that they have lots of little bumps, cracks, and pits. And what seems like a tiny bump to us can
look like a comfortable place to stand for a tiny fly! Some insects have little claws or hairs on
the ends of their legs, which they use to help them grab onto the bumps in the wall
or ceiling. There are also some insects that make an oily
liquid that helps them to stick to a wall or ceiling. It’s sticky enough to keep their bodies
from falling down, but not sticky enough that they get stuck in one place! Thanks for your awesome question, Matty! We love getting comments and mail! So if /you/ have a question for us, ask a
grownup to help you leave a comment below, or to send us an email at [email protected]! We’ll see you next time, here at the Fort! ♪Outro♪

Plastic bottle insect crafts

Plastic bottle insect crafts


Hi, this is Joelle Meijer. Here are giant insects made from recycled
plastic bottles. Take an empty one litre plastic bottle. The bottle will form the body of the insect. Hold the bottle horizontally and mark three
dots on either side of the body with an indelible marker. Mark these dots on the wide part of the bottle,
somewhat below the middle. Take small, pointed scissors and make holes
where you put the dots. Plastic is slippery, so be careful not to
hurt yourself if the scissors slide on the plastic. When you have made the holes, insert three
stem wires through the holes. Each wire passes through two opposite holes
and will form two legs, one on either side. When you have inserted the three stem wires, centre the bottle in relation to the wires. Put a dot of hot glue in each hole of the
bottle to prevent the stem wires from moving. When you are satisfied, bend the legs in the
correct position. When I represent insects, I like having the
first pair of legs turned forward, the middle pair remains as it is and the third
pair of legs is turned backwards. Choose which side of the bottle will represent
the front of the insect and glue googly eyes on the part that represents
the head. For this first model, I decided that the front
of my insect would be the cap of the bottle and so I glued
two googly eyes on the cap. I made a second insect but this time, I decided
that the bottom of the bottle would be the head and that’s where I glued
the googly eyes. I used two sides of a very large, rather rectangular
water bottle from which I cut wings that I glued on the
back of this second insect. And if you want, you can even decorate these
big insects with glow sticks that you put in the bottle, along the legs
or under the wings to illuminate your backyard in the evening. To print the document with the illustrated
instructions, click on the link below the video and visit
the Animaplates website where you will find hundreds of fun and educational
projects!

[Fabre’s Book of Insects]  Ep 26 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics

[Fabre’s Book of Insects] Ep 26 | Comics for Kids | Educational Comics | Free Comics


It’s raining When the wind blows, You can fall somewhere, or you can float in the water.
Oh, it’s terrible. So where is the right place to make a pupa? A crease of wood The point where branches come out. The lower part of the leaf is fine, The crack of cabbage here is also a good place. So where are you going to go?
Secret! The larvae of cabbage butterfly (cabbage worms) go to a suitable place to make a pupa.
I think this is the right place. Then, weave thread in the place to make thread bundles to hold the pupa. I can sleep now. When I wake up, I become a butterfly! Two days after a day passes
It is already a week.
But you should not wake up now.
I still have to wait a week more to become a butterfly. As the week goes by, the caterpillar in a pupa go through the process of ‘fable’. The ‘fable’ process is the process by which the larvae in the pupa turn into butterflies. Early morning, 14 days after the pupa. Smile! stuffy.
Where is this place? Ah! I turned into a pupa to become a butterfly. I was sleeping all the time … . I think I have changed my body a bit.
The number of legs is reduced a lot, and there is something on the back … . What was changed in the dark
I cannot tell. Hmm. The light is coming in.
Is it the door that goes out? As the back side of the pupa opens, the butterfly first comes out of the head and body.
Yo-ho! Because the wings are wrinkled. But do not worry. Dry their wings in warm sunshine The body fluid flows into the blood vessels in the wings and the wings of the butterfly are straightened. Finally the wi … The wings are all dry!
What should I do now? What should you do! Now it can fly the sky freely! Yo-ho! Wow ~! I… I’m a big butterfly now!
Butterfly!

What are Insects?

What are Insects?


[insect sounds] Abby: There are an estimated
10 quintillion insects creeping and crawling
and hopping and flying around the world
at any given time. From ants to beetles
to bees to grasshoppers. And that’s just
an entomologist’s best guess. Insects are very hard
to keep track of. [music] Abby: Some are always hiding
because camouflage is a great way
to defend themselves. Some have a lifecycle
of just 24 hours. And, not every creepy crawly
you encounter is an insect. Let’s become entomologists and study insects
a little closer. [music] Abby: The best way to identify
an insect versus other bugs is by studying their bodies. Insects have three body parts including a head,
a thorax, and an abdomen. And instead of bones
inside their bodies like ours, insects have an exoskeleton
or a hard supportive shell on the outside of their body. Most insects also have
one pair of antennae, two pairs of wings,
and three pairs of legs. Lots of insects are really
helpful to humans, and it’s true that some insects
can be pests, but think about this: Mosquitoes might bite us, but they make a delicious meal
for lots of other creatures. A bee could sting you
if you really bother it. But they are also pollinators, and plants cannot continue
to grow without pollination. Flies might bother us
in our homes, but they are decomposers which makes them
nature’s cleaning crew. Insects are fascinating. Head outside and see what you can find. [music]