The Trans Panic Epidemic: The Daily Show

The Trans Panic Epidemic: The Daily Show


So, what is it
that scares so many people about transgender communities? And what’s it like to live
as the focus of that fear? Jessica Williams finds out. WILLIAMS:Iowa’s most famous
for its cornfields,
butter sculptures, and butter
sculptures of cornfields.
Until last summer, when
transgender woman Meagan Taylor
tried to check in to the Drury
Inn in the city of Des Moines.
We sat down with Taylor herself
for an exclusive tell-all.
I could tell when I checked in to the hotel that it was…
it was…Shh. I got this,
real Meagan Taylor.
It was July 12, 2015.You presented your I.D.
to the hotel manager.
Hi. I have a reservation.But she was onto you.Fearing for her life,
she took immediate action.
WOMAN:And that’s when the cops came
and all hell broke loose.
But let’s rewind here.What triggered the cops
to respond?
You pull out a gun,
and then the cops come
and you’re arrested? None of that happened. Well, did you pull out a knife? ♪ ♪ No.Well, did you do drugs?Nothing of the sort. Well, then why the hell
were you arrested? Um, I got arrested because
I was a black transgender woman.Specifically, cops held her
because she didn’t have
a prescription
for her hormone pills.
And this is 2016.What were you doing in Iowa? I was there going to a funeral. -You were there for a funeral?
-Yeah. And did you get to attend
the funeral, -at least? -I didn’t get
to make the funeral at all. How long were you in jail for? I was in jail for eight days. I’m sorry. I… It’s terrible. Take your time.Ugh, I thought it was tough
being a black woman.
But compared
to a black transgender woman,
I might as well be
a white frat dude
at a Dave Matthews concert.Transgender women get arrested
all the time, especially
black transgender women, just by walking down the street
or anything.And by anything,
she means literally anything.
Because of discrimination
and profiling,
at least 47%
of black trans people
will have at some point in
their lives been incarcerated.
Let’s underline, bold, and set
fire to that
(bleep)graphic,because it’s 47%.You think there’d be laws
to correct this.
But instead, this year alone,state legislatures
have introduced
175 anti-trans bills.Many make it legal
to discriminate based solely
on religious beliefs.And then you have
these bathroom bills.
REPORTER:It would fine
and imprison transgender people
who use public restrooms
that don’t match
the gender
on their birth certificate. WILLIAMS:That’s what’s really
triggering this trans panic.
Just listen
to Colorado representative
and Elmer Fudd look-alike
Gordon Klingenschmitt.
Should we fear
the transgender community? Well, they not only want
to be confused about their own identity, but they want the rest of us
to be confused with them. Now they want the government
to join them in that pretense. -They’re making us into liars.
-Wow.Okay. I met
with these so-called liars
to find out
what their evil intentions are.
There’s a notion that
trans people are perpetrators in some way, that we’re sneaking
and trying to trick you for the purposes
of having sex with you. And that’s not the case at all. People just want
to see male and female, like it has to fit in one
of those two boxes, and if it doesn’t,
it makes people uncomfortable. -And it’s surely not a choice.
-That’s all you need to know.Well, not according
to Klingenschmitt, who thinks
that we’re all going to
get attacked in the bathroom.
A man can go into a ladies’ room and assault you
and your little girl.Especially in
our most important bathrooms.
Next time, ladies,
you go out to Olive Garden, watch out who’s gonna be
in the bathroom. There’s no reported incidences
of any trans person ever raping or assaulting anyone
in any bathroom ever. If anything, trans people
are the ones getting assaulted.These people are up against
some bull(bleep).
There must be some small way
I can help them out.
Give me some offensive comments
or questions, and I’ll give you
some good answers that you can use
in your day-to-day life. Why are your feet so small? Oh. You think my feet are small? -You have a (bleep).
-Wow. Whew! Okay, that’s guns a-blazing
on that question. Um, I don’t currently
have a (bleep), so… -How much?
-How much for…? -Sex.
-Oh, (bleep). Uh… -How do you have sex? -So,
are your parents ashamed of you? -What’s the gender mark on your
ID? -When do you tell them that -you’re really a man?
-I don’t know. When it’s appropriate? Do you have cadaver tits? -Don’t tell me what that is.
-What’s your real name? -Yeah. I just want to know.
-Yeah. What’s your name? -Tell us.
-Did you chop it off? Do straight women date you, -or gay women?
-How much would it cost? -(overlapping chatter)
-Do you like to suck (bleep)? -(overlapping chatter)
-What’s your real name? WILLIAMS:The transgender
community is more oppressed
than I could have ever
imagined,
so why does Gordon feel
so threatened?
Have you ever been attacked
by a transgender person? Is that why this is happening? No. Have you ever had a traumatic
experience with a trans person? I wouldn’t call it
traumatic, no. I-I… -Devastating?
-Yeah. No. You haven’t?So why does he feel this way?Dressing like a woman,
and he’s not a woman. WILLIAMS:Wait a second.
This guy’s a preacher, too?
And he thinks what?It’s not just
a psychological disorder. It’s actually a demonic spirit. WILLIAMS:
Okay, so now they’re possessed?
Go on.I would be comfortable talking
about religious freedom, but I’d have to change
into my alter ego if you’re okay with that. You have to change
into your alter ego? Who are you, Lady Gaga?
Go on ahead and change.Okay, hold up.
Is everybody seeing this?
I am actually waiting
for this man to transition
so that he can feel
more comfortable
during our interview.Oh, and also, hey, heads up.I am not judging him
for his personal choice.
Until he took out his phoneto judge others
for their personal choices.
And Deuteronomy 22:5 says, “A woman must not wear
men’s clothing, “nor a man wear women’s clothing for the Lord your God detests
anyone who does this.” I don’t remember that part, -but there is a part
about shellfish… -Mm-hmm. -…or stoning people to death.
-Mm-hmm. Getting tattoos. But what about their sincerely held
religious beliefs? They can go (bleep)
in their (bleep) hand, -because we have separation
of church and state. -Mm. Because we believe
in our constitution. WILLIAMS:Nevertheless,
these bathroom bills
are being passed,and Gordon is doing everything
he can to make it happen.
Get used to the idea of having your women
and children share bathrooms with cross-dressing men who are going to expose
themselves to you. Do you, for whatever reason, associate being transgender
with being a pervert? I mean, that is perversion. It’s people who label themselves as transgender for the purpose
of getting that access to violate the rights of others. Is it fair to say
that because you’re a priest that you’re a pedophile? Well, of course not. Why is it, “of course not.”?
Why? Because some people
are criminals, and some people
are not criminals. Could you take that logic and apply that
to the transgender community? They’re apples and oranges.
I think… By apples and oranges,
do you mean apples and apples?Unfortunately, a lot of people
think like Gordon.
So how can we end
this transphobic epidemic?
Hopefully, they can understand
that we are striving towards becoming a more
authentic version of ourselves, after a lot of soul-searching
and a lot of thought, and sometimes a lot of trauma
and tragedy. Passing these bills is
absolutely going to just add fuel to the fire
and ignite trans panic.Trans panic, panic, panic.WILLIAMS:They’ve existed
since the beginning of time.
They are not
who people think they are.
Girl, you know
we need to elevate that leg. WILLIAMS:
They come out at night.
-Stop! No!-Or during the day
depending on their schedule.
You forgot your hat. WILLIAMS:
They have an appetite.
When they’re hungry.You’re really gonna love
this salad! WILLIAMS:
This summer, get ready for…
the most boring movie everwhere transgender people
cause… transpanic!
(yelling) Lights went out again. WILLIAMS:Even though they’re
just like the rest of us.
What else is on Netflix?

ISU’s traveling Insect Zoo | Iowa Outdoors

ISU’s traveling Insect Zoo | Iowa Outdoors


Between TV, video games and iPads, more kids
are spending less time outdoors and less time enjoying outdoor creatures. But as Dan Wardell
discovered, Iowa State University’s traveling insect zoo brings cockroaches, spiders and
a little bit of everything straight to the classroom. It’s really special that he can, isn’t that
cool? Here’s his next behavior. If I try to pick him up by his head, what does he do?
Do you think he’s trying to get away from me? Yes. And Malachi. And Malachi. Now, tell me this — Ginny Morgal is the energetic entomologist
who coordinates Iowa State University’s traveling insect zoo. She carries a collection of critters
into classrooms to give kids a hands on lesson about arthropods and why they play important
roles in our environment. So today you guys are going to get to be an
entomologist and you might fall in love with bugs like I did when I was in second grade.
I love bugs. They are super awesome. This is what it looks like. Morgal: The general thought about bugs is
that they’re gross, they’re creepy, we should kill them, we should get rid of them and I
want them to take a step back and to look at how cool they are and their importance
in the world and that we can’t live without them. Now your first job when you get the millipedes
is to find the head. And your next job is to count the legs. Inside those black dots
are little tiny holes that it breathes through. You’re obviously a very animated presenter,
the kids love you. But you get a lot back from the kids too. Morgal: Yeah, I feed off of their energy.
Actually I love it whenever the kids are saying ooh gross, eww, I love that because then it’s
like, oh, now I’m challenged so let’s see how excited I can get them. Who wants to hold it? Not me. Not me. I’ll help you. Do you want to hold it Grace?
Okay. We’ll do this. Why don’t you put your hand right here on mine and we’ll do it together. So tell us how the whole turn the TVs off
and go outside and play and explore nature, how does this all fit in? Morgal: Well, because I’m bringing the outside
in to them and it seems that more and more kids are not spending a lot of time outside,
especially in urban areas. It gives the kids a chance to see something that they would
normally not see and then become familiar with it and even comfortable with it. And
perhaps that will encourage them to instead of hanging out inside to go outside and to
see what is out there. Just getting in touch with nature, I think it’s very important that
we are doing that. Now, if we first look at the Emperor Scorpion
in my right hand you will see it has a very big tail on the end, doesn’t it? And at the
end of that tail is a stinger. Tell us about Rosie. Morgal: So, Rosie is a Chilean Rose Hair and
she comes from Chile, which is in South America, and Rosie has been with the zoo for about
ten years. She’s about ten years old and she’s just very docile. Now, what is that right there? Web. That is her web, that’s right. Madie Fischer: My favorite bug was the tarantula
because I never touched a tarantula before. It was my first time. And I never, ever saw
a tarantula before. Now, what did you learn about the three parts
of an insect. Do you remember what those were? David Kaminski: I already know. — abdomen. What are the three parts again? Kaminski: Head, thorax, abdomen. How do you know if you’ve had success in your
programs? Morgal: Well, I gauge that by the reaction
of the kids. When kids are seeing something for real and they’re touching it and they
have all these emotions, they have fear, they have excitement, they have whatever else they’re
feeling, sparks something else in their brain and they’re going to retain that information
more, I think. They’re going to hold onto that and it’s going to be a memory that they
have for the rest of their life. I think that will encourage them to learn more about it. The insect zoo travels all across the state
educating thousands of Iowans each year. Maybe a few of them will want to become entomologists
someday. If you’d like to learn more about the program, go to our website, iptv.org/iowaoutdoors.

IMPACT: Managing Weeds, Insects and Diseases

IMPACT: Managing Weeds, Insects and Diseases


Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is helping Iowa farmers manage weeds, insects and diseases in their fields. Pest management is key to high yields and quality grain. Insects can impact yields in a couple ways and one way is causing indirect injury. So they feed on the leaves, stems, roots, other plant parts or they can directly feed on the seeds or the kernels. And so over time with building numbers of pests, increasing damage to the direct and indirect injury, they can take away yield. We’re never going to be able to control insects and we’re never going to be able to eliminate insects, but our best hope for farmers is to provide tools to suppress. We want to keep the numbers down as much as we can to protect the crop. ISU Extension and Outreach specialists are providing the tools and resources farmer’s need to manage insect pests. Being out in the field goes a long way. You can see the good insects, maybe the ones that we consider pests, and you can see them early before stand loss or plant death or anything really severe happens. Disease can also have an economic impact on field crops by reducing yield and grain quality. So my favorite question is when somebody asks me, what diseases can I expect to this coming growing season? I always like to say to that person well first of all, if you can tell me what the weather is going to be like, that’s going to give me an indication of what diseases that I should maybe be on the lookout for. And then the other thing to remember is what hybrid or variety is been grown in that field. To get disease you have to have a host, so that would be the crop that you’re growing. You have to have the pathogen present, so that’s the organism that’s going to cause disease has to be present in that field. And then the third part of that disease triangle is the environment, so we have to have environment that is conducive for disease. To help farmers recognize problems ISU Extension and Outreach offers scouting workshops and training to identify common diseases and insects that cause harm to Iowa crops. Specialists also provide information and education on evolving weeds of interest. We’ve relied on herbicides almost entirely for the past 30 years and that has worked well for the past 30 years. Whether we can continue that into the future is yet to be seen because the weeds are adapt adapting so quickly to these fairly simple weed management systems. Palmer Amaranth is a weed of new concern and it’s unique in that it is just moving into the state now. And so this is a weed farmers really need to keep an eye out for just because it is more competitive than the weeds we are dealing with, and it’s very good at evolving resistant to herbicides. Farmers really need to spend more time evaluating how they can diversify their weed management program. It’s not as easy as switching herbicides, but I think it’s going to be critical down the road. In operation for over 50 years Iowa State University’s Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic helps Iowans diagnose and identify about 1,500 samples of weeds, insects and diseases each year. The purpose of the PIDC is to have a service where samples can come in, where everything is tracked, uniquely numbered, where we can report nationally the things that we’re seeing. As well as providing that information then to Iowans and our clients that what’s going on. With a focus on weeds, insects and diseases Iowa State University Extension and Outreach is implementing integrated pest management strategies to help farmers grow healthy crops year after year.

What Happens to a Sample at the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic

What Happens to a Sample at the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic


Today we’ll see what happens when a sick plant is sent to the plant and insect diagnostic clinic. When the patient
arrives in the clinic the first thing that happens is triage. The
diagnosticians examine the plant or insect and read what you wrote on the
form. Next we enter the information you
provided in our database and assign your sample a unique number that helps us
track your case. The diagnosticians then examine your sample closely and discuss
what could be going wrong. We take photographs of what your plant
looks like and the symptoms of disease and insect problems. We use the
microscope to examine things more closely to look for insects and any
diseases. If we suspect a fungal disease often we have to incubate your
sample with moisture for several days to get the spores we need. All of this
occurs when the sample arrives. To see what happens next to your sample keep
tuning in to our videos. yeah

Why Native populations are attracting new attention in 2020 presidential race

Why Native populations are attracting new attention in 2020 presidential race


WILLIAM BRANGHAM: This week, Native American
voters got more attention from political candidates than they have in years. Our Lisa Desjardins has more on the presidential
forum which drew those candidates and the issues that matter most to Native voters. LISA DESJARDINS: First, a reminder about this
country’s Native population. As many know, it is most concentrated in Western
areas, but is present in every part of the country, including large cities. Less well-known the fact that Indian reservations
and Alaska Native villages make up more than 100 million acres across the country. On its own, that would be the fourth largest
state. At the same time, Native Americans also face
the highest poverty rate in this country, more than 20 percent. So there was much to discuss when nine Democrats
vying to be president spoke at this week’s forum on Native American issues in Sioux City,
Iowa, from the candidates and rising Native American leaders. REP. DEB HAALAND (D-NM): The epidemic of missing
and murdered indigenous women has been a silent crisis for far too long. SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN (D-MA), Presidential Candidate:
We need to honor our trust and treaty obligations to the Native tribes. (APPLAUSE) JULIAN CASTRO (D), Presidential Candidate:
In every single classroom in America, we need to be teaching about Native history. LISA DESJARDINS: I’m joined now by Mark Trahant. He moderated that presidential forum and is
the editor of Indian Country Today, a newspaper that is now owned by the National Congress
of American Indians. Mark, you were the emcee. From where you sat, what stood out at this
forum? MARK TRAHANT, Editor, Indian Country Today:
I think the main takeaway is that there are so many issues that just don’t get into the
public discourse that really ought to. These are stories that would benefit all Americans
to be able to understand and appreciate not just the history, but the context of today. One example would be, one of the issues that
all of the candidates addressed was that of honors of medal given to those massacred people
at Wounded Knee. Every candidate said they would like to have
those medals revoked. But that’s not a story that is often out there
in the public discourse. LISA DESJARDINS: I know there is actually
legislation in Congress about that as well that just a few representatives have entered. I’m wondering, what issues do you think matter
most to Native Americans right now? MARK TRAHANT: The very first one that came
up again every time is treaty rights. Under the Constitution, treaties are the supreme
law of the land. Yet, often, those treaties aren’t funded,
they’re not executed the way that tribes would like to see it. One part, for example, would be every — nearly
every treaty talks about health care. And yet the Indian Health Service, and — the
system is completely underfunded. LISA DESJARDINS: And this leaves, I know,
large gaps every year for I think it’s something like the 40 to 50 percent of Natives who depend
on that system. Another issue that I know we mentioned, of
course, is violence, and that the rates of violence for Native people is much higher
than the rest of Americans, especially indigenous women. Part of that issue is the bureaucracy, the
fact that federal prosecutors oversee most major crime in Indian country, yet they don’t
really spend time in Indian country. How do you think — or what proposals are
out there to try and fix that incredibly high violence rate? MARK TRAHANT: One of the candidates, Elizabeth
Warren, came straight out and said that the Oliphant decision, which was a Supreme Court
decision that said tribes could not prosecute non-Indians, should be reversed legislatively. And that would give tribes the right to prosecute
for all crimes on reservations. In fact, another candidate said that it’s
the same when you’re traveling throughout Europe. Each government has jurisdiction. And he said it should be the same for tribal
governments. So that’d be a very simple fix, to let tribes
do that. LISA DESJARDINS: Something else to ask you
about is the courts that you raised. How important are federal courts right now
in terms of rights and also regulation affecting Indian country? MARK TRAHANT: Well, the federal court system
has an enormous amount of influence in Indian country, because so many of the laws are federal
laws. And yet, out of 3,600 Article III judges,
there’s only one Native American district court judge, Diane Humetewa in Arizona. And one out of 3,600 seems a little bit absurd
in a country like this. LISA DESJARDINS: I’m curious. This forum represented also something significant. Tell me about how many candidates have shown
up in the past. And what other bright spots do you see for
our indigenous population politically? MARK TRAHANT: There’s only been one other
presidential forum like this. It was 12 years ago. And I actually was the moderator of that one
as well. And that one only had three candidates, Governor
Bill Richardson, Representative Dennis Kucinich, and Senator — former Senator Mike Gravel. And this one is elevated substantially with
major candidates being involved. And I think what’s important about that is,
it brings life to these issues that just don’t get the attention normally in the media. One of the funny things about the change with
the election last time of Deb Haaland and Sharice Davids to the Congress is that Congress
now has a better record than media in terms of representation, actually by about double. LISA DESJARDINS: But it’s still not proportional,
right? There are now, I think, four Native Americans
in Congress? MARK TRAHANT: Right. Proportional would be at least seven in the
House and two in the Senate. So there remains a long way to go. There’s actually a really interesting development
just this week on that. And this goes back to the idea of treaty rights. Several treaties actually have a delegate
to Congress as part of the provision. And the Cherokee Nation has appointed a delegate
and said it would like to exercise that treaty right and send a delegate to the Congress. LISA DESJARDINS: I’m going to be watching
that, as will we all. Mark Trahant from Indian Country Today, thank
you so much for joining us. MARK TRAHANT: Thank you, Lisa.

State of Addiction: Opioid epidemic grows in Iowa

State of Addiction: Opioid epidemic grows in Iowa


OPIOID ADDICTION IS ONE OF THE FASTEST GROWING SUBSTANCE ABUSE DISORDERS IN IOWA. FROM PRESCRIPTION PAINKILLERS – TO THE ILLEGAL, SYNTHETIC KNOCKOFFS – TO HEROIN … THE CLASS OF DRUGS IS EXREMELY ADDICTIVE — AND OFTEN LETHAL. OPIOID OVERDOSES KILLED 61 IOWANS IN 2015 – MORE THAN DOUBLE THE NUMBER FROM 2005 THERE’S A PERCEPTION OF SAFETY – WHEN THE POWERFUL DRUG IS COMING FROM A DOCTOR, WITH YOUR BEST INTERESTS IN MIND… THAT PERCEPTION HAS CONTRIBUTED TO WIDESPREAD MISUSE – AND ABUSE OF OPIOIDS … LEADING TO A NEW AGE OF ADDICTION. WHEN TONI VERMEER WAS 16 YEARS OLD SHE BEGAN TAKING PILLS RECREATIONALL Y. SHE GOT THEM FROM FRIENDS – WHO EITHER SWIPED THEM FROM A FAMILY MEDICINE CABINET, OR SOUGHT THEM OUT, AND EASILY RECEIVED THEM – FROM A DOCTOR. IT’S AN INCREASINGLY CLASSIC STORY – SHE WENT FROM ENJOYING THE EUPHORIC, CAREFREE FEELING THE OPIOIDS PROVIDED …. TO NEEDING IT. FENTANYL – A POWERFUL OPIOID PATCH – 50 TO 100 TIMES MORE POTENT THAN MORPHINE – GENERALLY PRESCRIBED FOR SEVERE CANCER PATIENTS. TONI’S STORY IS EXTRAORDINARY – IN THAT SHE’S STILL HERE, TELLING IT – AFTER 5 OVERDOSES…. BUT SIMILAR STORIES – OF OPIOID MISUSE.. ABUSE.. AND LIFE- SHATTERING CONSEQUENCES … ARE NOT.