Katelyn Kesheimer – Insects of Industrial Hemp: Year One

Katelyn Kesheimer – Insects of Industrial Hemp: Year One


– [Katelyn] Hi everyone, my
name’s Katelyn Kesheimer, and I’m an Extension entomologist
with Auburn University and Alabama Cooperative Extension Service. Today I’ll be giving a brief overview of insects that attack industrial hemp. Many of you are aware that
this is the first year that industrial hemp can
legally be grown in Alabama thanks to the 2018 farm bill that classifies it as an
ordinary agricultural commodity. And a few states outside Alabama have been growing hemp since 2015 or so with the passage of the 2014 farm bill. But prior to that, hemp
has not really been grown in any major capacity since World War II. However, lots has changed
in the past 70 years, and now that we’re back to
growing industrial hemp again, there is much to be learned. So today I’m gonna give a
quick background on hemp, and so far what we learned this first year about pest management in Alabama. So when I talk about industrial hemp, I’m talking about the
plant Cannabis sativa. The genus Cannabis
includes multiple species that produce these unique
compounds that are not found in any other plants
that we know of so far. And cannabis can be broadly separated into two distinct groups, and these include marijuana
and industrial hemp. Now, we all know that marijuana is illegal to grow in Alabama, but while these two groups,
marijuana and industrial hemp are used for two very different purposes, they are impossible to distinguish
from each other visually, and they will interbreed out in the wild. So talking about marijuana that is bred and grown
for its THC content, which is a psychoactive compound. These plants are almost exclusively grown indoors in greenhouses and cultivated for that THC content. On the other hand, we
have industrial hemp, and the major difference
here is the low THC content, is less than .3% THC. And industrial hemp can be grown indoors similar to marijuana, but
it’s also grown outdoors like when you think of a typical row crop shown in this picture here. And it’s bred and grown
for a variety of end uses including fiber, seed and cannabidiol which is used as medicinal
compounds, also known as CBD. So I mentioned there’s a
lot of different end uses, it’s a very versatile plant, and it can be grown for
seed and fiber production, seed can be used for human consumption, and it’s similar to growing
small grains in the field. Hemp grown for fiber can be
used for a variety of things such as clothing, paper,
rope, or building materials. And that’s one of the
reasons it was so popular about 100 years ago. And then hemp grown for fiber and seed are usually grown from seed in the field and have a much higher plant density in the field than those grown for CBD. And so plants grown for CBD is really the majority of the plants grown in Alabama right now. These are much lower density
plantings in the field, and are typically started as transplants, shown here in the greenhouse, and then moved into the field. And these are primary female plants which are the desirable plants as opposed to the male
plants that are also created. And there’s also a lot of variation just in the way that hemp is grown, it’s a very new crop, there’s no real kind of standard protocol for growing it as we’re still kind of
figuring things out. It’s grown outdoors in
the field, on plastic, pots, high tunnels, greenhouses, so there’s lots of variation with it. And with that variation
of growing methods, indoors and outdoors,
comes a lot of pests. These weeds and diseases and insects aren’t really gonna wait
for us to figure out the agronomics of the
crops before they show up, so here we are, and we have to kind of figure it out as we go along. For the next few minutes, I’m gonna focus primarily on insects, but I do just wanna mention
that as you’re growing, it’s really important to have a solid integrated pest
management program, that should be in place
for any type of pest. Especially with hemp because
we know very little about it and you’re gonna get inundated with weeds and diseases and insects. Any of these can hinder the
production of your crop. A lot of the questions this year have focused on pesticide usage and what can we spray to kill the weeds to stop this disease from
spreading, to kill this insect, but there are several other
things that are part of a good IPM strategy that you can do before you wanna even think about spraying that will really help your crop. And so when it comes to pest management, there’s all these different strategies. People usually think about
pesticides or chemical control as their first line of defense, but really, as shown
in this triangle here, it should be your last resort, it should be the last thing you consider. Because there’s a variety of strategies, and if you employ all these strategies and create a healthy crop,
if you have a healthy plant, it is more resistant to
these pests and diseases, it’s able to fight off
more of these problems and can maybe sustain some damage that isn’t going to be economical. And so starting with
cultural and sanitation, cultural control and sanitation, keeping your plants healthy, starting with good, clean seed, starting with a good
clean soil, clean field, making that environment
less hospitable for pests, making sure you’re not going into a field that’s already filled with
weeds or filled with pests that have overwintered and have
just a leg up on your crop. Another often overlooked
method is mechanical control. Just getting out there,
scouting for your pests and hand removing those insects,
creating physical barriers. Sticky traps are really good if you’re growing indoors
in the greenhouse. And then thinking about what are our free options for biological control? What are our natural enemies
that are gonna be out there that can help reduce some
of the pest populations? And so I mentioned pesticides
should be your last resort. If you end up spraying your hemp, it should be used as a
sensible control option. And most importantly, in
accordance with label directions. The label is the law, and so you have to make
sure to follow that label. And so I realized as
we’re in this first year, there’s a lot of confusion, a lot of misinformation
about what we can use in terms of chemicals on hemp. And so just a few things to think about before you put any chemical on your hemp. The number one thing to know is all pesticides used on
hemp have to be registered with the Alabama Department
of Agriculture and Industries. It’s the responsibility of the producer to make sure that the
pesticide can be used legally. And so this goes back to reading the label because that label is the law. And additionally, we have these rules that are put in place
by the state of Alabama, but then if you’re gonna take your hemp to a processor or a buyer, they may have a separate
set of regulations. And so I implore you before
applying any chemical to give your processor
or your buyer a call to make sure that they will still accept the product after the
chemical has been applied. Having this information
beforehand is crucial to ensure that you will pass, because a lot of these
processors have lists of chemicals that they
will and will not accept. They’ll also do residue tests for a lot of different substances and give the product a pass or fail, and so you wanna make sure
that if you put all this time and money into growing the
crop, that it’s going to pass. And finally, be very cautious of any lists that are not released by
the Alabama Department of Ag or Alabama Cooperative Extension. These have not been approved by the Department of Ag
in the state of Alabama. There’s some other lists going around that are approved by other states. And if you apply a product
that is on another state’s list but is not registered with the
Department of Ag in Alabama, it will result in your
crop being destroyed. If you have any questions
or are confused about this, feel free to give me a call, my contact information
will be at the end of this, or call the Alabama Department of Ag to verify the acceptability
of this chemical. Okay, now I’m just
gonna briefly go through what we have seen as some of
the major economical pests so far that are likely going to be major problems moving
forward with industrial hemp. This is not a comprehensive
list and it will likely change. I mentioned this is the first year, and so things may be very
different a year from now, but I imagine that these will
continue to be a problem. And so the first one is fire ants. These have been a major pest of hemp across the entire state of Alabama. Whether it’s grown in
open field conditions, in plastic, in pots, in
high tunnels, et cetera. What they’ll do is they’ll build mounds near the base of the plant underneath the pots,
underneath the plastic, and then they’ll tunnel into the stem as you can see in some
of the pictures here. Chewing and killing the seedlings, especially really young
plants are very vulnerable, and then after they kill a plant, they will quickly move to nearby plants. And then in many cases, it’s been so dry that you don’t see those stereotypical fire ant mounds that
you’re used to seeing, ’cause the ants get so
deep into the ground because it’s so hot. And so the picture on the bottom left here shows the yellowing and wilting
of a plant from ant damage, and you can see some of the tunneling and stripping of the bark that they’ve been doing
in fields this year. So recently we put out a pest alert about some of the products
that were approved through the Department of
Ag for fire ant control. These are all contact insecticides, which means they have to
find the fire ant mound and apply the chemical on
the mound to kill the ants. There is one bait in there, and that’s Extinguish Professional. And the bait means you put out the food, the ants go get it, and they
bring it back to the nest and feed it to all the
workers and the queen. The bait will obviously
be the most effective for long term control. But before applying, again,
check with your processor before to make sure that
they allow it even though this one has been approved
by the Department of Ag. And just one thing, when
using these products, especially the oils and the pyrethrins, these are all natural products and they’ll break down with UV exposure. And so you want to make sure you’re not applying them in full sun. Also, fire ants, they don’t wanna be out in the heat of the day,
they’re not gonna be foraging, they’re not gonna be at
the top of their mounds, they’re gonna be deep down in the deep part of the ground when it’s really hot in their tunnels. And so the best time to
apply these mound treatments is first thing in the morning
before it gets too hot or late in the day when it cools off. The other thing to think about is, these do need a lot of water to get into their
extensive tunneling system, so don’t cut back on water when you’re applying
some of these products. Our fire ant pest alert can be found at the URL at the bottom of this slide. The next major pest
that’s gonna be causing economic damage both indoors and outdoors are the hemp russet mites. These are a special type of
mites that’s very, very small. And what we know so far, these are a specialist on cannabis plants, and so they’re only gonna be
found on hemp or marijuana. When you’re getting plants
or scouting for them, I would highly recommend
investing in a hand lens or a magnifying glass if you have one, because you won’t see these mites without magnification
because they are so tiny on the plant unless
you’re looking for them, but you will see their
characteristic damage. So these pictures show characteristic hemp russet mite damage
with this upward curling of the leaves, yellowing, brittle leaves that can break off. And you can tell these are
different from spider mites if you’re familiar with
spider mite damage, because hemp mites do not produce the characteristic webbing
that spider mites do. However, they are similar to other mites in that
they are very prolific and they can explode in
populations if left unchecked. So you can see in this picture, it’s really bad mite damage, there’s thousands if not millions
of mites on these plants, and the bud’s already
starting to turn brown. So hemp mites can also
infest the flower tops and feed on the pistils, which will render the
female flower sterile. In the picture on the left, you can see the pistil is
healthy and white or green and hasn’t been damaged by mites. To contrast, the pistil on the right is turning brown from a
severe mite infestation. Unfortunately, we don’t
have a lot of information on the life history of hemp mites. Since they’re a specialist
on cannabis like I mentioned, there just hasn’t been a lot
of research done on them. For plants grown outdoors, they may overwinter on infested seeds. For indoor plants, they can
remain on plants year round. Anyone who’s grown plants
in a greenhouse or inside knows just how difficult it is and how much a pain in the butt mites are. And as the mite population increases and starts to kill the plant, they will crawl to the top of the plant to be dispersed naturally
by wind or water. And this is why early control and sanitation are so important. If you are receiving
transplants from a greenhouse, this is where you need
to get out your hand lens and inspect your plants very carefully. This is likely one of the main sources of hemp mites as they’re moving
around through the state. In terms of control, we don’t know a lot about biological control agents yet. That isn’t to say some
generalist predators won’t work, we just don’t know what they are yet. We have some data on what won’t work, but this is a very specific,
unique type of mite, and it behaves differently
than other mites that we have more experience with. And so it’s gonna take a
lot of time and research just to figure out what are the best
biological control agents. And there is some information about using oils like horticultural oils, and they are effective
against some russet mites like tomato russet mites, but they may or may not be effective against the hemp russet mites. Again, we just don’t have this research, and so the best option is to
scout your plants regularly and inspect anything coming from an indoor growing situation, because that’s really where you can have year-round mite infestations. Okay, and finally, there’s a whole host of caterpillars that are known to infest hemp and that we’ve already started to see around the state of Alabama. Historically, European corn
borer was the most destructive, but that really hasn’t materialized yet. But that’s not to say it isn’t a problem or won’t be in the future. There are defoliating caterpillars that we don’t think is gonna
cause a lot of problems, a lot of economical damage
as they chew the leaves. There’s also a hemp borer that hasn’t shown up yet in Alabama. It may be here, I just
haven’t found it personally. One of the main problems
we’re dealing with right now at the end of the season, it’s mid-September right
now, are the bud feeders. And these are feeding on the buds of the more mature hemp plants, both causing economic yield loss and then opening that bud up to infection which can cause bud rot, which will also lead to more yield loss. One of the other more abundant
caterpillars we’ve seen is the yellow-striped armyworm. Corn earworm is also really common. In a lot of instances,
proximity to other crops has determined both the abundance and severity of damage
by some of these pests, and so kind of look at your landscape and see what’s around you, is
there a lot of corn nearby, and use that to gauge
what the threat might be in terms of the caterpillar pests. But the point of this
slide is just to show that there’s a lot of different
species of caterpillars that may feed on hemp at
any given growth stage, and so it’s vulnerable to attack, and we’re still trying to figure out what is gonna be the most damaging, but right now it looks
like these bud feeders are having the biggest impact in terms of economic yield loss. So what can you do? The best thing really is just to be out there scouting your crops to control the caterpillars early. You’ll likely see the feeding damage or frass, which is insect poop, before you see the worms
because they’re really small, they can be cryptic, they
might hide under the leaves in the heat of the day. And sometimes even giving the lack of chemical control options
that we have right now, hand removal may be your best option. But keep in mind that as we get into these later growth stages of these caterpillars, they become increasingly difficult to kill. Bigger caterpillars do more damage, they feed more, and
they’re harder to kill, even if we had all the
chemical options available, a lot of them don’t even
touch these late instar fourth, fifth instar caterpillars. And so the best thing you can do is find them when they’re really young, when they’re only 1/4
inch or smaller at most. And so you really need to be
out there inspecting your crop to make sure that you don’t
have these caterpillars. And so I mentioned it a minute ago, but one of the biggest
problems we’re seeing right now is with corn earworm. They’re still around, the corn
either has been harvested, or even some of the late planted corn is past that silking stage, and so the corn eraworm moths do not want to lay eggs
in the more mature corn, and so the most attractive
crop to them right now is all the hemp that’s around. The hemp has these beautiful flowers and it’s just really attractive
for these moths to lay eggs, for them to hatch and have these nice buds for them to feed on. And once that bud gets a wound
from caterpillar feeding, it now becomes vulnerable
to infection from pathogens, and so this is where we’re
seeing a lot of bud rot in the last couple weeks
with this more mature hemp. So looking ahead, we are seeing some pests that are
causing economic damage, fire ants, mites, caterpillars,
namely yellow-stripe armyworm and corn earworm. But there’s a lot of information gaps. We don’t know what the
relationship between these insects and yield loss is quite yet, and as a result, we haven’t
developed economic thresholds. Just because we have
some insects on the plant doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a problem, it doesn’t mean it’s gonna
lead to economic yield loss. But hopefully some of these questions we can answer moving forward. We expect very much so in 2020, and in coming years
there will be an increase in the acreage of hemp grown
in Alabama and other states, and this will likely lead to an increase in the number and diversity of insects, weeds, and diseases that
can move into the crop. And so it’s important
just to stay vigilant. In 2019, we had approximately 10,000 acres approved for
growing hemp in Alabama, and I imagine that will
go much higher in 2020. And so just stay on top of your scouting and proper identification of
any pest we see in the field. And I understand that we have a lot of legal uncertainties
regarding pesticide usage between the state and federal government, the USDA is hopefully getting ready to release some rules in the coming weeks, and so hopefully that’ll add some clarity to this issue with pesticide usage. But if you have any questions or are confused about what product to use, if you can use it, please
get in touch with me. Please get in touch with someone from the Alabama Cooperative
Extension Hemp Action Team. We are happy to answer your questions. We’d much rather answer your questions than you apply something you can’t then have to deal with
your crop being destroyed. But right now we just have more questions than we do answers, and so as
a researcher, this is great, but there’s just a lot of information gaps that we need to fill moving forward. I hope this was helpful,
here’s my contact information. Please don’t hesitate
to get in touch with me. And hopefully we can get your questions on industrial hemp answered
moving forward, thanks.

The Insect Song for Preschoolers I Bug Songs I Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs I The Teolets

The Insect Song for Preschoolers I Bug Songs I Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs I The Teolets


Learning Objectives: Animal Kingdom-Bugs and Insects Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! The ants go marching, marching for food One by one in the grass The ants go marching, marching for food All day long! Busy bees around the flowers buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Busy bees around the flowers buzz All around the flowers! Crawling spiders spin their web Spin their web Crawling spiders spin their web Crawling and spinning their web! Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves Chomp on the leaves Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves On the yummy leaves! The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink Blink, Blink, Blink The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink All around the trees! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! The ants go marching, marching for food One by one in the grass The ants go marching, marching for food All day long! Busy bees around the flowers buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Busy bees around the flowers buzz All around the flowers! Crawling spiders spin their web Spin their web Crawling spiders spin their web Crawling and spinning their web! Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves Chomp on the leaves Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves On the yummy leaves! The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink Blink, Blink, Blink The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink All around the trees! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere!

Hungry? A pop-up resturant sells bugs and insects for lunch


When you’re on-the-go and feeling hungry,
the idea of tucking into some fast food can be appealing. But at a pop up restaurant in Cardiff – the
food on offer may not be that appealing to everyone. On the menu are cricket chocolate chip cookies,
bug blinis, salt and vinegar crickets, locust and scorpion lollipops among some other delights. Deep fried insects are regularly eaten as
street food in places like Bangkok. Local delicacies include crickets and worms
which come in a range of flavours including, salt, cheese, seaweed and barbecue and cost
around 65 pence each. But for the British tongue – it’s safe to
say they’re an acquired taste.

Insect Extinction – Behind the News

Insect Extinction – Behind the News


They are sometimes seen
as creepy… ..and they’re often crawly… ..or jumpy… ..or wriggly… ..or fly…y? Actually, there are lots of
different ways to describe insects because there are 30 million
different insect species in the world and they’re just the ones
we know about. In fact, if you put
all the insects together into one big, creepy, crawly,
wriggling mass, they’d outweigh all of humanity at least 17 times over. Now, hearing all that, who could blame you for thinking,
“Hey, insects are doing just fine.” But scientists say
that’s not the case. They are actually disappearing
at a worrying rate. A new study has found
that over the past decade the world’s insect populations
have reduced by 41%. That includes around 46%
of bee populations, 49% of beetles, 50% of crickets and grasshoppers and 53% of butterflies and moths. So, why are some insects dying out? Well, the finger is pointing
mostly towards us humans. Scientists say
habitat loss from deforestation, pollution and pesticides
and climate change are some of the biggest factors. The study predicted
a pretty sad future too where more than 40% of all
insect species could go extinct over the next few decades. Hey, Dan. How are you doing, Amelia?
Great to see you. Great to see you. This is amazing.
Yeah, it’s a fantastic place. Well, I think we should get cracking
and go and catch some bugs. I brought you along a net. Awesome! Let’s do it!
Yeah. Ben is a entomologist. That’s a scientist
that studies insects. So, I’ve always loved bugs. Ever since I was a pup, all I ever
wanted to be is a bug scientist. So, check this out, Amelia. I’ve caught a nice little fly
in the grass here. Oh, wow! He says even the tiniest,
most irritating insects are more important than they appear. They pollinate plants, they help to recycle material
in the environment, like plant material
but also animal material. They also play important roles
in food webs because, not only do they consume
things like plants, they are actually food sources for animals further up
the food chain. Ben, what would the world be
like without insects? I think we wouldn’t have
a world without insects. Once we remove that chain
from this kind of food web, everything collapses around it. We would pretty much have waste
piling up everywhere, and this is animal waste
and plant waste. We wouldn’t have any food to eat.
Whoa! So, it’s a pretty scary idea to think about
a world without insects. Ben says that’s why
it’s so important to take care of our environment and to keep a close eye
on how insects are going. Hey, I’ve got something! Let’s have a look. Oh, so this is a male velvet ant. Oh, look at that! This is a really good catch. So, what can I do and what can the kids of Australia
do to help insects? Some easy things you can do
around the home is reduce your reliance
on insecticides, spraying them
in and around the house. And as far as habitat loss,
to actually provide… By planting native plants
in your backyard which provide food sources
but also kind of habitat. While we go work on that, scientists like Ben
will keep spreading the word that without insects both pretty… Aww! ..and creepy… Ew! ..our world just
wouldn’t be the same.

Removing Bug Guts Made Easy

Removing Bug Guts Made Easy


Cleaning Bug Guts Made EASY. Hey Guys! Brian
here. Here’s a quick tip. As you hit the road this summer in the warmer weather, you are
bound to get pelted with all these bugs on the front of your RV. It’s just a fact of
life. It’s inevitable. They can’t avoid you and you can’t avoid them. But there’s one
thing you can do to help making cleaning up those bugs and all those guts and stuff a
little easier which is something I do each time I head out on a big trip. And that’s
to put a nice healthy coat of wax on all of the front facing areas of your RV that are
going to get hammered with bugs. What I do it get one or two good coats of wax on the
front and the parts that will be facing forward. And buff it out real nice. You’ll not only
end up with a nice shiny front end of your RV, but you’ll also make it a lot easier to
clean up those bugs at the end of the day and keep your RV looking pretty clean throughout
your trip. So I hope that’s helpful. Have a great trip and have a great summer out there
RVing. See you guys later!

What is an Insect?

What is an Insect?


Funtastic Hop Hop Creep Creep Crawl Crawl Fly Fly Fly, fly, fly! An insect has two antennae An insect has six legs An insect has a head An insect has a thorax An insect has an abdomen And so do I. An insect has two antennae An insect has six legs An insect has a head An insect has a thorax An insect has an abdomen And so do I Insects, insects Insects everywhere You see them in the park You see them in the grass You see them in the dark You can see them in the air Insects, insects Insects everywhere You hear them buzzing by You hear them hiss or squeak You hear the hum at night You hear them in your sleep Hop Hop Creep Creep Crawl Crawl Fly Fly Insects everywhere! Subscribe to our channel. And remember… Be Funtastic! We love you Bye Bye

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants

Massive Scarab Beetles For Feeding to Ants


Now speaking of incredible workings happening
underground, there’s a new plot of soil in the Antiverse which houses a few creatures
that I am positive you guys will truly marvel at, creatures that I have yet to feature on
this channel, and I can’t wait to show our new incubating creatures. Please subscribe to my channel and hit the
bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! AC Family, the utter beasts that lay hidden
within this container were unlike anything I have ever seen before in my life, gargatuans
creatures that I am certain will leave you in awe… either that, or make you grimmace
in disgust! Either way, I can’t wait to show you these
true natural wonders of the animal kingdom, so keep on watching until the end, as we uncover
the secret lives of these major players of the world’s forests. Khepri, Khepri, Ra, Ra, Ra
Soon to be this depicted god. In the soil, they wait and grow,
to become the creatures we all know, Make up more than a quarter,
of all we’ve discovered, In next week’s video,
they shall be uncovered. This was the riddle I left for you guys in
last week’s hidden video for anyone who wanted to take a stab at what our mystery creatures
were, featured in this week’s video, and turns out… Many of you hit the nail on the head, as I
knew AC Family would! Beetles as a group of insects, form the order
Coleoptera with about 400,000 species, making it the largest of all taxonomic orders, making
up a whopping 25% of all known animal life-forms we’ve ever discovered! Can you believe that of all the animals we’ve
ever documented, a quarter of them are beetles? If aliens were to study and survey the animals
of the planet Earth, it wouldn’t be surprising to me if they named Earth “Planet of the Beetles”. So, I’m pleased to announce that the newest
inhabitants of the Antiverse are beetles, but not just any beetles. They happen to be my favourite beetles in
the whole world: Scarab beetles! Scarab beetles, belonging to the family Scarabaeidae,
consists of over 30,000 species of beetles worldwide. Khepri, is an Egyptian god of creation with
the head of a scarab beetle. Chances are you’ve seen a scarab beetle at
least once in your life. Some of the well-known scarab beetles are
Japanese beetles, dung beetles, June beetles, rose chafers, Hercules beetles, and Goliath
beetles. But today, AC Family, the scarab beetles I’ll
be introducing to you are nothing less than epic! But first, the reason they’ve come to the
Antiverse! I opened my superworm farm last week and discovered
that it was empty. All that was left was an adult superworm,
a.k.a. a darkling beetle, but looking at the darkling beetle crawling across my hand, something
came to me. You see I had been thinking of what I could
possibly feed my ants for Canadian Thanksgiving which recently passed last weekend. I wanted to give them something other than
the ordinary superworms they were used to eating, something fatter and much more meatier. So I called up some beetle friends of mine,
and low and behold, so arrived this ominous container, which was allegedly full of fattened,
scarab beetle larvae collected from native forest soils, a beetle known to locals as
“salagubang”, the species: Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, the Siamese Rhinoceros beetle! These beetles can allegedly reach a whopping
length of 3.5–7 centimetres, which is massive. They are sexually dimorphic. The females are smaller, while males are larger
and have big rhino-like horns which can vary in size and shape, used to battle each other
for females and territory. I bet, the larvae of these Rhinoceros beetles
were just fat and juicy, the perfect Thanksgiving treats for my ants. Ahhh! I was so excited and nervous all at once to
peek inside! Upon arrival I immediately opened the container,
and saw the container was filled to the brim with digging medium. But, no… patience… I wasn’t going to harvest the beetle grubs
just yet. I promised myself to wait for Thanksgiving
Day before offering my ants, the fattened feasts they deserved. It was the morning of Canadian Thanksgiving,
and though I live in a completely different country on the opposite side of the planet,
I still celebrate Thanksgiving, and was eager to finally give my ants of the Antiverse their
fat, juicy turkeys, a.k.a. the scarab beetle grubs! But AC Family, I wasn’t ready to see what
I was about to see upon opening their container. Look! Mushrooms had sprouted in just two days since
the container’s arrival. And guys, it turns out those little black
pellets are the beetle grubs’ frass. Their droppings, which are super nutrient
rich for plants and I suppose mushrooms… hey! Did you guys see that movement? There must be a beetle grub now! I took my tweezers and tried to sift through
the soil for a beetle grub. Nothing. Alright, seriously though it’s time to dig
out these scarab beetle grubs! AC Family, let’s do this! I put on some gloves because I was told these
beetle grubs can bite with their powerful mandibles and it can hurt! I carefully sifted through the surface. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a bit
scared scraping through the soil like this! Suddenly, I hit something! A grub? No, a piece of wood. False alarm! Now, while digging, I decided to also collect
and store some of this frass-filled soil, because I could use it in the future as a
growing medium for terrariums and plants. In fact, you can buy insect frass in bags
for gardening. As mentioned, insect frass is jam-packed with
nutrients for plants. Comes to show you these beetles are super
essential in the forests they are part of as they recycle dead plants to nourish the
living plants. I continued to dig. I wasn’t sure how big these beetle grubs were
nor how many there were, but the whole time my heart was racing! Aside from the fear of being bitten, I’m also
mildly vermiphobic, and the sight of worms or anything worm-like, mini-snakes and legless
lizards excluded, make me shudder, and TBH, based on what I imagined these rhino beetle
larvae looked like, I knew I was going to initially be repulsed at first sight. But before I knew it, something shiny and
white caught my eye. We found one! OMG! Look at it! My jaw dropped to the floor. It was huge, fat, and curled up into a ball. Wow! Look at its body shape, and check out that
red head and massive mandibles. Indeed, it was unlike anything I’ve ever seen
before. I checked the back and underside of the beast. My ants were going to enjoy this giant morsel! It was time to prepare the ant turkey. I washed the grub clean with water, and it
flinched at every squirt, I held the creature in my hand. For such a big and scary beast, it sure didn’t
put up much of a fight. Alright, the grub was now ready for the execution
block. The first ant colony I planned on feeding
was my largest and hungriest of all, the Fire Nation. I knew this beetle grub would be enough to
feed my ravenous colony of fire ants for at least two days. I estimated that this fat larva had the equivalent
of at least two or three cockroaches. And as I do with all prey insects, I was to
put the creature out of its misery before feeding it to the ants. I took the execution scissors, still caked
with the dried blood and guts of previously killed prey insects. My plan was to split it in half so the ants
could easily get into the grub’s insides. Here we go… 1… 2… 3… Sorry, guys. 3! No…. I stood there motionless for a moment. My hand was frozen and defiant, unwilling
to close down. I watched the helpless beetle grub, curled
up in fetal position, awaiting its fate at the blades of my scissors. Ahhhh my heart… I couldn’t… I could not follow through with the execution. I withdrew my scissors and picked up beetle
grub with a heavy heart. I placed it back into the container. What was I going to do? It suddenly was no longer a vile beast to
my eyes, but in a strange way had become… well, cute! AC Family, how about you guys? Doesn’t it suddenly look real endearing to
you. The shift of perception was completely unexpected,
and with this new context, my plans had suddenly changed completely. They were to join our Antiverse as inhabitants. Behold, a simple container I bought from a
department store. It was to become the sacred home and growing
chamber of our rhinoceros beetles. Apparently, these grubs need at least 10 cm
x 10 cm x 10 cm of space, and it is allegedly better to keep the beetles singly because
they may fight and lethally puncture each other with their sharp mandibles. This container was perfect. I also modified the cover to create a much
more open top and airy sides. Next, I had to add the beetle larva’s food. Xylotrupes gideon philippinensis, happen to
be notorious pests in coconut farms in the Philippines where I live, as they prey on
the wood and roots of coconut trees, living or decaying, and it just so happens that my
neighbourhood is abundant in coconut trees. So, I took a walk down the street, found a
pile of decaying coconut wood, and harvested this favoured rhino beetle larva food. I couldn’t wait to put our growing chamber
together, AC Family! I placed some decaying coconout wood at the
bottom of the chamber. It was amazing to think that these rhino beetle
larvae actually eat and grow into gigantic beetles, subsisting entirely on decaying wood. This blew my mind! It also meant that the larvae had within their
gut, the necessary microbiota to allow them to properly digest and acquire nutrition from
the cellulose in the wood, much like termites do! Many animals cannot digest this stuff! But these beetle larvae can. After this initial layer of decaying wood
was set in place, next I was going to add their main growing medium. This brick of coco peat, also purchased at
a department store, can be found in most home and gardening stores. It’s really cool, because all you need to
do is soak the brick in water and it instantly expands and becomes great growing medium for
epiphytic plants, and well in our case, rhinoceros beetles! I packed this coco peat into the growing chamber. The beetle larva may also very well, find
this coco peat to be a tasty food, as well. I then added another layer of decaying coconut
wood, then pack it off with another layer of coco peat. And volia our new rhino beetle larva growing
chamber – a dedicated, double food layered catacomb in which the beetle larva can grow
and develop into adulthood in peace. What do you guys think of it? I placed the modified cover back on and proceeded
to do the exact same thing, to prepare 10 other growing chambers. I returned to the container and set the growing
chamber on the ground, removed the cover, and carefully went to pick up the larva we
had found, and place it inside its new home. The larva lay motionless. I admired the neat auburn hairs that covered
the larva’s entire body, as well as those reddish spots running down the body, and that
rear end though, looking crazy extra-terrestrial to me! But it wasn’t long before our rhino beetle
baby began to move, and began to move the soil using its head, mandibles, and front
legs. But watching it burrow now, my initial thoughts
were that it didn’t seem like such an effective burrower. I mean, honestly at this pace, it seemed like
it would take at least a good half hour to get soil-deep! It even strangely began to burrow horizontally. What an ineffective burrower! Have a look! But AC Family, I was wrong! For when it finally found its preferred place
to really start digging, it quite effectively started using its legs, head, and powerful
body muscles to start excavating a nice tunnel downwards. Those hairs seemed pretty good at keeping
soil moved upwards in place, as it continued to dig deeper and deeper. In 5 minutes flat, the grub was completely
concealed deep within the soil. I had to move some soil aside to see it! AC Family, isn’t that incredible? What amazing subterrarean creatures, right? I proceeded to cover it up, placed the cover
back on, and continued to dig out the remaining beetle larvae! I carefully sifted through the soils, I didn’t
want to injure the delicate grubs during excavation. I felt as though their bodies could pop with
a single puncture. Wait! Yes, we found a second grub! I dug some more… a third grub! Alright! This was actually fun! It was like we were digging for gold! I hit something solid and pulled it out. It was a large piece of decaying wood. This was what the larvae were eating in here,
I guessed. I found a fourth grub and a fifth. Woah this one was huge! Could be a male, perhaps! I placed each grub in its own growing chamber,
and boy was it ever satisfying to set each grub in its own, special home we made for
them. Have a look! I felt like we were bees, placing our larvae
into cells in which they were to grow for their whole larval lives, until they emerge
as adults! Each one of these growing chambers had all
they needed to develop into adult rhinoceros beetles. All I needed to do was water them periodically. And look! One grub already blessed its chamber with
a frass pellet. How cute! I made sure to enjoy looking at the grubs
now that they were visible, because I knew that once they were below the surface feeding
on our decaying coconut wood, they would be completely concealed in the soil away from
view. Alright, it was time to keep digging! I wonder how many more were left. I dug, and I dug, and I dug, and managed to
pull out four more huge beetle grubs. Just look at those cute babies. Now I also realized that I should space them
out a bit when setting them down so they don’t bite each other. I placed them each into their own growing
cell. It kinda felt like I was planting a tree or
something. Haha! When I had found the final beetle grub, I
held the huge creature in my hand for a bit. I just couldn’t believe Nature had fashioned
such a spectacular and beautiful creature. I wanted to take a final and good look at
the larva before setting it into its growing chamber. I loved watching it move around. When I was ready, I picked it up. AC Family, I feel we made the right choice
by saving these beetle babies from becoming ant food. Alright, our baby is squirming now and just
wants to be buried. I placed it into its growing chamber and watched
it burrow into the soil. The process took 8 minutes. Eat well, our beloved beetle larva. I can’t wait to see what you look like when
you emerge. When all was settled, the growing chambers
were arranged neatly behind the Plateaus of Gaia. A total of 13 beetle larvae were collected,
so I had to create two more extra chambers. All the larvae had long burrowed deep into
their growing chambers and were nestled deep in darkness, where they would remain for the
next couple of months, feeding on the decaying coconut wood we had prepared for them. So it turns out the larvae are expected to
pupate and emerge as adult rhino beetles by Christmas! Oh man, won’t that be quite the Christmas
gift in the Antiverse?! I have decided to call these incubating beetle
catacombs, the Chambers of Sudan, as a tribute to Sudan, the last male northern white rhinoceros,
who died earlier this year on March the 20th. Though I realize, keeping carnivorous wild
animals like ants, as pets, often requires the killing of living prey animals like beetle
larvae and roaches, but having said that, I am happy we chose life for these beetle
grubs. For Thanksgiving, I just gave my ants some
extra roaches. So, what should we call these new beetles? Leave your name suggestions in the comments
and I will choose my top 5 favourites for us to vote on in a future video. The Chambers of Sudan are placed right next
to my closet, so I will make sure to check on our beetles every day, for on a random
day in December, we, the AC Family, shall be ready and waiting in celebration, for the
arrival of the great rhinoceros beetles into the Antiverse, and boy, do I have some epic
plans when they do! Yes, AC Family! Did you enjoy this week’s episode? I seriously can’t wait for the adults to emerge,
can you? Imagine seeing huge rhino beetles emerging
from the soil. So you know the drill! Hit that Subscribe button and bell icon now,
so you don’t miss out on their grand emergeance, and hit the Like button every single time,
including now. And hey, if you’re new to the channel, and
want to catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story
line playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so
you can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you would like to watch extended play footage of the beetle larvae! They are incredible creatures to look at,
despite their scary demeanor! And before we proceed to the AC Question of
the Week, I’d like to plug my daily vlogging channel, daily vlogs which have become a full
out bird dad channel, as I am now raising a baby African Grey parrot! If you love birds, I’d love for you to meet
my new cute little bird! She’s quite the character, loves to cuddle,
is quite chatty, and is fun to watch grow up! Hope you can subscribe when you’re there. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What made it easier for
the ants in this video to dig more tunnels? Congratulations to Arnav Singh who correctly
answered: The moisture from the watering made
it easier for the ants in this video to dig more tunnels. Congratulations, Arnav, you just won a free
e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: Why did we have to separate each beetle larva? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

For These Tiny Spiders, It’s Sing or Get Served | Deep Look


Behold a very small and rather cute spider. This is clypeatus. A jumping spider. He doesn’t spin webs. Instead he uses silk as a lifeline, reeling
it out as he hops from place to place. But right now, he’s looking for a mate. The thread of a female spider that he can
trace back to its source. Problem is, she may have other priorities. While he’ll jump on pretty much anything
that moves…She only mates once. She’s picky. So he’s going to make his case… on the
dancefloor. Male jumping spiders perform courtship displays
that would make Bob Fosse proud. Jazz hands, leg-lifts…they even shimmy their
pedipalps. But he needs a soundtrack. So, by beating together the front and back
halves of his body, he creates vibrations that travel through the ground. This is what her ears look like. Tiny membranes stretched across slits in her
legs. To study these jumping spider pulses, researchers
at the University of California Berkeley use a sophisticated laser vibrometer developed
for quality-testing cars and airplanes. It turns those vibrations into something we
can hear. And guess what? It’s a song. The first verse sounds like this. A fast heartbeat. Thump thump thump thump thump thump thump. Then, more thumping. Followed by something new. A “BOOM.” This is verse two. That pattern, over and over again. For verse three he adds a third element. Almost like he’s casting a spell, right? From species to species, and there are thousands
of different jumping spiders, the songs vary. But one thing never changes: Male jumping
spiders sing like their lives depend on it. Because they do. She may mate with him. She might refuse. But she might just eat him instead. When the Berkeley scientists prevented the
males from singing while they danced, the females were three times as likely to hunt
them as prey. So he needs to go big. The closer he gets to her, the more danger
he’s in. The dance and the song get more and more urgent. But even with all that… She’s still calling the shots. Hi, it’s Amy. If female spiders are picky, with males, the
bar is so, so low. He’ll do this courting song and dance with
pretty much anything. In the lab, scientists use frozen specimens
this one. A dead female spider! And he still tries to mate with her. While you’re here, subscribe to Deep Look,
and thanks for watching.

Review of the Bug-A-Salt, a bug killing weapon.

Review of the Bug-A-Salt, a bug killing weapon.


Okay, I’m going to review the Bug-A-Salt.
Its a gun that shoots salt that is supposed to kill bugs. Here’s how you fill it up with
salt. This is its ammo, if you will. To pump it up, slide this lever, and take off the
safety like this. before shooting bugs, I thought I’d get an idea of is power by shooting
a piece of thick card stock. It made a small dent, but otherwise nothing. So next I tried
a regular sheet of paper. Again, it made a dent, but that was all. I tried a piece of
foil. it left a lot of tiny dents. I decided to try again keeping the foil stretched tightly.
This time it penetrated through. Ok, time for some bugs. I tried this little
beetle bug I found. It knocked him several feet away, but overall he seemed fine. I tried
one more time. Again, he seemed annoyed but otherwise unharmed as he goes about his business.
Next I tried this wasp that was trying to build a nest inside my power strip in my garage.
It knocked him for a loop, but he was also unharmed. Next I tried this fly I found in
my kitchen. Wow. It actually worked well. He died almost instantly, as you can see here.
Next I tried a couple of spiders. here’s the first one, and the second one. Neither spider
was hurt by this. So I found this tiny grasshopper. As you guessed, he was not hurt. I tried one
more time, but again, he was not hurt. Al right, so what are my final thoughts on
the bug-a-salt? Well, I think its a great idea! I love the idea of being able to shoot
at bugs without worrying about damaging my property with a projectile. um, in practice,
doesn’t work so well as you can see in the video, um, works well against flies, but I’ve
tried a variety of other insects, no nothing. I tried a bunch of june bugs. I shot one of
them about 20 times. I didn’t get it on video because it was too dark outside. I want to
show you something else that really irritates me about this design, its this safety thing.
Every time you pump it up, you have to disengage the safety. It re-engages it every single
time. And I can’t tell you how many times I went to shoot a bug, and I had it just in
my aim. Pull the trigger, nothing happened. Then I have to take back, pull the stupid
safety back, and by that time, the bug has moved or whatever. Really, really irritating
that the safety resets itself every single time. But anyway, as you can see its not particularly
effective against wasps, I certainly wouldn’t try attacking a wasp nest like this, you’re
just going to wind up getting yourself stung. In fact, that’s another disadvantage I have
to tell you about. There were at least two or three occasions in my video where I was
shooting spiders or wasps. the spiders actually came back, I mean it actually hit the spider
and blew the spider off the wall and back onto me. That’s why the video ends so abruptly
on the spider videos because I had to brush the spider off of me. And when I shot the
wasp in my garage, that wasp came after me. I had to take off running. If I’d had another
camera setup you know about 50 feet away, you’d have seen me hauling butt with this
thing in my hand. Because it was not real pleased about getting knocked four feet away
from where it was but otherwise it was unharmed. So I guess my final review is if you like
shooting flies, this is probably the device for you. If you need to kill any other kind
of bug, don’t waste your money. Send me some comments, tell me what you’d like to see in
the next video. If you happen to live in the Dallas/Ft.Worth area and you want to do a
joint video sometime, let me know that as well and I’ll see you next time.

Thaumetopoea & Spilostethus Jungle Insects – حشرات الغابة : دودة الصندل

Thaumetopoea & Spilostethus Jungle Insects – حشرات الغابة : دودة الصندل


Spilostethus pandurus
Lygaeidae – Spilostethus pandurus Scientific classification
Kingdom : Animalia Phylum : Arthropoda
Class : Insecta Order : Hemiptera
Suborder : Heteroptera Infraorder : Pentatomomorpha
Superfamily : Lygaeoidea Family : Lygaeidae
Subfamily : Lygaeinae Genus : Spilostethus
Species : S. pandurus Binomial name
Spilostethus pandurus Pine processionary larvae marching
in characteristic fashion Scientific classification Kingdom : Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Insecta Order: Lepidoptera Family: Thaumetopoeidae Genus: Thaumetopoea Species: T. pityocampa Binomial name
Thaumetopoea pityocampa Directed by ELBAR MOHAMED ELAMIN