STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

Feeding Cockroaches to Ants

Feeding Cockroaches to Ants


Welcome to the AC Ant Room, home to three
very large ant colonies. Each colony contains thousands and thousands
of ants. With all of these ants and brood within these
nests, surely there are hungry mouths to feed, and on today’s menu, we have their favourite
food item. Cockroaches. In this episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel,
we will watch each of our three ant colonies, the Golden Empire, The Fire Nation, and the
Dark Knights feeding on cockroaches, and even check out some of the other snacks they enjoy! Also in this video we will announce the winner
of our grand annual Ant Love Contest 2017 and reveal the winner of a brand new All You
Need Omni Gear Pack, a complete AntsCanada ant setup! Today will be full of ant discovery and fun,
so be sure to keep watching until the end! AC Family, sit back, relax, and let’s watch
our ants dine, in this thrilling episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel, and hit the
BELL icon! Welcome to the AC Family. Bon appetite! Today I wanted to present tonight’s ant feeding
session in a more natural and real light, so I figured for a change in this episode,
we would observe the ants non-timelapsed and with less editing, instead showing more intimate
footage of the ants feeding so we can truly admire what happens when ants get busy at
processing their food. First to be fed, is our Golden Empire, our
yellow crazy ants. It’s been about two weeks since they’ve moved
into this massive terrarium we call Hacienda Del Dorado. It was a way to help them get rid of their
body mites. It seems the ants now have the ability to
dispose of their garbage appropriately, as I see them creating rubbish piles in locations
away from the nest. Here are some discarded uneaten Fire Nation
alate body parts and look, mites have found these piles to feed on. Unfortunately, I still see mites on the ants,
but I do see some ants without mites, so we’ll have to wait, perhaps a month or two more,
until the new generation of workers has completely replaced the initial mite-infecected generation
in order to truly determine if the move into a massive terrarium helped. You will see ants feasting here on some rotting
mango as well as some raw honey. They’ve been working on this for two days
now and are definitely craving for their protein. So here we go. Dropping in a native Philippine cockroach! AC Family, enjoy watching the Golden Empire
feast! More workers are coming now. Word has reached the nest that food lays just
a skip and a hop away. It isn’t long before the roach is surrounded
by many hungry Golden Empire workers. Some have completely abandoned the raw honey
to come and help. Yellow Crazy Ants lack stingers. They instead spray formic acid, and they’re
using it to subdue and kill this huge roach which as you can see is many times their size. Other workers keep the cockroach pinned down. Look at these workers trying to pull the cockroach
by its antennae. Haha! Persistent little ones! Now for those wondering, I feed all prey insects
to my ants pre-killed which means they have been crushed. This also means that their body parts still
move because insects don’t have brains like ours. They have ganglia, a grouping of nerve cells
which run down the center of their body. This means then that even if you decapitate
or crush a cockroach to kill it, it still moves. OK, let’s let them continue to grapple with
this huge carcass and move on to our most aggressive and frightening ants, the Fire
Nation, our red tropical fire ants! As you know, we recently moved our fire ants
into the Fire Palace, this deep rubbermaid bin full of soil which they absolutley love! It has become the colony’s main nest! Let’s drop in a cockroach. This one is a no brainer. It gets swarmed by ants in a matter of seconds. It isn’t long before a thick carpet of ants
covers this roach. Let’s add another shall we? OK, and now time to head downstairs into the
abyss to visit the new outworld on the Silver Glacier of our Dark Knights, our Black Crazy
Ants. Let’s drop in a roach for these hungry and
deserving ants! Let’s reposition here so we can see a bit
more. In no time, the workers of the Dark Knights
are all over this cockroach. Watch them feed eagerly from the cockroach’s
wounds. These black crazy ants waste no time. Every night, I feed these three kingdoms different
foods. A varied diet is definitely the key to a healthy
ant colony. The Dark Knights usually get 1 or two roaches,
as does the Golden Empire, and the Fire Nation, being a lot larger than the other two ants
colonies, they take 12 or sometimes I feed them pieces of cooked meat, like this chicken
leg which we offered as their house warming gift, and yes, of course I filmed it, but
this needed to be timelapsed because it took 2 days! And gone! Now, I don’t know if you remember but a few
months back I caught a trapjaw queen ant and kept her in the dark and fed her hoping she
would give us eggs, so we could start a colony of trap jaw ants. Well, I have an update, and you will be both
shocked and super excited! And all of that to come, in next week’s video. Thanks for watching! And we’ll see you next week, AC Family! It’s ant love forever! Alright, AC Family! Were you grossed out or was that cool? Inner Colony members today’s episode was a
little taste of what you guys watch every week in our hidden videos, but of course I
still placed a hidden video for you here, for extended footage of a cockroach being
eaten by the Golden Empire. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: What is the name of the specialized workers
in honeypot ants that store water? Congratulations to Regnerum who correctly
answered “Aquapletes”. Congratulations Regnerum you just won a free
ebook handbook from our shop! For this week’s question of the week, we ask: What is the name of the groupings of nerves
controling movement in insects? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free Tshirt from our shop! Alright, and speaking of free stuff, as you
know, we love doing fun contest giveaways to you guys our AC Family, and so last week
we launched our annual “Ant Love Contest”, where we asked the question “What is Ant Love
to You?” for a chance to win a FREE All You Need Omni Gear Pack. This year, we received over 1700 entries on
our official Facebook page, and so as is our problem every single year, it was SO hard
for us to narrow it down to just 1 winner! There were just so many great entries that
made us smile, made us laugh, made us go WOW!, made us go what da?, even some that made us
tear up a little and warmed our ant-loving hearts! So, here we go after reviewing over 1700 entries,
a big congratulations goes out to our ANT LOVE CONTEST 2017 winner: John Poster, who wrote a cool ant poem, which
we have included in the info section of this video. Congratulations as well goes out to our runners
up. You guys each have won a FREE EBOOK Handbook
from our shop! Thank you all for playing this year, and for
those that didn’t win, don’t worry as we are always giving away free stuff from AntsCanada.com Thanks for watching and we’ll see you next
week, AC Family! Ant love forever!

Insects Photography-Insects-Natural Photography -Macro Photography-Nature


Swayamkrushigroup Official Channel Scan this Qr to Buy an VR Headset Natural Photography Photography by C ShankarPrasad Edited by VinayV it’s a HandMade Video Read our Blog: www.deepphilosophy.org visit our website: www.swayamkrushigroup.com Thankyou For Watching Please Subscribe!!!

The Smart Way Warthogs Keep Insects at Bay

The Smart Way Warthogs Keep Insects at Bay


NARRATOR: Meet the warthog. They love to roll
around in the mud. Known as wallowing,
it keeps their skin free from ticks and parasites. A mud bath might look messy. But pigs are actually
meticulously clean animals. The wallow also helps them cool
off in the heat of the day. But in the very hottest
months on the savanna, these warthogs face a dilemma. The intense African sun
dries out all the mud, leaving them exposed
to swarms of insects. It’s insufferable, even
with their tough hide. But a handful of smart warthogs
have figured out a solution. They enlist a helping hand– banded mongooses. They’re voracious insect eaters,
spending most of their day on the hunt for food. They patrol the savanna in
gangs of over 20 strong. And with so many mouths
to feed, mongooses need to find a lot of insects. As an insect magnet,
perhaps a warthog could provide a decent snack. Only, its long legs make this
dining table a little too high for a mongoose. So some clever warthogs
have learned to lie down when the gang is around. It sends a very clear message– the mongoose spa is
open for business. Now in range, the mongooses
clean the ticks and lice from all those hard-to-reach places. Pure bliss. It’s the perfect partnership. The warthogs are kept healthy. The mongooses get a
meal, eating their fill without nipping their patrons. Mutually beneficial
relationships like theirs are almost
unheard of between mammals. It’s a brilliant solution
for a nagging problem, one that hints pigs might well
be smarter than we realize.

Bushbaby Snacks on Insects

Bushbaby Snacks on Insects


(hooting of nocturnal animals) – [Narrator] But the flood
also creates problems. As it arrives, it isolates one
kind of small primitive ape on whatever termite island
they happen to be on. These temporary prisoners
rely almost entirely on the insects that the flood
forces to the high ground, and they do that with special adaptations. They have huge eyes that
are locked in position, so big, in fact, that to move its eyes, it has to move its entire head. (slurping, smacking) It’s effective, they can see and leap around a very complex
world in the high trees, and to help, they urinate on their hands for that extra stickiness. (chirping of nocturnal animals) Their tools work well for them as they navigate their
isolated tree-top realm. (very light eerie music)

Project Nucleus: How I Create Mini Planets Within Glass

Project Nucleus: How I Create Mini Planets Within Glass


Before we begin today’s episode, I wanted
to let everyone know that AntsCanada.com is having its big AC annual holidays Promo: the
20-20-20 sale. That’s 20% off all Hybrid Series ant farms
and gear packs from now until January 2020, plus a free copy of our newly updated “Ultimate
Ant Keeping Handbook,” right now at AntsCanada.com. Click the link in the description to get your
AC ant farm today! And now enjoy today’s ant episode! After a long and successful day, I looked
down at the clippings and dead tree I had collected from our projects. Ordinarily, I would throw these away, but
suddenly an awesome idea came to me, an idea that I felt could completely change and affect
the lives of every creature and terrarium in the entire AC Antiverse! AC Family, it was time to embark on a new
and exciting biological engineering project! Last week, we had two major maintenance operations
for two of our beloved kingdoms in the AC Antiverse. First, the mystical double floating island
of Avista, home to the Big-Headed ants, you named the Bobbleheads, underwent a serious
makeover, receiving a new island to their open-air ant archipelago. The Red Banyon tree, the Great Tree of Wisdom,
also needed trimming, so I snipped around their sacred tree, which resulted in this
gorgeous well-manicured main island. We replaced a dead tree with a new one, and
gave them a superworm as house warming gift. East of Avista, stands the Canopy of Vortexia. Our tree-top forest home to our aggressive
Weaver Ant Colony, The Emerald Empire. The territories also needed maintenance as
one of the trees had seriously overgrown. It was a scary operation to snip away at the
overgrown leaves and perform general maintenance with weaver ants wanting to attack me the
whole time, but the biggest thing that came out of this was that I also took the opportunity,
to improve the biological profile of Vortexia’s soil life, through the addition of roaches,
superworms and other creatures, and then sealing the entire thing up! It resulted in a clean, healthy, and bioactive
environment, where creatures could eat decaying materials, reproduce on their own, and be
hunted, all inside the Canopy of Vortexia. It was the epic creation of an entire, contained
ecosystem, and the way I saw it, like the creation of a mini-planet within glass. And this gave me an idea. This week, our journey towards creating the
ultimate homes for our ants and other creatures continues, as we launch a super cool, biological
engineering project, I call Project Nucleus, and AC Family, I think you guys will totally
dig it, no pun intended! So sit back, relax and enjoy this week’s
info-packed episode, as I show you how life of a successful vivarium begins, and how I
plan to create mini-planets within glass. In the past few weeks, my recent projects
of making more bioactive terrariums have been undeniably successful, bioactive, basically
meaning throwing in a bunch of different organisms with different purposes into a single enclosed
environment, resulting in a healthier and more dynamic life for our ant colonies, as
well as the fellow tenants living with them. In the case of the Dark Knights a few weeks
back, for instance, a new life with bagworms, millipedes, jumping spider, springtails, isopods,
worms, and who knows what else came with the layer of leaf litter and plants I threw into
their new home, which by the way needs a new name so VOTE here, AC Council, meant that
the ants could truly live like they did in the wild, defending their territory, with prey at their disposal, and home bioactively cleaned by creatures
that would eat their poop and garbage, converting it to fertilizer for the plants
which would go on to produce oxygen for the system, and so on. The partnerships of these various creatures
made for a very self-sustaining, biodynamic world! I thoroughly loved this streak of successfully
creating these super-bioactive terrariums on steroids, which ultimately gave me the
idea to start Project Nucleus. So, what is Project Nucleus, you ask. Well, it goes like this. So you may or may not know, every time I start
building a new terrarium, I either recycle aged terrarium soil or collect leaf litter
from my neighborhood and add it to the soil. I do this because soil creatures, like springtails,
mites, worms, millipedes, and isopods are needed to help breakdown organic waste in
the terrarium. Wilted leaves from plants, exoskeletons and
other wastes from the prey, as well as ant excrement are all broken down by these soil-residing
organisms. Without them, the entire terrarium may rot,
fungus take over, and just lead to a gross terrarium mess. Plus these soil creatures are the missing
link between organic waste and plant life, because soil creature poop from organic waste
contains a tonne of amazing nutrients for plants. The problem with using new soil to create
new terrariums is that they contain only a few of these creatures. It would take some time for a new terrarium
to develop the populations of soil biota, so as a general rule, the older the soil,
the more lush and abundant the soil life is. Now to better understand what I’m talking
about, and appreciate how cool of an undertaking Project Nucleus is, let’s take a look at one
of the amazing ant kingdoms in the AC Antiverse, on which a lot of you have been patiently
waiting for an update. Welcome everyone to the home of the Golden
Empire. This colony of Yellow Crazy Ants, scientifically
known as Anoplolepis gracillipes is one of the OG ant colonies of this channel. They were once a massive glorious colony of
millions but were unexpectedly hit by a lethal plague of blood-sucking mites earlier this
year, which reduced them to several hundreds. I rescued a small population and put them
into quarantine where I treated their vampiric body mites with predatory Hypoapsis mites
harvested from rhino beetles, of all places. And lucky for me, I was able to recover at
least 5 of the 7 queens and rid the colony of the vampiric mites. To rehabilitate them, I transferred them,
into this Hybrid Nest + Ant Tower setup. We even documented the cured Golden Empire
workers, transferring their brood into their new home. What a trip and triumphant day that was! During the mass emmigration, we also noticed
that the Hypoaspis mites were still living with the Golden Empire, assumingly protecting
the colony from future bad mite attacks. You can watch all of this here, by the way. So it was clear that these relationships with
smaller organisms like the Hypoaspis mites were extremely important for the ants’ well-being. And AC Family, you’re about to see how much
these relationships have evolved since they moved in a few months ago, and how it has
helped the Golden Empire flourish! Look! I’m happy to announce that the Golden Empire
is doing great. Here are the queens, who prefer to hang out
in their Hybrid Nest, which has become the main mothernest of the colony. They’ve been laying lots of eggs. Look at those egg batches being carried around
by caring workers. I estimate the colony is well over a thousand
workers now and is about to get even bigger. But what’s more amazing is this, guys! Other creatures are also living in the Hybrid
Nest, in cooperation with the colony. Here are springtails, known in the Antiverse
as the Springcleaners, which help eat decaying material, ant poop, and mold. We also have beneficial mites eating up the
same stuff. But check this out! For the first time on the channel, we get
a glimpse at a species of symbiotic isopods that live with the ants! Isn’t that amazing? The ants don’t attack these isopods, which
are actually crustaceans, who thrive off the garbage left behind by the ants, mold that
might be growing around the premises, and possibly their poop. It’s possible these isopods were living with
the Golden Empire the whole time since the beginning, back when they were still residing
in the Hacienda Del Dorado, but we’ve only been able to see them now due to visual access
of the Hybrid Nest. And that’s not all, guys. I even discovered there are silverfish-type
insects, living with the ants! I don’t know what species these little turbo
guys are, but I am pretty sure, they also have a key role at eating up dead insects
leftovers, ant poop, and fungi. So, guys check out the beauty of how this
all works. The Golden Empire has a system. So like humans, the colony produces garbage,
and like humans, the ants keep the garbage in piles and bury it. They’ve chosen designated areas of the Hybrid
Nest as garbage rooms. They also delegate certain areas for bathrooms. It’s essential especially in an underground,
moist environment for the colony to be as clean and systematic with their waste management
as possible so all hell doesn’t break loose and the colony dies from unsanitation. So once these garbage and bathroom spots get
too soiled and littered, the colony then buries these areas up, and that’s when the clean-up
team of soil creatures take over and work their magic. They’re small enough to fit into the tight
spaces of the buried chambers where they proceed to eat up the garbage and ant poop, and keeping
dangerous fungus that grows on the garbage and poop under control. A lot of you ask how I clean my ant farms,
and well, now you know. I kinda don’t need to, because the ant farms
bioactively clean themselves. The lifeforms take care of the maintenance
like they would in the wild. I just add water and watch it all happen! There’s even a whole other decomposition process
happening at the microbial level. If we were to take a look at a sample of this
ant nest material under a microscope, we’d find a whole other world of bacteria and colonies
of unicellular organisms also busy eating and decomposing organic matter. So as you can see, there’s quite the system
happening here. It’s mutualistic symbiosis at its finest,
which basically means there’s a cooperation between all parties for the benefit of all. It’s amazing to be able to see all of this
in the Hybrid Nest, because you can’t really see it happening in a terrarium, but I assure
you, this is what’s going on underground in all our terrariums, perhaps with different
sets of soil creatures unique to each terrarium. And look, the creatures even migrate and travel
through the tubes to and from the colony’s neighbouring satellite nests. Speaking of which, let’s cover up their Hybrid
Nest and briefly take a look at the Golden Empire’s satellite nest in the large Ant Tower
shall we? As you can see, this is the popular hangout
for the Springcleaners! A tonne of Springtails for some reason love
this place, and seem to be quite busy at the moment working on a leftover superworm. Now wanna see something cool: see this little
contraption with a switch? I turn it on and a light beneath the Ant Tower
illuminates from inside. For those of you who are new to ants, ants
are naturally photophobic which means they don’t like light in their nests, but it is
said that ants cannot see red light, so keeping the ants under red film and lighting them
up with red light, causes the ants to feel like they are shrouded in darkness. And peeling off this red film reveals ants
congregating in one of their chambers. Check out all the tunnels they’ve created
down to the bottom of the Ant Tower! Springtails can be seen frequenting all areas. Now, AC Family, after seeing all of this,
it’s now time to talk about my idea, Project Nucleus! Rich bioactive ant homes like the Golden Empire’s
here don’t happen overnight. The creatures are few at first, usually coming
in with plants, rocks, and soil that you first place into the terrariums and it takes months
to create populations as rich as the one we see here in the Golden Empire, and a good
year for it to really be established. And as you know AC Family, we are always creating
new worlds and vivariums on this channel, and it would be very beneficial to have a
constant supply of soil creatures, to help speed up the bioactivation process in newly
created terrariums. And so, my idea. AC Family, I present to you Project Nucleus. In this glass enclosure, I plan on creating
what shall become the Nucleus of the AC Antiverse, the creational furnace from which shall be
born epic populations of soil biota for future terrariums we make from here on in. If we could create a place where we could
culture soil creatures, a place with aged soil and an established soil ecosystem, then
when creating a new terrarium or ant home, we could simply scoop up a bit of the medium
from the Nucleus, to place into our new terrarium, and thereby help populate the new terrarium’s
soil with its team of soil creatures. One scoop of medium from the Nucleus, would
be enough to bioactivate any terrarium much more quickly than if it were just created
from scratch. Plus the medium produced by the AC Nucleus
would be super rich in nutrients for plants. My plan was for the Nucleus to be a place
where I could take leaf clippings, decaying material or waste, or even dead creatures
from other kingdoms of our Antiverse, and have them feed our Nuclear soil creatures
to be processed back into the soil. Essentially, we’d be creating a composter,
just amped up with a tonne of soil creatures. And so to build this AC Nucleus, we will be
needing various materials. So here we go. First, we need this glass tank, our Nuclear
furnace of soil life culture. Through the glass we’ll be able to see the
activities as well as the progress of the Nuclear inhabitants in real-time. Next, I’ll be adding activated carbon, to
keep the growing medium purified from harmful metals and chemicals which could poison the
populations of creatures living in here. Now, let’s move on to my worst fear in life,
ahem… Worms! I had to face these vile-looking creatures
once more. I began to use my trowel to scoop up earth
from the bag and I was immediately repulsed by these squirming African Nightcrawlers seething
from within the soils. As a scoleciphobe, it was disgusting to see
the worms squirming, but I knew I had to do this because earthworms are good for composting. They breakdown organic wastes and turn them
into valuable compost or black soil, which are great for plants! Plus, populating a new terrarium with its
starting team of earthworms is always a good thing. I placed the soil into the glass enclosure. As time passed, I forced myself to really
look at the worms. Some worms fell and I had to pick them up. Ugh! I had to coach my mind that the worms were
friends and harmless. Mind over matter. Mind over matter. I filled up the tank and pressed the medium
down a bit as I went along. When I had filled it to as much as I could,
I decided to actually pick the worms up and hold them in my hand. Not so bad, huh? Next, I added leaf litter collected from outside. I knew it contained lots of different soil
creatures that would be the forefathers, foremothers, and forehamaphrodites to bring our AC Nucleus
to life. I immediately saw that I’d scooped up lots
of millipedes. I couldn’t touch them, as this species produces
cyanide, so bad for the eyes and enough to make a human sick, but they would be great
at eating up decaying material. And Oh! Look! These millipedes immediately began mating. Wasting no time, I see. Also, I had a handful of leaf clippings from
Selva de Fuego maintenance. I cut these up so they could break down much
more quickly and placed them into the Nucleus, as well. Then I placed filter foam to cover everything
up, to ensure no mischievous fly could enter and lay their eggs inside the tank. We wouldn’t want to repeat the maggot episode
hehe… right? The filter foam also helps keep all Nuclear
inhabitants inside, while allowing the entire system to breathe. After adding all of the components, our AC
Nucleus was complete. Two days later, the Nucleus was already a
happening place. Millipedes were still mating, and I suspect
we’re about to get a booming population of them soon. I was surprised to see another species of
millipede had dug a burrow into the soils. Also, earthworms were seen everywhere! They created a network of burrows. And Oh! I could see worm casts. I also saw that they had dragged pieces of
the leaves into the soils for further feeding. Good job, earthworms! Such hard-working creatures. Not scary or disgusting at all… Sorta. I could also see several awesome mites already
starting to populate the soils. Springtails frolicked their new territories,
as well. And look! A bagworm was crawling along the top with
its constructed home made of debris. I didn’t even know we put a bagworm in there! I’m not sure what else we’ll be finding in
this increasingly bioactive chamber we call the AC Nucleus, but I can’t wait to see how
this soil ecosystem evolves over time, and eventually use it to help speed up the bioactivation
process of the terrariums we make in the future. In fact, I’ve been thinking a lot about all
this focus lately on bioactive setups for the ants and other creatures of the Ant Room,
and I feel AC Family that the AC Antiverse is approaching a new age, where more focus
is placed on creating more hollistic setups for the lifeforms we care for. Before, I used to create homes that would
usually focus most on one creature, one star on a stage, whether it be an ant colony in
an ant farm, or a tarantula in an enclosure. But I’m realizing more and more, after all
these years of keeping ants, that this isn’t the best way to house these creatures nor
appreciate them to the fullest. In order to properly and naturalistically
house them and watch them at their fullest potential, you need to do more than just decorate
their home in a naturalistic way. The key here is remembering the context, in
which the creatures live in nature. The ant colonies we care for and love, are
actually part of an interconnected food web, a piece in a puzzle and to properly house
them and witness them in their truest and greatest form, you need to include all pieces
of the puzzle. This to me means then that there should be
a focus on developing the necessary associated animals like soil creatures in their soils,
as we saw with the Golden Empire, prey creatures living in the territories as we’ve established
with Vortexia, and allow the system to develop a collective biological profile of its own
in an enclosed space, like we did with the Dark Knight’s new vivarium. I caught some surviving darkling beetles,
superworm survivors, mating within Olympus this week. Usually, I’d fish these out and place them
in my superworm bin, but this time, I decided I’d keep them in there. Also, as you can probably imagine, I’m running
out of room in the AC Antiverse, and while our future giant two-story ant room in my
new house is currently being built, I feel this merging of creatures to share a space,
may be a great solution to my now overcrowded ant room. A few months ago, I tried placing one of our
vampire crabs into the Selva de Fuego. Now hold on, before you freak out, normally
I’d never consider this because, in my mind, the Fire Ants as we know are savages, but
I also knew the crab occupies an entirely different niche, and can get away by retreating
underwater, and turns out AC Family, after 8 weeks, the crab is still alive and happy
in the Selva de Fuego. The Fire ants surprisingly don’t bother it,
and the crab goes about its daily activities picking up garbage and dead ants the fire
ants dump into the river, sleeping within the shadowy wet caves behind
the falls, and picking off organic waste and algae off
the rocks. Pretty awesome right? I’ve gone ahead and placed a few crabs into
the Hacienda Del Dorado, as well, where it now resides with a few microfrogs, shrimp,
rasbora fish, and trap-jaw ants. So as you can see, this new era for our Antiverse
and philosophy are both exciting and much more beneficial to the creatures we care for. It means a more deliberate structuring of
their worlds, so that the worlds can feed and sustain themselves, thereby minimizing
my interaction with them for the most part anyway. I realized recently, that as an ant keeper,
caregiver of life forms, and your Creator of Worlds, I’m not keeping individual creatures
in inanimate setups, but rather I’m keeping biodynamic superorganisms. The Selva de Fuego, the Hacienda Del Dorado,
Vortexia, Avista, Olympus… These are all superorganisms, composed of
a multitude of living components that all depend on each other for survival… Little dynamic planets of life in our ever-expanding
AC Antiverse. AC Family, I’ve learned it’s the difference
between just keeping pets and creating planets within glass. Speaking of making new terrariums, it just
so happens, another beast has been waiting in the shadows for you all to meet her. Yes, we have a new addition to our ever growing
AC Antiverse, and she’s one of the most dangerous animals to ever reside in the Ant Room. AC Family, I can’t wait to show her to you. AC Family, did you enjoy today’s episode? What do you think of Project Nucleus? Let me know in the comments. Next week, we meet our newest addition to
the Antiverse, so you know what to do! Smash that SUBSCRIBE button and BELL ICON
for notifications now, so you don’t miss out on who our new dangerous but beautiful beast
is, and don’t forget to hit the LIKE button every single time, including now! It would really help a lot! If you’re new to the channel, and want to
catch up on all your AntsCanada Lore, feel free to binge watch this complete story line
playlist here, which traces the origins of all the ant colonies of the ant room, so you
can follow their stories and better appreciate how these ant kingdoms came to be, and why
we love them so much! AC Inner Colony, I have left a hidden cookie
for you here, if you’d like a clue as to who our newest beast is. Maybe you might be able to figure it out,
so go check it out! And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
Week! Last week we asked: Name one of the bioactive creatures found
in Vortexia. Congratulations to Tan Grace Lin who correctly
answered: Millipedes Congratulations, Tan Grace Lin, you just won
a free e-book handbook from our shop! In this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is mutualistic symbiosis? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could also win a free e-book handbook from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we
upload every Saturday at 8AM EST. Please remember to LIKE, COMMENT, SHARE, and
SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed this video to help us keep making more. It’s ant love forever!

Fire Ants React to Cockroach on a Stick (Time Lapse)

Fire Ants React to Cockroach on a Stick (Time Lapse)


AntsCanada presents… Fire Ants React To Cockroach on a Stick We fed a precrushed cockroach to our fire ants and filmed them eating over a 2 day period Ants attacking cockroach. (Music in background) Cockroach Husk falls Ant Love Forever! Video by AntsCanada.com More Videos, Subscribe!

BUG BURRITO (Insect Eating Challenge) | Challenge Pete

BUG BURRITO (Insect Eating Challenge) | Challenge Pete


Hi I’m Pete and last week you guys voted for bug burrito that means that today I’m going to be eating a burrito that’s infested with ants, locusts, grasshoppers and a bunch more small insects and if that doesn’t make you hungry then I don’t know what will. Remember to vote on what you want to see me do next time by clicking the button that’s popping up on the top of the screen right now. To start off a burrito, you people at home would usually add a layer of rice but i’m going to be a bit more adventurous and use Queen Weaver ants. So let’s pour these on. Next up I have some caterpillars to use instead of beans. This burrito looks like it’s coming together quite nicely. And now to add a specialty ingredient that’s been in my family for years, some locust lettuce. My favorite Just how my grandma makes it… perfect! That can go straight on. It’s really got a beautiful after taste. Now you can’t have a burrito without salsa, so I’ve got some here with a secret ingredient some crickets. Let’s add a nice helping of this It’s time for my favorite part of the dish some grasshopper guacamole. Available in any good supermarket. Next up, I don’t liek cheese on my burrito so I’m going to add some mealworms and Buffalo worms instead. And finally, we’ll add some silkworm pupae sour cream. It’s already making my mouth water. You can probably tell I’m not exactly a professional at wrapping. Ok, so in this burrito I have ants, caterpillars, grasshoppers, crickets, mealworms, locusts, buffalo worms and silkworm pupae… They say that insects are the food of the future so I guess it’s time to find out. It’s so crunchy! It’s so hard to chew! There’s just no moisture in there, it’s so dry. My mouth feels like a desert. If I’m honest, it doesn’t taste that bad! it’s just like the texture of it and the dryness of the insects but the actual insects have a bit of flavour to them. Who’d have thought? I think I’ll start selling this at chipotle soon. Take a look inside. I’m sorry if you came to this video hoping to see me like throw up or at least gag but I don’t think it’s gonna happen! This is probably the nicest challenge I’ve ever done so thank you guys for voting for it. Maybe next time I’ll have to do it with live bugs. Although this burrito did cost me about 30 pounds to make so it’s probably a bit expensive at the moment. That’s the sign of a good meal. So there you have it, my bug burrito. Probably the tastiest challenge you guys have made me do but oh well I’m happy with that. You win some you lose some. Subscribe for new videos like this, or not quite like this usually they’re a bit more disgusting or gruesome, but subscribe for new videos every Thursday, if you enjoyed it please give a thumbs up. Thanks you for watching, goodbye!

Why Stink Bugs Stink: Revealed!

Why Stink Bugs Stink: Revealed!


– Oh my goodness hello, my name’s Charlie, nice to meet ya, on one of my last videos, Kevin wrote, oh since we’re
on the subject of insects, what makes a stinkbug stink so hard? Kevin, my man, thank you
so much for your question. Let’s get into it, bam. This is a stinkbug, people
also call ’em shieldbugs, because if you look at the back it’s kind of in the shape
of like a medieval shield, so if you see a bug in the wild that has like a shield-ish
back, it’s probably a stinkbug. Stinkbugs are super interesting, they’ve pretty much
conquered the entire world, this is where they live,
in these highlighted areas, so if you live there, keep an eye out, you might find a stinkbug, and there’re a lot of
different kinds of stinkbugs, there’s like green ones and brown ones and ones that look like this
and this and this and this. Ah very cool, first question,
do stinkbugs actually stink? Answer, yes, kind of, sometimes. Stinkbugs sometimes stink
and sometimes they don’t. Three follow-up questions then. When do they stink, why do they stink, and how do they stink? Yes, very interesting, we have when, why, and how stinkbugs stink. Let’s start with the when and why, that’s a nice place to begin, goodbye. Usually stinkbugs smell
like ordinary bugs, they only stink when it’s
advantageous to their survival, so they like strategically use their stink to protect themselves from predators. It’s what super fancy biologists
call a defense mechanism. A.k.a. an anti-predator behavior, or if those just are complicated, just think about it like it’s something that the animal uses to make
sure it doesn’t get eaten. But animals have like all
sorts of defense mechanisms. You can think of a turtle’s shell, makes it much more difficult to chew. Defense mechanism! Or some lizards can shed their tails to distract a predator while
they make a run runaway. Defense mechanism number two! Or some owls camouflage
into their environment so a predator can’t even spot ’em. Defense mechanism number three! But what about a stinkbug,
what’s their defense mechanism? Well this is how that
situation would shake out. Stinkbug enjoying its day,
predator looking for a meal, I’m gonna eat this stinkbug. Stinkbug secretes a bunch of chemicals that make it smell disgusting. The predator’s like, oh my gosh, you smell so bad, I’m
not gonna eat you anymore just because you’re so disgusting. And the stinkbug’s like fine. I won’t, that was my intention. Fine, fine, bye, bye,
victory to the stinkbug. Boom, wonderful, so that’s
when any why stinkbugs stink. When, when they are in
danger or under attack and why, to protect
themselves against a predator. Fantastic, now let’s talk about how. How does the stink come about, right? Well to answer this question,
let’s flip this bad boy over and take a look under the hood shall we? Bam, brilliant, this is the underside of a stinkbug and these two arrows are pointing to the location
of two very small scent glands located right behind those middle legs. The scent glands secret
different chemicals known as aldehydes, what a beautiful word. (ding) If you took chemistry, they look a little something like this, and if you didn’t take
chemistry, don’t worry about it. Supposedly these aldehydes
smell super terrible, some people describe it as
smelling like coriander. If you don’t know what coriander
smells like, I don’t either so let’s go with a different description. Other people describe it as
smelled like rancid almonds, which I can kind of imagine,
but also not really. So if those descriptions don’t
really make sense to you, the way they don’t make sense to me, I don’t know how to describe the smell, I wish I could do better, but I cannot. But anyways, that answers the question of how the stink comes about right? They have two tiny little scent glands behind their middle legs
which secrete aldehydes, which are super smelly, smell terrible. Fantastic, bam, bam, bam, we have done it. We have answered when they smell, why the smell, and how they smell right? Pretty much closin’ the book on stinkbugs. P.S. if you live in Mexico, India, Laos, Malawi, or Papa New Guinea, apparently they eat these
things as like snacks and parts of meals, they eat stinkbugs. So if you’ve ever eaten one before, let me know what it takes like, because that would be
similarly interesting. Or if you smell coriander, let us know what coriander smells like,
’cause I don’t cook a lot, and I don’t plan on
smelling coriander soon. Wow, what a stinky episode. Hey, do you know what doesn’t stink? Oh, the fresh new batch of patrons who’ve donated to my Patreon page! Ah, they smell wonderful,
I’m talkin’ about Matt Heckman, I’m talkin’
about Kaitie Janecke Soltesz, I don’t know if I said your
last name right I’m sorry. Jojo Kim, Kevin Estes, yes! (sniffs) Mm! Patreon’s a place where
you can support creators by donating a dollar or two a month in exchange for some super awesome perks like being part of this outstanding crew, having your name at the end of the video, let’s add you to the rest of the list. (claps) Bam, the list has been updated. All of these wonderful people
have donated to my Patreon and thusly, have made it possible for this video and all of
the other ones to exist. Thank you patrons. Alright, so if that’s
something that interests you or you’d like to support this channel, bam, click here to go to the Patreon page. Bam, click here to subscribe, that would be similarly helpful, or here’s a brand spankin’ new video fresh off the press ready for
viewin’ with your eyeballs. So feel free to watch that one next. Thanks so much and see ya later.