Samurai Wasps Say ‘Smell Ya Later, Stink Bugs’ | Deep Look

Samurai Wasps Say ‘Smell Ya Later, Stink Bugs’ | Deep Look


Can anything stop this stink bug? Oh what, it doesn’t look so bad? Think again. The brown marmorated stink bug is a fearsome
invader … a relentless force … … wreaking havoc on fields and orchards
across the country. These stink bugs are originally from Asia
– but probably made it to the U.S. as stowaways in shipping containers a few decades ago. Marmorated, by the way, means marbled – see
that pattern on their backs? They have a huge appetite – eating just about
any kind of fruit or vegetable out there. They use this – a long proboscis – to pierce
the skin. It makes a tiny hole. Dainty eater, you might think? Nope. Underneath, it’s squirting in chemicals
to dissolve the fruit. Then it sips up the juices, like a smoothie. The fruit looks okay on the outside, but now,
it’s ruined, rotting on the inside. Stink bugs can even pierce the hard shell
of a hazelnut. Just squish ‘em, you think? Yeah, you don’t want to do that. They genuinely stink. When disturbed, they can release an olfactory
bomb from small glands. The smell? Well, some people say it’s like dirty socks…
or rotting cilantro. These stink bugs have spread to 44 states
now. And oh yeah, in the winter, they might just
show up in your house, where it’s warm. What could possibly stand up to them? Hello, samurai wasp. This tiny wasp, also from Asia, is an old
enemy of stink bugs. It unleashes a stealth attack. A female wasp finds a mass of stink bug eggs
… … then one by one, she lays one of her own
inside them. The parasitic wasp larva grows secretly inside,
feasting on a tasty egg breakfast until the developing stink bug is no more. Then, the grown up wasps chew their way out,
nibbling the edges away like fingernail clippings. In their native range in Asia, 60-90% of stink
bug eggs are parasitized in this way, keeping them in check. So researchers in the U.S. want to recruit
the wasps, as long as they don’t become a pest too. The wasps have already been found in Oregon,
so scientists at Oregon State University are studying them as a kind of biological control. After all, using wasps is targeted, since
they primarily go after brown marmorated stink bugs. Maybe someday, they could release the wasps
in places where there are lots of stink bugs. Today, farmers use pesticides, but that can
kill lots of other helpful organisms. Researchers know that sometimes your enemy’s
enemy is your friend. So soon, the samurai wasp could be doing its
part to beat back the stink bug onslaught, one egg at a time. Hey there, Deep Peeps, It’s Lauren. So, guess what? There are some truly amazing creatures in Oaxaca,
Mexico and we want to go film them. But we need your support to get there. Can you help us? Head to Patreon – the link is in the description. Thanks!

BITTEN by a GIANT WATER BUG!

BITTEN by a GIANT WATER BUG!


– [Mark] All right, Coyote,
time to face your fears. – Argh. OK, here we go. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to be
bitten by the toe biter on my big toe. One, two. (screams in pain) (dramatic music) I got it! It’s a big turtle. Every time I leap from a kayak, find myself submerged
beneath the swampy surface, I am absolutely terrified. Not because I’m afraid of
the giant reptilian predator that I have likely
grabbed ahold of. No, no, snapping turtles
don’t scare me at all. What scares me is the
alien looking creature that may be hiding in the
tangles of pond plants that is infamously
known as the toe biter. You guys know what
that is, right? That’s my old arch
nemesis, the toe biter. Scientifically they are
known as the giant water bug, a nightmarish creature that
we have briefly featured in the past, one of the animals that I
have continuously expressed an honest fear of. Nobody in their right
mind would do this. I’d get bitten by
an alligator any day as compared to being
stung by this thing. With their alien
like appearance, grappling hook like arms, and massive rostrum
that can inflict an incredibly painful bite, trust me when I say, this is not something
you want to bump into when mucking around
in the swamps. Yet leave it up
to the Coyote Pack to request over and over again that I show the world
just how painful that bite really is, and in turn, how
to treat that bite if you are ever so
unfortunate to take one. These water dwelling insects can be found worldwide, and with just my luck, they happen to be very
common in Costa Rica. So the crew and
I headed out into the darkness of night when they are actively hunting, to see if we could
find one, a big one that sure enough would certainly give me a bite to remember. All right, I am looking
for a giant water bug, also known as a toe biter, and I’m pretty sure I saw one right on the other
side of that log. It’s right on the other
side of those plants now. What I’m gonna try to do is
actually go out on this log. You see this fallen log? That should get me right
in the perfect position. I don’t wanna disturb
the environment. I’m gonna use this net
to try to scoop it up. (dramatic music) Got it, got it! Wow, it’s big. Hold on, I’m coming
right towards you. – [Mark] Careful,
careful, careful. – Hold on, I’m
losing my balance. Ugh. There it is. Oh, it’s getting out of the net. Get in there, get in
there, get in there. That is a monster water bug. Look at the size of that thing. My goodness. Hold on, let me get
it out of the net. You guys got lights, lights? – [Mark] Yep. – Ew. Oh! Look at that creature. An alien from another planet. My hand is shaking. This giant water bug, also known as the toe biter. I’m not doing this
scene in the dark, guys. We’re waiting ’til
tomorrow morning. And yes, I’m going
to let my big toe be bitten by the toe biter. Ew, look at that. My goodness, it’s a beast. They can fly, they can swim, and their bite is one
of the most painful in the insect kingdom. Not a sting, guys, it is a bite. All right, I’m putting
it in the container. You ready? Just keep the lid on it. Trust me, you
don’t want this one getting in to your boot. Warning, the bite from a
giant water bug is non lethal, however, it is
excruciatingly painful. Never attempt to recreate
the following scene. (dramatic music) There it is, the little shop
of horrors itself, the giant water bug, also known as the toe biter. Now, let me tell you
guys a little story about when Coyote Peterson
was eight years old. I was out in the swamp,
searching for snapping turtles, wearing nothing other
than shorts and a t-shirt, wading through,
hoping to come across a giant reptile, when all of a sudden
I felt a piercing pain in my thigh. I immediately screamed,
reached my hand up my shorts, and what do I pull out? A giant water bug. I had never seen one of
these creatures before. I immediately started crying, not only from the pain, but because I was
absolutely terrified at the sight of this thing. I hobbled myself back to shore, got myself home, told
my mom what happened, and we looked it up
in a field guide. She called the doctor, and lo and behold,
they assured me I would be OK. It is not going to kill you. All I needed to do was
put ice on the bite, and relax for about
an hour and a half. And finally the pain
ended up going away. And ever since that day, this is the one insect that
I’ve truly been afraid of. Now before we get to the bite, let’s take a look at
this insect’s anatomy. Now, this is a true bug. It may look like a
beetle or a cockroach, but it is in fact
its own variety. There are around 60 species
of water bugs worldwide. In the United
States, there are 20. Now this one here,
the giant water bug, is very common here in
Central and South America. And this is about maximum size. The largest they get is
around four inches in length. And I would say that one is
about three and a half inches. An absolute monster. Now it’s interesting,
you can see it kind of skittering around inside
the container here, as soon as I move it, but you see that position
that it’s putting itself in, where it’s sticking its
rear up through the water. Look at that little snorkel
looking device there. That is actually
how it’s breathing. They breathe from
their back ends. – [Mark] It breathes
out its butt. – Yeah, it’s like a little
butt snorkel, right? (Mark laughs) So it’s keeping itself
positioned like that. And this is also
the same position in which they hunt. I’ll tell you what’s most
intimidating about this creature are those front arms. Let me turn it just a
little bit like that. Now, like all insects,
they have six legs. And these front two are modified with those hooks on the front. They use those to latch onto and grapple in their food. – [Mark] Am I seeing the
snorkel go in and out? – Yep, the snorkel does. It goes in and out. You can see its kind of, thrust its abdomen up
into the air there. That’s allowing it to breathe so it can just float
like a dead leaf, just like that, all day long, waiting for, let’s say, tadpoles need to come to
the surface to breathe, frogs need to come
to the surface, a fish could just swim by, and if it swims right
up towards that face, what they will do is reach
out with those forearms, and they have two
hooks right on the end. They’ll grapple on and
pull it towards their face. Right on the face there is
what’s called a rostrum, which is like a
little hooked beak. Now it is inside of a sheath, so as soon as they
catch something, it comes out of that sheath, and it injects a
incredibly potent saliva. Now the enzymes in that
saliva will actually paralyze the victim, and it kinda eek,
they’re stuck in place. So imagine that
you’re a tadpole, and then as that saliva
works it way into the system, it actually breaks apart
the victim’s insides. And then they drink it up just like a milkshake. How horrific is that? – [Mark] Is that what it’s
going to do to your toe? – Well, it’s not gonna
do that to my toe because I’m not gonna
let it hold on that long, but what it is going
to do is latch on, and then (whip sound)
wap me with that rostrum. And just a little
bit of that saliva getting into my system is going to be
unbelievably painful. This will probably be worse than any of the insect
stings I’ve taken. Remember guys, this
is not a sting, this is a bite. Very different. – [Mark] So is it venom? – It’s not technically venom,
but it works like venom in that the enzymes and
peptides in the saliva are modified, and break down
the insides of the victim. Now you may be asking yourself, well, something like this, does it have any predators? Well, certainly. A bird could eat it. A large snapping
turtle could eat it. But they are
incredibly camouflaged. Let me turn it like this. Take a look at its back, there. It looks just like a leaf. Here, I will just pick this
leaf up off the ground, hold that next to the container. Now if you were mucking
around in a little pond, like we have here behind
us where we caught it, and you just saw
it sitting there, just like that, completely
still, floating, you would have no idea
that that was an insect and not a leaf. Pretty incredible, huh? Now another name
for this insect is the electric light bug. That’s because in places, especially like Florida, where you have those
large halogen lamps, they will be drawn
in by the hundreds. And often times
people just think that they’re flying roaches. And if you go near one,
and you pick it up, you stand the chance
of being bitten. So if you see a bunch of bugs fluttering around a light, and they’re about
the size of a leaf, just admire them from
a safe distance, guys, because it’s a bite that
you’re never going to forget. – [Mark] So, to be clear, not just in the water,
these things fly. – [Coyote] Yes. Not just terrors
beneath the surface, but also terrors in the air. – [Mark] Didn’t we find
on in the parking lot once in Florida? – We did, yeah. It was actually
inside of my boot, believe it or not. Yeah, I think I actually
took a photo of it, and posted it on Instagram. Yep, now what’s interesting
is that this is a male. You know how I know that? The males carry
eggs on their backs. And I can see that
this one has a few eggs still hanging onto it. Now, this is one of
those rare species that you have the male
taking care of the young, making sure that
they are protected until they can form into larva, and then swim off on their own. – [Mark] They’re
quite strong, right? They’re like little Popeye, or– – They are super strong. Actually, you want
me to take it out of the little container here so you guys get
some better shots. I’m gonna gently reach
right down in there and pick it up. You ready? – [Mark] Here you go with
your little maneuver here. (dramatic music) – I’m gonna set it
down on the table, and pick it up
right from its back. Eeeee! See how they scurry like that? Oh, it’s unbelievably powerful. Let me turn it
like that for you. Look at the underside. Actually, you know what? Let me grab that leaf again ’cause now we can see it better that it’s out of the water. Oh, it’s so strong. So look at the underside
as compared to a leaf. Underside of the leaf, underside of the water bug. Almost identical, right? – [Mark] It’s really hard
to spot in the water. – Yeah. Here, look at the eyes. I’ll tilt it forward
a little bit. They actually have
really good eye sight. And those eyes reflect red if you shine a flashlight
into the water. That’s how you can identify
one of these insects. It’s trying to get me. It’s so angry right now. And you can see
on the back here, it has a joint that
allows it to move its head forward and backward. That’s how they can
drive that rostrum into their pray. – [Mark] You know, they do say
there’s a fine line between bravery and stupidity. Where does this fall? – This falls into
the complete realm of insanity, (Mark
laughs) I would say. Um, ugh, I still
remember the day that I was bitten by one. I mean, it’s incredibly painful. I mean, you guys
are gonna see me in unbelievable agony
here relatively soon. I’ve climbed the insect
sting pain index. And when it comes
to facing my fears of the two creepiest
crawlies in the bug world, bugs as a generalization, the giant water bug and the giant desert centipede are the two things
that just absolutely make my skin crawl. – [Mark] So in a
way this is not only going to be educational
and enlightening for all of us watching, but for yourself, this
is a way to move past any of those fears left
over from your childhood. – Yeah. This is for me, a true
moment of insane bravery. Insane bravery. (Mark laughs) Yeah. Oh, my poor toe. – [Mark] Give it one more look. – Oh man, this is craziness. Absolute craziness. OK. Oh man, I don’t know if I
can go through with this. (laughs nervously) – [Mark] You could just
like accidentally drop it, and you could scurry
back into the water. – Yeah maybe I throw
it up in the air, and it flies away. – [Mark] Yep. (dramatic music) – GoPro rolling. Water bug out of the container without being bitten. (dramatic music) Whoa, it is so strong. – [Mark] Good grip? – Good grip, good grip. (dramatic music) – [Mark] What do you say? Time to face your fear. – Are we ready? – [Mark] We’re ready. – Ugh! OK, here we go. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to be
bitten by the toe biter on my big toe. Here we go. One, two, three. (screaming in pain) Get it back in the container! (screaming in pain) Oh, it is just as
bad as I remember. (moans in pain) (screams in pain) Oh, that is worse than a sting. (moans in pain) (pants in pain) – [Mark] Dude, you are bleeding. (Coyote screams in pain) – I hope you guys got that shot. – [Mark] We got it. (Coyote moans in pain) – [Mark] I think
you got it too, man. Your toe is messed up. (Coyote moans in pain) – This guys, this is
worse than a sting. (moaning in pain) Let me put my foot
up here on the table. Oh sorry guys, I knocked the
whole thing of water over. It almost got away. – [Mark] Here, I got it. – OK, look at my toe. Now, the rostrum
went deep enough in, right at the tip there, to draw blood. And I also was just squeezing
it as much as I could, trying to get the saliva out. And there wasn’t a lot
of saliva that went in, but man, did it just
scream in pain immediately. Ah, my foot is throbbing. Ow, ow, this is like, ow. This is like dropping
a brick on your toe. Argh! I can’t move my toe. Ergh! (moans in pain) Wow. Oh gosh, that really hurts. That’s really bad. That’s really,
that’s really bad. Ow! – [Mark] Does it still hurt? – Oh man, it walloped me. I could feel that rostrum
go, whoosh, into my toe. Deep enough to draw blood. – [Mark] Wow. – A lot thicker and engaged than like the stinger of a bullet ant or a wasp. Man. Uh, hold on, let me go
walk around for a second. Oh man, my toe is throbbing. Man, it still hurts, but not
as much as the initial impact. – [Mark] Do you think
you got a full bite? – Yeah, I mean, it went in deep
enough to pierce skin. OK. OK. (moans in pain) Sorry guys, I’m trying
to stay composed here. Ow, my foot is throbbing. Oh man, my foot is
starting to itch. That is definitely one
way to face your fears. And the giant water bug
has terrified my dreams since I was a little kid. I spent a lot of time
out in the swamps, catching snapping turtles, and every time I jumped in, I’d wonder, is
this the next time that I’m gotten be
bitten by a toe biter? Man, that was just as
bad as I remember it. I’m sweating bullets right now. My foot is throbbing. I think we’re gonna
need to perform a little first aid on my toe. I gotta make sure
this is cleaned up. Obviously, I got mud and
stuff all over myself at this point, but. If you guys come across a
giant water bug in the wild, don’t try to pick it up. The bite is bad. If you’re bitten on your toe, maybe the bite is worse
than anywhere else. I don’t know. It is extremely painful. (breathing deeply) It’s really bad. It is worse than any sting I think that I’ve taken. – [Mark] It’s a
different kind of pain? – It’s a different
kind of pain, yeah. It’s like, man. I don’t think a lot of the
saliva got into my toe, but it is throbbing right now. It just feels like I
wanna take a rubber band and cut off the
circulation to my toe so I stop feeling it. OK, I’m gonna try to
give you an outro here. All right, guys, well, part one of facing my
fears, being bitten by the giant water bug, also known as the toe biter, has officially happened. Next up I’m going
to be bitten by the giant desert centipede, which is rumored to have the most painful bite in
the creepy crawler kingdom. I don’t know how I’m
gonna possibly go through with what that is, but stay tuned, guys. There is one bite left to come. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Oh man, this is really bad. – [Mark] Hold on, I’ve
got a first aid kit. – [Coyote] Since
childhood, I have feared the giant water bug
and its infamous bite. And I know you are wondering, was it truly as bad
as I remembered? Yes, yes it was. And there is
absolutely no chance I will ever be intentionally
bitten by one of these alien looking
insects ever again. When it comes to
bites and stings, it’s important to note that
there is a very big difference between the two, and often times it is the bites, especially the venomous ones, that hurt the worst. In the case of the
giant water bug, not only is the puncture
from the rostrum powerful enough to draw blood, but the digestive enzymes
that also enter the wound literally feel as if they
are melting your cells. (moans in pain) If you are an avid
wetlands explorer, and want to avoid being
bitten by a giant water bug, simply remember this advice. Always wear long durable pants
when wading in the water, and whatever you do, make sure that a good pair
of boots protects your feet. This way your toes
will never experience the painful bite of a toe biter. If you thought taking a bite
from the giant water bug looked painful,
make sure to go back and watch the episode
where I was chomped by a snapping turtle. Yeah, that one hurt. And don’t forget, subscribe so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (screams in pain) He missed the wood!

Top 10 Most DANGEROUS Insects in the world!

Top 10 Most DANGEROUS Insects in the world!


Bugs are a necessary evil in our world. They help pollinate our crops and ensure the
continuation of plant life for the Earth, but they can also be annoying to deal with
and sometimes creepy as hell. Even worse, some have a bite or sting that
can be painful or even lethal, which is obviously never fun. And the vast majority of insects are just
weird looking. From deadly venoms to nasty diseases, stay
tuned to number one to find out which insect carries a flesh eating toxin. Number 10: The Hemiptera Hemipteras, also known as “kissing bugs”,
are big fat bugs with huge tube mouths. They suck on tree bark to get nourishment,
but also suck on animals to get their blood, and that’s not creepy, right? Their tube-like mouth allows them to dig in
deep and get the enzymes and nutrients they need to keep living, so they can keep doing
this to other plants and animals. No one is really sure if these insects have
any use to the world and, based on what I can see, Im going to guess they don’t. More importantly, their sucking can spread
the deadly disease Chagas. Chagas is a nasty sickness, which develops
slowly, over the course of up to twenty years, leading to heart disease and malformation
of the intestines. You won’t die quickly, but you may not see
any symptoms of the disease for decades, when it’s unfortunately too late for treatment. Thanks, Hemiptera. Number 9: The Assassin Caterpillar This thing literally looks like a crawling
thorn bush. With the appearance of a caterpillar covered
with pine bows, the assassin has deadly venom in every branch. The worst of it is, the victim will barely
feel a thing as they brush up against it. You can bump this thing, not even know it,
and get infected. They look really cool, too, which is part
of their danger, as the enticing little devils make you want to pick them up. Unfortunately, the venom of the assassin caterpillar
causes internal bleeding and messes up your body’s ability to clot external wounds. Victims have been known to bleed from any
orifice, along with tons of internal bleeding. The victim’s body simply can’t stop bleeding,
causing an eventual death. Not a good way to go out: death by touching
a prickly pine tree caterpillar. Number 8: The Black Widow Spider Found mostly in the southwestern United States,
the black widow spider is one of the most famous dangerous insects known around the
country. It’s not the kind of fame you want, when you
think about it, though. The Black Widow’s bite can cause inflammation
of the bitten area, as well as respiratory problems. The bite also hurts like hell, not surprisingly. On the plus side, very few people die from
its bite, as the rate is only about one percent annually. The black widow is not very aggressive, and
is only know to attack when it feels threatened. Accidentally step too close, however, and
watch out! Another positive is the giant red hourglass
on its belly. If you see that shape on a spider, you know
it’s a black widow and you should avoid it. That makes things much easier than some other
bugs on this list. To be honest, if you see a spider of any kind,
it’s probably just best to stay away. Number 7: The Africanized Bee Famously known as “killer bees”, and for good
reason, Africanized bees are known for their painful sting and their gigantic appearance. These behemoth bees are known to be very aggressive
and will attack in swarms, basically guaranteeing your death. They will attack for any perceived threat
to their hive, so do what you can to avoid their near-invisible hives whenever you can. If you do piss off these deadly bees, strap
on your running shoes and get the hell out of there, as Africanized bees are known to
chase victims for up to a quarter mile. Although, if you’re with a slower friend,
you’ll be fine. To learn more about Africanized bees and their
impact, check out our video on the Most invasive Animal Species Introduced By Humans! Number 6: The Fire Ant Fire ants look similar to your typical ant,
except for a red appearance and a terrible bite. Their sharp teeth can dig deep into the flesh
and cause an awful pain that results in swelling and inflammation. You wouldn’t think that a tiny bug could pack
such a crazy bite, but unfortunately, these guys can. Some people are allergic to the bites and
can die from the allergic reaction, brought on from the bite of this tiny red ant. Fire ants are known to attack in swarms when
threatened, so don’t go provoking these tiny red monsters. As if avoiding these things isn’t tough enough,
flood waters can complicate things greatly. Fire ants are very skilled survivalists and
will literally form a floating boat of themselves when flooded out of their home. It’s creepy, to say the least but also strangely
cool looking at the same time. Number 5: The Bot Fly. This little bug looks pretty cute, actually. Nothing to worry about here, right? Unfortunately, this guy is known for its sneak
attack. The Bot Fly will lay eggs onto a mosquito. Then, the mosquito bites its victim. Then the eggs go into the victim. Then, a new baby Bot Fly emerges from the
victim. That is some ridiculously disgusting horror
movie crap, right there. The Bot Fly itself doesn’t typically bite
a person, but its process of procreation is just sort of terrifying. The victim becomes the host for a new Bot
Fly to be born, which I would hope is undesirable to most sane human beings. Just avoid all mosquitos in order to avoid
Bot Flies emerging out of your skin. Number 4: The Locust. Locusts may be famous from their starring
role in the Bible, but they are still around today. Related to the grasshopper, Locusts are long,
thin and creepy little bugs that can swarm around and generally look as menacing as any
other bug on the list. They have been known to appear in nearly any
area across the globe, so you’re never totally safe from these things. These little monsters don’t directly hurt
humans but can still be amazingly deadly due to how they attack plant life and crops. Locusts eat plants: lots of them. They swarm into an areas and decimate the
landscape, eating every green thing they can bite into. This can quickly lead to deforestation and
death of crops. And when this occurs, especially in poorer
nations with fewer resources, the food supply is killed off. No more plants means no more food, and starvation
overtakes the region. Without biting a single human, millions can
be killed, all because of a hungry little grasshopper. But hey, they generally don’t attack humans
directly, so that’s kind of a plus, I suppose! Before we move on, tell us what you think
of these insects in the comments below and take a moment to subscribe! Number 3: The Tse Tse Fly. Another fun little demon, the Tse Tse Fly
is not known for the vengeance of its bite or sting, but rather its aftermath. The Tse Tse Fly very commonly carries the
disease trypanosomiases. This illness, also called “Sleeping Sickness”
is known to mess with a person’s circadian rhythm and nervous system. Over time, the victim will have issues with
sleeping, develop neurological disorders and fell generally ill all the time. Tse Tse Flies are found in Africa more than
anywhere else, and trypanosomiases has been known to kill up to 250,000 people annually
throughout the continent. Of the twenty three types of Tse Tse Fly,
only six will transmit the disease. But still, that’s six too many to consider
this little bug a safe one to hang around. Symptoms can go unnoticed for months until
suddenly major health issues kick in. Nothing quite like having a deadly disease
just waiting for the right time to pounce on you, right? The Tse Tse Fly doesn’t offer a painful bite,
but it can be a deadly one, so do what you can to avoid it, obviously. Number 2: The Mosquito. Surprisingly, or maybe not, the mosquito is
one of the most dangerous insects on the planet. Just like a few others on the list, it’s not
the bite itself, but the spread of disease from the bite that can get you. Depending on the region, mosquitos are known
to carry all kinds of disease, most commonly Malaria and West Nile Virus and Lyme disease. One bite from a mosquito could cause a bit
of irritation but also the contraction of a deadly disease. Mosquitos breed by the millions. These guys stake out a warm spot in stagnant
water and lay as many eggs as they can, creating massive droves of blood-thirsty monster bugs. Couple this with the illnesses available in
the water itself, and you have the perfect recipe for cultivating disease. They spread throughout an area, biting every
warm-blooded creature they can find in order to stay alive, which is, ironically also another
source of the tons of disease they can carry. Suffice it to say, it’s best to bathe in bug
spray before going out to the lake. Number 1: The Asian Hornet. Three inches long. Three! The Asian Hornet will grow to a massive three
inches, so don’t worry about mistaking it for something else. This finger-length devil-spawn is incredibly
deadly, releasing eight different chemicals with its sting. One of the chemicals is known to dissolve
human tissue, which is just as awful as it sounds. Another one of these chemicals is even specifically
used for attracting fellow Asian Hornets to the victim so everyone in the family can enjoy
the feast! The other six chemicals have their very own
horror stories, so rest assured that any and all of them are terrible. If you want to keep all of these terrible
chemicals outside your body, stay away, just stay far away, from the Asian Hornet. Tell us about your encounters with insects
in the comments below, and thanks for watching!

How Does Bug Soup Become a Butterfly?

How Does Bug Soup Become a Butterfly?


You’re probably familiar with the basic
life cycle of moths and butterflies: an egg hatches into a caterpillar, which becomes
a pupa, which then transforms into a fully-grown moth or butterfly. But that transformation isn’t easy: if you
sliced open a pupa at just the right point, you’d find nothing but bug soup. Caterpillars grow the beginnings of their
adult body parts before they even hatch. They have these tiny clumps of cells called
imaginal discs spread around their bodies, and during metamorphosis, each disc develops
into a different part of the adult butterfly or moth. When a caterpillar becomes a pupa, it releases
enzymes that dissolve almost all of its tissues. Only the imaginal discs, plus certain muscles
and portions of the nervous system, survive. The rest of its body basically melts into
goo. This protein-rich slurry helps fuel an explosion
of new cell division, as the imaginal discs grow into full-fledged wings, eyes, and legs
for the adult insect. But even though they almost totally dissolve
and rebuild themselves from scratch, adult moths /can/ actually remember things from
when they were caterpillars. In one study, researchers gave mild electric
shocks to tobacco hornworm caterpillars, a type of moth, while exposing them to specific
smells. After metamorphosis, the adult moths still
avoided the smells they’d learn to associate with unpleasant shocks. So at least some of the caterpillar’s brain
seems to stick around through metamorphosis, even as most of its body dissolves. Even though metamorphosis is a complicated
process, we know that it’s helpful for insect species. The total rearrangement of body parts means
that adults and young can rely on different food sources. Usually caterpillars eat leaves, while butterflies
and moths specialize on nectar. Preventing different life stages from competing
for the same resources gives these insects a big evolutionary leg up. We’re still not entirely sure how metamorphosis
evolved, though. One theory, which has since been discredited,
suggested that metamorphosis became a thing when an insect that flew and an insect that
crawled happened to mate. Instead, it probably evolved gradually from
less-complicated forms of development. No matter how metamorphosis evolved, it does
make moths and butterflies super hardcore. They might look delicate and pretty, but those
critters dissolved their own /bodies/ and survived. Thanks for asking, and thanks especially to
all of our patrons on Patreon who keep these answers coming. If you’d like to submit questions to be
answered, or get some videos a few days early, go to patreon.com/scishow. And don’t forget to go to youtube.com/scishow
and subscribe!

Termite control by using neem leaves Kannada BAIF Karnataka

Termite control by using neem leaves Kannada BAIF Karnataka


Management of Termite Insect Farmer: Dharmaraj Buddini
Village: Tumarikoppa, Kalghatgi Block, Dharwad District Karnataka Namaste! I am Channabasakka. I am from Begur village, Kalghatgi taluk. I
am working as a CRP with BAIF, under Digital Green’s project. Namast! Kindly introduce yourself. My name is Daramraj Buddini. I am from Kalghatgi taluk, Dharwad district. We are 5 members in the family and have 7 acres of land. In these 7 acres, we sow cotton in 1 acre, soybean in
2 acres and the in remaining land, we sow paddy. We have two bulls and one buffalo This day, what information are you going to give to our farmers? Today, I will demonstrate a bio-pesticide preparation, to manage termite infestation. Due to termite infestation, what kinds of problems do you face in the fields? When we sow cotton seeds, termites attack cotton
plants and cotton does not grow. The growth of cotton plants is hampered and does not
revive, even after excessive cow dung manure doses. Termites also infest our wooden farm implements. Termites attack paddy straw, (that’s kept for drying), vermicompost pits,
dried dung manure and affects soil vitality. Termites hinder normal growth of plants. Termites also eat up the mango tree trunk as well! What are the materials and ingredients required to prevent termite attack? 1 Kg. Honge leaves (Millettia pinnata or Pongamia pinnata ) 1 Kg Neem leaves (Azadirachta indica) 250 ml castor seed (Ricinus communis) oil 20 gm of soapnut powder (Sapindus saponaria) or Ritha on Hindi. 3 liters water So far, you explained the ingredients required. Can you please
demonstrate the steps and preparation method as well? Boil 3 liters of water and pour 1 Kg honge leaves
and 1 Kg neem leaves into boiling water. Once you add both neem and honge leaves into 3
liters boiling water, stir it intermittently. Keep boiling this mixture, till the water in the vessel is reduced
to half, that is from 3 liters to about 3.5 liters. Now neem leaves annd honge leaves extract, castor oil and soapnut powder
have mixed well. This solution is ready to be sprayed. If you look, the water has evaporated and only
1.5 liters of water is remaining. Now, filter the content into a separate vessel, using a clean cotton cloth. After the solution cools, mix 250 ml of castor oil. Now add 20 gm of soapnut powder and mix thoroughly. Castor oil does not mix well with water. Soapnut powder helps in
through mixing of oil and water, due to its soapy property Stir well, until soapnut powder blends with oil and leaf extract misture. Method of Spraying Take 20 ml of honge, neem extract, mixed with castor oil
and soapnut powder. Add it to a sprayer can. This cup measures 10 ml. Add twice, to make up to 20 ml bio pesticide mixture. Add 1 liter water to 20 ml bio-pesticide mix. Tightly cover the sprayer, with its lid. Spray this mix, where ever there is termite infestation. This is how you need to spray. You explained and demonstrated, how to manage termite infestation in the fields. On behalf of our farmers, BAIF and Digital Green, I thank you. Thank you Facilitator: Channabasakka, Begur village, Kalghatgi Taluk. Camera Person: Renulka Ghatge, Tumarikoppa, Kalghatgi Taluk. Supported by: BAIF Karnataka and Digital Green

‪Do Social Insects Share Brain Power?‬

‪Do Social Insects Share Brain Power?‬


♪ MUSIC ♪ SEAN O’DONNELL: Brains are expensive. The field of neuroecology explores how brains develop and evolve to match the challenges animals face. One compelling idea in this field is that living in societies places special pressures on animals. Dealing with social competitors and even forming alliances can require a lot of brain power. This idea, called the Social Brain Hypothesis, is well supported for vertebrate animals, ranging from fish through birds to mammals. Species with more complex social interactions tend to have larger brains or larger brain regions that process complex information. Many researchers suspect that the human brain is actually a product of social brain evolution. The way our brains work has a lot to do with the way we interact with each other and our human brains may have evolved along with human societies. But social behavior is not unique to humans or even other vertebrates. In fact, insect societies are some of the largest and most sophisticated on earth. So my lab set out to test for social brain patterns in social insects. We chose wasps as subjects because related species of wasps range from solitary living through simple groups to some of the largest and most complex colonies we know of. Did insect brains increase as sociality evolved? The answer was a resounding no. In fact, the opposite was true. We found that investment in key higher brain regions actually decreased going from solitary to social species. So why are insects so different from vertebrates? We suspect the answer lies in how insect societies form. Most vertebrate societies are groups that include non-relatives, whereas most insect colonies are a single family of cooperating close relatives. Wasp colonies, for example, support the reproduction of one or a few mother queens, and colony members’ interests are often tightly aligned. So if colony members can communicate and rely on each other, perhaps the need for individual brain power is decreased. It’s as if the insects that cooperate in colonies have shared brain power, so even though individual wasps may be less brainy than solitary individuals, the colony as a whole may be smart together. We call this the Distributed Cognition idea. It’s a sign that there’s more than one way for complex societies and intelligence can evolve together. And if this finding holds true with other kinds of social insects, it could reshape our assumptions about the evolutionary connections between brains and behavior. ♪ MUSIC ♪

Insects: White Pine Weevil, 4-H Forestry

Insects: White Pine Weevil, 4-H Forestry


– [Narrator] The next insect
is the White pine weevil. Again, another weevil. This one is distinguishable
from the pales weevil because of the two white blotches near the rear end of the insect. These are distinguishable. You can see these if you’re
using your magnifying glass. Also the snout, you can
see the snout there, is really skinny and it’s very long compared to the pales weevil. Those are your only two characteristics between the adults to tell them apart. It has a really skinny long snout and it has those two
white patches right next to each other on the
rear end of the insect. The damage for the white pine weevil occurs in the shoots and in the leaders. It may look similar to the
damage of the pales weevil. The pales weevil’s in the
stem of young seedlings and the white pine weevil
is gonna be in the shoots and in the leaders. You can see where they bore
in, there’ll be little holes and splits where the
larvae bore in and feed in these shoots and stems. And that’s the white pine weevil.

Insects Porn Director – Mini-Mocks

Insects Porn Director – Mini-Mocks


– When a beetle has
sex with a beetle, is it still considered
doggy style? I’m Jordan Mendoza, and
I direct insects porn. Take it out and put it back in. Sexual taboos reminds us of
where our ethical edges are. It’s standard human psychology, the more forbidden something is, the more you want it,
and I direct just about the most forbidden nasty
stuff in the world. Grab her by the exoskeleton now. I came up with the
idea when I realized everyone was doing big
boobs, big ass porn. I thought, what if
I did the opposite? Classic lady on lady action. It’s all about
finding your niche, and sometimes your niche is
about the size of a worm hole. It’s casting day. When I told my
family I was trying to break in to the
insects porn industry, they were absolutely disgusted. So I said it more
slowly, insects porn. And then they were
only mildly disgusted. Take nine. You might think
attracting new talent would be difficult,
but it turns out they’ll work for free
as long as you feed ’em. And I do try to cater to
a variety of audiences. I’ve got dung beetles
for ass people, public exhibitionist stuff, and, of course, your
classic water sports. Yes, of course I’m concerned
about disease transmission, but all of our talent
has been tested for malaria, so
no problem there. Cameras are rolling, okay? Insect porn stars have
incredibly short-lived careers, but they make for
great collectibles. There’s Daddy Long Schlong,
star of Hairy Arachnid Milfs. We’ve got Riley
Roach, Tori Thorax, and, of course, Antenna Jameson. We’re even dipping our toes
into the live cam bug arena. Oh (bleep), I think
this bug might be dead. Like with any normal porn
set, clean up can be an issue, but ever since I got Rick on
payroll, it’s been a snap. This guy is a cunnilingus king. Oh, also, all these
bugs are step siblings. (light guitar music)

Amazing Insect Camouflage in Nature | Bugs, Insects & Spiders | Love Nature

Amazing Insect Camouflage in Nature | Bugs, Insects & Spiders | Love Nature


To avoid the keen eyes of predators these wonderbugs have
become masters of disguise. (gentle music) A six inch stick insect
gingerly makes its way to the end of a twig. If it weren’t for its movement, it would be almost impossible to discern. Made of chitin, insect
exoskeletons can take on any shape, color, or texture. Looking like a dead stick is apparently a very successful option. There are more than 3,000 different kinds of stick insects in the world. Each with a slightly different
interpretation of a stick. (dramatic music) Just another stick in the forest? No, it’s a grasshopper. When not feeding, this
four inch South American horsehead grasshopper
stands absolutely still. Like stick insects, it’s
opted for the stick disguise. A case of convergent evolution. There are nearly 200 species
of these stick grasshoppers in South America that
look almost identical to the unrelated stick insects. It’s bizarrely elongated
head adds to the disguise and helps confuse predators. When is a leaf not a leaf? When it’s a katydid. Invisible when still. When it does have to
move it tries its best to look just life a leaf
blowing in the wind. In the dense undergrowth of the jungle, there are just so many
options for camouflage. Leaves, twigs, and flowers abound, of all shapes and sizes. But don’t be fooled,
this too is an insect, hiding in plain sight. It’s a leaf insect, one of
elite masters of disguise. Covered in the same intricate pattern of veins as real leaves. It’s another example
of convergent evolution with the leaf-like katydid. Eventually real leaves shrivel and die. But this just adds to
the options for mimicry. A dead leaf mantis wafts
gently in the breeze. To complete the disguise
the bug’s flattened thorax looks like a leaf that’s going moldy. And that’s even been nibbled on. It’s wing cases look
like curled up leaves, complete with veins. This extraordinary
deception enables the mantis to hide from those that would eat it. But it too is a predator, all mantids are, and their disguise sets them
up for the perfect ambush. (dramatic music) Here an orchid mantis sits exposed, looking like a flower. And rocks in the breeze
to complete its disguise. Evolution has perfected this
mimicry to such a degree the mantis even reflects
ultraviolet light. Copying the way real
flowers attract insects to feed on their nectar. But lurking beneath this cloak of deceit is a ruthless hunter licking its chops. (dramatic music) When it’s finished there’s
not a scrap of evidence left to betray this lethal bloom. We know there are millions
of species of bugs out there. But how many more are
waiting to be discovered, hiding in plain sight?

Magnetic Termites: Leading You Out of the Australian Outback

Magnetic Termites: Leading You Out of the Australian Outback


Hi Guys. I am Trisha with Insectopia here to talk to
you about magnetic termites. These termites build tall mounds that some
people say bear a resemblance to headstones. They build them in plains and they all face
the same direction. Mostly North-South, which is where they get
the name magnetic. But why in the world would they build a mound
that is 9-12 feet high with a North/South axis of 7 feet, and an East/West axis of only
3 feet? The leading hypothesis for their North/South
orientation is, temperature control. In the early morning the termites spend their
time on the east wall to warm up. By noon, when the day is hottest and the sun
is directly overhead in the Australian Outback, the termite mound is thin so the mound does
not have a large amount of surface area that the sun can heat. As the day is ending, the mound can pick up
enough heat to make it through the night. How does this help you? Well, now with the knowledge that the termite
mounds are built North to South. The next time that you are lost and wandering
around the Australian Outback and you run into one of these mounds, you will have a
50/50 shot at picking North instead of walking around completely lost. Before we dive into this mound, I want to
clear up a common misconception. Termites are eusocial cockroaches. Let’s try to clear this up a little, termites
are a kind of cockroach and are closer related to grasshoppers, praying mantids, and walking
sticks than they are to ants. This has to do with termites having an incomplete
metamorphosis and ants having a complete metamorphosis. Now, let’s look inside of this mound. In each mound there are varying ages of individuals
from eggs to adults and the individuals are specialized for different jobs. These special groups of individuals are called
castes. The 5 castes are: queen, king, soldier, worker,
and reproductive. The life cycle of a termite mound goes something
like this: The queen lays every egg in the colony and
is the mother to every individual in the colony other than the king. The eggs are cared for by the workers. In fact, the workers do all of the hard work
in the colony. They clean and repair the nest, gather food
and water, care for the young, construct the tunnels and galleries, and control the numbers
of soldiers and reproductives by killing and eating them based on chemical cues. The workers are very busy. Every single worker in the termite mound is
a nymph and most of them will stay nymphs for their entire life. These insects never molt into adulthood! It is as if most termites live in Peter Pan’s
Neverland. The lucky few individuals that come into adulthood
turn into either soldiers or reproductives. The soldiers have large mandibles and it is
their job to protect the colony. The reproductives gain wings and will wait
around in the colony until the external conditions are right so that they can go on a mating
flight. On a mating flight, a reproductive female
and a reproductive male will mate and become a king and queen. They will land on the ground and shed their
wings. The queen will find an ideal location to start
a colony. At that point, it is the king’s job to tend
for the colony and the eggs until there are workers to do these jobs. The king will stay by the side of the queen
in her chamber for the rest of his life. The queen will become as large as a human
index finger and lay an egg every 3 seconds. She actually becomes so large that she is
no longer able to move or leave the chamber that she is in. The workers will carry the eggs to another
chamber and care for them. This is how the cycle starts anew. These are real life pictures of the magnetic
termite’s mounds. This is what a termite looks like in real
life. On the left you can see an egg on the right
you can see a worker. On the left you can see a soldier and on the
right you can see a reproductive. On this final slide you can see a queen. Thank you for listening! If you have any questions about magnetic termites
or a thought on which caste you would be if you were a termite, let us know in the comment
section below! Make sure to like, comment, and subscribe
for more videos like this one. I will be posting videos frequently. Come and check out our next epic insect tale.