You Wish You Had Mites Like This Hissing Cockroach | Deep Look


Is there anything more lowly than the lowly
cockroach? Uh, yeah there is. That’s a cockroach mite. It lives its entire life on this cockroach. But these hitchhikers are doing a lot more
good than you might think. The mites are only on one type of cockroach – these
guys – Madagascar hissing cockroaches… …which are known for their hiss, of course. They do that when disturbed or looking for
a mate. They only live in the Madagascar rainforest
on an island off the coast of Africa. And they’re bigger than the cockroaches
you might find in your kitchen, like these brown-banded roaches. These pests will eat anything: food scraps,
poop, trash – you name it. As a result, they can spread disease or trigger
allergies. Hissing cockroaches are detritivores – they
mainly eat decaying leaves, tidying up the forest floor. They can even be kept as pets, because they’re
more docile than their common cousins. And most importantly, they’re a lot cleaner
… thanks to a permanent population of tiny housekeepers. Ok, yeah, it looks pretty bad. The mites crowd together in the crevices – places
where the cockroach can’t brush them off. They get their meals near the cockroach’s
head, gobbling up the food bits and saliva that the roach leaves behind. When they get thirsty, they head to the spiracles:
the openings the roach uses to breathe. The mites get water vapor from them. The roach also has one special hissing spiracle
for that signature sound. The mites live on a single roach, unless they
get passed on from roach parent to roach baby. They’re doing these cockroaches a favor. By cleaning up the old food and debris, the
mites help keep them free of mold and pathogens … potentially extending the roaches’ lives. Really, both a hissing cockroach and its mites
have the same important job: keeping the world a little bit neater. Not so lowly, after all. Looking for more wild science adventures? Journey to Earth’s most remote laboratory
in Antarctic Extremes, a harsh, thrilling and hilarious new show from NOVA and PBS Digital
Studios. Hosts Caitlin Saks and Arlo Pérez reveal
a world where science and survival meet. Find the show on Terra, PBS Digital Studios’
new science channel. Link is in the description.

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Honey bees – Natural History 2

Honey bees – Natural History 2


Bees are called social insects because they
live and work together as a community. Thousands of female bees, called worker bees, live together
in a hive with a queen bee. The queen bee is marked with a red dot so we can see her
better. The worker bees are all females, but they
almost never lay eggs. Worker bees do almost all the chores in the hive. They gather pollen
or nectar, guard the entrance, clean the hive, build the comb, make honey, tend the queen,
and feed the larvae. They even fan the hive with their wings to keep it cool on a hot
summer day. The queen bee is larger than the worker bees.
She lays about a thousand eggs each day! Watch the worker bees attending to the queen bee
and feeding her. The worker bees touch and lick her as they tend to her needs. They get
a substance from the queen that they carry around the hive, and when they touch and lick
other bees, this substance, or pheromone, tells them that the queen bee is alive and
well. Then all the worker bees keep doing their jobs. The queen bee walks from cell
to cell to lay a small white egg in each one. She lays all the eggs.
Inside the cells, the eggs hatch into larvae or grubs. The workers take care of all the
larvae, which include several queen bee larvae. The worker bees take pollen mixed with honey
to feed them. The larvae eat a lot, but the pupae do not
eat at all. When the larvae are ready to turn into pupae, the worker bees close off the
cell with wax. Inside, the grubs pupate and metamorphose into bees in about 12 days. Pupae
use the stored up fat and tissue from the larval stage to metamorphose into adult bees.
Honey bees undergo a complete metamorphosis. After the pupae have changed into adult bees,
they chew their way out of the cells and start working! Watch the young bee crawl out of
the cell! The cells are also used for storing nectar
and pollen. Honey is made inside cells. Adult bees also rest in them.
If a female larva is fed special food called royal jelly, she becomes a queen bee. If not,
she becomes a worker bee. A new queen goes on her nuptial, or wedding
flight, a flight to mate with drones. Only a few drones, or male bees, live in each
hive. Thousands of drones from many bee colonies gather in one place. Queens fly there, too.
The drones mate with a queen bee. After the young queen has mated, she heads to the colony
where she was raised and becomes the new queen. The old queen and approximately half of the
workers leave the hive as a swarm, to find a new nest site.

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

A Tiny Wasp, with a Big Evolutionary Secret to Tell

A Tiny Wasp, with a Big Evolutionary Secret to Tell


[Ellen Martinson] So, our study was done with the jewel
wasp, nasonia vitripennis, which is a parasitoid wasp and that means that
they inject venom into other organisms that changes the metabolism of that
organism so that it becomes a good environment for their young to be raised in. [Jack Werren] Parasitoids are a vast group of insects. Estimates of the number of species in the world range from 100,000 to up as
high as 600,000 and they play a very important role in keeping other insect
populations in check. [Ellen] You don’t actually know the function of venom until it’s injected into another organism and how it changes that organism and so when we
study wasp venom we can see these very close knit interactions of two different
species and see how those interactions evolve over time. In the past, most people
have attributed new gene functions to duplication and neofunctionalization
and that simply means that you have a gene and a gene has a function and then
the genes duplicates it changes into a new function. But the problem with that
theory is that it’s very slow and then if we’re looking at the time scale
we see with this wasp venom we’re seeing that that is happening much, much, much
faster. For example, to two of the species that we looked at are relatively closely
related. So they separated from each other only about 1 million years ago and
40% of their venom repertoire has changed in just that relatively short
period of time and when we saw that we realized that it couldn’t possibly be
described by duplication and neofunctionalization [Jack] Primarily what happens is a non-venom single-copy gene gets recruited and evolves the new function. It’s sort of
like it’s taking on a new job. it’s like they’re moonlighting. They have a day job
and now they’ve got a night job and the night job is being a venom and then the
question is what then happens next? Maybe the night job is more lucrative
and the gene evolves to become a venom specialist. Some of these genes actually
maintain both functions and then we even found that in some cases when a venom
gene stopped being a venom gene it appears to be going back to its day job.
This co-option method because it’s exploiting an existing gene can in
principle happen more quickly and therefore we think that this may be a
common process when organisms are subject to strong selection in a
changing environment. [Ellen] Venom research has important implications in medical research because venom is basically composed of metabolically active
compounds so these are things that will go into another organism and change a
gene or metabolite and venom in the past has actually been developed into new
pharmaceuticals and drugs [Jack] It has a vast potential resource for new drug discovery, which basically has not been explored at all. So I think
going forward that’s probably the largest implication of venoms and
parasitoids to medicine

Bee waves at toddler that saved its life

Bee waves at toddler that saved its life


this is unbelievable
Abby has been filmed apparently waving at a toddler that saved its life nursery
school people Olivia hi I’m waved hello to the insect which she had just rescued
with sugar and water and was delighted when the insect appeared to return the
way it was the second time in three days the bee had been rescued by the
three-year-old and dad Sam – who were from Oswald whistle Lancashire young
Olivia was delighted and broke out in a massive smile when the bee lifted its
middle leg to wave right back at hear Sam 28 said it’s like she’s made a great
new friend and a couple of people have said it’s like a real-life b-movie it’s
really sweet on Thursday I went to pick Olivia up from nursery and we found this
B on the side of the road we picked it up and brought it home and fed it sugar
and water once it was up and running again we let it out in our back garden
Olivia loved it she was really invested in the bee and interested in helping it
I told her where are we giving it sugar and water to help it in she kept
repeating what I was saying then on Saturday morning she was outside
and she started shouting bee bee it was the exact same on we saw on Thursday and
he was not doing too well we brought it inside and gave it sugar and water again
and Olivia just started waving at it I was amazed when it started waving back I
thought I was seeing things Olivia was so excited and really loved
it when she saw the be waving back and carried on doing it it was a lovely
moment she looks at 4 bees a lot more now Darrell Cox senior science and
policy officer at the bumble bee Conservation Trust said it’s really
great to hear our future generation are so keen to help bumble bees there are so
many things you can do with children safely to further their understanding of
bumble bees and support this species

Parasitic Wasps – AskMDC


Today I’m going to talk about something
a bit gruesome, but interesting, nonetheless! The topic is Parasitic Wasps. See those little white things? They are the cocoons of tiny parasitic wasps
that have already devoured the caterpillar’s internal organs. Here’s what happened: A female wasp injected
eggs into the caterpillar some time back. The eggs hatched inside the caterpillar as
little grub-like larvae and then ate their fill of innards. Once they were ready to pupate, they exited
the caterpillar by chewing little holes through the body wall. Then they spun little silken cocoons on the
caterpillar’s back. After about 4 days, they will chew a neat
little cap in the cocoon and emerge as adult wasps. Many parasitoid wasps are considered beneficial
to humans because they naturally control agricultural pests. If you are a gardener and see one of these
caterpillars in your tomato patch, the best thing you can do is to leave it alone and
let nature take its course.

What Gall! The Crazy Cribs of Parasitic Wasps | Deep Look


Plenty of animals build
their homes in oak trees, but it’s another thing
entirely to get the oak tree to do all the work. To build your house for you. Say you’re an oak tree,
just sitting there minding your own business, when suddenly
this tiny wasp comes along. She says hey, why
don’t you build me a nursery for these baby
wasps I’m about to have? And then she injects her
eggs under your skin. You find yourself creating an
entirely new structure, one you would have never
built for yourself. What nerve, you
might say, what gall! And you’d be right. This thing, this parasitic
wasp house, it’s called a gall. There can be dozens of types
of galls on a single tree, each one built to order for
a specific species of wasp. They’re called
gall-inducing wasps, and each gall is weirder and
more flamboyant than the next. Sometimes the wasps
prefer a mobile home. This one is called
a jumping gall. It falls from the
tree and bounces across the ground like
a Mexican jumping bean until it finds a
safe place to hatch. As a protection
against predators, galls can taste
incredibly bitter, bitter like the bile produced
by a gallbladder. In fact, the earliest doctors
believed being bitter and angry meant an excess of
gall in the body. Anyway, back to our tree. Inside the gall, the
larvae mature and develop, and as they grow they
release chemicals that tell the tree
how to build the gall. The tree is tricked
into funneling nutrients into the gall to feed
the hungry wasp larvae. Scientists call this
a physiologic sink. For the larvae, it’s like
living inside a giant banana, an endless supply of food. But the peace and
quiet don’t last long. All that free food starts
attracting uninvited guests. That original wasp
itself becomes a host for another set of
wasps, called parasitoids. One study in the UK found
17 different wasp species living in one gall. But the oak tree? It does just fine, in most cases
unharmed by the tiny rivalries in tiny houses on its
branches and its leaves.

Brown-banded Cockroach (Female)

Brown-banded Cockroach (Female)


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Indian Cockroach


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