People Eat Bugs For The First Time

People Eat Bugs For The First Time


♫ I’m gonna eat some worms ♫ Long and skinny ones, ♫ Big, thick fat ones, ♫ I’m gonna eat some worms ♫ – This isn’t a real song. – It’s a real song! – Timon and Pumbaa used to eat bugs, and they turned out great. – Everyone’s had a bug
fly in their mouth before, so this is no different. – Ohh no!
– Ha ha ha! – Just think of of it
as like it’s popcorn. – It’s popcorn. – It’s popcorn, it’s popcorn. – Hakuna matata. (laughs) – The aftertaste is like a pistachio, but like, I don’t know,
that was a bad one. – Oh, the head came off. – I could see myself like drunk, just eating this whole thing. – It sounds like pretzel sticks. – This looks like something that will give you a tapeworm. – Don’t lick it. What are you doing, Keith? – Oh, don’t lick the bug. That’s not the right way to eat the bug. – For all we know, that could be peanut butter on the inside. – Arrrrgh! – I dig this. – It tastes like, a little
bit like a snap pea. – I like it, but if it was, like, gummy and like not an actual worm, but it was just like a gummy version and it was sour and it
had different colors, I think I would love it then. – I would much rather have
a plate of dead grasshoppers than a plate of live grasshoppers. That’s for damn sure. – Imagine if you just
saw that jump at you, like… – Hey! – Oh my God! (helicopter sound) – Do it! – Mm, pretty crunchy. – This also tastes like going to the vet. It tastes like that stainless
steel, animal sadness. – Not bad. – Bring it on over, what you got? – [Voiceover] Scorpions! – [Voiceover] Scorpions, scorpions. – Yo, isn’t this how Steve Irwin died? – Look at this little guy. This guy will hurt you. – I don’t know, oh, okay. – You gotta eat the stinger. – Yeah. – Oh, it’s so hard to eat. – Mmm! – Oh my God, wow, woah! – Woah, this is great! – Oh, ooh! I like it! So salty. This one’s amazing. – Mmm, It’s good! It’s so good!
– It’s so good! – It tasted like old sweat, right? – Scorpion king! You can call me. (laughter) – I legitimately believe, in the future, we’re gonna have to eat bugs, so… – I will do it then, like
then my tolerance will be like, I must survive. But right now I know we got some Cheetos. – I mean, I guess at the end of the day, what’s weirder, eating insect larvae or mushing together different chicken bits into dinosaur shapes? – That’s a good point. – [Woman] Oh my God! – [Man] Why did you make me do that?

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth | Deep Look


Pill bugs…… roly polies….. potato bugs… whatever you want to call them, somehow there’s something less creepy about these guys than other insects. More loveable, or something. Maybe it’s because they’re not insects
at all. Pill bugs are actually crustaceans. They’re more closely related to shrimp and
lobsters than crickets or beetles. Pill bugs even taste like shellfish, if you
cook them right. Some adventurous foragers call them wood shrimp. As early as 300 million years ago, some intrepid
ancestor crawled out of the ocean, sensing there might be more to eat, or less competition,
on dry land.” But unlike lobsters, pillbugs can roll up
into a perfect little ball for protection. If you look closely you can see the evidence
of where these guys came from. Like their ocean-dwelling cousins, pill bugs
still use gills to breathe. True insects — like this cricket — use a
totally different system. See those tiny holes on this cricket’s abdomen? They’re called spiracles. They lead to a series of tubes that bring
fresh air directly to the insect’s cells. But pill bugs don’t have any of that. To survive on land, they had to adapt. Their gills, called pleopods, are modified
to work in air. Folds in the pleopod gills developed into
hollow branched structures, almost like tiny lungs. In a way, the pillbug is only halfway to becoming
a true land animal. Because… they’re still gills. They need to be kept moist in order to work. Which is why you usually find pill bugs in
moist places, like under damp, rotting logs. They can’t venture too far away. Sure, pill bugs look like the most ordinary
of bugs. But they’re much more than that: evidence
that over evolutionary time, species make big, life-changing leaps. And those stories are written on their bodies. Hey, while we’re on the subject of oddball
crustaceans… check out this episode about mantis shrimp. Their eyes see colors we can’t even
comprehend. Their punch is faster than Muhammad Ali’s. And while we have you: Subscribe. OK? Thank you! And see you next time.