Protect Small Honeybee colonies from Robbing and predators Wasp VS Wasp?


okay so here we are on September 4th so it’s very late in the season and what you’re looking at is a box it’s the bottom box of a flow hive and we have a swarm in it very late in the season they’re gonna need every edge we can give them and we’re gonna have to feed these bees one of the things I want you to notice when we’re trying to help out the honey bees is first of all look at this wide entrance this landing board now this hive the bottom board is screened so there’s plenty of ventilation here but we want to give them another edge and that’s giving them a smaller area to defend the culprits of course are robbing bees and the notorious Yellowjackets very simple thing this is regular window screen and I just cut equal lengths of it and tripled it over here and we’re gonna fold it into a little V and just hand push it into this little opening now the flow hive bottom boards do not have the standard size entrance reducer openings they’re a little smaller so we’re just going to loose fit this in there and wasps for example the Yellowjackets can’t pull it out the only thing that’s going to move this would be a mouse or something trying to get in and we’re not worried about that and if it were moved we would know that there’s a mouse around trying to get into our colony here but what we’re trying to cut down on is the amount of effort that they have to put out to defend the colony and of course limit the access zone for the Yellowjackets which sometimes sneaked in on the far edges to either side it’s a small colony the swarm I suspect was about 3 or 4 pounds not huge but not terribly small I think their chances are really good because we’re still going into a pretty strong nectar flow here with the goldenrod the asters they’re getting pollen from a number of sources including sunflowers and this is a simple thing so we’re closing it in without shutting down ventilation we want them to stay cool today is 88 degrees Fahrenheit so now we’ve got about a four inch opening that they can very easily defend and they inspect the beads that are coming in from the field here and this is just a close-up to show you that our guards are doing their job pretty easily notice them grabbing and inspecting every bee that comes in this is a pretty good behavior for a newly captured and hived swarm so I’m pretty pleased with them I had no problems we have Acorn pre-waxed frames inside some have drawn comb if you want to keep your swarm from taking off put a frame of brood in there and they will not leave those developing brood and it gives them a good kick off they’re kind of have their work cut out for them here as we’re gonna run out of resources within the next eight to ten weeks and we’ll talk a little more about the pollen resources in the area but I’m also doing things to other beehives that I have in my apiary and I want to show you some of the landing board and entry differences and what we’re doing about Yellowjackets in the apiary you can hear my chickens in the background here they roam freely through the apiary and they collect bugs all day long and of course this hive is situated in the shade so that’s going to help them out too the blue spruce which is on our right here as we’re looking at the scene is where the swarm congregated and we clipped the branch off and then I put it right on top of the hive this is one of those beesmart design ventilated tops also which vents without allowing other insects to get in like the Yellow Jackets and even the bees can’t come in through the top and now we’re looking at the whole width of the board and the activity is pretty good so it’s good to see them already bringing in pollen which is interesting to me consider they really don’t have any place to put it unless they’re drawing out comb in record time now we’re looking at another standard Langstroth hive this is the landing board and we have not restricted the entrance that’s because there’s an abundance of bees this is an extremely strong colony of bees and they’re more than capable of defending their entrance from the full length of their landing board and there’s something you should notice they are doing deck washing here so if you look at the bees on the leading edge of the landing board they’re all kind of moving forward and going backwards they are licking every inch of the surface of that landing board now to the left you can see that they’re lined up like aircrafts and they’re flapping their wings as much as they can if you could smell it if you were in front of this hive you would notice that it is just heavy with nectar the honey is being dehydrated inside all of the colonies they’re bringing on about 2 to 3 pounds per day and hive numbers are great the health of the bees is fantastic and again you can see the abdomens in the foreground here of those that are doing the deck washing maneuver and you can just listen to it the air movement here is substantial right in front of the hive they really do a fantastic job of ventilating and again this is just a standard Langstroth hive design and notice how big the opening is here where we would normally put an entry reducer and real of course install that later on in the year when their numbers get down in the temperatures drop now we do see some of the drones moving around now we’re at the landing board of the flow hive 2 notice that it has a much smaller entrance we can’t fit standard entry reducers here but also notice that it has an aluminum bottom board cover so it is a ventilated bottom board and we have that plastic tray inside where we can do varroa counts varroa this year are extremely low we’ve not treated I’ve only been able to find one or two four row up per colony so they’re doing a fantastic job of keeping those under control on their own again we’re just showing a nice strong colony they don’t need to have their entrance reduced any more and now we’re looking at another flow hive this is the full size flow hive standard not the flow hive 2- and notice that I did restrict their entrance now we have wooden shims stuck in here and that’s because the bottom board of this colony of this hive is screened so they have plenty of ventilation inside we can pull out the insert and increase ventilation or we can push the insert back in from the back and reduce air circulation as needed so if you may recall if you’ve been watching my other videos these are the colonies that had the new Queen’s installed now this looks like a cast-off box but this is my ongoing experiment in my apiary I’m repurposing old bee boxes that I’ve had and you notice they have the vent holes and this is what I’m culturing in the bee yard this is a paper wasp so I decided early in the year since paper wasps don’t attack or harass the honeybees and I’ve never seen a bee hive being robbed by paper wasps I’ve also seen paper wasps driving off Yellow Jackets so it occurred to me if we install a paper wasp nest intentionally in the apiary then we would displace Yellowjackets and we could use wasps to repel other wasps so the beneficial wasps like these paper wasps wish you a terrific job in pest control are actually being raised by me right here in the apiary and I’m going to show you what their nest looks like here in a second but since they have no impact on the honeybees but do displace Yellowjackets my ongoing experiment is to see if increasing the numbers of paper wasps and providing them with habitat in close proximity to my honeybees would help reduce the numbers of the Yellowjackets and so far that has been working we have Yellowjackets everywhere in the environment this time of year and their numbers are extremely small here in my bee yard so let’s open it up I want you to see what they look like and just like managing bees you just move slowly I’m not smoking them I’m just gonna move slow and deliberate and show you what they’re like here I also want you to notice as they come flying out here listen to how quiet their wings are now they’re actually considering that I’m opening their nest and exposing them they really are not that defensive I am protected with a bee suit I’m wearing a ventilated bee suit because it is so hot today but I’m only wearing surgical gloves and I want to show you this nest they do have capped brood that’s what you see the white cottony looking pieces around the perimeter and there are a couple in the middle of the field here we’ll get you in closer so you can take a look and you can see that summer in the process of hatching we’re coming to the end of their hatching season actually so eventually the last batch that grows here we’ll all be queens and then they will go into the next season after wintering over in solitary locations around the environment so we’re just going to you put them back here again listen to them they don’t sound angry at all they’re very laid-back that doesn’t mean you can’t be stung by them you certainly can this is my experiment that I wanted to share with you and that is that I’m keeping them in the middle of my apiary they have had zero impact on the bees the bees don’t seem to pay attention to them they don’t pay attention to the bees they are not competing with the same they’re not competing for the same resources that the bees do although they do get some nectar they’re mostly pest control they do get some pollen but mostly their protein comes from other insects that they are feeding to they’re developing brood so I think having paper wasps like these in the bee yard is a very interesting method for kind of having a wasp versus wasp situation so that the Yellowjackets don’t have free reign I would never manage Yellowjackets like this they would just boil out and sting you anyone who’s had encounters with Yellowjackets knows that they’re extremely defensive I am within a foot of these guys and they are of course very much on alert but they don’t really consider me personally to be a threat so they didn’t really attack get getting you in closer here get a nice look at them I appreciate your comments down below if you have ever seen paper wasps used to displace Yellowjackets I’d like to know more about that from your personal experiences and I can say that this seems to be working out really well now listen to the difference in wing frequency that’s a yellowjacket flying by me and the paper wants just don’t tolerate it now we also have a large paper wasps nest inside my be shed and I go in and out of it and they don’t pay any attention to me at all I also have them in the eaves on either side of my bee shed again to prevent Yellowjackets from moving in so if I have to have wasps around I would say these paper wasps are at the top of my list for those that are passive towards people yet not passive towards other wasps and species now of course we’re out on the golden rod here and there’s another wasp he is not a great pollinator obviously they don’t have the fur that the bees have there none of those split ends that collect the pollen but this loss is actively getting nectar so not every wasp is a yellowjacket keep that in mind and let me know your thoughts thanks for watching

STUNG by a GIANT HORNET!


(intense music)
(buzzing) – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to enter
the sting zone with the Japanese Giant Hornet. One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. (suspenseful music) Oh searing pain! Absolute searing pain! (intense jungle music) (lion roars) There are moments
we have brought you on the Brave Wilderness
channel that the world will never forget. (grunts) Oh it’s stuck in my arm,
it’s stuck in my arm. (yelling and grunting) Then there are the moments that we know the
world is waiting for. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m about to
enter the sting zone with the executioner
wasp, here we go. But before we get there, first, I must face one
more horrific sting. Ah!
(grunts) The Tottori Prefecture is one of the most remote
stretches of wildnerness in all of Japan. And mysteriously hidden deep within it fog
covered mountains, a world of giants stalk
this ancient landscape. For days we searched in
every place possible. Yet much to our chagrin, it seemed as an encounter with
Japan’s most notorious insect would allude us. Then in our second to
last day in country, when it seemed as if
all hope was lost, the very encounter I
had been searching for presented itself in the
form of a giant hornet. (gasps) Hornet, hornet, hornet,
hornet, hornet, hornet, right there, right
there, right there, right on the edge of that weed, look at that, it’s huge, right there, right
there, right there. (suspenseful music) Got it, hornet! Hornet, giant hornet 100%. – [Cameraman] You caught one? – [Coyote] Yes, yes, yes,
yes, yes, hold on a second. Yes, right there, right
there, right there. – [Cameraman] Dude you got it. – Got it, hold on I’m
gonna put this Go-Pro down. – [Cameraman] Wow
that is a big hornet! – Where is it, where
is it, hold on. – [Cameraman] It’s right
here, it’s right here. – Right there, right
there, right there. Let me trap it up against
the front of the net. – [Cameraman 2] Where is it? – It’s tangled up
within all these plants. – [Cameraman]
Mario, look at that. – [Cameraman 2]
Where, where, where? – [Coyote] Look, look, look, it’s biting right
through the net. – [Cameraman 2] You
can barely see it. – Here let’s do this, I
gotta get it in the capsule. – [Cameraman 2] Let’s
get it in the capsule. – [Coyote] Hold on
a second, here, uh. – [Cameraman 2]
Do you need help? – Hold the end of that,
hold the end of that. Ah!
(mischievous laughter) Yeah you guys will be
able to see a lot better if I get it into here,
hold on a second. I don’t wanna get
stung through the net. Okay, opp. (suspenseful music) I almost got it. – [Cameraman] You’re
sure it’s a giant. – I’m 100% certain
dude, it’s huge, there’s no way this
is anything else. Look at it, it’s
biting onto the net. Probably chew right
through there if it could. – [Cameraman] Hasn’t stung yet. – Got it, got it, got
it, got it, got it. – [Cameraman 2] Let’s
take a look at it. – Look at that, that is it, yep. – [Cameraman] You got one! Man! – How about that right? Oh my goodness, look
at how big it is, my hand is shaking. – [Cameraman] How’d you find it? – It was just on top of
the plants, I saw it, it was about ready to
take off and I was like, (gasps) I don’t know if I got
the shot on the Go-Pro, just dropped it into the dirt, I just had to make
sure that I got it. I swiped down right on
top of those plants, got the plants, and got the
hornet at the same time. It is huge. Wow. I guess that’s why they
call it the giant hornet. Man, okay, well, we’re
starting to lose light, but we definitely still
have time to get the scene. Let’s hike back up this
way, find a flat spot. Yes! We have got the
Japanese giant hornet! Man! Ho yeah! (suspenseful music) There it is, the
Japanese giant hornet. And I would say the giant
is an understatement. Not since the tarantula hawk have we encountered a
more intimidating insect. Look at that beast. From its head to its thorax, down its legs, which end
in grappling hooked feet, and then of course, that
enormous pulsating abdomen. Everything about
this creature screams run in the other direction. Yet here we are, on the door
step of the executioner wasp. And what we’re gonna
find out today, is just how painful the sting
of this hornet really is. Now on the insect sting
pain index it only ranks as a two, can you believe that? On a scale of one to
four, this is only a two. Maybe its bark is
bigger than its bite. Or in this case I
should say its sting. Today, I’m going to be stung by the largest
hornet in the world. Alright, what we’re gonna do now is get a couple of
really cool B-roll shots, I’m gonna walk around,
address the Coyote Pack, and then, we’re gonna
enter the sting zone. (deep exhale) I am nervous. The Japanese giant hornet
is considered to be one of the largest stinging
insects in the world. This nightmarish creature is armed with a 6.25
millimeter stinger and it injects a venom
known as mandaratoxin in a high dosage that
can destroy tissue and attack the nervous
system of its victim. And while a single sting
is not likely to be deadly, over 30 people die
every year in Japan from taking multiple stings. (grunts) In most cases, these
deaths come as a result of anaphylactic shock. But no matter how
you break it down, this sting is
incredibly dangerous. (deep breath) That is a big hornet. That is a huge hornet. The biggest hornet on
the face of the planet. And I have a feeling
that the sting is going to be intense. Now it’s rumored that the sting
of this insect can kill you. Guys, a single sting
is not going to kill me unless I go into
anaphylactic shock. Now if you were to be
swarmed by 30 or 40 bees, and be stung repetitively, yes, there is a good chance
that you will die. Now I’ve also heard that
the venom is going to cook a hole in my arm. (deep breath) Not exactly looking
forward to that, but, it all depends on how my
body reacts to the venom. Everybody reacts differently, you guys have to remember that. So, I’m gonna go
through with this. I know a lot of you
are probably running to the comments section
right now saying Coyote you don’t
have to do this, you don’t have to do this, I do have to do this. We have climbed the
insect sting pain index, and this is the only
one guys, the only one that I think we just have to
find out how bad that sting is. It’s so big, it’s such
a dominant character throughout all of
Japanese culture, and certainly when it comes to
the insect sting pain index, I don’t think that we can
leave this stone unturned. So if you guys are ready,
I think the crew is ready. It is time to enter
the sting zone with the Japanese giant hornet. (deep breath) Here we go. (heavy breathing) Warning, never attempt to
recreate the following scene as a sting from the giant
hornet has the potential to be lethal. Alright guys, this is it, the moment that you
all showed up for. Now before we go
through with the sting, first let’s talk a little
bit about the safety. We do have an
epinephrine pen with us. Now a single sting from this
hornet should not kill me. However, like most stings, you can go into
anaphylactic shock. It just depends how your
body reacts to the venom. I should be just fine. I will experience
some pain, discomfort, potentially some pretty
extreme swelling, but I shouldn’t die
from a single sting. I do have my etymology
forceps with me, what we’re gonna do is get
the insect into the net and then I’m gonna
get it under control. Same way we’ve done all the
sting videos in the past, are you guys ready? – Sounds good, are
you ready to do this? – [Coyote] Here we go. – Alright. – Alright, net coming up. This is probably one
of the most risky bits, we do not want to
lose the hornet, and I do not want to
get stung too early. Okay I’m gonna
gently stand up here, put the basin of the capsule
at the bottom of the net, alright, and hornet is
going live inside the net. Let me get the platform out. Here we go, platform
is out of the net. And, come on guy, out you go. And, come on guy, out you go. Alright, hornet is out of
the capsule, there we go. (sighs) Okay, so I’m gonna
keep the capsule close, you guys know the
goal is to always get the capsule back
on top of the insect before it flies away, place that there
for just a second, and now it gets intense. I have to figure out the best
way to pick up this giant. I want to grab right onto
the back of its thorax behind the wings so
I have full control. Alright, you guys
got a good shot? Alright, I’m gonna slightly
have to maneuver myself just a little bit here. Ooo, it is not happening,
this is one angry hornet. Hold on, hold on, got it. (suspenseful music) Oh it’s turning,
hold on a second. (deep sigh) My hand is shaking. (grunts) Control your nerves Coyote,
control your nerves. My heart is racing a
million miles a second and I can’t keep my hand still, I’ll have grab onto
the insect, hold on. Ah, the hornet is actually
biting onto the forceps. (suspenseful music) Okay, I’ve got it, I’ve
got it, perfect hold, that’s what we want. (sighs) Wow, alright, everyone just
take a moment to soak this in, that is an enormous hornet. Look at its abdomen pulsating. You look at the mandibles,
those are used for chomping. I think I may also take a bite
during this video as well, which I’m kind of afraid of, and if you zoom in on the legs, you can see that they
have these little hooks, they almost look
like grappling hooks, and one thing that
also scares me there is the chance it’s
gonna latch onto my arm, and sting more than once. I can’t stop my
hand from shaking. I haven’t been this nervous
since the tarantula hawk. – [Cameraman] Sure
you wanna do this? – Yeah, there’s no
turning back now. Alright, you guys ready? – [Cameraman] Ready if you are. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
Japanese giant hornet. (suspenseful music) One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. One, two, here we go, three. (suspenseful music) (loud yell) Oh, the stinger’s
stuck in my arm. (loud grunt) (painful noises) – [Cameraman] How bad is it? – Oh man, wave of
dizziness really quick. (loud yelling) Oh, searing pain,
absolute searing pain. There’s where the stinger
went in right there, did you guys see how
slow the sting was? – I see blood. (painful yelling) Oh my gosh. (painful yelling and grunting) Oh my gosh. – [Cameraman] I know
it’s tough to describe, but you gotta
describe it for us. – Okay, okay, okay, okay. My hand is completely seized
up and locked in place. This is like the tarantula hawk, look at the swelling that’s
beginning to form on my arm, forearm is incredibly total, only about 45
seconds have gone by. – [Cameraman] Careful
not to go over this cliff edge by the way. Let’s move over there. – Back up, back up,
back up, back up. (painful yelling) – [Cameraman] You gotta tell
us if you’re in trouble. Are you gonna be okay? – When the stinger
went into my arm, I had this like wave, like a wave came over me
and I got super dizzy, almost didn’t feel
what was happening, and then the pain just
was like immediate, immediately searing. (slow motion yell) (grunting) – [Cameraman] Look at your
arm, oh my gosh, look at that, look at that. Wow, you are
swelling like crazy. He’s swelling up bad. (loud grunt) Hang on a second, let’s put a circle around
where the swelling’s at to see the progression of it. This is the outer, and then that is the immediate
right there. (loud grunting) – Oh man, not a two, far
surpasses the tarantula hawk. Far surpasses the
tarantula hawk. (grunting) Here, here, here, look at this, if I turn my arm sideways, look at the welt on my. (grunting) Okay, can’t touch near it, sharp shooting pain
if I touch near it. – [Cameraman] Wow. – Oh my gosh. – I [Cameraman] I can
see that your wrist is starting to swell, do you
wanna take your watch off? Need help? – I got it, I got it, I got it. Ah. (loud grunting) No relief yet. It’s just a matter of
harnessing the pain, controlling the level of pain, and, rolling around
on the ground and screaming at this point really isn’t doing me any good. Alright, let’s cut
cameras and come back in about five minutes. Let me get a drink of water. (suspenseful music) – [Cameraman] Alright man, well,
I can definitely see that– – [Coyote] Don’t touch it. – [Cameraman] I’m not,
I’m not gonna touch it. I just wanna show
everyone at home, the swelling has
completely gone outside of these initial marks, I mean, and I don’t think you’re
out of the woods yet, I think that’s gonna
swell a whole lot worse. Yeah, we are only 20
minutes in a this point. 20 minutes since that stinger went deep into my forearm. You can see the discoloration
in my skin there, the massive goose
egg that has formed, the venom has worked
its way up my arm. – [Cameraman] Can
you show us the lump, can you hold you arm up at all? Oh my goodness. Wow. – I’m sure you guys
wanna know how this feels as compared to some of
the other tops insects on the sting index. It blows the cow killer out
of the water, no comparison. It definitely trumps
the tarantula hawk. And we’re talking blood ant, I would definitely say that
at this point it is on par and in just one month, the episode you have
all been waiting for, the sting of the
executioner wasp will determine who the true
kind of sting really is. We’re gonna monitor this
sting for the next 24 hours, and see what happens, I can promise you this much, I’ve got a world of pain ahead
of me for the next few hours. Alright, let’s get an outro and get back down to
civilization, you ready? I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave, (sighs)
stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. Oh that was a bad one. (suspenseful music) The hours following
my brutal sting we’re some of the most
painful I have ever faced and my arm continued
swelling to nearly double its normal size. The trauma that my
mind and body endured, today seemed like a blur, yet when we look back, there is a strange
similarity to the scenario I faced with a bullet ant. Both insect’s stingers became lodged in my arm, and as a result they put me
with a higher dosage of venom than I had originally
intended to take. When I compare the
stings side by side, I am completely
honest when I say that the Japanese giant hornet is an overall more intimidating and overall more painful
sting than the bullet ant. Absolute searing pain. (grunting) – [Cameraman] You alright man? – Yep. There’s no question about it, through my personal experience, the Japanese giant
hornet ranks as a four on the insect sting pain index, and in this very moment, I consider it to be the most
painful sting in the world. But will it be able to
hold onto its prized title as the king of sting? Stay tuned, we all know,
what’s coming next. Hey Coyote Pack, are you excited for the
conclusion to my climb up the insect sting pain index? If so, learn more
about these thrilling and painful adventures
in my new book The King of Sting, it swarms into
bookstores November 27th, but you can preorder
your copy today. Look for the link in
the description below. And don’t forget, subscribe! Then click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on the next wild adventure. I’ve never seen this
species before guys, so we are actually going to
take it back to base camp, we’re gonna have
to look this up. (animal calls)

Honey Bee and Wasp Sugar Water Preferences Open Feeding What Bees Use First


okay so today is Friday the 13th in
October and what we have is an abundance of foraging bees and wasps in the air
and the resources are low so competition is high now what a lot of beekeepers do
is they open feed and they open feed a variety of different materials the most
popular is 50/50 sugar water and sugar like C&H pure cane sugar and what I have
here for this test and you’re looking at the time-lapse sequence here 50% so
that’s the 50/50 sugar water all the way to the right and this is by volume 25%
second from the right and 10% second from the left and 5% sugar water all the
way to the left and the water resource is the pure P U R filtered water that
we talked about before in the last test and turned out to be the water that was
preferred by the bees so this four minute time lapse sequence shows that
the bees really pile on the twenty five and fifty percent sugar water now sugar
and water together just provides the carbohydrate that the bees need to have
the energy to warm the hive and to forage of course
so by open feeding what we’re doing is we’re giving something for those
foragers to do plus they are bringing resources to the hive and they won’t be
attacking other colonies of honeybees hopefully if there were no resources in
the environment and as you can see in the background there the corn is dry and
ready for harvest there are very few flowering plants left so the stronger
colonies tend to converge on weaker colonies and raid them out and take
their resources so by open feeding you do two things you give those foragers
something to do and get their energy away from weaker colonies that may be
robbed out and you provide resources that will help them keep their hives
warm now the more water percentage there is compared to the sugar the more
dehydrating they have to do so once the imitation nectar here is taken into the
hive the bees have to dry it out and
condense it so that it becomes honey now you want to do this open feeding well
after you’ve taken honey off of your hives because you obviously don’t want
to be taking sugar water honey off as a resource for your own consumption so do
this after you’ve done your last harvest and so as you can see here the 50% 25%
are equally consumed by the bees they are just taking it down now I wish it
were backlit better so that you could see right now they’re down by 1/3 what
goes on is the bees are taking this all off in just a day so the entire cycle of
what you’re seeing in this video happens within a 24 hour period and the
time-lapse sequence is what I’m starting off with but if you’ll continue watching
I’ll get over some close-ups of the bees and some more discussion about what
other insects come to these feeders and again we’re using highly filtered water
this is from a well because my house is on a well so that’s pre filtered and
then I use the PUR filters that we get from Amazon I’ll put a link for that
in the video description I’ll also put a link to these drinkers that I use these
are 1 quart plastic drinkers and that’ll also be in the video description now what happened during the day of
course it warms up we started this sequence right after sunrise and the
bees of course the activity picks up after noon most foraging occurs late
morning early afternoon and here we are in the final sequences 10% 25% and 50%
are completely empty now and you notice that they’re concentrated all the way to
the left and look what is predominantly present here these are all wasps for the
most part the honeybees have already gone into their colonies for nighttime
protection and the wasps continue to forage well after sunset now for those of you who want to know
the exact weather conditions I decided to take a picture of my weather station
here and the sensor for wind we’re at 4 miles an hour we have 74 degrees outside
and 67% average humidity rainfall of course has been light for the whole
month we only have three point four four inches so this gives you kind of a base
for when I started and did this test I guess I could also if you’re interested
in this weather station I’ll put a link to that I got it on Amazon now for the
time lapse sequences I use the GoPro Hero 5 I just had that thing up on a
tripod right in front of all four the drinkers and set it for a shot every 5
seconds so here we are first one is 5 percent 5 percent sugar to water by
volume and if you notice the honeybees really didn’t care too much for that
overall we went to 10 percent they did show moderate interest in this but so
long as 25 percent and 50 percent sugar to water ratio was made available they
really heavily concentrated on that and here you see a mix of the honeybees
which are from my apiary I know some people get concerned and have made
comments in the past when I open feed that bees are coming from other apiaries
and we’re mixing potential varroa mites and things like that
well my bees are isolated we are at least five miles from the nearest
beekeeper in my area so for me open feeding number one I’m not wasting my
resources feeding other people’s bees and number two I’m really not that
concerned about contagions passing back and forth bee to bee while they’re
concentrated at these drinkers and this just shows again the GoPros setup so
here they are they’re concentrating to the Yellowjackets here in the foreground
lining up and now Yellowjackets even though they do raid beehives when
they’re all at an area like this where there’s an abundant resource they
congregate without attacking each other the exception to that though is and
you’ll see them in here see that bald-faced hornet which is really a
wasp but she’s on the right there kind of in the middle of the pack they show
up for nectar resources which is the sugar water but they’re also here to
attack kill and fly away with some of the smaller wasps they don’t seem to be
very successful against the honeybees but they are definitely here as dual
purpose predators one for the nectar and the second is to get some protein by
capturing a smaller wasp tearing it apart and bringing that back
to their nest site so by sunset this future percent sugar water was basically
empty and twenty five percent went down pretty much at the exact same rate I
think during this sequence we do still have some of the water in those
reservoirs and you can still see as the sun’s back lit twenty-five and fifty
percent are at fifty percent and the ten and five percent are down by about 20
percent now bees have to drink their food any
insect that you see that has that thorax and then the very thread thin
connection between the thorax and the abdomen meat protein isn’t gonna pass
through that so they can only drink now insects of different styles can handle
thicker liquid than others I hope some of you enjoyed those
slow-motion sequences they are a lower-resolution of course we will
improve on those at another time but these are cool in slow motion and here
we are again we’re just gonna continue to show the bees and wasps kind of
cooperating here at the drinkers now if you look closely there are a
variety of wasp species here and the ones when you see their abdomens and
they’ve got the yellow and black stripes going across them now we’re going into
nighttime so even though the video looks well lit this is actually after sunset
so what’s left at the feeders wasps so and wasps are not all the same I have
to tell you that you know like mud dobbers and some of the smaller
Yellowjackets woodland Yellowjackets they are pretty gentle to be around but
what we’re looking at here this nice large black and white one is what’s
known as a bald-faced hornet now they’re really just a wasp themselves but they
are really at the top of the food chain when it comes to wasps in our area and
some of them are here licking up the sugar water that’s remaining if you
notice all of these reservoirs are empty except for the 5% sugar water by now and
these boldface Hornets if you’ve seen my other videos I am NOT a fan of these
wasps they are really aggressive they can fly at night they navigate at night
they can squirt venom in your eyes they are just I don’t know what to say they
are a very very defensive and capable flying stinging insect and the cool
thing is here now that we’re after sunset and most of the honeybees have
gone to their hives you get to see on these reservoirs all these different
varieties of wasps and some of these again they’ve come from the woods some
of them are meadow some of them come from ground nests and
others are paper wasps there’s a honey bee real quick they’re like look at this
curious looking Los long and slender and they’re pretty docile I’m close to these
things they don’t have any protection on and they’re just pretty passive at this
point of course it’s cooling down it’s nighttime there’s a honey bee there on
the left but again as I said most of the honey bees have gone there’s a bee fly
there right in front of us that’s an imitator now I’m showing you my
bug-zooka this is what I use to collect sometimes Yellowjackets if they’re
really getting pesky I’m trying to work the bees but tonight
you know I just can’t let these boldface Hornets go so I’m gonna have to go after
them these are Yellow Jackets these are not my target species right now but I am
collecting bald faced Hornet so that I can look at them up close the bug-zooka
lets you catch things alive if you get something that you don’t want to kill
you can release it later after observation and for me in my case I can
photograph them but look at these different wasp species they’re really
interesting five percent the only thing that’s left
to drink from and you can see the honeybees are
congregated there to the right side of the screen these bees are staying kind
of grouped together and they’re gonna stay on these feeders overnight which is
interesting too now look at these boldface Hornets I
just can’t let him sit there look there you go taking them out with my bug-zooka
oh there’s another one she’s aggressive just you know they’re not like any other
wasp goodbye and these are what I would call you know passive friendly wasps
here those of you know your wasp species very well could chime in in the comment
section and share with all of us again it’s it’s fairly dark now don’t be
fooled by the exposure of the video camera that I’m using which makes it
look well lit we are well past sunset and of course these honey bees have
moved up underneath this brick to protect themselves from heavy dew and of
course the cold temps overnight in the morning they’ll find their way back to
their hives another bald-faced hornet got that one and there’s a bald-faced
hornet if you’ve ever had an encounter with bald-faced hornet so you know
exactly what I’m talking about they come at you like nothing else just look at
her going after all the other wasps that are just there to drink she is not a
friendly wasp when it comes to the drinking hole here yeah got you too! so we’re putting away
everything packing up the GoPro and of course here’s a little wasp on it very
timid you know we’re out here we’re not at their nest so keep in mind wasps when
they’re out of the feeding space are not defending that site so they’re very easy
to approach and here’s my collection for the evening a bald-faced hornet so i’m
gonna take these back and get some close-up photographs of them and again
my least favorite wasp I’ll put a link to the bug-zooka – if you’re interested
in that now here we are this is the following morning actually right at
sunrise it’s cold and it’s rainy and who’s out flying around the Yellow
Jackets Yellow Jackets have a huge advantage over the honeybee they fly in
colder temperatures I’ve seen Yellow Jackets flying around in 38 degrees
Fahrenheit and they are able to gather resources before the honeybees are even
out and about and if you look at the ones that have the abdomens with the
independent dots on left and right going down the back that’s a queen so this
time of year a lot of the Yellowjackets that are going out and about are the
newly hatched Queens that are gonna hope to winner over here because the
temperatures are getting colder and they’ll be the ones that will establish
new colonies in the spring of next year so they are definitely hungry for
carbohydrates thank you for watching this video I hope you got something out
of it and I hope you enjoyed seeing these wasps up close and what sugar
preferences the bees and wasps have thanks again

Two Giant Killer Hornet Colonies Fight to the Death


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: The Samurai scouts
bring news that there’s an army on its way. [BUZZING] They rally the troops. But it’s too late. The Bamboo Battalion is on them. The Rock Samurais are ambushed
at their own entrance. When times are tough,
giant killer hornets turn on their kind. It’s like on like,
giant on giant. Claws, stingers, and mandibles,
all weapons deployed and heads will roll. Disabling the enemy is
the primary strategy. Beheading and severing
limbs, the mandibles are the ultimate weapon of war. It’s impossible to
determine who’s winning until the pillaging starts. The marauding Bamboo
giants enter the fortress. They’re conquered
the Rock Samurais and they’ve struck gold. The precious nursery of
developing princesses is ransacked, next year’s
queens killed and cannibalized in their chambers. The sentry can do nothing
but witness the devastation of her precious family.

Hornets and Wasps can be VERY Dangerous Burning a Bald Faced Hornet Nest Dracarys


Night time is best for visiting hornet/wasp nests you can hear night insects this is a bald faced hornet nest there are around 300 insects in this nest you can hear a fire lighting off a torch is coming close crackle of brush testing the flame strength this is a propane flame thrower also known as a weed burner dramatic music begins the reason the nest doesn’t burn completely is that there are brood inside the cells brood are mostly water, so they dispell heat once you start burning a nest, it’s important to keep the fire going you may notice hornets flying around those are scouts and foragers that were not inside the nest during the burn it is important not to do this when grass is dry we have had lots of rain, so the surrounding brush won’t catch fire you can hear some crackling sounds note the scouts flying around already each colony has ONEqueen in the spring when nests begin, there is one hornet at first, that is the queen Queens are much larger than workers ants move in here right away this is a normal sized worker hornet buzzing can be heard going around the camera none of these workers were present during the burn they often spend the night out in the field and return during daylight that’s why it’s important to follow up any treatment for removal the white packets are brood it’s amazing that this much of the nest it left after burning they actually pull the bodies out of the six sided cells this entire nest is the result of one queen in spring now they are after me and the camera the slightest tap and you’re done! walk away, but do not run they will sting you anyway, but more stings result if you flail or swat at them the nest is uncovered, so they are more defensive than ever you can hear them butting into the microphone speed is reduced for detail they sound like small motorized aircraft you can hear night insects chirping it is actually dark hornets don’t see well but go after objects in low light starting off the fires again frogs are croaking on the pond propane flame thrower starting up again dramatic music is playing a woman’s voice laments the demise of the insects it’s generally a good idea to call professionals to deal with bald faced hornets though their sting is no more potent than most, they are definitely more defensive they are quick to attack near their nest all quiet now only insects and frogs can be heard night birds and bugs a few hornets can be heard flying around again, those were not in the nest during the burn over the next several days, only a few hornets returned and I collected them for study the nest was taken apart by a skunk or some other night prowler if they are not near people, leave them alone thank you for watching stay safe

STUNG by a YELLOW JACKET!

STUNG by a YELLOW JACKET!


(upbeat music) – [Coyote] Hold
on, oh it’s flying. Hold on let’s go back
towards the nest. No wait, wait, wait, don’t move. – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yes, yes. I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the yellow jacket. Here we go. (yelling) (upbeat music) Today we are headed out
into the suburban wilds of Westerville, Ohio to search
for any species of paper wasp which can be carefully
caught and ultimately used to give me a good
series of stings. Welcome to another
day in the office for Coyote Peterson. – [Mark] Coyote, are we doing what I think we’re doing today? – Oh yes, today is
yellow jacket day. Now you guys may remember
a little episode called, “The Bullet Ant Challenge” where I was stung
by a bullet ant. (yelling) And then a subsequent
video called, “Bullet Ant Kryptonite” where I used a product
called Sting-Kill to help alleviate the
pain and the itching. A Sting-Kill absolutely
loved that video and then they came
to us and said, “We’d love to work with you
guys and do a sponsored video, but let’s get you stung by something a little
more commonplace.” You know, not many people
are running into bullet ants. So they said, “What if you
get stung by yellow jackets?” Now we all know that
yellow jackets can be found at your local park, maybe you
see them in your backyard, sometimes they even
get into the house. We know they’re angry, we
know they’re aggressive, and people are often
stung every single summer. So what we’re gonna do today is actually build a bug vacuum. (record scratches) – [Mark] A bug what? – [Coyote] A bug vacuum. Bear with me here for a second. So you see this? I found this online, right? – [Mark] Looks pretty cool. – Right, the Extreme Bug Vac. But unfortunately, I
have one opened up here. This is supposed to
have a lot of suction, Mark put your hand out. – Yeah, no. – Pretty sure that’s not
gonna catch us any hornets but what I love about this
is the plastic capsule. Check that out. It’s got this little
revolving door and you are supposed to be able to suck a bug in
there, close it up, look at it through
the magnifying glass and then of course it’s
go a little screen, so that the insect can breathe. What I wanna do,
is actually take this capsule from the bug vacuum and Macgyver something
with a real vacuum. (vacuum sucking) Check out that suction. – Oh yeah.
– Yeah. – [Mark] Suction power there. – Oh yeah, that’s
gonna catch a hornet. But what I need to do
is reconstruct this, where I’m gonna
actually cut the hose and duct tape the
capsule in between. Then I’ll be able to use
this end with the nozzle, which has great suction power. And then I think
we’re gonna be ready to go out and start searching
for some yellow jackets. Oh I almost forgot, I am gonna mount the
GoPro on it as well. – [Mark] So where are we today? We’re in Ohio, right? – We are in Ohio. We’re actually
right in my backyard here in Westerville, Ohio. And I actually put
in a phone call and email to a number of my
different friends in the area and I said, “Go out this
morning and look around near the eaves of your house.” You know where the gutter
attaches to the roof? “And let me know if you
see any wasps nests, hornet nests,
yellow jacket nests, anything that looks
like a stinging insect, let me know and we may
come and investigate it.” So we’re gonna kinda
go on a little bit of a field trip today guys, until we can find ourselves
some good stinging bugs. – [Mark] Are we testin’ it out? (vacuum sucking)
– Yep. (vacuum sucking)
– Yep. I think it’s gonna work. – Last step. (Mark laughing) Now it’s like a proton pack. (Mark laughing) Oh yeah, this thing is awesome. Alright, well if
you guys are ready, let’s go try to catch
some yellow jackets. – [Mark] Let’s do it. (Coyote cheering) – Alright, well we might as well check the park
that we started at. Great structures here
for us to invest. You see that all these
eaves and overhangs, perfect place for paper wasps. – [Mark] Now why do paper wasps
like these under hangs here? – Well because it’s a
great spot to build a nest. It’s out of the realm of
predators and the rain. See anything yet? (mysterious music) There are eight known species
of wasps that call Ohio home. And many of them
can be encountered right in your own backyard. However, unless they
are intentionally or accidentally provoked, your odds of being stung
are actually very slim. Let’s go this way. – [Mark] Come on Mario. – Well it’s a fun
day at the park. – [Mark] Yep. – On the weekend. – [Mark] Should’ve
brought a soccer ball. What do you see? – [Mario] Did you see
something fly out? – I did, I think it
was a honey bee though. Now honey bees, you often
times see on clover. Let me see, there’s
one right there. Look, look, look, look. That’s a honey bee. – [Mark] European honey bee. – Yep. Now that is
not what we’re after. honey bees actually have
fur all over their bodies, whereas yellow jackets
are completely bald. Bees also have barbs
on their stingers, so when you get stung by a
bee, it’s stinger gets removed. If you get stung
by a yellow jacket, no barbs, so it can sting
you over and over and over. If I was looking for honey
bees, we’d be in the right spot. But unfortunately, yellow
jackets do not pollinate clover. Alright, let’s keep lookin’. (mysterious music) – [Mark] So why are we
looking at the ground now? I thought we were looking up. – That’s a good
question actually. Oh. That could be perfect, I
see some ants in there. A lot of times yellow jackets will actually build
their nests underground. So if you see something
that looks like a mole hole, just respect it
from a safe distance because it’s possible
that yellow jackets have built a nest in there. A cavity in a tree like
this is also fair game. But there’s nothing
in this tree. Not sure we’re gonna find
anything in this park, guys. Might be time to
take a road trip, see where else we can
look for yellow jackets. You ready? – [Mark] The bug suckers
are hittin’ the road. – Oh yeah, vroom vroom. (upbeat music) Well it is 12:43, which means
it’s officially lunch time. And we have a new plan. – Searching for the
yellow jackets ourselves is not exactly
panning out very well. We found some nests
that were vacant, we found some honey bees,
and some bumblebees. But we haven’t found the
infamous yellow jacket. What we’re gonna do, bear
with me here for a second, is actually have a picnic. Because often times,
if you think about it, yellow jackets show up
when you’re at a picnic. So I’m thinking if we get some
soda pops and some ice cream, we hang out in the sun,
maybe these stinging insects will come to us and
we will then be able to use the Bug Sucker 5000 to
just sit there and just go, vroom, and suck ’em up. Give me this, I’m gonna go look
in the garbage can right now and see if there
are any hornets. Guys, we are really lookin’
hard for these hornets but you know what, they
empty their trash a lot. Check this out. There’s like nothin’ in there. Can’t exactly find hornets if there isn’t a bunch
of sticky stuff around. And what Mario did was, he put, look at that. Ice cream in the
grass on top of a lid. Maybe that will
bring in the hornets and the yellow
jackets, and the wasps. I don’t know, I guess
we’ll see what happens. – Mmm. – [Mark] Pretty good, huh Mario? I’m enjoying mine. – It’s a beautiful
day for a picnic. – I’ll see you
then, alright bye. – [Mark] No yellow
jackets though. – Guys. – [Mark] What’s up? – We might be in business. I just got off the phone
with my friend, Jasper. Now I know at the
beginning of the video, I kinda made a joke and said, “Yeah I sent an email and
texts to my friends that live “in the area and I
told ’em to go outside “and check around their houses “to see if any yellow
jackets were hanging out.” Sure enough, my
friend Jasper went out and he said right
on his back patio, there’s a little nest and
there are three yellow jackets. And I said, “You’re sure?” He said, “Well, they’re
yellow and they’re black “and they look like
they wanna sting.” So, I think we may
actually be able to put the Bug Sucker
5000 to the test. You guys ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it. And can we bring
our treats with us? – Oh of course. – Yeah. – Let’s catch some
yellow jackets. Alright guys, well we
are at Jasper’s house. Now he has asked to
not be on camera, because he’s not used
to being on YouTube. So you won’t get
to meet him today, but he has given us permission
to go out on his porch and scout for these
yellow jackets. If they’re there,
we’re gonna use the Bug Sucker
5000 to catch them and then go to a
controlled environment so that we can get me stung. You guys ready? – [Mark] Sounds like
a plan, let’s do it. – Gear up, you guys
grab the other cameras and we’ll be ready to go. – [Mark] You look happy. – [Coyote] See that
corner right there? – [Mark] Uh-huh. – That is a small nest and there are two
yellow jackets. Now Jasper has provided
us with a step stool. He was thinkin’ ahead. So I’m gonna use this step stool and get up close with
the Bug Sucker 5000. You guys ready? We’re gonna have
to do this quick ’cause I already see
that they’re on the alert with their wings
kind of propped out ready to swoop
down and sting us. So we really just
have one shot at this. Okay so what I’m gonna do,
I love my Ghostbuster pack, but to really make this
work I do have to take the Bug Sucker 5000 out. – [Mark] The moment we’ve
all been waiting for. – Let’s put it this way, it’s either gonna work, or
we’re all gonna get stung. (vacuum sucking) – [Mark] Move fast. (vacuum sucking) Did it work? – We got one of ’em in there. – [Mark] Oh there’s
still one on the nest. (vacuum sucking) – [Coyote] Get the net,
get the net, get the net. Oh it’s flying. Hold on, hold on let’s
go back towards the nest. Wait, wait, wait,
wait, don’t move. (vacuum sucking) – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yes, yes. – [Mark] Shut the
door, shut the door. (laughing) It totally worked.
– Look at that. Totally caught the
yellow jackets. Both of ’em, just like that. (cheering) The Bug Sucker 5000 pays off. Can you guys believe that? Holy mackerel, we caught ’em. Wow. That was crazy, the one
was actually climbed onto this thing and I was like, “Uh, oh. We’re gonna get stung.” I was like, “Get the
net, get the net.” But then it went
back up to the nest and sure enough, got it
inside of the capsule. – [Mark] So alright
Coyote, now we have to go to where we’re
gonna get you stung. Not at Jasper’s house. – Yeah, no we’re gonna go
to a controlled situation, and we’re gonna get
these yellow jackets out of the little
capsule and get me stung. But what I’m gonna
do for transport, is not take this hose apart. Now I’m actually just
gonna place it inside of the bug net just
in case they get out. And just like that,
we’re ready to go. – [Mark] Nice. – Awesome, high fives guys. (laughing)
– That totally worked. – That’s so cool
that that worked. – [Mark] That totally worked. Boom. – Alright guys, and we’re back. Now we do have the
yellow jackets on hand. But first let’s
talk about the kit that I have here on the table. Now as always, with
these sting episodes, I have my trusty
entomology forceps here. I’ll be using this
to actually hold one of the yellow
jackets against my
arm to induce a sting. And just in case something
goes horribly wrong, as always, the epinephrin pen. – [Mark] Now do you think you’re
in the clear at this point? You’ve been stung a bunch. – I have and you never know. Every single insect
sting is unique and you never know how
your body will react. Even a yellow jacket can force
you into anaphylactic shock. So I always have this just
as a safety precaution. And of course, the star of
today’s episode, Sting-Kill. Who probably is
sponsoring this episode. Now what we’re gonna
do after I’m stung, is try out both of these
products on the sting, to make sure that it can
relieve not only the pain, but also the itching that’s
gonna come after the fact. You guys ready to see
the yellow jackets? – [Mark] Let’s bring ’em out. – Alright, well they
did transport safely
inside of the net and still inside of
the little capsule. – [Mark] Pretty happy they
didn’t escape in the car. – Yeah that would’ve been a
bad situation, wouldn’t it? All of us in the car and then
yellow jackets flying around. And sure enough there they
are inside of the capsule. Now what I need to
do is actually remove the hose from the capsule so we just have
this individualized. And then I can carefully get one of those yellow
jackets out of there. Now here’s a really interesting
little fact to remember, all hornets are
technically wasps, but not all wasps are hornets. How about that? And anything that
is black and yellow is technically considered
a yellow jacket. – [Mark] So what do we
have, what did we find? – This I believe, is what’s
called a European paper wasp. But because it’s
yellow and black, we’re just generically
calling it a yellow jacket. – [Mark] And is this
what we find at picnics? Is this what’s swarming
us when we’re trying to eat our ice cream? – No, that is usually a hornet. Now a hornet has a much
stockier looking body, a thicker abdomen and
a narrower thorax. But these ones look
just like wasps. You see the very pointy wings,
if you kind of see there. Do you see where
the thorax leads into the abdomen right there? It’s very narrow and indicative
of being an actual wasp. But I think at this junction,
what we’re ready to do, is bring the bug
net back into this, place the capsule inside,
and work on getting one of these yellow jackets
out of the container. You ready for that? – [Mark] So what’s
the process here? You’re gonna let ’em
go inside the net and then grab them
with the forceps? – Yeah, here’s
what’s gonna happen. So I’m gonna place
the capsule down inside of the net like
this, keep it contained. I’m going to open the capsule, hopefully only let
one of them out, close it back up,
remove the capsule, and then go in there with
the entomology forceps, to pick it up, bring it out,
and place it on my forearm. (suspenseful music) I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with a
yellow jacket, here we go. One, (breathes), two, three. (suspenseful music) Ow. – [Mark] Did you get there? – [Coyote] Got me there, yeah. (suspenseful music) (yelling) – [Mark] Did you get it? – Yeah it got me twice. Ah. Here we go. (suspenseful music) (yelling) – [Mark] Was that the worst one? – [Coyote] Yeah that was
the worst one so far. – [Mark] Are you good? (yelling) – He got the stinger all the
way inserted into my arm. Oh my arm’s startin’
to hurt a little bit, hold on, let’s do this. We’re gonna get back
into the capsule. – [Mark] Gonna lay it back. (breathes) – Ah, yep there you have it. You see all those welts? I took several stings
all right in that area. And look at this, there’s
a lot of red coloration developing right near the veins. That is really
interesting looking. And it burns and it’s really
warm, really warm right now. Honestly, it’s hot
to the touch right? – [Mark] Yeah you can
definitely feel the swelling. – Yeah, now it was
not nearly as painful as any of the other
stings I’ve gone through. I was actually able to keep
the yellow jacket on my arm as it was inflicting stings. It did get me one time pretty
good right at the end there, and I had to let it go. Of course we got it safely back into the capsule, as
you can see there. There they both are, they’ll
be released here shortly. But what we wanna
do now, is actually use the Sting-Kill products to see if it will alleviate
some of the burning in my arm and of course the itching
that is almost certain to come if I don’t use the
Sting-Kill ointment. You guys ready for that? – [Mark] Let’s do it. – [Coyote] Okay. – [Mark] Well which
one do we want? Do you want the capsules
or do you want the? How about you take both. Let’s talk about both.
– We’re gonna give a shot at both. So this is the Sting-Kill wipe. Often times used for
anything from a bee sting or a wasp sting, even a
mosquito bite, even a jellyfish. If you guys are on the
beach and you’re swimming and you run into a jellyfish, this is perfect for that. So what I’m gonna do, is
I’m gonna open this up. I’ll tell you what, I keep
myself pretty well composed in a lot of this, but
now that the pain’s actually starting to
set in my arm, I do, I get a little bit light headed. So the Sting-Kill wipes
have a maximum strength mix of benzocaine and menthol and
I actually really like these. They’re neon green, looks
like Ninja Turtle Mutagen. Check that out. And wow that is a strong
smell right there. Alright I’m gonna put that
on the sting, are you ready? – [Mark] Yeah sure go ahead. – Oh wow, it’s cold. The menthol definitely
cools it immediately. (sighs) Yes.
(laughing) Wow that really does have a pretty incredible
cooling effect. Now similar to the bullet ant, I was in a lot of pain
after that and it did help, but of course the
bullet ant pain eventually did come back and
lasted for nearly 36 hours. I’m hoping that this
relieves much quicker. Now I do love the wipes. And I carry the wipes in my
pack, but this right here, the sting kill capsules.
– Those, I like those. – Yeah these are my
absolute favorite. Okay let me open one up for you. Now they are individually
wrapped, see this, very cool. And all you have to do is pop
the back end out like that. And inside here is a
little glass capsule within the plastic. So all you have to do, this
is my favorite part, ready? (glass breaks)
(laughing) Shatter the glass on the inside that has this
little cotton swab. – [Mark] It’s
strangely satisfying. – I know, it’s like, “Oh
here comes the ooze.” Yes, ah. (laughing) Oh that is my favorite. And that real thick
serum right there is literally
instantaneous relief. I personally love
to just do this, dab it right on the sting zone. Wow. And as you can see,
there is more liquid here than you get in the wipes. So if you have a
really bad sting, or you’re stung multiple times, I definitely recommend going
to the Sting-Kill capsules, ’cause as you can see, look
how much of the ointment is actually coming out there. – [Mark] Okay, so once again,
Sting-Kill saves the day. (breathes) – Yes. Sting-Kill
has saved the day. My arm feels a lot better. In fact, there’s also a little
bit of a numbing agent here, so I can’t feel any of
the pain at this point. Wow, arm is a little bit stiff, but hopefully this
formula will also reduce any potential itching that’s
gonna come down the road here. And I know you’re
thinking to yourselves, “Coyote, those were
simply yellow jackets. “And you’ve been stung
by tarantula hawks,
and bullet ants, “and hopefully soon
warrior wasps.” But keep in mind guys,
that the yellow jacket is something that is
right in your backyard. It’s something you
can easily come across and something you definitely
have the potential of being stung by. Now if you are
unfortunately stung, remember, Sting-Kill is
definitely gonna help you out when it comes to
alleviating that pain and any potential itching. Alright guys, well
I think it’s time to release the yellow
jackets back into the wild. But before we do,
I just want to give an extra special
thanks to Sting-Kill for supporting this episode and of course, for
keeping us kitted up with sting ointment, when
we’re out there in the field. I’m Coyote Peterson,
be brave, stay wild, we’ll see you on
the next adventure. It is not often that an
animal like a yellow jacket is safely relocated from an
urban setting to a wild one. As most human
encounters usually end with the insect being
sprayed and killed. I know this sounds strange, but
it truly made my heart happy to know that this
beautiful pair of wasps will now have the chance to continue building
their nest in the wild. No matter what, always
admire these insects from a safe distance. However if you are
stung, all you need to do is visit your local pharmacist, where you are likely to find
the Sting-Kill products. And whether you use the
sting wipes or the capsules, both are armed with
a maximum strength benzocaine and menthol formula that is certain to
provide fast relief to the pain and itching. For more information,
visit Sting-Kill’s website to connect with the
brand for special offers. If you thought
(yelling) getting stung by a yellow
jacket was intense, (yelling) make sure to go back
and watch the episode where I applied
Sting-Kill to help alleviate the searing pain
of the bullet ant’s sting. And don’t forget, subscribe. So you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. What I’m gonna do
is open this up, and let’s see if
the sting wipe helps (sighs) to cool off my arm. This is nice, these are perfect. This could fit right
in any hiking backpack. (coyote howling)

How to Get Rid of Wasps

How to Get Rid of Wasps


Hi I’m Tricia an organic gardener I grow
organically for healthy and safe food supply. For
a clean and sustainable environment. For an enjoyable and rewarding
experience. There’s nothing like a wasp sting to
ruin an outdoor event. Today I’m gonna be
sharing some tips on how to control wasps, yellow jackets and hornets organically. Social living wasps like
Hornets and yellow jackets are actually considered beneficial insects and that’s because they’re the predators
of many pest worms and caterpillars. Social living wasps make annual colonies
only the Queens over winter and then in the early spring they start
a new colony which then lives for one season before being killed by frost. If a wasp
nest is out of the way of people, pets and livestock. It’s
best just to let them be and then benefit from the pest control
that they provide Wasps are only a problem when they nest where people frequent. Or later in the
season when they scavenge instead of hunt. You
can prevent wasps from building nests inside your
structures like inside your attic by caulking up any holes or openings that
they could get in. You can also hang decoys like this Waspinator and this will help prevent territorial
wasps like paper wasps from nesting because they’ll think that
the area is already taken. In early spring be aware of wasps
building nests under eaves or entries or in holes in
the ground. If you see a lot of back and forth with
wasps they’re probably building a nest. You can control some small nests by
yourself using products like this WHY spray. It’s labeled for wasps hornets Yellow
Jackets and it can be used under the eaves are in holes in the
ground and its natural. It contains lemongrass oil, clove oil,
rosemary oil, and geranium oil. To control a nest wait until
after dark or early morning when most of the wasps
will be in the nest and they’ll be sluggish. When you’re
ready to spray the nest make sure you wear long sleeves long
pants gloves and a veil if you can. Check back in the morning to
make sure that the nest is gone. Repeat the process at 3-day intervals. At nighttime wearing protective gear you
can remove wasps nest by hand and then you can put
them in plastic bags, put them in the freezer
or out in the sun so that the wasps will die. If the nest
is large it’s wise to call a professional
exterminator who can remove the nest safely. In late summer the wasps stop
hunting and start scavenging and they’ll bother you on a picnic they’ll
try to eat your food and they’ll climb into your beverage can
and boy that can be a painful sting right on the mouth. Traps like these contain a
lure and can draw scavenging wasps away from your party. Hang these kind of traps away from your
gathering area you’ll have the best effects if you hang
them in the pathway that they take to your party. These types
of traps won’t eradicate a nest but they’ll
reduce the number of gate crashers to your party. So enjoy the outdoors and grow organic for life!

What is the Difference Between Bees, Wasps, and Hornets?

What is the Difference Between Bees, Wasps, and Hornets?


There are many similarities and differences
between our little wing-whipping friends. For starters, all can sting you. That said, you may derive some solace in the
fact that when certain of them sting humans, they die- not so when they sting many other
animals. The barbed stingers on honey bees particularly
end up getting lodged in our soft flesh, ripping out their backsides when they try and get
away after stinging you. When they sting most animals, this doesn’t
happen. Further, all three live in hives or combs. These humble abodes are always in cooler and
sheltered areas, often within the shade of trees. Bees, wasps, and hornets all proliferate in
warm weather, their hives growing in the spring and early summer. By late summer, food becomes scarce and that’s
when they, especially wasps and hornets, start finding their way to human food and your picnic. While the colors are all pretty similar (brown/black,
yellow, with some white) on bees, wasps, and hornets, the markings differ. This is where the insects we all tend to lump
in the same category (flying, stinging, and scary), begin to show their differences. We start with the humble bee. Bees are furry pollen collectors, who rarely
have any need to interact with humans. As the expression “as busy as a bee” insinuates,
worker bees (usually the only type of bee most people will see) spend their lives going
to and from the hive, acquiring nectar (and pollen on their bodies) during their trips. They play an integral part in the pollination
of various plants, and some of them provide us with tasty honey. bumblee2They feed the acquired nectar to their
young, developing the new generation of bees. They also protect the queen bee, allowing
her to lay the eggs. There are over 25,000 known bee species, but
the two most common types of bees are honeybees and bumblebees. Both produce wax, but only the honeybee produces
honey. Another big difference between the two is
that the bumblebee is nearly double the size of the honeybee. Bumblebees are fat (at least in bee terms)
and hairy, their size relative to their wingspan giving rise to the myth that science can’t
explain how they are able to fly. Honeybees are more sleek. They both are yellow with black stripes, though
the bumblebee often has a red/orange or white tale. Additionally, honeybees live in large colonies,
topping out at 25,000 bees. Bumblebees tend build their nests underground
(though they have been found in walls), and sometimes in tunnels constructed by other
animals. Their colonies are much smaller than bumblebees,
only numbering into the hundreds. waspWasps, unlike bees, are aggressive and
predators. There are over 30,000 species of wasps and
they are distinguishable from bees by their pointed lower abdomens and narrow “waist,”
a petiole, that separates the abdomen from the thorax. They also have little to no hair on their
bodies (as opposed to bees) and don’t play much of a role in the pollination of plants. Their legs are shiny, slender, and shaped
like cylinders. All wasps hunt for their food and build nests
for shelter. What exactly they prey on and how they build
their nests depends on the type of wasp. There are two general types of wasps: social
and solitary. Social wasps build colonies and start from
scratch every spring, never nesting in the same spot twice. They design their home sweet home out of chewed
up wood fibers and their own saliva. The nests may hold up to five thousands wasps
and are typically found in protected spaces, like attics, inside of walls, or under decks. Social wasps eat many different types of things
(they are omnivorous) including fruits, plants, human food, and other insects (flies, bee
larva, caterpillars, etc.) Solitary wasps do not form colonies and live
under ground or in tubular mud nests. There’s no caste system, as in the queen
cares for it’s own young. The queen seeks out prey – flies, bee larva,
cicadas (there’s actually a species of wasp known as “cicada killers”), and paralyzes
it with its sting. They take the still-living insect back to
the nest and feed it to their larva. It’s during the late summer when wasps begin
to get aggressive. This is due to the fact that the worker wasps
job is done for the year and they’re, literally, waiting to die. After taking care of the queen and feeding
the new generation of worker wasps, the old ones are now useless. They become disoriented and begin to venture
away from the nest, in search of food and something sweet. As absurd as this sounds, these wasps have
nothing left to live for besides satisfying their sweet tooth. So, they become aggressive, bold, and persistent. They land on a human hand that’s holding
an ice cream cone. They dive into a can of soda. They munch on a half-eaten apple. In fact, in September of 2013, the British
Red Cross warned citizens that wasps were getting “drunk” on fermented fruit and
were going all out in search of more. Said Joe Mulligan of the Red Cross to the
British newspaper, The Independent, in 2013: It’s hilarious that, now worker wasps have
finished their life’s work, all they are doing now is feasting on fermented fruit and
getting ‘drunk’. All that being said, wasps aren’t just pests,
but benefit humanity in some ways. They prey on many other “pest” insects
and have actually been used by the agricultural industry as an effective means to control
crop pests, resulting in a much more environmentally friendly way to do this over many pesticides. giant-hornetHornets are actually a species
of wasps. Hornets differ from other wasps in that their
stings are more venomous (they contain more acetylcholine); they tend to attack for food
as a colony, and their nests are all aerial (as opposed to many wasps species). The Giant Asian Hornet, native to parts of
Russia, China, Vietnam, and the mountains of Japan, can grow to be about 2 inches long
with about a 4-5 inch wingspan. It is the world’s largest and most venomous
wasp. It is colloquially known as the yak-killer,
due to the venom’s ability to dissolve the tissue of even the largest of mammals. Because the honey bee is on an individual
level incapable of harming the Giant Asian Hornet and just a handful of Giant Asian Hornets
are capable of decimating an entire hive of honeybees, the Japanese Honeybee has come
up with an alternate strategy to stopping the mass-destruction of their populace by
the hornets. When the Giant Asian Hornet is detected, first
the honey bee will emit a pheromone that the Hornet can pick up on that’s basically an
“I see you” warning. The scouting hornet then may leave in this
case. ball-hornetIf not, and the hornet continues
towards the hive, the honey bees will ball the hornet– essentially surrounding it completely
with as many bees as possible. They will then exert themselves as much as
possible to raise their body temperatures. Inside the ball, the temperature will rise
rapidly, while simultaneously the carbon dioxide levels will also increase. Once the temperature inside the ball passes
115 degrees Fahrenheit or 46 degrees Celsius, it exceeds what the hornet can tolerate, but
is still well under what the honey bees can handle (around 50 degrees Celsius). The combination of heat and low oxygen level
will eventually kill the Giant Asian Hornet. Several of the honey bees will likely die
before the hornet and this means of defense isn’t effective against a large number of
Giant Asian Hornets, but it works well at eliminating the scouting Giant Asian Hornets,
which can potentially stop a large scale attack from happening in the first place.