What Are Those Yellow Spots On My Car? It’s Bee Poop! – Chemical Guys Car Wash

What Are Those Yellow Spots On My Car? It’s Bee Poop! – Chemical Guys Car Wash


Welcome back to Detail Garage! Today we’re working on this beautiful Tesla
Model S here in the shop. Now we were looking at it to inspect it before
we decided how to wash the car. We can see the car was covered in all these
little yellow spots. So we get a lot of questions about what are
these little yellow spots and how do I take care of them or will they stain or damage the paint. So we get a lot of questions about what it
is and we’ve actually had some of these residues removed from the car and analyzed in a lab. When you look at it under a microscope the
technicians were able to see that it’s full of pollen and digested nectar. That means its bee poop. So bees eat nectar and pollen from the flowers
and move from one to another and go back to their hive but when they’re out and about they
have to poop. Their just like birds and they’ll poop all
over your car and that’s where you get this little spots from. So the good thing is it’s not too caustic
and it’s not as bad as bird poop which will etch your paint because it’s very acidic. Bee poop is fairly neutral but it gets annoying
and it’s ugly and it’s actually abrasive if it isn’t removed correctly. So we’re going to show you how to take it
off without damaging the paint in anyway. I’m just going to use some EcoSmart because
we’re indoors and I don’t want to worry about using a hose or bucket. So I’m just going to clean the car using EcoSmart
and a couple microfiber towels. So to get started by spraying down your surface. I’m just going to start on the hood. And I’ll get a nice coat of EcoSmart over
the paintwork. Now whenever you’re cleaning with a waterless
method I’ll take my towel and wipe in one direction that way I pick any dirt with the
towel as I go and I don’t grind it into the surface and cause scratches. Flip the towel once it gets dirty. And proceed to wipe in one direction. Now this whole side of the towel is dirty
so I’ll flip it over and expose a clean side and keep wiping. So now that I’ve cleaned this half of the
hood you can see that I still have some yellow spots stuck on the surface. So what I’m going to do is flip to a completely
clean side of the towel so there is no dirt at all on this side of the towel. Now I have to spray a little more EcoSmart
right on the surface. But I don’t want to focus on just one spot
because I’ll be wasting product as it runs away. Instead I’m going to spray some EcoSmart right
into the towel. I’ll focus with a little bit of the towel
and gently rub. You see all the spots immediately breaking off and lifting off the surface so I’ll wipe them up. Now that spot is all clean. I’ve removed all the bits of pollen and bee
poop from the surface. I’ll move on to this next spot and do the same trick. There you go you might be able to see a little
bit of residue so I’ll take some more EcoSmart and buff it totally dry. It’s also very important you keep your car
waxed and you keep your car sealed at all times. So any little bits like bee poop or airplane
fuel you need to take it off the paint so it won’t etch the paint and cause permanent damage. So I have a lot of the car left to do because
the whole car is covered in this contamination. It’s on the paint, it’s on the clear plastic
head lights, the grill, the windshield and even the chrome on the side view mirrors. So I have a lot of contamination to remove. I’ll start by doing a 50/50 so you can see
the before and after of cleaning. After that we’re going to clean the rest of the car. So if you have any other questions about removing
bee poop or any other contamination on your car you can check out all the videos on our
YouTube channel. We have over nine hundred videos showing you
how to do just about anything. Make sure you like this video hit the subscribe
button to stay in tune with all the top tips as they come out. If you want to learn more about the products
you can check them out on our website the links are right below in the description. You got a nice car lets keep it clean with
Chemical Guys.

Honey bees – Natural History 1

Honey bees – Natural History 1


Honey bees are social insects in the family
Apidae, order Hymenoptera. The most important species to humans is Apis millifera, the honey
bee. Honey bees live in colonies or bee hives. Bees have two pairs of wings and compound
eyes. Beekeepers make hives for the bees out of
straw, pottery, or wooden boxes. Wild bees make their hives in hollow trees
or logs or sometimes under the eaves of houses. Worker bees stand guard at the entrance of
the hive, keeping out bees from other hives. Honey bees protect their hive by stinging
intruders. Bees communicate with each other with pheromones.
Pheromones are body chemicals that allow bees and other animals to talk to each other by
smell. Bees smell pheromones and other scents with their antennae and can tell whether a
bee is from the same hive, a worker, a queen bee, or is warning about danger.
Bees can fight most honey robbers like skunks, bears, and wasps who come to raid the hive.
When a honey bee stings, the barbs on the stinger get stuck in the victim, and the stinger
is pulled out of the bee’s body. The bee dies shortly after stinging. Queen bees however
can sting many times and can pull their stinger out of the victim’s skin.
The honeycombs inside the hive are made up of small boxes called cells. The cells are
six-sided or hexagons. They are tilted so that the honey does not flow out. All the
cells together make up the comb. The comb is made from wax that bees make with their
wax glands. The wax comes out from openings on the underside of the bee’s abdomen.
Bees forage thousands of flowers a day to gather nectar and pollen.
Nectar and pollen are food for bees. Pollen is sometimes called bee bread. Nectar is a
sweet liquid found inside flowers. The bee laps and sucks up nectar with her tube-like
tongue and stores it in her honey stomach. The female worker bees make honey from nectar
in the bee hive. Bees eat this honey in the winter when there is no food available from
flowers. It takes more than 5,000 flower visits to
make one teaspoon of honey. Honey bees also gather pollen grains from
each flower they visit. The bee uses her hind legs to scrape off the pollen grains stuck
to its abdomen and then presses them into the pollen basket on the hind leg.
While gathering pollen, the honey bee also pollinates flowers as she accidentally carries
pollen from flower to flower. When a pollen grain combines with a flower
egg cell inside the flower, a seed begins to grow. Bees pollinate many crop plants—plants
that give us food like oranges, apples and watermelons.

What’s inside a Giant Wasp Nest?

What’s inside a Giant Wasp Nest?


– Welcome back to What’s Inside. I’m Lincoln, this is Dan,
and that’s my friend Kai. – Have you ever wondered what’s inside of a wasp nest? We did, we kind of got
curious and wanted to know. We went outside, all of our wasp nests have lots of wasps in them. – Yup. – And they were very small.
(laughing) We went onto eBay, and you can buy wasp nests from people! (laughing) This came from Wisconsin. I just bought a wasp
nest for like 30 bucks from somebody in Wisconsin. So we’re gonna cut this open and get this wasp nest out of here. Hopefully, it’s actually in here. Hopefully, bees don’t
come flying out at us. – Yeah. – No wasps, yet, have flown out. Oh, that’s so gross! – Oh my!
– Oh my gosh! – Disgusting. – It’s huge! – Oh my! That is huge!
– Holy smokes! That is the biggest wasp
nest I’ve ever seen. – Yeah, me too. I don’t how comfortable I am with cutting this open inside the house. (boys giggling) – I have no idea. It would be kind of funny
to cut it open in the house. – All right. – Yeah, lets do it right here. – Kai says we cut it open in the house. – Let’s do it! – We’re cutting it open in the house. All right, so what’d you get? A basketball. – And soccer ball.
– And a soccer ball. – [Dan] And soccer ball, put
the soccer ball next to it. – It’s way bigger than the soccer ball. – [Dan] Or for other
people outside the US, a football. Don’t get mad at me, I said it right. – [Lincoln] That is really disgusting. – That’s even bigger than a basketball. – Like, when you think about it, there’s tons of wasps that are on that, and I’m touching it right now. – [Dan] All right, it’s time. The biggest wasp nest that I’ve ever seen is about to be cut open. Okay, if bees come out, you guys save me, okay? – [Kai] You mean, you save me. – [Lincoln] No, we’ll be saving our lives. (laughing) Not yours. (thick tearing sound) Woah, that’s pretty easy. – [Kai] That’s just gonna make me sick. – [Lincoln] Ew! – [Kai] Ugh! Oh my gosh! – [Lincoln] This is really disgusting. (Kai chuckles) – [Kai] Oh, I can’t wait to see
what’s inside of this thing. You’re cutting paper. Very hard paper. – Let me take a sample of that. Look at that. (mumbles) – [Dan] Okay guys, you ready? – Yeah.
– Yeah. – [Kai] Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh, oh my gosh, oh my gosh! Oh my gosh. – [Dan] Woah! – [Kai] What’s in there? (boys gasp) – Woah! That’s amazing. – They still have like dead eggs in there. (crumpling) – [Dan] All right, check
out the inside of this guy. All the different little homes from the different bees
that were in there, different wasps that were in there. Wow. That is fascinating. – [Kai] (gasps) Dead bee. Dead wasp. – Ah! Ah! – [Dan] Hey, hey, stop,
stop, stop, stop, stop. (Kai laughs) Lincoln is very afraid of wasps. – I got stung four times! It’s not fun! – [Kai] Oh my gosh, Lincoln’s gonna cry. – I’m not gonna cry, I’m just freaked out. – Wow. – Oh, there’s one. Bzzz! (chuckles) – [Lincoln] I am really scared of those! – You’re really scared of those? Okay. I don’t know if any of you are as afraid as Lincoln is of wasps, but that was fun. We’ve kept a lot of the
things that we cut open. This is one I don’t
know that I wanna keep. (boys laugh) What do you think, should
we put it in a plastic bag, and just hide it away
in the garage somewhere? – Do it. – Just hold on to it? If you guys need your own wasp nest, go to eBay, you can get one. But we cut things open
so you don’t have to, so now, you don’t have to
cut open a wasp nest anymore. – Thanks for watching the grossest edition of What’s Inside. I wanna get out of here! Please! – Make sure to follow
us on Instagram so that, ugh, you can see all the
gross things that we’re up to. Lincoln, it’s your new hat! (laughing) Just like a soccer ball! (laughing) Now I’m gonna clean all this up before my wife comes down and sees this. I’m just gonna let her watch the video and see what we did. (hip hop music)

Wasp Nests and Bee Hives

Wasp Nests and Bee Hives


[INTRO] It’s summer! And there you are, exploring
the great outdoors and suddenly you hear a buzz, see a flash of yellow and black
and–yeah! You’ve been stung! Was it a bee or wasp or a yellow jacket or hornet? If you didn’t get a good look at the tiny attacker,
you could always try following a home, You know, carefully. Because you can learn a lot about
certain kinds of stinging insects by looking at their nests. First up you should know that all wasps and bees belong to the Hymenoptera Order of insects. And bees actually evolved from wasps sometime
around a hundred and thirty million years ago. This probably happened when a solitary
female wasp somehow, maybe even accidentally, introduced pollen to her
personal nest while, bringing insect prey back for her larva. Pollen, is full of protein and could have
been a nutritious food source especially when prey insects were scarce. So,
scientists think that some wasps might have started actively collecting pollen
and eventually gave up hunting entirely. Trading their smooth, elongated bodies
with big mandibles, for bodies that were adapted to collect pollen and mouth
parts to slurp up nectar. In other words, they evolved into the first solitary
bees. Lots of differences we see between wasps and bees today reflect these food
choices. Whether they nest alone or are social types that live in colonies. Some
solitary female wasps just lay eggs in paralyzed pray, but others create a small
nest to store the bodies by reusing holes and wood made by other insects,
building it out of mud or digging it into the ground. Solitary bees bring back
pollen and nectar to a wood or dirt chamber. Sometimes lining their nests with
different materials depending on the species. For example, Mason Bees use mud,
Carpenter Bees use saw dust and Leaf- Cutter Bees, well, you get the picture. They use tiny leaf pieces. But what about the
colonies? Those big old nests you see in trees or on the corner your garage? Most
social wasps, which include Yellow Jackets and Hornets, are in the family
Vespidae, and make their nests out of paper. They come in different shapes and
sizes depending on what kind of wasp is building. If you’re looking at a big umbrella
shaped nest, tucked under the eaves of your house and you can see hexagonal
cells then, probably that’s a home to some Paper Wasps. If it’s a football-shaped
nest with smooth walls hanging from say, a tree
branch, you’re probably standing next to a colony of Hornets. If you see a stream
of wasps zipping into a hole in the ground or the walls of a building, you’re probably watching Yellow Jackets
duck into their hidden home. Each spring, a Queen wasp starts
constructing her new colony in her preferred location by gathering wood
pulp. Scraping her mandibles against things like tree branches, fence posts,
and even cardboard boxes. She mixes this pulp with saliva to make a fibery-goo
that dries into a solid, paper structure. She’ll then lay some eggs that will grow
into female workers, who will help expand and defend the nest. Most wasp
colonies tend to be pretty small. Some Paper Wasp nests have fewer than a
hundred individuals while, some Yellow Jacket nests hold up to a couple
thousand. And aside from the Queen these wasps may only live for a few weeks. So
especially in temperate areas their nests really only need to provide
shelter for a season’s worth of offspring before their abandoned and
left to degrade. Everyone dies, besides any fertilized Queens, and even they
abandon ship to find a safe place to hibernate for the cold winter before
starting the whole cycle over again. But social bees in the family Apidae, like
Bumble Bees and Honey Bees, they do things kind of different. Bumble Bees still have pretty small nests
holding up to a few hundred bees and they build them in all kinds of
protected places: abandoned rodent dens thick grass, sheds or in trees. Their
Queens operate on yearly cycles as well. Hibernating over the winter then
emerging in the spring to gather food. But bees lack the proper mouth parts to
make their hives out of paper so, instead they secrete a durable, waxy substance
from their abdomens to construct nectar pots and start a small colony. Honey Bees
on the other hand, carefully select the perfect hive location as a group.
Favoring protected areas like, inside the hollow of tree cavities, within walls or
in artificial beekeeper boxes. Honey Bee hives are sturdy. Constructed
out of organized hexagonal honeycomb cells that they used to store honey, pollen and raise larvae. Their colonies
are huge, supporting tens of thousands of members, who live up to a couple months.
And these hives are built to last through the winter since, these bees
store around 60 pounds of honey for food and huddle together for warmth. So we all
know bees are essential for their role in pollination and you might hate social
wasps for setting up camp in your garage but, they do help to
keep pests insect populations down and their homes are perfectly suited for
their lifestyles. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow, which is brought
to you in part by Audible. Right now Audible is offering SciShow viewers a
free 30-day trial membership. Check out audible.com / scishow where you can
choose from over a hundred and eighty thousand audio programs and titles. Such
as, Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation by Tammy Horn. Go to
audible.com / scishow for a free 30-day trial and download your free title today. The science of how and why this happened
isn’t entirely settled but, one thing is certain, royal jelly plays a large role. Worker Bees produce royal jelly from …

Wasp sucking machine

Wasp sucking machine


So, I’ve got this old
oil barrel in my yard. And this
year I have a bit of a wasp
infestation in there. So, at the rate they’re
coming and going it’s got to be a pretty
good sized nest. Last year when I was berry
picking, I accidentally stepped into a wasp nest. I got stung 6
times in a matter of seconds. But I have a solution
for these guys. So what I’ve got here
is a powerful blower and I’ve got a box for
putting on top of this. And this box has got a
screen on the bottom and the plexiglass
lid on top. And a hose for
sucking the air and I’ll put that
near the nest. So, the idea is not so much
to suck them out of the nest but to suck them out of the
air when they hover near the entrance. And I hope
this will work out. Got 1. Got 2. 3. 4. So they’re
coming. Pretty good build-up
on the catch so far. See, the ones that are
leaving don’t get caught. But the ones coming back often
get sucked into the pipe. So, we got some good
progress on the catch but there really isn’t that much
going on there right now but I know there’s gonna
be more wasps in there. So, I’m gonna have to get those
to come out a little bit. OK, well they’re
coming and going now. They’re just checking out the
ruckus so I have to stay away so they won’t
sting me. So, even shaking doesn’t get
those wasps to come out. I think that hive is
fairly depleted now. Looks like there are a few more
than I thought there was left. Now that I’ve uncovered that
nest, just look at all of them flying around. Uh oh. Not good. So I’ve discovered the screen
is actually not entirely wasp proof. Some of them have made
it through there. Just gonna
kill those. My what a lively
bunch they are now without all that wind
blowing all the time.

Bees are going extinct…but not the ones you think

Bees are going extinct…but not the ones you think


– [Narrator] You’ve probably heard a few of these things about bees: they’re in danger, they’re being poisoned by pesticides, they’re spontaneously vanishing, they’re going extinct. The plight of bees has been in the news for years now. Back in 2013, Time Magazine asked as all to imagine, quote,
a world without bees. In short, whatever you’ve heard about bees in the past decade, it’s probably bad. So what is going on with bees? The truth is, they are in trouble, but maybe not the bees you’re thinking of. Without bees, humans would have a serious food problem. Some 35 percent of crops around the world benefit from pollinators like bees. Without pollinators, everything from strawberries, to chocolate, to coffee, would suffer. And of course, there’s the honey. And there’s one particular species, the Western Honey Bee, that farmers rely on all around the world. It’s also probably what you’d just call a bee. – Yeah, generally when
people think about bees, it is the Western Honey Bee. – [Narrator] This is Bernardo Nino. He’s a researcher at UC Davis. And head of R and D at
a startup called UBEESs. Bernardo’s quick to point out all the crops in America that benefit from honeybees. – Cherries, blueberries, apples, some avocados. – [Narrator] And some that we couldn’t grow at all without honeybees. – [Bernardo] Here in California, the almonds are a very important crop. And they essentially require
honeybee pollination. – [Narrator] This all
explains why it was big news, when starting in late 2006, beekeepers reported losing 30 to 90% of their colonies. For comparison, it’s normal to lose more like, 15 to 20% of colonies annually. The weirdest part is that the bees weren’t all dying, they were just flying away. It was bad enough to
warrant an official term. – Colony collapse disorder
can be described as, essentially all the adult bees, well most of the adult bees, leaving the colony. Leaving the queen, healthy looking brood, and that was part of the really stressful, and confusing part is that the bees seemed to just leave. – [Narrator] Colony
collapse disorder, or CCD, broke into the national news. – Colony collapse disorder. – Colony collapse. – Colony collapse disorder. – Colony collapse disorder
remains a mystery. – [Narrator] And for years now, we’ve all fretted about the bee-pocalypse. – Do you like to eat? Well this next story is of concern to you. – [Narrator] In the year since 2006, we’ve learned a lot about CCD. But it’s still a bit of a mystery. – [Bernardo] There’s a
lot of funding thrown at research programs. There was never any particular one thing that was defined as the cause of CCD. – [Narrator] Instead, we’ve come to better understand the stresses that bees face. For example, entire
colonies can fall victim to the varroa mite, a stubborn parasite that’s wreaked havoc on bees for decades. Certain pesticide chemicals
called neonicotinoids, can also be deadly. And viruses, poor nutrition, and habit loss can take
their toll as well. This mix of factors might be causing colony collapse disorder, but any one of them is a problem that needs addressing, regardless of CCD. So since 2006, beekeepers have upped their game to improve colony health, and it seems to be working. Numbers vary, but for
the past couple years, the number of bee colonies lost in the US, has been leveling off. – [Bernardo] The silver lining of CCD, is we were able to learn a lot about honeybee heath, and really make some great strides. – [Narrator] So problem solved? Not quite. All this news, and research and debate, concerns that one species, the Western Honeybee. And we have a lot of control over the Western Honeybee. – [Bernardo] Western
Honeybees are introduced. And so they have been domesticated, and now we treat them at a commercial level, a lot like livestock. – [Narrator] Beekeepers breed them by the millions and rent them out to farms and orchards. In some ways, they’re more like a fertilizer, than an animal. In fact, our mass production of honeybees, is the reason we have an almond industry in California. – [Bernardo] There’s a million acres of nut-bearing almonds this year, in California. Each one of those acres requires two colonies per acre, about. And so, that’s two million colonies that come out here to California just for that event. – [Narrator] For the record, there are maybe 50 thousand
bees in one colony. So two million colonies is about 100 billion bees on almond duty. But here’s what so many news reports miss. Honeybees may be doing better, but when it comes to pollination, it’s not just about honeybees. Thousand of species of wild bees are key pollinators. And other insects like wasps, butterflies, and beetles play an important role, too. Oftentimes, certain pollinators,
are just better suited to certain crops. – [Bernardo] Some of
the native pollinators get up earlier, some of them work different
aspects of the flower. So having all of them working together, ends up being more beneficial for the growers. – [Narrator] And wild pollinators are in trouble. Habitat loss, climate change, and pesticide use are threatening wild pollinators around the world. And when those numbers drop, there’s no easy fix. The honeybee population is recovering partly because beekeepers are just breeding more bees. Or buying them wholesale. – [Bernardo] You can buy packaged bees so a three pound, basically box of bees with a mated queen. Those prices range anywhere between 90 and I would say $140 dollars, depending on how many you’re ordering. – [Narrator] So what
is going on with bees? It really depends on the bee. – [Bernardo] The Western Honeybee is not in danger of extinction. There’s about two point seven million colonies in the United States. So their species is not in any sort of trouble, whereas native bees, are affected by the habitat loss and other challenges and there are species that are endangered. There are species that have become extinct. – [Narrator] Pollination supports between two and six billion dollars in global agriculture every year. Honeybees are in effort to control and optimize that process, to help feed the seven billion plus people on earth. But we clearly don’t have the control we want. Wild pollinators are proof of that. So while honeybees may
still be struggling, that’s not the same thing as being truly threatened. – [Bernardo] So when we say we need to save the bees, to me, I would say help honeybees, rather than save honeybees. – [Narrator] Hey everyone
thanks for watching and make sure to subscribe. We’ve got new videos coming out every Tuesday. And if you find yourself beekeeping, and you get a bee in your veil, don’t worry we asked
Bernardo about that too. – Turtle your neck, let it fly up, and smash it.

Honey Bees Make Honey … and Bread? | Deep Look

Honey Bees Make Honey … and Bread? | Deep Look


OK, time to head to work. But before this honey bee starts her commute,
she’s prepping her tools. Because honey bees collect pollen. You knew that. But it’s not as simple as you might think. Plants want the bees to carry the pollen away
and spread it to other flowers. That’s pollination, how plants reproduce. But bees also need to carry lots of it home
– pollen is a protein-packed food for the hive. Luckily, they have the right gear. They’re hairy, like tiny flying teddy bears. She’s covered in 3 million hairs for trapping
pollen. They’re even on her eyes. Here on her legs, they’re shaped into spiky brushes and flat combs. When she lands on a bloom, she really gets
in there. Nibbling on the flower’s anthers detaches
the pollen. Time to pack up her haul. She cleans it off her eyes and antennae with
those brushes on her front legs … like windshield wipers. Here it is up close. That leg wipes the pollen right off her eye. Then she moves the pollen from leg to leg,
like a conveyor belt … front to middle to back. The bee does this super-fast, while she flies
from bloom to bloom, moving the pollen into special baskets on her back legs called corbiculae. She bends her leg, using it to squish the
pollen into a ball, packing it together with a little saliva and nectar. She can get as many as 160,000 pollen grains
into each ball. She’s hauling as much as one-third of her
weight. Back at the hive, meal prep is about to start. But the pollen isn’t for making honey. The honey, under this wax, is made from nectar. They eat it for its sugar. Bees turn pollen into something completely
different: bee bread. That’s their source of protein. Step one: Find an open spot. Step two: Deposit your goods and pack them neatly. Step three: Let the pollen “marinate”
with a hint of honey. And voilà! It’s ready. The pantry is stocked – both for adult bees
and the babies that are growing in the cells next door. The adults pop in to drop off a special bee bread
snack … a little home cooking for the hive’s future hard-working flyers. OK. More bees? We’ll keep them coming. Blue orchard bees build nests that look like
stunning jewels. And bumblebees really have to shake what they’ve
got to get their pollen. One more thing: If you love Deep Look, why
not join our hive mind on Patreon today? We’ve got a limited-time offer to sweeten
the deal. Link is in the description. Thanks.

A Girl And Her Insect ♦ [RimVerse Cinematic]

A Girl And Her Insect ♦ [RimVerse Cinematic]


WAIT A SECOND Do you expect me to believe you run faster than a megaspider? Its true… Later we became friends You can’t be serious… Also a bear appeared And he had like 6 meters What? Guys? Liar, don’t exist bears here It’s true, i have a picture It’s drunk talk I can show you Shut up Is impossible tame a megaspider But… Sssshhhh You need to stop drinking

Bee Propolis – Could This Be Cure For Baldness? Insects May Have Answer To Hair Growth Problem

Bee Propolis – Could This Be Cure For Baldness? Insects May Have Answer To Hair Growth Problem


A compound bees use to repair their hives
can boost hair growth in a buzzing discovery for bald people. The natural sealant – called propolis – was
tested on mice that had been shaved or waxed, and experts today revealed those that had
the treatment re-grew their fur faster than those that did not. Bees use the substance to seal small gaps
in their hives, but now the scientists say the find could help develop new hair loss
therapies. The experts – headed by Dr Ken Kobayashi,
of Hokkaido University in Japan – said after propolis was applied, the number of special
cells involved in growing hair increased. They said growth “occurred without any detectable
abnormalities in the shape of the follicles”. Despite using shaved mice rather than those
unable to grow fur, the researchers – whose findings are published in the Journal of Agricultural
and Food Chemistry – expect it could also apply to baldness. They say hair loss often results from inflammation,
and propolis contains anti-­inflammatory properties.

SCP-439 Bone Hive | Euclid class | Transfiguration / Species / skeletal / insect scp

SCP-439 Bone Hive | Euclid class | Transfiguration / Species / skeletal / insect scp


Item #: SCP-439 Object Class: Euclid Special Containment Procedures: Specimen is
to be kept at Armed Research Site-45, Hazardous Lifeforms Wing, in a sealed, locked 38 L (10
gal) Type-G containment unit with connected oxygen supply. Specimen is to be fed through
Feeding Tube 16a with Approved Nutritive Substance X-F. Handling is available to Level 2 personnel
and higher. Description: SCP-439 is an insect of unknown
origin, somewhat resembling a greyish, semitranslucent Forficula auricularia (common earwig), approximately
2.5 cm in length. Originally located/obtained in mainland China in the ████ ████ province.
No other specimen has been found, as of yet. SCP-439 is relatively harmless when encountered
on safe terms, aside from the ability to deliver a firm, painful pinch with its abdominal forceps.
The true hazard this creature poses lies in its habitat construction and reproduction,
which is initiated when the specimen enters the mouth of a sleeping human. This will only
occur with humans; other lifeforms have been presented to SCP-439 and have been uniformly
rejected. Upon location of a suitable host, the specimen will hide itself in the immediate
vicinity and wait until the victim has fallen asleep. How it is able to determine the state
of sleep is unknown, but it has shown to be accurate in [DATA EXPUNGED] times out of [DATA
EXPUNGED]. Upon entering the mouth of the new host, SCP-439 will travel down the trachea
and take up residence in one of the victim’s lungs. In approximately 4-8 hours, after awakening,
the host will complain of chest pains and shortness of breath, followed shortly by abdominal
cramping. The tightness in the chest will increase as well as a fever until the host
is incapacitated. It is around this time that the onset of Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva
(FOP) occurs, a disorder that is normally genetic in nature that promotes growth of
bone into muscle tissue. Since the production of new bone growth is so rapid, the procedure
is also quite painful for the subject, with new bone spurs occasionally protruding through
the flesh. While this is happening, the host will become compelled to seek shelter in a
darkened, enclosed space, such as inside household cabinetry, closets, or heating ductwork. Within the first three days without treatment,
the host will become completely withdrawn and immobile due to the extreme pain of new
bone growth coupled with difficulty breathing. At this point, the subject’s body will begin
the final stage of transformation into a “bone hive”: having concealed itself in its new
home, the body of the host will huddle in a foetal position. Entire portions of the
skeletal structure will shift along [DATA EXPUNGED] until the host body is roughly spherical
in nature and reduced to 3/4 its original size. New bone protrusions will continue to
grow and, if possible, anchor the body permanently to its new location. The skeletal structure
is almost completely unrecognizable, having been converted to a round “cage” to protect
the internal organs and colony. At this point, transformation is complete.
The original Queen that entered the host will have produced 20-30,000 offspring that function
as workers, drones and warriors in a typical insect hive hierarchy. Since only the Queen
is capable of reproduction, the rest of the hive’s inhabitants are, fortunately, harmless
save for large, strong abdominal forceps of the warriors. The interior of the original
host is nearly unrecognizable as a human body: certain organs are removed and used as food,
while others are modified by the worker insects to serve as egg incubation chambers. An ingenious
method exists of using the host’s own digestive system to process pieces of organic materials
collected by the warriors into a nutritive slurry that feeds both the colony and sustains
the host hive structure. After 4-6 months, a new Queen will emerge
from within the ranks and choose a drone to mate with. At this point, the colony will
destroy itself by rupturing [DATA EXPUNGED], upon which the majority of the insects die.
Workers and drones are unfit to survive outside the host hive, and warriors will abandon the
site, wandering away, their tasks complete. No food will be consumed by warriors that
isn’t nutritive slurry produced by the hive of origin. The new Queen will venture out,
fertilized, to search for her own new hive. Incredibly, the trauma of evacuation is not
what finally causes biological activity to cease in the hive, but starvation. Addendum: In a particularly disturbing development,
Dr. ██████ performed a range of experiments to determine the extent of damage
to the host body after it has finished the transformation into a hive. While it had been
previously discovered in autopsy that portions of the brain are hollowed out to serve as
food, others are left intact, presumably to regulate what bodily functions continue. During
the last round of experimentation, ██████ took the opportunity to examine a hive at close
range shortly after transformation. While the eyes are eventually reached and used as
a food source, at the point ██████ performed her examination, they were still intact. Opening
the eyelids, and examining them with a flashlight, ██████ discovered that the host’s
eyes followed the beam. Experimentation was terminated and no further testing is scheduled.