Medicine from Bees: Royal Jelly, Propolis, Pollen and Manuka Honey

Medicine from Bees: Royal Jelly, Propolis, Pollen and Manuka Honey


My name is Goran. I’m a third generation
beekeeper on Solta, a small island in Dalmatia. Eighty-five years the bees be in my family. Originally my whole family came from Split. My grandpa came here with the first ferry. He decided to come with the bees. He finds some owner, he asked, “Can I bring 20 beehives?” and owner says, “Yes” and after few years my grandpa and my father start to buy the land, built a little house for bees,
then we built a little room for sleeping. My grandpa start 1934 in 20th century with bees and I hope so my son be fourth generation. Bees are too important for us.
Without bees, we die. I always start presentation with this
picture. My grandpa, my father, and me 1970 in Split. They teach me everything what I
know right now. I’m not beekeeper because of school. I am a beekeeper because of
experience and family job. I hope so you don’t afraid because bees is very nice animal. Behind the picture of my family it’s bees. Some children wrote me, “Goran, thank you. Before I came to your place, I (was) afraid of bees. After your presentation, I don’t afraid of the bees.” This small community present normal beehive. This honey came from all six continents
because this is a part of mission, “Give Bees A Chance.” Next year I probably make a new shell because a lot of honey came. When I collect 500 jars, maybe next two
years, I (will) organize the contest here. I call during the winter my friends and we
open every jar and we test. Before five years every bees be here, 200 boxes. Forget the pool, forget everything. Only bees here. Bees never sting my
children, never. They play all around, but I must move the bees right now because a lot of guests is here. We try to put here Lavender, Sage and Rosemary. You know,
domestic plants for the bees, not some plant from other continent. Slovenia beekeeper have a tradition to paint, but only first side, but I go with this boxes to our elementary school and I prayed, “Children,
please make me picture”, and they make me picture. This is my grandpa’s centrifuge
and old, maybe 70 years, is the same procedure you know. Always is the same
procedure. We must remove the bees. It’s approximately 2 pound of honey. Before we put the frame in centrifuge we must remove the wax covering. I turn around, honey go outside. I open the pipe and honey go out. The big pieces of wax stay in the filter. In
a few days the little pieces of wax going up. I pick up the pieces of wax and sell
to the people. Very simple. I need to collect always more than honey because a lot of beekeeper only collect honey. Honey it’s one of the six products. Honey,
pollen and propolis came from nature. Other three; royal jelly, beeswax, bee poison. A beekeeper collect the poison because pharmacy industry use the poison for
medicine. Young worker bees produce royal jelly. She eat royal jelly. If you want to
build your immunity system with the best food from the beehive, please buy royal
jelly. I collect from the bottom of the Queen cell royal jelly and I put directly
in the deep freezer. One gram per day it’s enough and you build your immunity
system and you’ll be full of energy. A lot of people never heard about propolis.
Bees collect sap and produce propolis. I put in one liter pharmacy alcohol. At thirty days, I mix it. After thirty days I filter it and final product I put in the jar. If you cut your skin. Alcohol operate it and propolis make a film. You don’t need antibiotic cream or bandage or whatever. If you have the cold
sore or before flu you feel something in your throat, sometimes propolis help. Pollen it’s a better product. You have heavier pollen allergy one little teaspoon every
day and you build your immunity system. If you eat one little teaspoon every day,
local, your heavier be less. Two pieces are two pieces of pollen. When I put the
pollen trap she must pass through this tiny hole, pollen falling down, and every
evening I collect pollen. This pollen came directly from freezer. And this is a 50% pollen 50% honey. This pollen stay outside because honey protect the pollen.
This pollen must go in the deep freezer. Every beekeeper says, “My honey’s the best in the world.” I’m a beekeeper, but I’m not stupid
beekeeper. This is good honey but the best honey in the world came
from New Zealand. This honey a lot of hospital use. They put directly Manuka
honey on the bedsores with some bandages. The scientists discover inside it’s
super antibacterial ingredients and please if you want to have one jar
please order directly from New Zealand. A lot of people make mistake. If you put
honey in hot tea, if you cook with honey, you kill the best part inside. A lot of
people have never heard about some of the products and this is a good chance to
speak with the audience and say something. We make a mission here and
right now I have a chance to talk. The bees are pollinating more than 60% fruit and vegetable. We lose the bees definitely 15-20 percent per year and this is not problem of Croatia, Great Britain or Alaska. This is a world problem, global. It’s a lot of reasons; little parasites, modern agricultural, pesticide,
insecticide, bees flying near mobile phone towers. This is a problem and thank God I have a lot of chance on the island Solta to speak about it. If you live in New York, if yo u live in Berlin, if you live in little city, visit a local beekeeper. It’s easy to go to the shop, to supermarket, and buy honey from the shop. But they care about profit and I respect, but they don’t care about pollination. You must care about pollination and please visit local beekeeper. This is the
first step. If you have a garden in front of your house bees love flowers like
Rosemary, Sage, Lavender or whatever. If you be enough brave start with two
beehive in your garden. Call your local beekeeper association. They must give you a mentor for free. You must buy a few books, you must go to the internet and
educate, but one season it’s enough to your mentor teach you the basic stuff
about bees. After one year you will be ready to be beekeeper alone without
mentor.

What Happens If All The Bees Die?

What Happens If All The Bees Die?


Bees play a crucial role on Earth – some even
claim that if they go extinct, humanity would be next. So with the dramatic decline in bee
population, should we be worried? What happens if the bees all die? Simply put, if a plant produces a flower,
you can bet that bees help them reproduce. This long-standing, working relationship evolved
with flowers being bright and fragrant to attract bees, and the bees fuzzy, velcro-like
bodies helping them to efficiently transfer pollen from the male part of the plant to
the female part. This seemingly simple mechanism is directly responsible for the production
of 70% of fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts that we consume on a daily basis. 70%! Which
translates into almost $200 billion in global agriculture revenue. This huge responsibility
is accomplished by droves of commercial bees, reared by professional beekeepers for the
sole purpose of being transported to farms and orchards to pollinate crops. But since 2006, these hardworking, busy bees
have been mysteriously disappearing. This Colony Collapse Disorder has seen an average
of 1/3rd of commercial bees abandoning their hives. In fact, some beekeepers have even
reported that 90% of their bees have simply buzzed off. In some colonies, mites, viruses and parasites
have been to blame, but many are now looking at a class of insecticides called neonicotinoids.
This neurotoxin is used to kill off crop eating insects and pests, but also affects the central
nervous systems of bees when they consume contaminated nectar. And since nectar is brought
back to hives, the entire colony can be affected, leading to mass confusion and disorientation.
On top of this, other factors such as extremely cold and long winters, a lack of genetic diversity
in commercial bees, and less variable nectar in the fields may be at fault. If the trend continues, entire food chains
and webs may be at risk. Take almond plants for example; the hulls of these nuts are used
as feed for farm cattle and chickens. Fewer bees means fewer almonds, which could mean
declining livestock, and ultimately less milk, cheese, eggs and meat production. Not to mention
almonds are used in cereal, baking and many other food products. Beef and dairy cows would
also be harshly affected by the vanishing alfalfa fields which are used to harvest hay
for cattle. Looking for a morning buzz? Considering bees pollinate Coffea arabica, whose seeds
we grind for coffee, you can count that out. Without bees, our diet would consist of mostly
corn, wheat and rice, as they are wind pollinated plants. Like your clothes? Not only is cotton the
biggest cash crop in the US, it also makes up about 35% of the world’s fiber use. So
you can forget those blue jeans, towels, mattresses and high quality paper products. Simply put, we’d be living in a completely
different world without bees, not to mention suffering a substantial economic strain from
their disappearance. So while we may not necessarily go ‘extinct’ should the downward trend
persist, a world without the buzz of bees would definitely…sting! Want a free copy of our NEW book? Now you
can get one from Audible.com/asap which is the leading provider of audiobooks with over
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which we’re so excited to share with you! You can download it, or another audio book
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Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look

Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look


What’s this bee up to digging around in
the mud? This blue orchard bee is a mason, a builder. Her material is – you guessed it – mud. And she works alone. In fact, unlike those honeybee hives you might
think of, most of the 4,000 types of bees in North America are solitary. See how she scrapes the wet earth? She collects it with two huge pincer-like
tools on her face called mandibles. She’s gathering mud to make her nest. The nest is long and thin. In nature, she goes into places like hollow
twigs. At the University of California, Davis, she
uses a six-inch-long paper straw provided by researchers. In this nest without a straw you can see how
she builds a wall of mud. Then she gathers food from spring flowers,
but not only to feed herself. See the pretty purple pollen on the anther
of this flower? She grabs the anthers with her legs and rubs
the pollen onto hairs on her abdomen called scopa. And while she’s at it, she sips a little
nectar from the blooms. When she climbs back into her nest, she turns
the pollen and nectar into a sweet morsel next to the mud wall. On this purple ball she lays a single egg. She repeats this several times in her narrow
nest. Egg. Wall. Egg. Wall. When she’s done, she seals it all up with
more mud. A cross-section of the nest shows her incredible
craftsmanship: it looks like a piece of jewelry. Soon, the eggs hatch. The hungry larvae feed on their pollen provision,
the purple lunchbox their mom packed for them. Still in the safety of the nest, the well-fed
larva spins a cocoon. The following spring, the adult bee chews
its way out. Just like their name says, blue orchard bees
love orchards: fields of almonds and sweet cherries. And they’re really good at pollinating them:
A few hundred females can pollinate as many almonds as thousands of honeybees. And their tube nest means they’re portable. That makes it easy to distribute them to farmers. So why haven’t they taken over the fields? Well, they reproduce slowly. They only have 15 babies a year. A queen honeybee has 500 … a day. So there just aren’t that many blue orchard
bees around. But some farmers are enlisting them anyway,
hoping they can provide some relief to their struggling honeybee cousins. If you look carefully, you might just spot
a blue orchard bee foraging out in a field, helping keep fruits and nuts on our plates. Hi. It’s Laura. A special shoutout and thank you to Bill Cass
and James Tarraga, whose generous monthly support on Patreon helps make Deep Look possible. If you’d like to get in on the buzz, come
join our Deep Look community on Patreon. Click the button or link below to unlock rewards
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Two Giant Killer Hornet Colonies Fight to the Death


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: The Samurai scouts
bring news that there’s an army on its way. [BUZZING] They rally the troops. But it’s too late. The Bamboo Battalion is on them. The Rock Samurais are ambushed
at their own entrance. When times are tough,
giant killer hornets turn on their kind. It’s like on like,
giant on giant. Claws, stingers, and mandibles,
all weapons deployed and heads will roll. Disabling the enemy is
the primary strategy. Beheading and severing
limbs, the mandibles are the ultimate weapon of war. It’s impossible to
determine who’s winning until the pillaging starts. The marauding Bamboo
giants enter the fortress. They’re conquered
the Rock Samurais and they’ve struck gold. The precious nursery of
developing princesses is ransacked, next year’s
queens killed and cannibalized in their chambers. The sentry can do nothing
but witness the devastation of her precious family.

How a Bee Becomes Queen

How a Bee Becomes Queen


(INTRO TUNE) Honey bees have a harsh caste system. Of
the tens of thousands of bees found in a hive just about all of them are female
workers and they do pretty much everything from cleaning and building
the hive, to collecting pollen and nectar. Their lives are so intense that while a
worker can live from four to nine months during the winter, a worker bee born in
the busy summer season will only last about six weeks before dying of
exhaustion. It’s not a whole lot better for the 300 to 3000 male drones who
basically hang around waiting to mate with the Queen during the summer after
which they die or are kicked out of the hive and when fall comes, and they are of no
more use. Then there’s that Queen. There’s one per hive and she can live to be up to five years old laying up to 2,000 eggs in a day. And she
owes her entire existence to a bitter protein-rich secretion called royal
jelly. Given their long life and unique position, there’s rarely a need for a new
queen, but when one dies or leaves the hive along with a swarm, the colony needs
to find a replacement and fast. In both situations, a larval bee is chosen to
become the new queen. The science of how and why this happens
isn’t entirely settled but one thing is certain, royal jelly plays a large role. Worker bees produce royal jelly from a
gland in their heads called the hypopharynx and feed it to newly hatched
honeybee larva. The milky-yellowish substance is made of digested pollen and
either honey or nectar. Not only is a high in protein but royal jelly also has
a combination of vitamins especially vitamin B plus lipids, sugars, hormones
and, minerals including potassium, magnesium, calcium, and iron. This bee “super-food”
also contains acetylcholine a neurotransmitter also found in humans.
It’s what nerves use to tell muscles to start or stop movement and may also
contribute to learning. All those nutrients might explain why royal jelly is often
marketed as an expensive, dietary supplement cure-all even though studies
haven’t been able to prove that it does anything too significant for humans. We are after all, not bees. But for bees, it
does a lot and around day three of the royal jelly diet is where things get
interesting. Worker bees will choose a few of the
larvae and continue to feed them royal jelly while every other larva is switched
to a less nutrient intensive diet of honey pollen and water. As the future
Queens gorge the royal jelly triggers other
phases of development that workers don’t experience like the formation of ovaries
for laying eggs. If one Queen emerges first she will search for and destroy
any other Queens still developing in their wax cells and if multiple Queens
come out simultaneously they will fight to the death until only one Queen
remains. We don’t know exactly how the worker
bees decide which larvae get the royal treatment but for a long time we thought
it was random. That would make sense because basically worker bees and queen
bees are genetically identical. But there’s some evidence that the selection of a
queen might not actually be so random. A 2011 study found that
the larvae of future Queens have higher levels of proteins that increase some
metabolic activities, so there may indeed be a tiny genetic
difference in the two that plays a huge role. Scientists are also still trying to
figure out what it is about the royal jelly that lets it change a larva’s whole
life. For a while we thought it might be a hormone in the jelly or the way it
affected insulin signals in the larvae then another 2011 study zeroed in on a
protein called ROYALACTIN which when isolated and combined with other
nutrients can transform larvae into queens just like royal jelly. Once they emerge Queens continue eating
royal jelly their entire lives and given that the Queen lives a lot longer than
the thousands of relatives around her, it sounds like a reasonable dietary
choice for a royal bee to make. Thank you for watching this SciShow dose which was
brought to you by our patrons on Patreon, if you want to help support the show you
can go to patreon.com/scishow and if you want to keep getting smarter with us just go to youtube.com/scishow and
subscribe (OUTRO MUSIC)

Why do Bees Die when they Sting us? | #aumsum

Why do Bees Die when they Sting us? | #aumsum


It’s AumSum Time. Why do bees die when they sting us? I don’t know. But it sounds super sad. Yes. Honeybees are the only bees that die after
stinging. But if they die, why do they sting? Bees only sting when they feel we are a threat
to their queen or their hive. Now, the stinger of a honeybee is barbed. After stinging, it can easily come out, if
the skin is thin. But since human skin is thick, the barbed
stinger gets stuck. Hence, when the bee tries to pull herself,
she ends up tearing the abdomen. Leaving behind her venom sac, parts of the
digestive tract, etc. and thus, killing herself. Now, although the bee is dead, we should make
sure that we remove the sting. Why? Because in spite of being detached from the
bee. The venom sac continues to pump venom, thus
increasing the pain. How do scars form? It is a secret process. I cannot reveal it. No. It’s not a secret process. A scar is formed when our skin tissue heals
itself after an injury. Our skin tissue has collagen. Collagen is a structural protein produced
by fibroblasts. Collagen keeps our skin firm and it is usually
arranged in a basket weave pattern. Can I use this basket to keep my bags of chips? Please listen. When we get injured, our skin tissue gets
damaged. So, in order to heal and close the wound,
fibroblasts produce more collagen. But, instead of arranging in a basket weave
pattern. The collagen cross links and aligns in a single
direction. As a result. The injured area of the skin appears different
from normal skin, thus causing a scar. Why do our muscles get sore? Because they want to go to a spa. No. When we begin to go to gym or perform a new
intense physical workout. Our muscles begin to feel sore the next morning. This soreness is called Delayed Onset Muscle
Soreness or DOMS. DOMS occurs usually after eccentric contractions. What does that even mean? When a muscle is lengthening and contracting
at the same time. It is known as an eccentric contraction. For example, when we lower a dumbbell. Our biceps muscle is slowly relaxing and lengthening. But at the same time, it is still contracting
to hold the heavy weight of the dumbbell. Similarly, in a squat, as we lower ourselves,
our quadriceps muscle is lengthening. But at the same time, it is still contracting
to hold our upper body weight. Such eccentric contractions generate tension
in the muscles. Creating minute tears in them, thus, causing
the soreness or pain. Can animals get a sunburn? Yes. Due to ultraviolet radiation of the sun, animals
can also get sunburns. However, to protect themselves from the harmful
radiation. Different animals have different biological
defenses. For example, reptiles have scales, birds have
feathers. Animals like sheep, dogs and cats have fur
or hair. Sperm whales have a special protein, fin whales
have more melanin, etc. Does anybody have Captain America’s shield? Please listen. Some animals even produce certain substances
to protect themselves from the harmful radiation. For example, hippopotamuses secrete a fluid
made up of red and orange pigments. Some fish, amphibians, reptiles and birds
produce a chemical called gadusol. In addition to this, animals like rhinoceroses,
elephants and pigs take mud baths. It is said that mud acts like a physical barrier
between their skin and ultraviolet radiation. Thus preventing them from getting sunburns.

Hairy Flower Wasp – Australian Wasp | Short Documentary

Hairy Flower Wasp – Australian Wasp | Short Documentary


The Hairy Flower Wasp is native to Australia and can be identified by their purple-bluish shinny wings, black body and short antennae. The adult Hairy Flower Wasp often feeds on nectar They are often seen flying just above ground level around compost heaps, wood heaps and decaying tree stumps. Being strong burrowers the female Hairy Flower Wasp searches for beetle larva to lay their eggs. First the beetle larva are stung and paralyze, the female lays her eggs and when the baby wasps are hatched they feeds on the beetle larva. The Hairy Flower Wasp can administer a nasty sting. However they are quit placid and not aggressive, unless provoked.

NATURE | Silence of the Bees | Inside the Hive | PBS

NATURE | Silence of the Bees | Inside the Hive | PBS


A Healthy hive of honey bees functions like a perfect and fluid organism at the center of all activity is the queen an Egg-laying machine the queen is actually a slave to her duties laying up to [2500] eggs a day as many as 2 million in her lifetime The worker bees are all female and make up the bulk of the colony In a typical hive of 30,000 bees only about 100 of males called drones with oversized eyes and bulky bodies drones are not equipped to Gather Pollen or nectar and must rely on the workers to feed them the [invaluable] work bees. Do takes its toll in the summer workers only live around 30 days Literally worked to death But the hive is constantly replenished with new generations of beans ready to go to work from the moment they hatch When [abby] is three weeks old [she] becomes a forager and will spend the rest of her short life collecting nectar and Pollen She will fly up to three miles away, and amazingly always return to the same hive when she discovers an abundant pollen source she’ll recruit other foragers through a most unusual form of communication a dance She informs the other bees that food is [available] and [that] food is in such and such a Direction from the hive and is at such and such a distance away from the hive and those pieces of information Distance and Direction are encoded symbolically in movements and sounds that she produces Turn right at 100 feet take a left at 50 feet The Waggle Dance is the only known symbolic language that exists outside the realm of humans and lower primates? There’s really nothing that compares to the dance language of the honeybee it stands as one of the seven [wonders] of the animal Behavior world

Types of stingless bees 🐝

Types of stingless bees 🐝


Hi, I’m nick from Australiannativebee.com Today we are going to show you a few of the different types of bees that we have in Queensland and New South Wales that are most commonly kept We’ve got some australis boxes there’s the queen on her Brood You’ve got a single thin layer of involucrum australis. We’ve got honey pots. They’re the darker ones Down the front here. We’ve got these yellow pollen pots Right somebody told me this tastes like sherbet They were wrong The honey’s delicious! Okay, that’s australis got another australis box over here lovely It’s really nice Okay, that’s australis. This is Tetragonula Carbonaria You can see he’s a small bee with a thin type of an abdomen on him Got honey pots. Right tool for the job under here, We should have the brood so this is the involucrum on top of the Brood See, it’s multiple layers good for insulation just Multiple layers there we go Probably not happy with me doing this This broods almost ready to hatch I can tell by the color of it. I’m not going to go in any further the honey is quite runny Yeah carbonaria Tetragonula hockingsi box Tetragonula hockingsi or [hocks] as I like to call them, a lot shorter Mostly found in Queensland, but also found across into the northern territory You can see the involucrum is less developed than in the Carbonaria bees they’re not evolved to deal with the same types of cold temperatures as Carbonaria Carbonari are found all the way down to Sydney and below Sydney Where these hockingsi bees basically stop about Brisbane in Queensland The bees have a slightly wider stance like this than the carbonaria These ones very similar in the abdomen size, but some of the hockinsi. I have a thicker type abdomen like this bee Here you can see just going over the top of the involucrum. That’s a Good hockingsi type bee, that one there Broods a little bit interesting it’s not in those regular Sheets like in the Carbonaria it’s a little bit more irregular. I Have some honey pots I’ll go down a level and i’ll show you some pollen pots as well Okay, I’m not going to lift this all the way off the bees are the pollen pots in here You can see they’ve got a different color. They’re not as dark when you look at them from the top that one’s broken and It’s not some tastes like sherbet either. Oh, that’s bad Okay