How Do Ants Find Food? | Animal Science for Kids


Squeaks and I just got back from a picnic
outside. We brought all of our favorite picnic foods:
sandwiches, fruit, and even some cookies for dessert. That’s true, we also got some unexpected
visitors! Some ants came to check out our picnic, too. They carried away some of our crumbs! The ants that came to our picnic were worker
ants, and it’s their job to collect food. See, ants live together in homes called anthills. If you’ve ever seen a little pile of sand
on the sidewalk with ants crawling all over it — that’s an anthill! The different ants that live in the anthill
have different jobs. There’s one big ant called the queen. Her job is to lay all of the eggs that will
hatch into baby ants. Then there are the males, all of the boy ants
that take care of the queen. The queen and the males hardly ever leave
the anthill. The rest of the ants are called workers. They do things like build the ant hill tunnels,
protect the anthill, and go out to find food to bring back for the queen and the males. The worker ants do have to work really hard,
Squeaks. They need to find enough food to feed themselves,
the queen, and the males, not to mention the baby ants. Luckily, the workers have some special skills
that help them to find plenty of food. When a worker ant is out looking for food,
she uses her great sense of smell to sniff out any food in the area. But instead of using a nose like us, she uses
her antennae, the two little things sitting on top of her head. An ant’s antennae are actually better at
smelling than a human’s nose. They can easily smell things that people can’t
smell at all. And when a worker ant’s antennae smell some
tasty food, like the fruit at our picnic, she can follow the smell until she finds the
food. Now that she knows where the food is, she
can use her eyes to look around at what’s near the food, like a tree or our bright picnic
blanket. If she needs to find the food again, she’ll
look for those familiar sights until she finds the food. And ants will eat just about anything. Most ants are omnivores, meaning that they’ll
eat plants, other animals, and all sorts of things. The different foods they like to eat all have
different smells, so the ant can smell out which one she wants to bring home today. Ants love sugar, so it makes sense that they
went after our cookie crumbs! They were really big pieces for one tiny ant
to carry, Squeaks. But ants are incredibly strong! They can carry something that’s up to 50
times heavier than they are. That would be like you picking up a small
car! But if something is too heavy even for an
ant, a bunch of other worker ants will come help her out. Squeaks, how do you think the other ants find
the first worker ant? That’s right, they use their antennae and
their sense of smell. When a worker ant is on the trail for some
tasty food, she can leave a smelly trail behind her, which the other ants can follow using
their antennae. When a whole group of ants is following a
trail like this, they form a line of helpers ready to use
some teamwork to move some big food. At our picnic, they even managed to move a
whole cookie together. One ant is pretty strong by herself, but by
working together, these ants are incredible. I’m glad they came to visit our picnic,
too! And I’m glad that the whole anthill will
have food now. What about you? Have you ever seen worker ants looking for
food? What would you look for if you had super-smeller
antennae? Grab a grownup to help you leave a comment
below, or send us an email at [email protected] We’ll see you next time, here at the fort.

Stingless bee hive split 🐝


Hi, I’m nick from australiannativebee.com Today I’m going to show you two different types of splits you can do if you have an Existing hive That’s Fairly strong The first is (Exchanging boxes) and this is quite a common sort of split And most boxes are designed to be split this way The first thing you want to check is to see whether the box is really full This one has a clear panel and so I can check that quite easy This is the entrance of the new box and I’ve put a screen over it to keep the bees in and also on the inside of it. I’ve put Native Beeswax around the hole and this will help the bees make an entrance tunnel at a later date The first thing you’ll need to do is undo the straps or the tie downs holding your old full Box Together. I Like to use a propolis chisel or wax chisel to pop the boxes apart because it’s fairly subtle on the open This is actually a Downunder box designed by Dean Haley. It has the honey super at the base of the box I Won’t be touching the honey super today I’m just interested in where the brood is positioned between these two top boxes This box has plywood separators, and you can see they’ve worked quite. Well here. I’m Looking for some queen cells now, and they’re usually situated on the edge of the brood with Tetragonula Carbonaria You can see one up here. It’s a larger cell and also there’s one down here on the edge it’s very important to make sure both halves of the box have an even amount of Brood and The remaining box there has a good amount of brood and it also has two queen cells When doing a split like this you’re taking half the brood and therefore half the “Age of Brood” Meaning there’s going to be a slump in bee numbers When the eggs that are supposed to be there go to hatch, and they’re not there Here I’m sitting the new frame on top of the box Making sure nothing’s in the way because I don’t want pests coming in through that crack between the boxes So I want it nice and tight Place the frame down gently and make sure you blow any bees out of that crack because you don’t want to squash any That’s just bad beekeeping place the honey super on top of the top box and Get ready to tape it up. Here’s what the honey super looks like Now the old frame that came off this box that keys into your new box And you will have made a new colony just by swapping box frames around The last step is to use some tape and run around those cracks in the boxes because syrphid fly Phorid fly and hive beetle all love to get into native boxes that have just been split Where you have broken honey pots and broken Pollen pots After use it around and taped up your box use some warm soapy water to wipe down Any honey or Pollen off the outside of the box Because dean’s box had the entrance hole at the top and my new box has the entrance hole at the bottom I’ll need to drill a new entrance hole for this box and The job will be done The next transfer, we’ll be doing is transferring bees from the smaller box to a larger box in some cases this will work The process is going to be relatively simple we’re simply going to cut out the top section of a box and put it into the new Box I Have already made sure there’s some queen cells in this brood so should take off and make a good colony again, I’m using the propolis chisel and I don’t want to squash any bees. So I’m just slowly working my way around as to just push them out of the way Now I’m going to lift it up put it on top of another box frame so that the brood isn’t being squashed on the ground And I’m going to cut around the edges of this box. So the whole nest structure can be removed as one Have a look at all these bees on the underside of the clear panel Don’t throw this clear panel away because there’s a lot of useful resins on the underside of that that the bees will need Even though this part of the film is in fast-forward you can see how slowly I’m working along the edge This is so the bees have time to move out of the way and don’t get cut in half while you’re cutting the nest structure Once you’ve cut all the way around the nest structure it should lift out and you can place the whole nest structure into your new box Try to Avoid putting any broken honey or pollen pots in I can’t stress this enough Unless you want pests descending on your hive like the angels of hell. Do not do this Once you’ve checked everything is good make sure the nest structure isn’t touching the sides of any of your new box this way the bees can get around and make any necessary repairs to the Nest I Usually will give the bees three days in a room inside my house that way no pests can get to them After the three days up, I will reduce the entrance hole so that only one bee can enter an exit This will give them time to finish their entrance Tube and ward off any pests that might want to enter

Honey bees – Natural History 2

Honey bees – Natural History 2


Bees are called social insects because they
live and work together as a community. Thousands of female bees, called worker bees, live together
in a hive with a queen bee. The queen bee is marked with a red dot so we can see her
better. The worker bees are all females, but they
almost never lay eggs. Worker bees do almost all the chores in the hive. They gather pollen
or nectar, guard the entrance, clean the hive, build the comb, make honey, tend the queen,
and feed the larvae. They even fan the hive with their wings to keep it cool on a hot
summer day. The queen bee is larger than the worker bees.
She lays about a thousand eggs each day! Watch the worker bees attending to the queen bee
and feeding her. The worker bees touch and lick her as they tend to her needs. They get
a substance from the queen that they carry around the hive, and when they touch and lick
other bees, this substance, or pheromone, tells them that the queen bee is alive and
well. Then all the worker bees keep doing their jobs. The queen bee walks from cell
to cell to lay a small white egg in each one. She lays all the eggs.
Inside the cells, the eggs hatch into larvae or grubs. The workers take care of all the
larvae, which include several queen bee larvae. The worker bees take pollen mixed with honey
to feed them. The larvae eat a lot, but the pupae do not
eat at all. When the larvae are ready to turn into pupae, the worker bees close off the
cell with wax. Inside, the grubs pupate and metamorphose into bees in about 12 days. Pupae
use the stored up fat and tissue from the larval stage to metamorphose into adult bees.
Honey bees undergo a complete metamorphosis. After the pupae have changed into adult bees,
they chew their way out of the cells and start working! Watch the young bee crawl out of
the cell! The cells are also used for storing nectar
and pollen. Honey is made inside cells. Adult bees also rest in them.
If a female larva is fed special food called royal jelly, she becomes a queen bee. If not,
she becomes a worker bee. A new queen goes on her nuptial, or wedding
flight, a flight to mate with drones. Only a few drones, or male bees, live in each
hive. Thousands of drones from many bee colonies gather in one place. Queens fly there, too.
The drones mate with a queen bee. After the young queen has mated, she heads to the colony
where she was raised and becomes the new queen. The old queen and approximately half of the
workers leave the hive as a swarm, to find a new nest site.

Honey Bee Orientation Flights, Honeybees

Honey Bee Orientation Flights, Honeybees


Out working to bees the other day I
caught some orientation flights here’s what a normal hive looks like with bees stacking up to land in an orderly fashion busy hive but nothing really extraordinary
good group of bees landing, coming and going Now the chaos of orientation. Here we can
see bees filling the air space in front of the hive as a climb the front of the hive they
cast themselves off hover about in front of the hive orienting
themselves to the surroundings. Again, typical hive entrance activity
sees the returning bees stacking up waiting to land as the bees
at the front of the hive on the landing board inspect the returning bees in an orderly fashion. As I was filming the initial hive
orienting a second hive started its orientation
flights. This hive, right here in the foreground with the red honey super is in the initial stages of orientation. You can see the frenzied activity in the
air space in front of the hive as bees slowly come out of the hive and climb the hive surface, casting themselves off and orienting. These bees are actually making small figure 8 patterns that they will increase in size as they rise above the hive in the air above the bee yard. So, that’s it for orientation flights. Thanks
for watching and remember to eat more honey and tune
back in for more HIVE ACTION!!!

Honey Bee Observation Hive 8-Frame Setup How to Start Keeping Bees with a split!

Honey Bee Observation Hive 8-Frame Setup How to Start Keeping Bees with a split!


okay so today what I’m showing you is
something that I’ve always wanted to have and that’s an observation hive and
this is an observation hive I purchased as an already assembled kit it comes
with everything except the glazing so we have to do that ourselves but this is
called a swing view hive it holds eight deep frames and I’m gonna go
step-by-step how to set it up and I had a special order this plexiglass I got
the thick stuff so it’s a little over a quarter of an inch thick and it’s
clarity is perfect it’s acrylic and of course you have this paper on it that
you have to peel off and make sure that your dimensions are perfect because you
don’t want to have to cut the Plexiglas yourself and this particular company I
will give you a link for them but they do custom cutting for you and they were
within a sixteenth of an inch to my dimensions the next thing you have to do
is bed the glass in a hundred percent pure silicon that’s rated for all
weather conditions and that’s what we did we put this little can bead down and
now we’re gonna drop in the Plexiglas and remember you test fit it dry before
you put this in to make sure you don’t have any problems and now once it’s in I
go around the edges and I press it up to make sure that the silicon bead goes the
full width of the joint we don’t want any movement in this we definitely don’t
want bees and debris to get between the Plexiglas and the frames that came with
this observation hive and they mark the sides a and B and we’re looking at the
top there and that’s actually a feeder screen and this is the B side it’s all
framed up you can see that there’s a full bead of silicone there and you can
later come and cut it off with a razor blade if you want to take out that
excess I ended up just leaving it but make sure that you absolutely fill the
joint just for a lot of reasons with strength being the first so we have the
a side and the B side nice and strong you have the option of course to finish
these frames finish the woodwork the exterior of it I wouldn’t put any finish
inside or just leave it plain and I’m leaving it plain this is the silicon
tube that I used 100% silicone totally stable inert material once it’s dry you
want to make sure when you’re using this stuff that you have plenty of
ventilation going and then once you have put the Plexiglas bedded in the silicon
into these frames give them at least 24 hours and here we are at the shed that
I’ve decided to put the observation hive in and this is the included landing
board that goes with it and you have to drill a 2 inch diameter hole from the
inside before you of coarse screw this on here and they use two inch grey
electrical conduit the plastic stuff that’s rated for sun exposure and i had
to do some modifications on the inside here because I’m using 2×4 supports and
this shed was Amish built so the dimensional lumber is a fall like when
they say 2×4 it is four inches so I had to chisel some of that out and we’re
vertically mounting these two by fours so they’re glued and they’re screwed in
because it’s gonna hold quite a bit of weight remember this is an eighth frame
observation hive and that’s eight deep frames so let’s say at the outside 20
pounds per frame so you’re looking at yeah quite a bit of weight if the thing
actually filled up completely with honey we know that’s not likely but if it did
you want to definitely be able to support it and this is the swing view
mounting bracket that goes on the wall some people actually put this thing
inside their house I really didn’t want to do that I couldn’t think of a great
way that I wanted to keep it plus inside your house sometimes you have to tend to
that you’d have to pull the thing off and carry it outside and so that you
could access the bees and do some maintenance with your observation hive
so here I’m just eyeballing the again it’s electrical conduit that came with it
and you can see that it’s already cut out there that landing board has a
receiver for it that’s perfect I did not glue or do anything other than
friction set that and when you put the the plate on for
the wall it also has a recess that houses that tube that the bees will use
to go in and out and at the top there’s that threaded grommet so that you can
put the bolt through the top on the bottom which is where the bees go in and
out it has that nice piece of angled wood that supports it and then again a
little tail piece of electrical conduit sticks out and the swing view is
actually going to turn on that so what they want you to do is put down some
beeswax so that it can sit on that and that becomes the gliding surface and so
here we are showing you the frame again without the glazing yet and this is that
little piece I talked about and these are clumps of beeswax that I put down
there and we’re just going to use the weight of the swing view itself to smear
that around and of course beeswax is pretty stable here it is mounted now and
again you can see that the joints are cutout dedos or whatever you want to
call that that will accommodate the frames and I’m going to show you
step-by-step how I set it up and those are order 20 threaded studs that are
there that will hold the frames on so it looks pretty good stainless steel
screens and again little segments that have been cut off of electrical conduit
that act like spring clips they hold it in there so it’s easy to remove if you
have to get inside also if you needed to close off the entry and exit point there
is this little galvanized piece of Steel there and it comes with a screw so I
just pulled it out which opens it up so the bees can come and go and then I just
put that screw back in the hole there so I don’t lose it but if you ever have to
close off your observation hive for transportation that’s the plate that you
put in the other thing is I’m going with acorn plastic frames these are food
grade plastic frames that come with a heavy heavy coat of beeswax on them in
the past I’ve used Piergo and these are what I’ve gone to now so and the green
stuff is actually drone frame so you’ll see that the the cell size is much
larger and people use that to get drones to
develop and they use that as some kind of protection for varroa because I’ll
just pull out the drone and then here’s the white frames it comes in white
plastic or black I prefer the black because I’m a photographer and I’m
trying to get a look at egg development larvae development and a lot of things
that are going on which is why I have the observation hive to begin with the
green here I’m just showing it to you’re really close and they’re marked on the
top again is your acorn frames and I’ll put a link to that in the description
one X means it’s dipped once 2 X dip twice and 3 X triple dip or what they
call heavy wax coating the more wax you have on these frames the more readily
your bees will start to draw them out and make their their honeycomb on that
so we’re gonna get to see all of that and it’s one of the great things about
having an observation hive because we get to watch them draw out comb and
start to occupy the hive now if you want to put in wooden frames or
something like that go ahead because then you’ll be able to watch how they
draw out comb without foundation and that company I believe also sells
plastic frame foundation without the full frame but I just personally prefer
the full frames and we’re gonna have both in care so the top four frames will
be the new acorn variety which now I prefer they don’t flex in the middle and
they don’t distort as much as the Piergo frames which are going to be the
bottom four as much as those did and those were out
in my beehives so the next thing I have to do is bring in some frames of bees to
populate the hive so I’m going to a hive that has a lot of activity they’ve got
some brood in there and I’m going to light load the observation hive because
again I want to watch them expand so I’m gonna pull some frames that have some
brood and some resources on them and I want to put those inside the frame and
then I’ve mail ordered in this Weaver queen which is a survivor bee line
they’re varroa resistant they’re super hygienic
and she comes out of Texas and there are workers of course in there because the
Queen can’t feed herself and you’ll just put her on top of all the frames inside
the observation hive and then what I did later was I just pulled that gray clip
out and the stainless steel screen and then used forceps to withdraw the cage
so you want to make sure of course and pulled the plug on the sugar side and
now we’re doing something different here normally you’d be Re-Queening because the
queen would have died and you’d have a queenless hive that means that the bees
that would be in there would be looking for a new queen and would readily accept
a new queen that’s not gonna happen here because we’re pulling frames from hives
that have Queens and those bees have pheromone associated with the Queen in
the hive they’ve come from so again here’s my first frame we’re gonna put
that in there and again I don’t want fully drawn out frames I don’t want them
to be complete because part of the fun is in watching them draw out wax on
their own and watching the colony establish itself and you notice how calm
these bees are you also want to position them carefully you don’t want to put it
right up against the surface where the Plexiglas will be because you want to
maintain these space they’re thinking about where the comb will be and how far
drawn out it will be and then leave additional bee space 3/16 of an inch
roughly is good but remember that once you close it up you’re not gonna have
access to move these things around so positioning them carefully now will be
worth its weight in gold later so what I’m doing is I’m putting the
frames in one by one and going back back out to the apiary collecting other
frames now look at this one it’s absolutely loaded with pollen there’s
also capped honey there so these are resources that the bees are going to use
to expand their colony now I did have to put on some protective clothing
remember I’m getting into hives and I am taking away their brood if you
want to kick off a defensive response from a colony of bees pull some brood
frames and you’ll see that they will really want to get you away from those
resources much different than if you were just pulling honey supers so here
again I’m just being very careful in the alignment of these frames now these are
all worker bees most of them my target bees of course
are nurse bees bees that are still in there cleaning stages feeding stages for
larvae and those that would otherwise occupy brood frames and that’s
because they haven’t been outside of their hive yet they don’t know where
they live all of their experience in life has been inside the hive so that
means hopefully that they will be better prepared to occupy this hive and stay
where I put them because the hives that I’m pulling them from are within a
hundred feet actually of this observation hive in the shed that it’s
in also you get a glass jar with a tin cap on it that is your feet our jar goes
right on the top there and I’m putting of course 50/50 sugar water and I use
super filtered water and I heat it up and sanitize it carefully before I put
that on the hive and here it is all together an eighth frame swing view hive
and if you’ve been watching any many other videos that show macro video
close-ups of different behavior whether it be a queen laying eggs or whether it
be baby bees hatching or the development of larvae that has all been filmed in
this observation hive and because we’re in the shed and now you can see there
are larvae there very small ones to the left and again here’s the reason why I
like the black plastic frames and in this case from acorn is because the
contrast there lets me see eggs better and lets me see developing larvae and
here we have a collection of bees that aren’t doing a lot
now but what they are is forming a physical barrier around these larvae to
keep the cooler air from getting to them and here is what looks like the start of
a queen cell but what they actually did within days after installing these
frames is they they dismantled that they chewed it all apart and some of these
little areas here are packed now with pollen pollen varies widely in color it
could be cheeto yellow or it can be very pale green and in some cases almost just
off-white and look at this variety of pollen here as soon as a worker comes in
and unloads the pollen directly into the cell a worker bee then goes right in and
starts to mix that pollen and seal it up with a little bit of honey and actually
the pollen will ferment in these cells so if you can smell it if you open up a
pollen area that’s been there for 48 hours you start to smell that it is
fermenting and actually the two-day-old pollen that’s been stored is most
frequently used by those nurse bees so here we are again I want you to notice
this behavior here’s the Queen and her workers and they’re in this cage look at
the abdomen of the occupants of this colony right now they are trying as hard
as they can to sting through that screen see how they bend their abdomens towards
the occupants of this little queen cage they’re trying to kill off the occupants
and the reason is they perceive the pheromone of this Queen and these
workers as alien to the hive and they definitely don’t want them there so
we’re gonna get back to that later now we’re gonna show here that there are
resources see the pollen in the top and then we also have honey lower down all
around the brood that are currently hatching here and that’s a convenience
thing the nurse bees don’t have to go very far to get resources to feed these
baby bees of course once they’re capped they’re not eating anything so it’s only
during the larvae stage that they’re being fed and then they’ll come out of
there capping on their own these baby bees will go right to work
they turn into nurse bees themselves and will turn around and attend to those
other developing larvae now here we are back at the Queen this is 24 hours later
notice the body posture of the bees that are on that screen now their abdomens
are laid out straight and what they’re actually doing is sticking their heads
in and extending their tongues to make sure that that Queen has plenty of food
Queens do not feed themselves they’re only fed by nurse bees in the hive so
now it’s safe to pull the plug and release that Queen into this new colony and here again we’re just we’re actually
shooting this through the opposite screen there are vents left and right
top and bottom and here’s the Queen out on her own and she is fertile and she
set right about laying eggs the only thing that really held her back in this
new hive was the number of cells that were available for her to lay in she
laid an egg in every single cell that was not occupied it was a fantastic
experience now the observation hive is set up and
ready to go and now all we have to do is drink coffee and watch and learn about
what goes on inside a honey bee hive I hope you’ve enjoyed watching this and if
you want to see bees at your leisure protected from weather I suggest that
you get an observation hive of your own or maybe even build one thank you so
much for watching this video and thank you again for your interest and honey
bees I hope this was helpful see ya!

Medicine from Bees: Royal Jelly, Propolis, Pollen and Manuka Honey

Medicine from Bees: Royal Jelly, Propolis, Pollen and Manuka Honey


My name is Goran. I’m a third generation
beekeeper on Solta, a small island in Dalmatia. Eighty-five years the bees be in my family. Originally my whole family came from Split. My grandpa came here with the first ferry. He decided to come with the bees. He finds some owner, he asked, “Can I bring 20 beehives?” and owner says, “Yes” and after few years my grandpa and my father start to buy the land, built a little house for bees,
then we built a little room for sleeping. My grandpa start 1934 in 20th century with bees and I hope so my son be fourth generation. Bees are too important for us.
Without bees, we die. I always start presentation with this
picture. My grandpa, my father, and me 1970 in Split. They teach me everything what I
know right now. I’m not beekeeper because of school. I am a beekeeper because of
experience and family job. I hope so you don’t afraid because bees is very nice animal. Behind the picture of my family it’s bees. Some children wrote me, “Goran, thank you. Before I came to your place, I (was) afraid of bees. After your presentation, I don’t afraid of the bees.” This small community present normal beehive. This honey came from all six continents
because this is a part of mission, “Give Bees A Chance.” Next year I probably make a new shell because a lot of honey came. When I collect 500 jars, maybe next two
years, I (will) organize the contest here. I call during the winter my friends and we
open every jar and we test. Before five years every bees be here, 200 boxes. Forget the pool, forget everything. Only bees here. Bees never sting my
children, never. They play all around, but I must move the bees right now because a lot of guests is here. We try to put here Lavender, Sage and Rosemary. You know,
domestic plants for the bees, not some plant from other continent. Slovenia beekeeper have a tradition to paint, but only first side, but I go with this boxes to our elementary school and I prayed, “Children,
please make me picture”, and they make me picture. This is my grandpa’s centrifuge
and old, maybe 70 years, is the same procedure you know. Always is the same
procedure. We must remove the bees. It’s approximately 2 pound of honey. Before we put the frame in centrifuge we must remove the wax covering. I turn around, honey go outside. I open the pipe and honey go out. The big pieces of wax stay in the filter. In
a few days the little pieces of wax going up. I pick up the pieces of wax and sell
to the people. Very simple. I need to collect always more than honey because a lot of beekeeper only collect honey. Honey it’s one of the six products. Honey,
pollen and propolis came from nature. Other three; royal jelly, beeswax, bee poison. A beekeeper collect the poison because pharmacy industry use the poison for
medicine. Young worker bees produce royal jelly. She eat royal jelly. If you want to
build your immunity system with the best food from the beehive, please buy royal
jelly. I collect from the bottom of the Queen cell royal jelly and I put directly
in the deep freezer. One gram per day it’s enough and you build your immunity
system and you’ll be full of energy. A lot of people never heard about propolis.
Bees collect sap and produce propolis. I put in one liter pharmacy alcohol. At thirty days, I mix it. After thirty days I filter it and final product I put in the jar. If you cut your skin. Alcohol operate it and propolis make a film. You don’t need antibiotic cream or bandage or whatever. If you have the cold
sore or before flu you feel something in your throat, sometimes propolis help. Pollen it’s a better product. You have heavier pollen allergy one little teaspoon every
day and you build your immunity system. If you eat one little teaspoon every day,
local, your heavier be less. Two pieces are two pieces of pollen. When I put the
pollen trap she must pass through this tiny hole, pollen falling down, and every
evening I collect pollen. This pollen came directly from freezer. And this is a 50% pollen 50% honey. This pollen stay outside because honey protect the pollen.
This pollen must go in the deep freezer. Every beekeeper says, “My honey’s the best in the world.” I’m a beekeeper, but I’m not stupid
beekeeper. This is good honey but the best honey in the world came
from New Zealand. This honey a lot of hospital use. They put directly Manuka
honey on the bedsores with some bandages. The scientists discover inside it’s
super antibacterial ingredients and please if you want to have one jar
please order directly from New Zealand. A lot of people make mistake. If you put
honey in hot tea, if you cook with honey, you kill the best part inside. A lot of
people have never heard about some of the products and this is a good chance to
speak with the audience and say something. We make a mission here and
right now I have a chance to talk. The bees are pollinating more than 60% fruit and vegetable. We lose the bees definitely 15-20 percent per year and this is not problem of Croatia, Great Britain or Alaska. This is a world problem, global. It’s a lot of reasons; little parasites, modern agricultural, pesticide,
insecticide, bees flying near mobile phone towers. This is a problem and thank God I have a lot of chance on the island Solta to speak about it. If you live in New York, if yo u live in Berlin, if you live in little city, visit a local beekeeper. It’s easy to go to the shop, to supermarket, and buy honey from the shop. But they care about profit and I respect, but they don’t care about pollination. You must care about pollination and please visit local beekeeper. This is the
first step. If you have a garden in front of your house bees love flowers like
Rosemary, Sage, Lavender or whatever. If you be enough brave start with two
beehive in your garden. Call your local beekeeper association. They must give you a mentor for free. You must buy a few books, you must go to the internet and
educate, but one season it’s enough to your mentor teach you the basic stuff
about bees. After one year you will be ready to be beekeeper alone without
mentor.

What Happens If All The Bees Die?

What Happens If All The Bees Die?


Bees play a crucial role on Earth – some even
claim that if they go extinct, humanity would be next. So with the dramatic decline in bee
population, should we be worried? What happens if the bees all die? Simply put, if a plant produces a flower,
you can bet that bees help them reproduce. This long-standing, working relationship evolved
with flowers being bright and fragrant to attract bees, and the bees fuzzy, velcro-like
bodies helping them to efficiently transfer pollen from the male part of the plant to
the female part. This seemingly simple mechanism is directly responsible for the production
of 70% of fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts that we consume on a daily basis. 70%! Which
translates into almost $200 billion in global agriculture revenue. This huge responsibility
is accomplished by droves of commercial bees, reared by professional beekeepers for the
sole purpose of being transported to farms and orchards to pollinate crops. But since 2006, these hardworking, busy bees
have been mysteriously disappearing. This Colony Collapse Disorder has seen an average
of 1/3rd of commercial bees abandoning their hives. In fact, some beekeepers have even
reported that 90% of their bees have simply buzzed off. In some colonies, mites, viruses and parasites
have been to blame, but many are now looking at a class of insecticides called neonicotinoids.
This neurotoxin is used to kill off crop eating insects and pests, but also affects the central
nervous systems of bees when they consume contaminated nectar. And since nectar is brought
back to hives, the entire colony can be affected, leading to mass confusion and disorientation.
On top of this, other factors such as extremely cold and long winters, a lack of genetic diversity
in commercial bees, and less variable nectar in the fields may be at fault. If the trend continues, entire food chains
and webs may be at risk. Take almond plants for example; the hulls of these nuts are used
as feed for farm cattle and chickens. Fewer bees means fewer almonds, which could mean
declining livestock, and ultimately less milk, cheese, eggs and meat production. Not to mention
almonds are used in cereal, baking and many other food products. Beef and dairy cows would
also be harshly affected by the vanishing alfalfa fields which are used to harvest hay
for cattle. Looking for a morning buzz? Considering bees pollinate Coffea arabica, whose seeds
we grind for coffee, you can count that out. Without bees, our diet would consist of mostly
corn, wheat and rice, as they are wind pollinated plants. Like your clothes? Not only is cotton the
biggest cash crop in the US, it also makes up about 35% of the world’s fiber use. So
you can forget those blue jeans, towels, mattresses and high quality paper products. Simply put, we’d be living in a completely
different world without bees, not to mention suffering a substantial economic strain from
their disappearance. So while we may not necessarily go ‘extinct’ should the downward trend
persist, a world without the buzz of bees would definitely…sting! Want a free copy of our NEW book? Now you
can get one from Audible.com/asap which is the leading provider of audiobooks with over
150,000 dowloadable titles across all types of literature. Our book just came out this
past week and it covers a ton of questions that have never been answered in our videos
which we’re so excited to share with you! You can download it, or another audio book
of your choice, for free, at audible.com/asap. Special thanks to Audible for making these
videos possible, and to YOU for continually supporting our show and science education.
It means a lot! And if you missed our Live SCIENCE stream
last week where we performed the Periodic Table Song live and answered your burning
questions, be sure to check it out here, or by using the link in the description. And subscribe for more weekly science videos.

Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look

Watch This Bee Build Her Bee-jeweled Nest | Deep Look


What’s this bee up to digging around in
the mud? This blue orchard bee is a mason, a builder. Her material is – you guessed it – mud. And she works alone. In fact, unlike those honeybee hives you might
think of, most of the 4,000 types of bees in North America are solitary. See how she scrapes the wet earth? She collects it with two huge pincer-like
tools on her face called mandibles. She’s gathering mud to make her nest. The nest is long and thin. In nature, she goes into places like hollow
twigs. At the University of California, Davis, she
uses a six-inch-long paper straw provided by researchers. In this nest without a straw you can see how
she builds a wall of mud. Then she gathers food from spring flowers,
but not only to feed herself. See the pretty purple pollen on the anther
of this flower? She grabs the anthers with her legs and rubs
the pollen onto hairs on her abdomen called scopa. And while she’s at it, she sips a little
nectar from the blooms. When she climbs back into her nest, she turns
the pollen and nectar into a sweet morsel next to the mud wall. On this purple ball she lays a single egg. She repeats this several times in her narrow
nest. Egg. Wall. Egg. Wall. When she’s done, she seals it all up with
more mud. A cross-section of the nest shows her incredible
craftsmanship: it looks like a piece of jewelry. Soon, the eggs hatch. The hungry larvae feed on their pollen provision,
the purple lunchbox their mom packed for them. Still in the safety of the nest, the well-fed
larva spins a cocoon. The following spring, the adult bee chews
its way out. Just like their name says, blue orchard bees
love orchards: fields of almonds and sweet cherries. And they’re really good at pollinating them:
A few hundred females can pollinate as many almonds as thousands of honeybees. And their tube nest means they’re portable. That makes it easy to distribute them to farmers. So why haven’t they taken over the fields? Well, they reproduce slowly. They only have 15 babies a year. A queen honeybee has 500 … a day. So there just aren’t that many blue orchard
bees around. But some farmers are enlisting them anyway,
hoping they can provide some relief to their struggling honeybee cousins. If you look carefully, you might just spot
a blue orchard bee foraging out in a field, helping keep fruits and nuts on our plates. Hi. It’s Laura. A special shoutout and thank you to Bill Cass
and James Tarraga, whose generous monthly support on Patreon helps make Deep Look possible. If you’d like to get in on the buzz, come
join our Deep Look community on Patreon. Click the button or link below to unlock rewards
like exclusive digital downloads, chats with the producers and cool swag. One more thing. Our partner, PBS Digital Studios, wants to
hear from you. It’s a survey so we can make even better
shows. It takes about ten minutes, and you might
win a sweet T-shirt. Link in the description. Thanks!

Two Giant Killer Hornet Colonies Fight to the Death


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: The Samurai scouts
bring news that there’s an army on its way. [BUZZING] They rally the troops. But it’s too late. The Bamboo Battalion is on them. The Rock Samurais are ambushed
at their own entrance. When times are tough,
giant killer hornets turn on their kind. It’s like on like,
giant on giant. Claws, stingers, and mandibles,
all weapons deployed and heads will roll. Disabling the enemy is
the primary strategy. Beheading and severing
limbs, the mandibles are the ultimate weapon of war. It’s impossible to
determine who’s winning until the pillaging starts. The marauding Bamboo
giants enter the fortress. They’re conquered
the Rock Samurais and they’ve struck gold. The precious nursery of
developing princesses is ransacked, next year’s
queens killed and cannibalized in their chambers. The sentry can do nothing
but witness the devastation of her precious family.