Alternative Treatment For Fibroids – Dr.  Su Yun An’s Story

Alternative Treatment For Fibroids – Dr. Su Yun An’s Story


My name is Dr. Su Yun An. I’ve always known that i’ve had uterine fibroids over the last seven, eight years
and I didn’t realize gradually that it was growing and interfering with my life, but
because these changes were so suttle I was trying to brush off to the side saying that
well everybody has mestrual cramps or everybody has this kind of problem. But just because everyone has it doesn’t make
it normal. My OBGYN was very sure that I should get a
myomectomy. I have some friends who’ve actually gotten
a myomectomy with some complications and they took a whole lot longer than me to recover
as well. It took me three days to fully recover. The first twelve hours was very difficult,
but gradually it went away relatively quickly. Within about forty eight hours I was able
to walk and do most of the chores and I even felt like I could go back to work that day
but I took an additional day off. You know it was nothing, it was everything
that I could manage. I almost want to call Dr. Doe’s office every
month, every time I have my cycle because it is so much better. You know my message to you is to really consider
this procedure because it has been a life changing experience for me and now if I talk
to any women who has uterine fibroids without hesitation I recommend Dr. Doe and his office.

What If We Killed All the Wasps?


♪ Wasps seem to be best known for stinging people,
ruining picnics, and generally being jerks. But believe it or not, our lives are actually
a lot better because of them. Wasps are nuisance bugs, but they kill lots
of other nuisance bugs and are important pollinators. And scientists even think that certain compounds
in wasp venom could be used as cancer therapies or new antimicrobials. So while you might have daydreamed of humans
wiping out every wasp on the planet, it would actually be a pretty terrible idea. First, even though wasps may seem like pests
themselves, they’re actually important pest control agents, taking out other insects that
are harmful to forests or crops. Take yellow jackets — the group you probably
think of when you hear the word wasp. Although these guys will try to steal a taste
of your sugary soft drink or fruit, they also collect lots of insects to feed to their larvae. And predatory wasps like yellow jackets make
up just a tiny fraction of specie of wasp. In fact, most wasps — maybe as many as 2
million species of them — are parasitoid wasps. And they have a whole different way of taking
down insects. Parasitoids use special venom to paralyze
or zombie-fy other bugs, then lay their eggs on or inside the unfortunate host. The host is then slowly eaten alive. And while this is pretty gruesome, it’s
also helpful for farmers. Parasitoid wasps help control crop-destroying
pests like aphids and caterpillars. In fact, one genus — called Trichogramma
— is an essential biocontrol agent. Worldwide, hundreds of thousands of square
kilometers of crops and forests are treated with these wasps to control pests. And that translates to a lot of harmful insects. So the next time you’re able to stock up
on fresh produce at the grocery store, you might have a wasp to thank. Besides defending them from insects, wasps
are also important pollinators for certain plants, although the way they do it is often
a bit weird. For example, some species of orchids actually
trick male wasps into pollinating them by looking like a hot female wasp. And the relationship wasps have with figs
is even weirder, but arguably even more important. Figs have flowers that grow inside a mostly-enclosed
shell called the syconium, and they can’t be pollinated by the wind or by most insects. Instead, they usually have to be pollinated
by a specific group of wasp species. First, the female wasp lays her eggs inside
the flowers, then dies in the syconium. When the new wasps hatch, they stick around,
grow up, and eventually mate inside the fig plant. And yes, they are siblings — which can lead
to problems, but generally works out okay. After mating, the blind, flightless males
chew a hole in the plant so that the females can escape. Then, the females take pollen from the fig
flowers and go in search of another fig tree with another syconium. And the process starts all over again. This is a mutually beneficial relationship
for both the insects and the trees. And while most figs grown for human consumption
can be produced without wasps, wild figs are completely dependent on them to reproduce. These fruits are surprisingly important, too. They’re known as a keystone species, and
are consumed by over 1200 types of animals, including birds, fruit bats, and primates. Scientists even think figs might have been
a vital food source for early humans. So by pollinating them, wasps help to maintain
tropical and sub-tropical forest ecosystems all over the world. And your family tree might also have them
to thank. Finally, wasps aren’t just worth keeping
around for our plants. If we killed them all off, we might also be
missing out on an important medical resource. See, wasp venom contains a class of peptides,
which are essentially small proteins, called mastoparans. And although they’re toxic, mastoparans
could treat diseases if they’re used in the right way. Recently, several studies have investigated
whether they could be used to treat cancer. A 2015 study from the journal Peptides found
that they increased survival in a mouse model of melanoma. And a 2016 study demonstrated that mastoparans
could also kill several types of cancer cells by splitting open the cell membranes. This peptide was more toxic to cancer cells
than to healthy cells, too. Right now, scientists aren’t sure exactly
why, but they think it’s because cancer cell membranes have different properties than
healthy cells. For example, they have more of a negative
electrical charge, which could attract the positively-charged mastoparan. Several studies have even shown that these
peptides might be useful antibiotics. They’ve been shown to be effective at killing
several types of bacteria and fungi that can infect humans. In a 2017 study published in the International
Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, a mastoparan peptide was shown to significantly reduce
the number of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in mice. This is an extremely common and potentially
dangerous human pathogen, and causes everything from skin infections to pneumonia. It can even cause blood, heart, and bone infections. In this study, after six days of applying
the mastoparan to cuts infected with the bacteria, there were significantly fewer S. aureus. There’s a lot more research to be done before
wasp venom therapies are ready to be tested on humans, but they are definitely worth investigating
further. So, even though wasps are kind of obnoxious,
they play a really important role in the environment. And maybe one day, they’ll play a big role
in human health. Which means that, as great as it would be
to never have one buzzing around your next picnic or trip to the cider mill, they’re
worth keeping around. Besides, if we’re going to eliminate an
animal from the earth, it should obviously be the ticks. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow! If you’d like to learn more about surprisingly
useful insects, you can watch our episode on what would happen if we killed all of the
world’s mosquitos, and look forward to the one in which we talk about why ticks are good
I guess! ♪

What a little Turmeric everyday can do for your health! #HealthTipsbyGurudev | Health Tip 1

What a little Turmeric everyday can do for your health! #HealthTipsbyGurudev | Health Tip 1


Turmeric should be an essential ingredient in our food Consume turmeric and ginger daily Make pickle out of ginger and turmeric Small serving of ginger and turmeric pickle everyday is good for chidren as well as adults Turmeric has anti-viral properties When you suffer a viral attack which last for few days, you are forced to take various tablets You can keep the viral attack at bay with a regular dose of lemon juice and turmeric Turmeric is a divine medicine for curing viral fever Turmeric and amruth should be consumed

Alkaline Water Is A Life Saver And It’s Easy To Make! #HealthTipsByGurudev | Health Tip 2

Alkaline Water Is A Life Saver And It’s Easy To Make! #HealthTipsByGurudev | Health Tip 2


If we observe the nature of our food habits we come to know that it is more of acidic in nature To reduce the acidic nature of the food we eat, we need to balance it with alkaline food We should be able to differentiate acidic and alkaline food Grains are acidic and vegetables are alkaline in nature Consume alkaline water daily How many of you know how to make alkaline solution/water? Learn to prepare alkaline water today In a jug of 1 litre of water add 4 pieces of cucumber and 2 small pieces of lemon Leave it overnight and next day morning it turns into alkaline water Take small portion from this 1 litre of water for one to one and a half days Drink it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach It should not be consumed just before or after a meal Drink it 2 hours after any meal This practice turns our blood into alkaline And hence It improves blood circulation This gradually cures joint pain, head ache etc

Health Benefits Of Curry Leaves | कढ़ी पत्ते के लाभ | #HealthTipsByGurudev | Health Tip 4

Health Benefits Of Curry Leaves | कढ़ी पत्ते के लाभ | #HealthTipsByGurudev | Health Tip 4


Gujarati meals always have a few curry leaves in them Curry leaves are anti-cholestrol Statin tablet is prescribed for people with high cholestrol I advise them not to take it ever It helps the pharmacy make money but it will have no effect on our body After so many years, the latest research in America reveals that statin brings only harm to the body We knew it much before them India was always against the use of statin tablets Instead……curry leaf chutney is the remedy for high cholestrol

Do Not Eat Fruits After A Meal! | #HealthTipsByGurudev | With Subtitles | Health Tip 6

Do Not Eat Fruits After A Meal! | #HealthTipsByGurudev | With Subtitles | Health Tip 6


When you are consuming fruits, don’t combine it with your main meal Fruits can be had post meal after sometime Your one meal could be of only nuts and fruits When you consume cooked food, avoid fruits It is a practice in western countries to consume fruits soon after a meal This is wrong Ayurveda does not allow this According to Ayurveda, fruits and vegetables have to be consumed separately Do not combine fruits and vegetables Only vegetables are suggested along with a cooked meal Breakfast could be of fruits but not vegetables

Cockroaches, Alligators & Other Weird Sources of New Drugs


Antibiotics are one of humankind’s most amazing
discoveries. Ever since that fateful day in 1928 when Scottish physician Alexander Fleming
noticed a funny mold growing in one of his petri dishes, antibiotics have been kicking
bacterial butt. That famous mold, of course, was producing
penicillin, the founding antibiotic superstar, which has since extended the average human
life by at least a decade. It fundamentally changed the face of medicine. Antibiotics,
or antimicrobials, are basically selective poisons designed to either kill or slow the
growth of bacteria to the point where your body’s own immune system can clean up. These
drugs target a specific part of bacteria or some important stage in their development
without damaging the body’s host cells. And they’re really great their job. Until they
aren’t. Lately, antibiotic technology has been having
a hard time keeping pace with bacterial evolution. We’ve talked here on SciShow about how lots
of your die-hard, go-to favorite antibiotics are starting to lose their mojo in the face
of sneaky and rapidly evolving bacteria. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
estimates that at least 2,000,000 Americans became infected with drug-resistant bacteria
in 2012, and 23,000 of them died as a result. These superbugs are deadly serious and could
quickly unleash a global health crisis if we don’t find a way to keep them in check.
The problem is we’ve already hit up many of the most obvious sources of antibiotics, like
fungi, which includes penicillin, and synthetic molecules.
Fortunately, we humans have big, delicious brains, and some of the best of them are hard
at work trying to invent all-new ways to kill dangerous bacteria or find other organisms
on the planet that are better at it than we are so we can steal their secrets. And while
they’re finding some promising leads, I gotta say, they’re looking in some pretty weird
places. [Intro] You know how everyone jokes that after some
big global disaster, only cockroaches will survive? Well, we recently found what may
partially explain their famous, and infuriating, tenacity. Research from the University of
Nottingham suggests that certain insects, like roaches and locusts, have brain tissues
that are infused with super-powered antibiotic juju. The researchers found nine different
antibiotic molecules tucked into the roaches’ nervous systems that may be protecting them
from otherwise lethal bacteria. They’re all a type of molecule known as peptides, short
chains of amino acids that make up proteins, kinda like proto-proteins. And these peptides
are specific to the bugs’ brains. They seem to be chemicals that roaches” brain cells
use to communicate with each other, y’know, whenever a cockroach is sitting around thinking
about stuff, which I guess can happen, and although we’re not sure how these peptides
actually work, laboratory tests have shown that they’re incredibly effective at eliminating
some of our least favorite bacteria, like the most dangerous strains of e.coli, which
cause gastrointestinal infections. And even MRSA, a super-resistant type of staphylococcus
bacterium that can cause unstoppable deadly infections in humans, particularly in hospitals.
In lab trials, these roach brain molecules killed over 90% of MRSA bacteria, without
harming any host cells. So I can guess what you’re thinking: shut
up and take my money! Well, hold on a sec, because we’re a bit away from having cockroach
brains on the pharmacy shelves. There’s still loads of technical hurdles to overcome, tests
to conduct, basic things we need to figure out, like how exactly these molecules work.
But roaches aren’t the only hardy animals out there. Alligators are some of the Earth’s
most rugged beasts. They essentially live in cesspool swamps teeming with bacteria and
fungus and other microbes, and more than that, they’re known brawlers. Put just a few territorial
800 pound toothy reptiles together in a dirty swamp, and you will no doubt come out with
some serious bite marks and bloody wounds, even missing limbs. But amazingly, what you
probably won’t find are any infections. This got some bayou scientists to thinkin’!
Dr. Mark Merchant, a biochemist at McNeese State University in Louisiana, helped conduct
a decade long study that investigated what makes alligators so unusually resistant to
bacterial and fungal infection. Turns out, it’s in their blood. An alligator’s
immune system is largely innate, meaning it can fight off harmful micro-organisms without
having any prior exposure to them. They just pop right out of their eggs ready to do battle.
We humans also have some innate immunity, provided by things like our skin and white
blood cells, but a big part of our immunities are adaptive, meaning we often develop a resistance
to specific diseases only after being exposed to them. Which of course is not ideal all
the time, but alligators get to skip this step. Researchers examining blood samples from American
alligators isolated their infection fighting white blood cells and then extracted the active
proteins working in those cells. And these two included a special class of peptides which
seemed to have a knack for weakening the membranes of bacteria, causing them to die. When pitted
against a wide range of bacteria including drug-resistant MRSA, these tough little peptides
proved to be effective killers. They also wiped out 6 of 8 strains of candida albicans,
a type of yeast infection that’s particularly troublesome for AIDS and transplant patients
with weakened immune systems. Such compounds may also be found in similar animals, like
crocodiles, Komodo dragons, and the skins of some frogs and toads. So far, lab trials
have shown that gator blood can kill at least 23 different strains of bacteria including
salmonella, e.coli, staph, and strep infections AND even a strain of HIV. For now, scientists
are working to find the exact chemical structures at work in four of these promising chemicals
and pinpoint which types are best at killing which microbes. One problem so far: high concentrations
of gator blood serum have already been found to be so powerful that they are toxic to human
cells. So other biologists are taking a different approach in the search for the next generation
of antibiotics. Rather than looking at other animals, they’re
exploring strange, new places, like cave soils and deep-sea sediments. Researchers have recently
discovered evidence of promising new fungi strains living way down in hundred million
year old nutrient-starved sediments in the Pacific Ocean. Everyone thought this was a
near-dead zone for life, too harsh and remote an environment for something like fungi to
survive in. Just a decade ago, the only living things known to inhabit such deep sediment
layers were single-celled bacteria and archaea, organisms known to flourish in extreme environments.
But while examining dredged up sediments from as deep as 127 meters into the sea floor,
scientists found fungi of at least eight different types, four of which they successfully cultured
in the lab. Some of the fungi even belonged to the genus Penicillium, which we have to
thank for the development of penicillin. Now, we’re not exactly sure how old these fungi
are, but they are definitely quite old and maybe, more importantly, they appear to have
been living in isolation for eons. If that’s the case, they may have evolved specific and
unusual defenses against bacteria, which, just like their penicillin kin in that famous
petri dish, could end up being a new and powerful source of antibiotics.
And there’s one more strategy that scientists are using, one that works in espionage as
well as in medicine. And that is seeing what the enemy is up to.
While exploring life in strange new places around the world, some biologists are looking
for bacteria that have never been exposed to our drugs, but still appear to be naturally
resistant to them. Wherever we find the most naturally resistant
bacteria, we might also find natural antibiotics that we never knew about.
And here, one of the most promising leads is again in one of the hardest-to-reach places:
New Mexico’s Lechuguilla cave, a place that was isolated from all human contact until
it was discovered in the 1980’s. One of the many fascinating things that scientists
have discovered here is that the cave bacteria seem to be resistant to everything.
Even though they’ve never been exposed to us or our drugs, all of the bacteria have
proven to be resistant to at least one major antibiotic, and many tend to fend off more
than a dozen of the most powerful antimicrobials we have. This suggests to scientists that
the bacteria have evolved to be this way because they live in an environment that’s rich in
naturally occurring antibiotics, ones that the germs we live with up here on the surface
have never encountered. Now we just have to find out what exactly
those compounds are. So look, I’m not going to lie to you: we have
a lot of work to do. While we might discover a new super-drug lurking
in a cave or under the sea or in a cockroach’s head, there’s a big difference between finding
a substance that cleans house in a petri dish and actually putting a new antibiotic in the
vein of a human patient. So the bummer is, as promising as some of
these bold new discoveries may be, none of them has yet yielded an actual marketable
drug. Still, there’s a long list of successful antibiotics
that we’ve managed to derive from strange sources, starting with Dr. Fleming’s rogue
fungus. So if we keep exploring strange new places
and studying how other animals deal with the problems we’re facing, we just might find
the next penicillin before the superbugs get the best of us. Thanks for watching this SciShow Infusion,
especially to our Subbable subscribers. To learn how you can support us in exploring
the world, just go to Subbable.com. And as always, if you want to keep getting smarter
with us, you can go to YouTube.com/SciShow and subscribe.