SPIDER-MAN INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE Promos

SPIDER-MAN INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE Promos


Oh, yeah, I got these two there’s a little shed where I keep my spider gear In this place is pretentious Like this but take away the Jeep playing imagine it weighs smaller imagine a futon Kingpin knows we’re coming. We’re going to be outnumbered don’t be so sure. You might need these Do you think you’re the only people who’ve had to come here? Hey fellas, it’s Even black and white, where’s that wind coming from? We’re in a basement wherever I go then follows in the wind. It smells like rain This could literally not get any weirder it can get weirder I Just washed my hands. That’s why they’re wet No other reason, okay Hey guys Wanda, it’s Gwen. Actually, oh, you know her very cool. I’m from another dimension I mean another another dimension. All right people. Let’s start at the beginning My name is Gwen Stacy For the last two years. I’ve been the one and only spider grunt I join the band Save my dad One day this weird thing happened and I mean like really weird I was blown into last week Literally I Landed in New York, but not mine, New York Let’s go. How many more spotty people are there save it for Comic? Oh, what’s Comic Con Oh Electing a bagel spider-man, you know, that’s funny. I get that a lot This is what you Before you wanted to hit Double tap to release and flip it out again and release Your nap We’re a little tease me is the teacher who could still do it you as the student who can do just not as good I’m proud of us Peter Wow Hey guys Wanda its Gwen You know her very cool. I Mean another We gotta go You know, maybe any to OKC your mouth cuz that earthquake glass know what you talking about I slept like a baby last night house. That is cool. So easy mission, I’ll you miss me. I still live me Seriously dad Walken would have been fine I mean this guy swings in once a day zip zap zop in his little mask and answers to no. No, right? Yeah dad yeah, I Love you miles No dad Dad I Love you doctor copy. My name is Peter Parker I’m pretty sure you know the rest I saved the city fell in love then I saved the city again and again and again Look, I’m a comic book Serial, I get a Christmas album and it’s soso popsicle, but this isn’t about me Not anymore Spider-man swings in once a day zip zap zop in his little mask and answers to no one. I love you morons Dad are you serious? I wanted here dad. I love you Oh God My name is Miles Morales I’m the one and only spider-man At least that’s what I thought you have you here for super collider. You gotta love this dimension You’re like me that’s impossible Alright kid. Listen up this part is your universe soggy. It’s weird It’s gross and this delicious normal fry is my universe So you want to learn to be spider-man teen teacher? Yes, I can time to swing good do it double tap to release and Twitter it out again Okay whip and release your natural quick Hey guys, who are you I’m Gwen Stacy I’m from another another dimension. How many more spider people are there? Hey fellas This could literally not get any weirder it can get weird Okay We need to get back to our universes soon. Brooklyn is gonna collapse my family lives in Brooklyn What’s wrong? This was WC It’s mine If I don’t destroy the collider, none of us will have a home to go home soon. Remember what makes you different? That’s all Is what makes you spider-man? Officer I love you wait That way that way Other way other way other way other way do animals talk in this dimension cuz I don’t want to freak him out

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE – Is It Deep or Dumb? – Wisecrack Edition

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE – Is It Deep or Dumb? – Wisecrack Edition


What’s up guys? Jared again. Spiderman:
Into the Spiderverse burst into theaters in 2018 and was immediately met with critical
acclaim, eventually crescendoing into an Oscar win for Best Animated Film. It’s a rare
film to surpass 90% approval ratings amongst both critics AND audiences on Rotten Tomatoes,
and quickly established itself as a fan favorite. Importantly, based on Wisecrack’s unscientific
and anecdotal evidence, this film is also an incredible conversion machine, turning
decidedly non-comic-book-lovers into Spidey stans in just under two hours. So what makes this movie so intoxicating?
I mean, besides the obvious magnetism of Nicolas Cage’s acting: “Sometimes I let matches burn down to my
fingertips just to feel something, anything” Ok but seriously – is it the charismatic,
relatable, non-shoe-lace-tying Miles? Is it the trippy visual aesthetic? Spiderham? Or
is there something deeper going on here? And does it have anything to do with Charles Dickens?
Let’s find out in this Wisecrack Edition on Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse: Deep or
Dumb? And as always, spoilers ahead. Alright, let’s dive into a recap. Meet Miles
Morales, a Brooklyn kid who hates his pretentious new boarding school, Visions Academy. While
graffiting a subway service tunnel with his cool Uncle Aaron, Miles gets bitten by a radioactive
spider… and well, you know what happens. Trying to figure out why his hands are so
sticky, Miles returns to the scene where he stumbles upon Spiderman trying to stop Kingpin
from using a deadly particle collider to access another dimension. “Whoa.” The experiment gets cut short and Spidrman
gives Myles a thumb drive to override the collider before getting killed by Kingpin.
Still green at the whole Spidermanning thing, Miles swiftly destroys the drive by accident. Miles finds out that Kingpin’s particle
collider did partially succeed, at least in summoning a bunch of other spider persons
into his dimensions. Among them, the older, dad-bodied Peter B. Parker, Spider-Gwen, Spider-Peni,
Spider-Ham, and Spider-Academy-Award-Winner-Nicolas-Cage. They team up to defeat Kingpin, and to return
to their dimensions. Miles becomes his dimension’s new friendly neighborhood spiderman- the end. So is Spiderverse deep, or just an emotionally
engaging, heartwarming feast for the eyes? Let’s review the evidence. Argument 1: Myles’s Quantum Arc The film’s first suspected reservoir of
depth rests in the journey of newly-anointed Spiderman, Miles. If we weren’t sure what
the central theme of Miles’ arc is, the movie pretty blatantly telegraphs it right
up top when he and his dad discuss his life: “We all make choices in life,”
“Why, it doesn’t feel like I have a choice-” “You don’t!” Peter Parker echoes this sentiment once Miles
has been bitten, telling him that becoming Spiderman ain’t optional: “I don’t think you have a choice, kiddo.” But what’s exceptionally clever about the
film’s exploration of choice is the way it’s reinforced through recurring references
to quantum theory and quantum mechanics- scientific concepts central to the plot. In an early
scene, Miles’ science class watches a video about the topic. In it, a civilian-clothed
Doc Oc explains: “Our universe is actually one of many parallel
universes going on at the same time.” Here, she outlines the Many-Worlds Interpretation
of quantum mechanics, which holds that there are many parallel universes existing in the
same space and time as our own, including a tragic dimension in which I shaved my beard
and Woody was dognapped by pirates. Anyway, Doc Oc goes on to say that: Here, the film invokes an aspect of quantum
mechanics – the idea that every opportunity yields multiple possibilities which ripple
out, eventually creating countless more possibilities. Although relevant to Miles’s outer conflict-
having to save the multiverse with his pals, it also mirrors Miles’s inner conflict-
confronting the fact that every choice is a leap of faith down a diverging path, one
that has ripple effects. We see this early on through the motif of
Miles’ shoelaces. It starts with Miles’s dad telling him:
“Tie your shoes, please.” Then, when a random student says the same,
he replies “Hey.”
“Yeah?” “Your shoe’s untied.”
“Yeah, I’m aware. It’s a choice.” Even Spiderman soon joins the chorus: “You know your shoes are untied?” Still, Miles continues to rock the untied
look. Fittingly, this choice has a consequence – he trips over his laces and breaks the thumb
drive needed to disable the accelerator. Here we see the power of choice and the consequences
of one’s choices literalized. The theme of choice and diverging paths is
reinforced by contrasting versions of Peter Parker. The first one has lived up to his
responsibilities to protect New York, and died a hero as a result. His foil, Peter B.
Parker, the Type-B of the two, is the less-than-perfect Spiderman who chose to alienate his wife,
fall out of shape, and spend a lot of time crying in the bathtub instead of saving the
city. Their shared name and essential attributes suggest that they could have gone down similar
paths, but the ripple effect of choices, and the infinite possibilities presented by those
choices, led them to become very different Spiderdudes A similar dichotomy exists in the contrast
between Miles’ dad and Uncle Aaron, each offering a unique path for Miles’s future.
Miles exists in a flux between his lawful dad and his cool Uncle Aaron, who likes to
indulge in some light artistic vandalism Early on, Aaron tells Miles that his dad also used
to be a rule-breaking punk before he made the choice to straighten out and became a
very rule-abiding cop: “Oh my gosh, don’t cops run red lights?”
“Oh, yea, some do. But, uh, not your dad.” In contrast, Uncle Aaron’s rebellious streak
has led him down a drastically different path – one which involves working for Kingpin,
killing people, and generally being a not great guy. In his final moments, Uncle Aaron
reflects on the gravity of his mistakes: “I wanted you to look up to me. I let you
down, man, I let you down.” This functions as an interesting reversal
of the Uncle Ben story – in which Spiderman lets a robber go, only to find out that this
very robber shot and killed his beloved uncle. In that narrative, he blames himself for making
the wrong choice. In contrast, this time, it’s Uncle Aaron, not Miles, who blames
himself for the series of choices that led him to die in an alley and left his nephew
uncle-less. Just as the death of Uncle Ben taught Peter Parker that he has to use his
powers, and use them responsibly, the death of Uncle Aaron teaches Miles that his choices
can easily lead him down a regrettable path, and that he must take responsibility for those
choices. The dire mistake of not taking responsibility
for your choices is also embodied in Kingpin, who can’t live with himself for driving
his family away, such that they literally drove away and got into a car crash and died.
The ripple effects of his actions have left him all alone, and rather than accepting responsibility,
he tries to reverse fate by summoning his family from another dimension. So we see several characters accepting varying
levels of responsibility for their choices, as well as the ripple effects & diverging
paths that come with those choices. The central question of the film becomes: What kind of
person, and specifically what kind of spiderguy, will Miles become in the universe of this
film? This calls to mind another aspect of quantum
mechanics: The Copenhagen Interpretation, which a few physicists dreamt up in the 1920s.
The theory postulates that an object can and does exist in all possible states. For instance,
are photons particles or waves? Well, sometimes they act like particles, and sometimes they
act like waves. Quantum mechanics uses the term superposition to refer to multiple possible
states existing at once, say as a wave or a particle, or an alive cat or a dead cat.
Metaphorically, Miles exists in a kind of indeterminate superposition between two extremes:
he exists in both the state of becoming like his criminal Uncle Aaron or like his honorable
cop father. But here’s the thing about superpositions: when somebody observes the object in question,
its superposition “collapses” meaning that the object is forced to “choose a probability”,
that is, become either a wave or a particle. In the film, it’s not a literal observation
that forces Miles to choose which “state” to exist in, although he certainly is being
observed by his fellow spider-people. Rather, it’s the immense pressure of the task at
hand. So what decision is he going to make? Well,
at the beginning of the film, we see him choosing to resist responsibility – he doesn’t want
to take advantage of getting into a prestigious school, and even chooses to get every question
on his true false test wrong. So it’s not surprising that, when he’s first bitten,
he resists and actively does not want to take on the mantle of Spiderman. “You’re like me.”
“I don’t wanna be.” When he watches Peter Parker fighting off
multiple bad guys, he knows he should help but realizes: Here, he’s choosing passivity, rather than
making an active decision. Regardless, Miles learns that his choices have ripple effects
– Peter Parker dies. Though it’s not implied he blames himself for Parker’s death, he
does blame himself for not doing anything to try to stop it, as indicated the next time
he’s faced with a similar situation: “I can’t sit there and just let Spiderman
die without doing anything about it, I’m not doing that again.” We start seeing Miles make active choices,
like choosing to help Peter B. Parker steal trade secrets. We also see Miles taking responsibility
for the promises he’s made: “Look I made a promise, so, I have to keep
it.” This underscores the way the theme of choice
is used as a new take on the cliche Spiderman theme of: “With great powers, comes great-”
“Don’t you dare finish that sentence. Don’t do it. I’m sick of it.” In the first two-thirds of the film, we watch
Miles accept his new identity and express desire to keep the promises he made to Peter
Parker and save the glitching Spiderpeople. But we start to realize that Miles’ choice
to embrace being Spiderman won’t be enough, as he can’t control his finnecky powers.
However, in the next pivotal scene, Miles asks Peter B. Parker: “When will I know I’m ready?”
“You won’t, it’s a leap of faith.” Here, the film posits a so-called “leap
of faith” or the choice to take a chance and embrace the scary unknown, which here
means diving into a dangerous situation without knowing if you’re ready. Miles is able to
take this leap after an encouraging monologue from his father, who says a lot of adorable
dad-ish stuff like: “I see this, this spark in you, it-it’s
amazing. It’s why I push you, but, it’s yours. Whatever you choose to do with it you’ll
be great.” The message seems to be that the choice to
believe in oneself is ultimately the most important choice of all – as soon as Miles
is able to do that, he goes from Sticky Fingers to Smooth Operator. Well, at least when it
comes to Spidermanning, he could still use some work in the romance department. “Friends?”
“Friends.” It’s also worth noting that Peter B. Parker
similarly undergoes a leap of faith in one’s self when he returns to his own dimension,
and, rather than bemoaning his fate, attempts to fix it: He reconciles with MJ, presumably
in the hopes of finally making his dad bod dad-certified, even though he doesn’t know
if he’s ready to start changing diapers. “Do I want kids?” So there you have it. A film with truly smart
screenwriting that uses quantum theory thematically to mirror the main characters larger emotional
arc. Smart, yes. But deep like…deep dish pizza? Deep like… Wait a second – What’s
the deal with this: Argument 2: Is Great Expectations A Great,Deep,
or Dumb Reference? Charles Dickens’ novel Great Expectations
becomes a recurring reference in the film. Miles’s English class is reading the book,
he gets assigned to write an essay on it after deliberately failing a test, and he even riffs
on the book’s title in his graffiti art. The recurring presence of this novel, on its
face, seems to imply that Miles has the potential to go from average Brooklyn kid to truly dope
superhero, that he will literally go from having “no expectations” to living up
to majorly great expectations. After his uncle dies, Miles throws the notebook with his “Great
Expectations” graffiti art out of the window, as if giving up on the task before him. In
direct rebuttal, Peter B Parker throws the notebook right back at him, as if insisting
that he live up to the great Spiderman name. So, surface-level reference? Or a deep thematic
connection? It appears to just be a surface level nod to Dickens’ novel, as it doesn’t
really speak to what the book is about. Importantly, it seems to ignore the fact that Dickens’
novel deals heavily in irony and satire, and his protagonist, Pip, is something of a punchline.
A blacksmith’s nephew & apprentice, Pip is obsessed with improving his status and
becoming more sophisticated so that he can win over his truly-unpleasant love interest,
Estella. While Miles is special in spite of his initial desire to just be normal, and
generally not live up to his potential, Pip believes he is special and entitled to more
than his humble lot in life, and thus spends the book attempting to realize the “great
expectations” he has for himself. The entire story is told from the point of view of an
older Pip, who has since learned that his expectations were baloney. In contrast, Miles
learns, over the course of the film, that his expectations for himself need to be higher.
You could read them as foils to one another, but we don’t really see how that contrast
deepens the meaning, or adds anything much of value to the film. So we’re going to
say that, in this interpretation, the film is Deep with a debatably kinda-dumb literary
reference. Argument 3 – The Spiderverse as Eye Candy But there’s one more layer to this film
that we’d be dumb not to mention: its visuals. From a purely aesthetic perspective, this
film is absolutely revolutionary. For context: Basically since 1995, when Pixar released
the first CGI animated feature, Toy Story, the lamp-loving studio has set the standard
for what modern animation should look like. You’d recognize that aesthetic anywhere:
Shiny surfaces, clean lines, highly-realistic imagery. Now we love Pixar as much as the
next emotionally-stunted millennial, but we’d argue that Spiderverse is so visually stunning
because it blatantly refuses to conform to the Pixar look. Instead, the film fully embraces
the comic book aesthetic, becoming increasingly more comic-book-like as Myles transitions
into Spiderman. This is even clear from the opening moments,
which show the Sony logo fading into ben day dots. Ben day dots are those tiny circles
you’ll see in some comic books, usually in the colors of cyan, magenta, yellow, or
black. They were initially used by comic book illustrators in the early to mid-1900s to
create a sense of depth and tonal range on the cheap – printing a bunch of tiny dots
was less expensive than printing large swaths of solid color. Comic book artists today will
often use ben day dots to indicate a flashback or evoke a more retro aesthetic. The geniuses
behind Spiderverse’s animation employ ben day dots throughout the film, particularly
during moments of emotional intensity. In this way, they mimic the aesthetic that accompanied
some of the earliest Spiderman comics in the 60s. Through sheer inventiveness, it debatably
does more to evoke the original Spiderman experience than any other rendition before
it. Other comic book visual effects also work
their way into the film, from written sound effects, to actual paneling, to the Spidey
Tingle. By incorporating so many hallmark qualities of comic books – the film inherently
defends the oft-maligned medium. At the same time, the film also visually pays
homage to another, frequently derided medium – street art. First, Miles literally creates
eye-popping street art, and we watch the long, laborious process that entails. Then, the
shapes and colors of Miles’ art return with a vengeance later on when the supercollider
is turned on. Also, he spray paints his Spidey suit, giving it a graffiti’ed aesthetic.
Some of the film’s most visually masterful moments occur when its directly evoking street
art – So that’s pretty cool too. The film elevates both the street art and comic book
aesthetic; making a compelling argument for the artistic merits of both. For all of these reasons, we’re inclined
to see Spiderman: Into the Spiderverse as a pretty deep film. Couching Mile’s arc
in quantum theory is so sharp, and the visuals are on point. The Great Expectations thing?
Eh. It can’t ruin this fun and heartwarming film. But what do you guys think? Is there,
indeed, more to the Miles Morales story than meets the eye, or is our Peter tingle way
off track? Let us know in the comments. Thanks to our amazing subscribers for sponsoring
our podcasts and channel. Click the hell out of our subscribe button –

Dickinson — The Bee | Apple TV+

Dickinson — The Bee | Apple TV+


(Music) Emily has a wild imagination. Bee, I was hoping you’d come. What’s up? (Music) Alena Smith:
She’s always asking for someone
to understand her. And it feels like she becomes
increasing alone. Alena Smith:
But because she’s Emily, she’s
conducting all sorts of Alena Smith:
relationships with imaginary
figures. How did you get inside? Girl, I flew through the window. Hailee Steinfeld:
The Bee is a figment of Emily’s
imagination. The Bee shows up every time
Emily was feeling a bit lost, or
alone. Will you dance with me? Hailee Steinfeld:
And the bumblebee will sort of
come in and save the day. Bee, you’re so sweet. I’m covered in pollen, baby. Emily:
Bee! Alena Smith:
The show explores that being
alone, Alena Smith:
can be tough, but perhaps that
was the very thing that generated such
powerful creativity. May I have this dance? Bee, you don’t mind, do you? (Music) Buzz… (Music)