What If You Were Stung By The Most Painful Bee?


Have you ever come upon a small bee or wasp
and it scared you out of your mind?! It might feel silly to be afraid of such a
small insect, however your instincts are right on track… Sometimes the smallest little bugs are some
of the most dangerous! And that can include the bees and wasps that
are in your backyard right now! When you hear buzzing coming from a nearby
tree, you might immediately take notice. We really love honey, but nobody likes a bee
sting. While a simple bee sting from a honeybee is
unlikely to cause much harm, some people are allergic to a specific chemical in the bee
venom. They can have severe reactions to bee venom
causing them to go into anaphylactic shock that causes swelling and difficulty breathing. Luckily a quick dose of epinephrine through
an EpiPen can quickly counteract the bee venom… But if the person can’t get that dose they
could possibly die. But there are bees and wasps that are dangerous
even to those without a bee venom allergy. First off there’s the hybrid honey bee called
the Africanized honey bee. These bees are an invasive species that take
over local honey bee hives. These bees are more aggressive than your average
honey bee. If they perceive a threat to their home, like
a human accidentally disturbing the hive, the bees go into hyper defensive mode. They can swarm a person in cloud up to 60
thousand bees strong, stinging the victim thousands of times. The stings from these thousands of bees can
cause tissues and body functions to breakdown almost immediately. People have been known to suffer cardiac arrest
and die almost instantly from these bee swarms! If you see a hive, stay clear, and notify
animal control to take care of it. But even those bees are no match for the Giant
Asian Hornet. These guys are up to 2 inches in length and
eat bees for breakfast, literally. They are carnivorous species of hornet and
contain a neurotoxin that shuts down their prey’s nervous system. They are also prone to hyper defensiveness. If a person gets stung by even one of these
Hornets, they can go into anaphylactic shock and die. The deadliest of all though, is the Vespa
luctuosa, a species of wasp found only in the Philippines. It has the most toxic venom of any bee or
wasp and only a couple insects in the whole world are known to be more toxic. A single bite from this little wasp is extremely
painful and can lead to convulsions, your skin turning blue, and even death. Luckily for us they rarely build their hives
around humans so unless you’re walking through the Filipino wilderness you’re not likely
to meet one. Whether you’re allergic to bees or not though,
be careful. Some of them might be more dangerous than
you think so it’s always best to keep your distance and not take any chances. Even if you get a honey craving and see a
hive – under no circumstances should you disturb them. Leave it to the pros and both you and the
bees will be much happier. Thanks for watching and don’t forget to
subscribe for lots more Fuzzy and Nutz.

What If You Were Stung by 1000 Bees?

What If You Were Stung by 1000 Bees?


Summer is here and that can only mean sunshine,
blooming flowers and… bee stings. But what exactly happens when you get stung by a bee,
and what would happen if you were stung by 1,000 of them?! First though let’s learn a bit about the history
of the bee. The first bees were descendants of a carnivorous wasp-like insect and appeared
over 125 million years ago, evolving into pollen-eating and honey-producing herbivores,
and though they were here well before us, cave paintings dated to over 10,000 years
ago in Spain and France show that man and bees have a long history together thanks to
that honey. Apiculture- or beekeping- first began around
7,000 BC in the Middle East, with honey finding use as food, medicine and even preservative.
The practice soon spread around the world from Egypt, to Greece, and Africa. And though
famous for their stingers, most bees only sting in defense of the hive, and give up
an attack pretty quickly. Most bees that is, with the exception of the
legendary Africanized Honey Bee. Also known as Killer Bees, they will pursue a threat
for distances up to 3 miles! And if you think water can save you, think again- killer bee
swarms have been known to patiently hover in wait over water until their victim comes
up to breathe so they can continue attacking! But what actually happens when you get stung
by a bee? For that, we’ll need to take a much closer look…v A bee’s stinger evolved from its egg-laying
organ, the ovipositor, so only female bees can sting. Once a stinger penetrates flesh,
barbs along its shaft help it dig deeper into the victim even after the bee has tore free
the stinger. The stinger immediately begins to pump venom into the blood, because the
venom is about 88% water and we are ourselves mostly water, the venom disperses easily through
the body. So what exactly is in that other 12%, and
why does it hurt so much? Half of a bee’s venom is made up of a peptide called melittin.
Together with Phospholipase A2, this toxic brew works to destroy cells, bursting red
blood cells in the sting site. Apamin, which makes up about 3% of sa bee’s venom directly
attacks nerve tissue, causing further pain, while Hyaluronidase, which makes up about
2% of the venom, destroys cell membranes allowing the venom to spread easier. As if that wasn’t
enough, this toxic brew also makes blood vessels expand- which is why bee stings can be so
dangerous to people with low blood pressure. So what exactly would happen if you were stung
by 1,000 bees at once? Most healthy people can tolerate about 10
stings per pound of body weight. According to the CDC the average American weighs about
181 pounds, meaning most people could tolerate about 1800 stings before death. However, even
if 1000 stings is far below this fatal threshold, there is the potential for serious and life-threatening complications. The most dangerous part o
f a bee sting is when it produces swelling in locations other than the sting site- or
when the sting site is in a particularly vulnerable area such as the throat. This swelling can
compromise the airway and lead to asphyxiation. Because it also causes blood vessels to expand,
all that venom can also critically lower blood pressure, becoming potentially fatal for the
sick or elderly. But even if 1,000 stings don’t kill you outright,
they can still be lethal days after the attack! When a bee stings you it damages a great deal
of cellular tissue- and it’s the kidney’s job to eliminate this cell tissue and keep
it from ‘gunking up’ the body. However if there is too much damaged tissue the kidneys
can’t keep up and may be overwhelmed, leading to a shut-down. This is why people suffering
from extreme bee attacks are typically hospitalized and closely monitored for a few days after. For the average human, 1000 stings shouldn’t
be fatal, but approximately 2% of the population suffers from extreme allergic reactions that
can be triggered by just a single sting. Bees aren’t very prone to attacking people though
and with the exception of Africanized Honey Bees are actually quite tolerant of us- most
beekepers don’t even wear suits! So while they may seem quite scary, just remember:
bees will typically leave you alone as long as you leave them alone… typically.