Two Giant Killer Hornet Colonies Fight to the Death


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: The Samurai scouts
bring news that there’s an army on its way. [BUZZING] They rally the troops. But it’s too late. The Bamboo Battalion is on them. The Rock Samurais are ambushed
at their own entrance. When times are tough,
giant killer hornets turn on their kind. It’s like on like,
giant on giant. Claws, stingers, and mandibles,
all weapons deployed and heads will roll. Disabling the enemy is
the primary strategy. Beheading and severing
limbs, the mandibles are the ultimate weapon of war. It’s impossible to
determine who’s winning until the pillaging starts. The marauding Bamboo
giants enter the fortress. They’re conquered
the Rock Samurais and they’ve struck gold. The precious nursery of
developing princesses is ransacked, next year’s
queens killed and cannibalized in their chambers. The sentry can do nothing
but witness the devastation of her precious family.

The Smart Way Warthogs Keep Insects at Bay

The Smart Way Warthogs Keep Insects at Bay


NARRATOR: Meet the warthog. They love to roll
around in the mud. Known as wallowing,
it keeps their skin free from ticks and parasites. A mud bath might look messy. But pigs are actually
meticulously clean animals. The wallow also helps them cool
off in the heat of the day. But in the very hottest
months on the savanna, these warthogs face a dilemma. The intense African sun
dries out all the mud, leaving them exposed
to swarms of insects. It’s insufferable, even
with their tough hide. But a handful of smart warthogs
have figured out a solution. They enlist a helping hand– banded mongooses. They’re voracious insect eaters,
spending most of their day on the hunt for food. They patrol the savanna in
gangs of over 20 strong. And with so many mouths
to feed, mongooses need to find a lot of insects. As an insect magnet,
perhaps a warthog could provide a decent snack. Only, its long legs make this
dining table a little too high for a mongoose. So some clever warthogs
have learned to lie down when the gang is around. It sends a very clear message– the mongoose spa is
open for business. Now in range, the mongooses
clean the ticks and lice from all those hard-to-reach places. Pure bliss. It’s the perfect partnership. The warthogs are kept healthy. The mongooses get a
meal, eating their fill without nipping their patrons. Mutually beneficial
relationships like theirs are almost
unheard of between mammals. It’s a brilliant solution
for a nagging problem, one that hints pigs might well
be smarter than we realize.