ANTSTORE Reinigung der Röhren in einer Ameisenanlage


Hello and welcome. We
were often asked … … how to clean the tubes in a leaf cutter ants system. In this video you can see how we do it. Leaf-cutter ants can build up deposits in the tubes. Deposits are soil, food residues, dead Ants, excrement or leaves. These leaf cutter ants have put their Fungus in the tubes. It is very important for the colony, so we have to return it to the fungus-chamber. For the cleaning we need a bucket which we coat with oil at the edge. Block the Openings after disconnecting the tubes. Our plug-in system makes cleaning easier. Now we hold the pipe vertically above the bucket. Shake out the Ants, Fungus and garbage. Now we are able to clean the tube with a rag or cloth. You can use a broomstick. We have brushes for small pipes (20-40mm) up to 1 m in length. You can also pull a cord through the pipe and then attach a rag to it. Now we collect the ants and the fungus and put them back in. Now the tubes are clean. Lets connect them again. We hope these tips where useful to you. Thank you for watching.

Weaver Ants | The Guardians of the Canopy

Weaver Ants | The Guardians of the Canopy


hi guys my name is Jordan and in this
video I’m exploring Australia’s topics up in northern Queensland. Here ancient
rainforests stretch as far as the eye can see and are home to an incredibly
diverse range of wildlife. Including one of the most unique ant species I’ve ever
encountered. They are the highly prolific and ingenious Weaver ants. Weaver ants fall under the genus Oecophylla and are found solely within tropical and
subtropical climates throughout Africa Asia and Australia. The ones found here
in Australia are often known as green ants after their vibrant green color. what makes Weaver ants so different from
most other ants is instead of burrowing down and forming their nests within the
ground, Weaver ants form their nests up in the trees. Their homes can usually be
found towards the ends of branches where the fresh healthy leaves sprout. Fruit
bearing trees with broad leaves are favored, but they’ll happily work within
narrow-leaved eucalyptus trees and sometimes will even utilise needle thin
leaves like those from this Beach she-oak. Construction begins with the ants firmly
grabbing hold of a leaf with their mandibles pulling stretching and curling
them into position… Next, the ants do something quite
remarkable they enlist the help of an unlikely ally, their own young. These
small pill shaped grubs are the ants larvae. They’re unable to travel on their
own so the ants carefully carry them over to their worksite. At this point the ants begin to gently
tap their heads using their antennae. This induces the larvae to expel strands
of silk from a small gland underneath their mouths. Normally ant larvae use their silk for metamorphosis spinning a cocoon which
helps protect them as they develop into their pupal form and eventually hatch
as an adult. But in the case of Weaver ants, they use their silken thread to
instead weave leaves together. Creating a super strong binding. Once complete the
ants now have themselves a comfy and safe waterproof refuge, a perfect place
to raise their young and allow their colony to thrive. Younger colonies might
have their nests comprised of just a single leaf curled in half and neatly
stitched together. But as they expand their numbers they gradually create
additional nests. Established Weaver ant colonies may occupy dozens at once, some
with massive nests comprised of hundreds of leaves all clustered purposefully
together. This nest here the size of a beach ball. Other much smaller nests are often
positioned along the perimeter of the colony’s territory acting as outposts.
The first line of defence against intruders, the most common of which being
foreign and colonies. Which may seek to ambush and invade their rivals. This
Vanguard is often occupied by the eldest ants of the colony deemed to be the
most expendable. But it’s not just raiders that the Weaver ants need to
worry about. Here in the dense foliage of the rain forest, plants are constantly
competing with one another, reaching as high as they can to soak up as much
light as possible. So naturally down on the forest floor
not much light seeps through making ground temperatures significantly cooler as ants are cold-blooded animals when in
happening cool climates they aren’t nearly as active limiting their foraging
capabilities and slowing down the growth of their future generations
this gives Weaver ants a significant advantage over the forest ground
dwelling ant species living up in the canopy Weaver ants can stay nice and
warm in the sun’s rays much like a crocodile basking on an open riverbank
the extra heat greatly extends the ants active hours and increases their
productivity but the canopy is ever-changing many
trees lose the battle against neighboring trees which outgrow them
shrouding them in darkness some even become the target of parasitic plants
like this strangler fig which slowly wraps itself around its host restricting
the tree’s ability to grow its dealing their life from above and absorbing up
most of the surrounding nutrients within the soil below so Weaver ants must
actively reposition themselves in order to pursue the sun’s valuable heat the
most successful colonies are often found nearby clearings in the forest alongside
rivers coastlines and cyclone affected areas
where strong winds have torn down temporary clearings in the forest
here along the forest perimeters they’re almost completely unhindered by shade so
the ants can take even better advantage of the sun’s warmth rapidly speeding up
the development cycles of the young helping them grow to enormous sizes some
colonies can be home to hundreds of thousands of ants strong the leaves which form their homes do
inevitably die and crumble into pieces and so must be abandoned for fresh ones
so even in ideal conditions Weaver ants are kept extremely busy constantly
rebuilding renovating and relocating their homes all this hard work requires plenty of
energy which we’ve Rance obtained from two main sources
honey jus and insects honey you is sourced from sap-sucking invertebrates
like these merely bugs here these tiny insects bore their way into fresh plant
stems and leaves and consume their SAP as the SAP is digested they excrete
excess waste in the form of a sugary liquid rich in carbohydrates the perfect
fuel to keep the ever busy Weaver ants going so instead of eating these bugs
themselves the Weaver ants cluster around them waiting patiently for their
sweet reward but most other bugs aren’t so forward-thinking ladybugs love
devouring these little guys the mealy bugs can secrete a powdery wax coating
their bodies which helps discourage their attackers someone but otherwise
they’re virtually defenseless the ants are their real defense as a few of them
feed many others patrol the surrounding area for threats but there are some predators which can
be a much trickier foe to deal with jumping spiders they’re often seen
eyeing off their little friends on their own they’re no match for the Weaver ants
so they must be stealthy and wait for the perfect opportunity to strike if
detected the predator could easily turn into the prey almost spotted the spider
sensibly backs off too risky for this meal weave rants themselves a very
effective predators they have excellent eyesight when compared to most other
ends and can utilize their strong razor-sharp mandibles to great effect
given the chance and they’ll tackle almost anything they find once their
prey is secured each end pulls from multiple directions stretching out and
dismembering their helpless victims so that they can be efficiently returned to
their nests and distributed amongst their corny
a large part of Weaver ants diet are other ants a great source of amino acids
here in the rainforest ants a highly abundant and come in all manner of
shapes and sizes many of the ground dwelling species regularly venture up
into the trees to forage for food but this often means passing through Weaver
ant territory so they must be wary all it takes is a single ant to notice their
presence and soundly along once one ant gets a good grip all it needs to do is
secure their rival down and simply wait for reinforcements to arrive this one on
one scuffle is likely the victims only chance to escape several more quickly follow suit pinning
it down its fate now sealed not only a rival ants and nutritious and reliable
source of food but removing them also reduces competition at the same time any
food that these ants would have discovered and returned back to their
nest now ends up as their own further proliferating their range and dominance the more vast the corney’s territories
the longer distances the ants must cover in order to best utilize the available
resources and to maintain their control over it in dense forests Weaver ants can
easily navigate from one tree to the next thanks to the vast labyrinth of
vines and branches into connecting the canopy allowing them to access and
colonize multiple trees without ever needing to descend the long way down to
the forest floor whilst most comfortable up in the trees
on occasion they will venture down to the ground forage this particular colony
is nested along the beach in and amongst the salt tolerant mangroves regularly
they send out scouting parties during low tide scavenging upon whatever the
water is swept in this gecko here is a notable find and
will be a great source of nourishment for their quarry the answer tempted to
break a park the lizard into more manageable pieces pulling from all
angles some of the ends begin targeting the vulnerable joints slicing into and
spraying them with formic acid this noxious liquid expelled from the ants
abdomens slowly burns and breaks down the flesh within despite the ants determined biting an
acid spring the gecko is proving rather difficult to pour part before the tide
returns it must be either taken to higher ground as is or left behind but
these Weaver ants are more than up to the challenge
they have tiny hooked claws on the ends of their feet giving them incredible
gripping strength even at the steepest and most obscure of angles paired with their ability to work in
synergy with their fellow colony members they are able to accomplish some pretty
remarkable feats hauling our prey much larger than themselves all the way up to
the treetops sometimes Weaver ants will improvise
quicker routes along the way to make their job is a little easier some of
which may at first not even seem possible the path up a low-hanging
branch from the ground below the ants can’t jump or fly across like
other insects mine instead they must build a bridge to close the gap a bridge
made of hands each ant grips on to each other using their mandibles slowly
forming a chain and eventually they’ll link up from
either end and their shortcut is complete such incredible teamwork but
not all members of the colony err is capable of securing prey in traversing
their environment as these answer some rarely venture out from their homes at
all Weaver ants are a polymorphic species meaning they produce different
castes of workers which perform distinct roles within their colony the main cast
are the mages the ones who do most of the foraging in nest building another
first line of defense against intruders the other caste are the miners they look
almost identical to the mages but side-by-side you can see they’re much
smaller in size this cast of worker is assigned to nesting duties spending most
of their time tending to the colony’s developing brood and looking after their
queen the mother to the entire colony quite the accomplishment so that’s we friends there’s such an
incredibly unique and species from the way that they construct their homes from
leaves using their own young as tools to building living bridges to efficiently
scale their surroundings to their brutal yet methodical approach of securing prey
I think what amazes me most is their extreme aggression just slightly
brushing against their nests or a nearby branch is enough to set them into a
frenzy as a defensive response they posture up their bodies and kill their
abdomens over their heads poised to fire out wrapping strings of their formic
acid if this liquid were to get into a potential threat size like a bird or a
lizard it surely made for a great deterrent one of the reasons most other
animals like to give these guys a wide berth next to me dance they’re probably
the most territorial ants I’ve ever encountered regardless I really enjoyed
documenting these guys and exploring the forests which they and countless other
animals call home like giant butterflies and grasshoppers the size of my hand
plenty of other amazing ant species like trap joints jumping adds spider heads golden tailed spiny ants
and lots more the cute little turtles I saw swimming up and down the streams and
the massive saltwater crocodiles hanging out along the estuaries the largest
living reptiles in the world I was even lucky enough to spot three wild southern
cassowaries one of the largest living birds in the world these modern-day
dinosaurs mostly feed on fallen fruit and a highly important seed disperses
many of the forest plants depend entirely on these birds to survive unfortunately they’re an endangered
species mostly due to habitat loss as a result of deforestation
let’s just hope these ancient and incredibly biodiverse forests remain
around for a long time to come sadly Australia has just been hit with
one of its worst bushfire seasons in recorded history which definitely
doesn’t help I’m fortunate to not have been affected
by the fires living here in Melbourne aside from experiencing several days of
thick smoke I could only imagine what it was like
closer to the flames whilst fire is a natural part of the Australian landscape
with some forests actually needing fire in order to reproduce and thrive these
fires following Australia’s 2019 record average high temperatures and low levels
of rainfall burned an unprecedented strength devastating vast amounts of
land and claiming the lives of countless native animals many which managed to
escape the flames had little to no habitats left to them and ended up
either starving or being hunted down by invasive predators like feral cats and
foxes which have an easy time spotting them within the open scorched land
the combination of this extreme heat and prolonged droughts also allowed fire to
reach his way into environments which aren’t naturally adapted to it unable to
fully recover if affected even lush rainforests which
has stood since the Cretaceous period at least 65 million years ago were ablaze
as Earth’s climate changes we can expect to see extreme natural disasters like
these occurring more and more frequently and on even larger scales governments
and policies at least here in Australia really treat environmental concerns
seriously repeatedly dismissing scientific research and delaying the
transition from fossil fuels into cleaner energy production so it’s really
up to us as individuals to take matters into our own hands there’s many places
we can start in reducing our environmental footprint but one of the
most impactful steps we can take is changing something which most of us do
at least three times every day it’s what we eat whilst often-overlooked animal
agriculture is one of the main drivers of deforestation fresh water usage
species extinction and greenhouse gas emissions so avoiding the consumption of
animal products like meat dairy and eggs is a simple way we can all collectively
make a huge difference helping to conserve and restore the natural world
and bring it back to its former glory oh no I don’t know this channel is
almost at a hundred thousand subscribers thank you guys so much for your
overwhelming support over the years when I started making videos back in 2014 I
honestly never expected more than a hundred people to be interested let
alone nearly a hundred thousand it’s really great to see that there’s so many
of you out there deeply interested in ads also a big thanks to my generous
patreon supporters for helping make these videos possible and a special
thanks to my top-tier supporters and Iker Ben Cargill John Overton nicholas
atkins and thomas window now on to the regular giveaway where you
guys get a chance to win one of our specially designed air phones in my last
video on medias I asked what do you find most interesting about them I think what
I find so interesting is the way that they kick box to resolve their
territorial disputes with rival colonies such a quirky yet highly civilized
strategy of success so the winner is Alex Boyd who is most interested in how
medians can predate Australia’s invasive cane toads making them conservationists
ants of sorts and was also fascinated with how medians and sugar ants are able
to coincide due to their opposite foraging hours a great display of how
maidens have their own niche in their ecosystem congratulations Alex you’ve
just won yourself one of our acrylic starter kits for next videos giveaway
we’ll be putting one of our white song starter kits up for grabs which includes
one of our founding size of white or nests along with a bunch of accessories
to enter simply answer the following what do you find most interesting about
Weaver ants is it the way that they stitch leaves together how they build
living bridges or something else post your answers in
the comment section below I’ll pick out a single comment and announce them as
the winner in my next video as always thanks for watching and I hope you enjoy

ANTSTORE Gespräch mit Andrew Stephenson über Blattschneideameisen


Hello and welcome. I’m driving to the airport. But I’m not traveling, I’m picking up someone. He is from Scotland, an experienced antkeeper, who knows a lot about leaf-cutter ants. And I will have a talk with him. Come on, join us. Martin: My guest today is Andrew Stephenson. Martin: Hi Andrew, how was your flight? I had a 2 hour flight from Edinburgh. Everything was fine. Nice that you are here. I am happy that we can talk today. Thank you for having me it’s very nice
to be here. Which was your first ant colony. I did research in University on social insects. I wanted an ant colony so in 1992 I bought my first Atta cephalotus colony from a professor. I kept the ants for several years and the colony got bigger and bigger. One day they managed to escape from the formicarium and leave the house under the door They removed all plants from the neighbors garden and carried them back in. At that point I gave the colony to a zoo because it was too big. That was my first encounter with Atta Cephalotus. lifelong love of them which I’ve pursued
ever since you are also expert for for animals with leaf cutter ants and wise
leaf cutter ants what why you likes us and spits well leaf cutting ants are the
most advanced of all the social insects the the things that they do the way that
they’re cast differentiations the soldiers the
gardeners how it’s all laid out is incredible nobody could fail to be
amazed by what what you see when you look in these displays and and when you
see them in our a big public display in a zoo or a museum and you see all the
different elements of the colony it’s fantastic I mean in the tropics in the
wild you see them and they’ll they’ll travel they’ll travel hundreds of meters
to plan and carry the leaves by and the fact that they’re not eating the leaves
the fact that they’re using the leaves to grow a crop and then to feed on the
crop and all the different elements of that they are fantastic so do you give
them different leaves every day or do you keep on black is that blackberry yes
yes normally we give this loose at this moment it’s very easy to get plans like
it and we use odds of flour from dried flowers
so we have the ant farm for the wall whoa that’s lovely
that’s nice have you seen that before that’s very nice thank you so do you
make here as well so you got CNC yes she amazing that’s beautiful
you tell me that you’re often and and and treated at why what what what us
especial was treated at so the first colony of ants that I bought came from
timid Italian so I wanted to find where they came from so I followed them back
to Trinidad and and from then on pretty much put down roots into the diet I’ve
bought a house there and I spend several months a year and and in fact at the end
of this year I’m going to move to trigger that permanently and lovin
Trinidad and then travel to Europe to do the work that I do
so why Trinidad they speak English they drive an IRA side of the road it’s very
it’s very Yuki friendly into the diet so it’s it’s a nice place to be
my wife is Trinidadian and the children they I have children who are half-turn
Italian so it’s it’s a place that I feel very comfortable and there’s only two
species of leaf cotton and there are artists authorities and academics on
spinosus so in terms of variety it’s not fantastic but in the rest of South
America there’s plenty to see and it’s a good place to travel there from Trinidad
to see all so yeah Trinidad is an amazing place I would recommend anybody
come to another floor yeah and you are also travel in other
countries in which country it was travel so virtually all of the South American
countries but Paraguay is where I’m concentrating now I was there last year
and trying to organize paperwork people work in South American countries is very
very difficult and it’s taken 18 months to finally sort that so I’ll be going to
Paraguay this year to bring back lots of different species and whereas there’s
only two species of leafcutters and Trinidad those 22 species in Paraguay so
fantastic variety including the grass cutting ants which should be really good
to see so yeah I’m looking forward to that and I’ve managed to set up all the
people and need the infrastructure all the things that you need to be able to
go there and get colonies here is a strategy that birds don’t find the nest
that’s the head node not a street you know you see here so and here’s the
answers ended okay so not a lie in your van yes interesting
so then we have here from sauce he drops a mess over borrows so we had here built
nest was calm and and they’ve dug that themselves of the RS that are preformed
you know they’ve got did you got problems with the keeping of leaf cutter
ants and if yes what how did you fix it so we look at two parameters when we’re
setting up we’ve got lines nice even temperature and high high humidity so
when we are setting up our our display in a zoo and we are talking to the
client about about looking at them we see that you have to monitor the
temperature and humidity in the fungus garden so we so the humidity meter
should have a probe that goes into the fungus so you can you can satisfy
yourself it’s amazing how you if you measure the humidity even a little
distance away from where the fungus is it can be completely different so we try
to get them to measure the humidity and the where the funguses and the biggest
problem with the type of display is that if you don’t
have lots of soil in the display which a lot of people don’t want because they
want to see the fungus if you don’t have lots of soil it can be quite difficult
to keep the humidity and the temperature even some things with very small
colonies you don’t hear that there’s a problem until the colonies nearly dead
and the fungus is gone so you’ve got to get it right at the beginning there’s no
time with small colonies to to make mistakes often and so people think that
leaf cutter ants are difficult species they’re not a difficult species if you
if you set it up properly there are only are difficult species of it’s not
correct so taking advice at the beginning from
experts about how to say to up aesthetic colors and do the research make sure
that you do the research to know what you’re talking about I think it’s really
important have an acrylic which you see but what is very popular in the internet
I don’t like it but the customers liked it so we produce this nests do you make
these yes we have obvious glass and then back side we have for acrylic
workshop and we have here and a special ground which saves the water what are
the mmunity what was your biggest adventure or experience about ends the
adventures that you have with ants normally start once you’ve got the ants
and you’ve got to try and move them across the world but recently I was in
French Guiana and I was on this huge mound of artists a Flutie’s it was a
massive big mound and it was quiet because you know they come out at night
and I wanted to see some activity so I stood on the top of the mound and stamp
my feet on it and nothing happened at all and I was kind of confused as to why
they weren’t coming out and I stepped back and all round the outside of this
mound there was lots of tall grass and what I didn’t realize was all the
soldiers all the majors had come out and they were all over the grass and I
stepped back into them and I had shorts oh and I had short trousers on and they
were my legs were covered in majors and covered in blood because they just all
bare and it was a it was a flight a shock and
one of the biggest adventures we did a program for the BBC and the UK called
plan ants and we were asked to go to the tropics and find a million ants in a
colony and bring it back to the UK and film it in our studio and it took us two
days to dig this colony and find the Queen and we were bringing big handfuls
of fungus gardens there was a hundred and sixty fungus gardens that we took
and we had a massive big box off camera and we were preaching all the fungus
into the box but what you didn’t see on the camera was the box was covered in
blood because we had gloves on but within about half an hour the gloves
were all cut to pieces because the soldiers had cut the gloves so we were
we were lifting and putting in but there was blood dripping and as well it was
very very unpleasant yeah yeah it really was but we did it we got the Queen we
found the Queen at the end of the second day we found the Queen and she was she
was in the last fungus garden because they’d obviously moved our there but she
was surrounded by ants so she was about the size of a mouse but with all the
antler and so we knew immediately we found the Queen and we would pick it up
and she was it was huge a big cocoon of ants and we got her so yeah and that
film no I think you can see on YouTube now it’s it’s a couple hours long and it
says a fantastic documentary on leaf covenants camponotus our lovely aunt the
one these are a nice big chunky and quite an attractive and okay and this is
a oneness and some people say with this material it’s maybe the ants can do but
to know we have tested with lots of ants and we have knows much remixes that the
ants cannot cut that is amazing and so this nest is one year old and you see
it’s very clean no never you must clean and to ask the and spring or to the last
box in front of us we have a starter kit a set up which we sell for private
customers and what do you think about this what is your feedback about us well
all the elements that you need are here the the next tank the feeding area and
the waste is it’s all there and it’s so easy to distinguish between all the
different processes you can see them cutting leaves bringing it to the garden
and then taking the waste to the to the waste chamber for our small-scale private collector to have something like
this in their home and to be able to see all the different things it’s fantastic
absolutely fantastic I mean I’m assuming you could extend the walkway if you
wanted to you could have a lot longer if you wanted to have the the feeding area
a distance to the nest you could have that you could take it right in a room
as our as our set office is amazing and the colony of this and there I mean if
you want any proof that this is a good system just look at how healthy that
colony is its enormous it’s one of the biggest a crumber makes colonies I’ve
ever seen when I see your setups and I’ve seen these setups all over the
world because people have come here and bought them and taking them back and
then I’ll go along and see them most recently in our in a zoo and Englund I
saw some of your setups there and they’re obviously functioning very well
and they’re doing you know they’re looking great so we have also option for
a b2b customers they move this way or you can change this the street
it’s ant way Wow open closed systems I like this this is very nice
so you’ve this is glass yes so when you have our species on display
do you have smaller colonies offshore to sail yes so they can say I won best one
and then you can yes our showroom so we can talk with other customers what is
possible aha and really the size of this you could
make this any size depending on what the people want
yeah so Andrew many tanks that you was here I was very happy and I have a small
present for you and not really for you know you can look in the inside Oh Oh fantastic
dry flowers for your ends Wow maybe you can test it I’ve actually never used
these before but I’ve always seen no and I wondered these are great well
leafcutter ants like mowers a red color but you can check it I will check
amazing thank you very much I appreciate Yeah I hope you enjoyed the video. Thank you so much for being there. And I look forward to the next video.

Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

ANT SOLDIERS?! | My NEW Pheidole Noda Colony!

ANT SOLDIERS?! | My NEW Pheidole Noda Colony!


Hi guys, it’s Ants Britania and today, I’m going to be showing you my brand new Pheidole Noda colony So I’m holding this colony currently in a small Tupperware container that came with some Chinese food It was all I had at the time when they arrived so it’s just a temporary out world for them to explore and to get food as you can see I’ve put a Small piece small bit of Vaseline around the entry hole I’ve dropped food in and stuff at the top But guys I’m gonna be moving them into a Plaster form aquarium, which I made a couple videos ago If you want to check that out, I’ll leave a link below in the description Okay and for the foraging area or out. Well. I’m using this glass kind of aquarium It’s got two holes either side entry holes and on the top It’s got a frame, which has Vaseline underneath the lip of it. It’s also got a Nice lid which has some fine mesh on the on the top which is needed because these ants are escape artists Okay guys I’m gonna start by hydrating the plaster nest this will create a sense of humidity inside the nest Which will encourage the ants to head into the nest? Also, I’m going to cut out some red film and lay it over the top And for warming up the nest guys, I’m going to use a komodo seven watt heat map I’ll leave it a link in the description below if you want to check it out Okay now it’s time to get these guys in the foraging area and get the container open and get them moving in I Seem to struggle to get the lid off so I decided to just take the top off of the the container and Put it into the out world because loads about coming out and biting me So I decided to just drop it straight away into the out world and remove the lid slowly but carefully and As when I’ve done that I put the lid back on and I gave the out some time to just calm down So guys I’m trying to isolate the test-tube here We’re trying to get it out the container and put it into the foraging area This is this will make it a lot easier to move the test room around if I need to at the moment It’s quite difficult to get access to the colony while they’re in this kind of container Yes, we finally got the test tube out with a little drop Don’t worry. The Allens are very resilient They have like an exoskeleton, which means their skeleton is on the outside body so it can take a little drop like that So as I tipped the container upside down to try and tap in the remaining ounce I tapped in a lot of their rubbish so here. You can just see me cleaning up any like all get crickets old ants Picking them up and chuck them in a little little pot got by the side So guys after an hour the first Anne has gone into the nest and he started laying chemical trail and Before you know it other hands have followed his chemical trail and entered the nest as well With the increase in activity around the test tube and around the nest it seems like the ants are starting to mobilize with Some encouragement from the light from my phone it will speed up the process over the move As you can see here the ants are starting to move their brood from the test-tube They are obviously sensing that there is a better alternative elsewhere The colony starts to rush into the nest they’re trying to take shelter from the beaming light from my phone And Before you know it the whole colony has moved into the nest and As you can see here the Queen is sitting comfortably in her new plaster former carrier After a week had passed guys the ants have settled in really well to the into their place the nest They’ve even brought some sand from the foraging area into the nest to kind of make it bit me home a bit more comfortable Just a small fun fact for you guys In this small chamber here, we can see the Queen She is a lot larger than the other ants in the colony. The small ones are the workers. They as you can see here They’re tending to the brood, but the real guardians are the soldiers Now these guys will defend the colony from any threat. Whether it be human or ant? So these girls are doing really well They’ve got a huge pile of brood you can see here, and they’re always active they’re always going in and out of the foraging area gathering food and gathering sand like I explained earlier and They’re lovely So speaking of gathering food and suppliers I think it’s time to feed or answer some honey water So our first customer emerges and as expected She’s drinking a lot of that honey water and she’s filling up her social stomach So now she’s gonna make her journey back to the nest to tell all of her sisters about what she has found And Before you know it More and more ants are coming in to have a drink of the honey water to fill up their social stomachs as well Now it’s time to feed them a cricket this worker is already showing some real interest in this food And With a repeat of the same process she would have gone back and told her sisters and as you can see here Even a soldier has come to enjoy the feast So guys I hope you like my new if they don’t know the colony I Absolutely love this colony. I love the soldiers. I love how they’re absolutely fearless and those defend the nest against anything even myself And I can’t wait to make another future kind of update video About these guys just to show you guys how they’re getting on But if you can if you guys can’t wait for the next video I do record my ants on my Instagram and my facebook So if you want to kind of keep up today slightly with my colonies and myself Be sure to go over to Instagram Facebook and give us a little follow So these girls are not native to the UK They’re actually native to Southeast Asia and kind of China region so I had to buy them from an online ad store and I bought them from British and calm so if you guys have a Bit of spare time be sure to go and check them out. I’ll leave a link below in the description if You guys haven’t seen it already I uploaded a video last week showing off my other new ant colony from Southeast Asia My trap-jaw ant’s so if you’ve got some extra spare time be sure to go and check out that video So guys, I hope you enjoyed this video. It’s always a pleasure making these videos for you guys I’ve always loved for winning my aunt’s and my how to make kind of former carrion videos So if you like this if you like my content be sure to hit the subscribe button to join the colony and click the blue ant to check out my videos and to see my channel and to keep up with my Weekly uploads because I upload every weekend get the Bell one button as well Okay, guys. Have a great weekend, and I’ll see you next week

ANTCUBE Ameisenarenen – Arena für Ameisen

ANTCUBE Ameisenarenen – Arena für Ameisen


Hi Guys, do you love to play with such Clamps, too? Everything fits together perfectly. That was exactly the idea for our ANCUBE Arenas. Which Arena sizes and designs are available? First of all we have three sizes of cubes: 10x10x10, 20x20x20 and 30x30x30 cm For more space, the arenas are also available in double length and height. Then there are the flat Arena versions. The flat arena version has better accessibility to the ground. Or you let decoration stick out. The 10 and 20cm depth Arenas have 27mm hole for 3/4 inch … … or M25 screw connection. So you can put together Arenas with the same depth perfectly. The 30cm deep arenas have 50mm holes for larger colonies. We also offer Arenas with the hole centered in the middle hight. These are intended for half-filled with soil applications. Here the ants can dig free. In this case you cn look very well into the nest from below. In addition tu that there is the center design. The center cube has an additional 13 mm holes on the side for feeding. But here is the danger that pets or children accidentally open the formicarium. These here are The “Combi Arenas”. A compact design with integrated farm / nest area. You can fill it with Sand loam for example. When using nestin inserts from cork, plaster or Digfix… You can see this little 8mm gap. This is because these are the same Nests which we made for our ant farms. So you have to fill this gap with clay or something or something similar. All arenas are expandable and have two holes. We have suitable grid-caps and plugs With our different Connectors you can add additional arenas or farms. Here some examples: A Formicarium plug is used for easy closing. If you want to provide ventilation, you can use a grid insert. Use a basin hose connector to connect a tube to the arena. You can also connect several arenas together. We have transparent connections. And many other special connectors. Usually, you would stay at one of the three arena depths 10, 20 or 30cm. But sometimes you want to switch between sizes. This is an example between the size 10 and 20cm. Both have a 27mm hole. But the 30cm Arenas have 50mm holes. So if you want to connect a 27mm hole with a 50mm hole, … … you can simply use a Formicarium plug 50mm with a 27mm cutout. Now you have 27mm holes on both sides. Now you can connect it easy. But there are many other options that we will show you in a separate video. Of course there is alos a frame avalible for every arena size. You can coat the frame from below with escape protection oil, lacquer or powder. Now the Ants are no longer able to walk along the frame. If it is secured this way, you can even keep ants in an open Setup. The Arena covers have 50 mm holes We have suitable lamps, fans, humidifiers, mesh inserts and plugs for all of our covers. As decoration or to hide a heating mat… … we also offer different Photo Backgrounds for different habitats. We were often asked what the difference to a terrarium or aquarium is The first thing you notice is the side holes for the expansion options. An aquarium or terrarium is normally not expandable. In addition, the glass bonds are special. It is transparent, not black, as is often the case with aquariums and terrariums. You can see very well whether ants crawl up the corners. There is no silicone bead inside. Aquariums need them so that they can take the water pressure. Here is hardly any silicone between the glass so that the corners are very close. Some species could bite through wide seams. Our edges are also finer deburred than in an aquarium. Which results in a more precise finish on Top. Everything is as tight as possible. On the Top edge the Arena have a rubber coating. This creates a tight and sealed fit… wich prevents the Ants from escaping. Hey, lets have a look from an Ant perspective. I am in the middle of the colony.The Ants are running around wild here. And from this perspective you can see the breakout protection frame quite well. In this case it is coated with powder. I am not be able to climb up there, And the Ants should not be able, too. Now it is a little to crowded in here.
I get out of here. I hope this was a useful overview to you about the different ANTCUBE Ant arenas. Thanks for watching see you next time!

ANTSTORE – Biosphäre Potsdam – Planung einer Ameisenanlage – Teil 1

ANTSTORE – Biosphäre Potsdam – Planung einer Ameisenanlage – Teil 1


Hello and welcome. Today we are at the biosphere in Potsdam. We were asked to plan construct and build an Ant Setup For this tropical indoor world. So that the visitors can explore The Antworld. Join us on this Projekt. “Good morning, Mr. Sebesta, nice to have you here. Welcome to the biosphere.” Martin: “Hello, nice to meet you. Let’s take a look!” This is our first visit and now we will find a good location for the ants together with the customer. We will probably choose Leafcutter Ants for this project because of the Perfect climatic conditions. Its so hot I’ll take my jacket off right away. Leafcutter Ants are also very interesting to watch for the visitors, when they carry the Leaf pieces. I think that will be the right choice. But I’m going to discuss that now. “Hello.” Martin: “It looks wonderful in here.
What inspired you to keep Ants and what is your vision.” Mrs. Hüerkamp: “In the summer we had an exhibition on the topic of” bees… …wich are eusocial insects. The second idea to This was to show Ants. Ants are very well known for their, and the best example for the eusocial form of existenz. Ants are also in a real rainforest so we wanted some for ours too. You can also learn a lot from these animals social structure and working together. We also have the optimal habitat for Ants to live here. We also have the opportunity to build upwards Very high. So a Big Setup would be awesome.” Martin: “So in your case I would suggest Leafcutter ants from South America. Exotic and very active animals that can build large colonies. …a lot to see for the visitors. The climate is like in the natural environment. We could have several small ant arenas spread out… …so that there is something to see everywhere. So let’s take a look at the Suggested spot.” Ms. Hüerkamp: “I like the Idea Leafcutter Ants, … … because you can watch them well when they carry their Leaves. And if our visitors could see that too, it would be great. So lets go down into the jungle. ” Ms. Hüerkamp: “From here you could build straight up to the Platform. And here we have space for an ant arena. Can the ants reach this 6m height? Martin: “We could go along this tree.” Mrs. Hüerkamp: “That should work.” Martin: “How much space do we have down here? ” Mrs. Hüerkamp: “We can choose a location and then speak to the gardener.” Gardener: “So every large plant like a palm or a tree I can not move… … But we can put the little plants somewhere else.” Martin: “We also have the option to place the Ant Arena on logs, to use as little space of the plants as possible. And up here we could build a platform With multiple chambers. Here is a sketch. We could use 20 and 30cm Cubes in here. We connect all the different sections,
so the Ants can choose on their own Fungus and waste chambers. Let’s mesure this height… 1.6 Meters The Formicarium itself can be placed on an 30cm or 40cm High Base. ” Ms. Hüerkamp: “Yes, that’s great, even small children can look inside that way.” Martin: “If you ever have to collect one of these ants, you can carefully lift them up with your Fingers. With this species you don’t have worry to hurt the Ants because they have a strong exoskeleton. So you can easily put the Ants back. This species is not toxic and cannot hurt you either. Martin: “Okay, I wrote down all dimensions and important details, we keep in touch. Thank you.” Ms. Hüerkamp: “Yes, great, I’m looking forward to your ideas. We will definitely have a great implementation which will impress us and the visitors.” “All right, bye.” So there is really a lot to discover here, let’s take a look. Now I have to finish planning the construction Setup. We’re going to build something awesome here. Stay tuned.

My Cockroach Farm

My Cockroach Farm


Greetings, AC Family! Welcome to the AntsCanada Ant Channel. If you have a fascination for nature, you’re
in the right place. On this channel, we take a look at the amazing
world of ants, and even explore pet ant keeping, as a hobby. But did you know that a big part of keeping
pet ant colonies, for most people, also involves keeping colonies of other insects? Today, for a change, we will turn our attention
from the ant colonies we all love on this channel, and turn our inquiring eyes toward
the colonies of insects our ants depend on for food. This week, we go from ants, to cockroaches! Feeder cockroaches, that is! Cockroaches, though repulsive to many people
throughout the world, are our ants’ favourite protein food source, and are actually quite
fascinating creatures in their own right. Today we take a look at the two species of
feeder roaches that I breed as food to our 4 ant colonies on this channel, and explore
what their cockroach societies are like. They happen to be two of the most popular
feeder cockroaches for ant colonies and other insect-eating exotic pets. You won’t want to miss all of this amazing
cockroach info ahead, so keep watching until the end. Ladies and gentlemen, let’s put away that
bug spray and explore why cockroaches are also some of the coolest of insects, not just
as ant food, in this episode of the AntsCanada Ant Channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my channel! And hit the bell icon. Welcome to the AC Family! Enjoy! Cockroaches, they’re perhaps the most notorious
and hated of all domestic insect pests, even more so than ants. They’re associated with being avid carriers
of germs, disease, bacteria, and more. But you may be surprised to know that cockroaches
which belong to the order called Blattodea, are comprised of about 4,600 species and only
30 of these 4,600 species of cockroaches are human house pests. The rest live out in forests, jungles, and
other habitats away from human homes. The two species of cockroaches that I feed
to my ants, which we will look at today, are examples of such non-pest cockroach species. First, presenting my Dubia Roach colony, scientific
name Blaptica dubia. These large cockroaches grow to about 4 to
4.5 cm in length. Their exoskeletons are strong, and the ants
aren’t able to eat them. You can tell the adult males and females apart
because adult males have huge wings while females have what are called tegmina, which
are small wing stubs. Though the males have fully developed wings
as adults, they rarely ever fly. If dropped from a high altitude they could
use the wings to direct their landing but don’t actually take off like most true flying
insects do. Juveniles, as seen here, have a mottled brown
colour. These roaches love to eat fruits. I offer a variety of different juicy fruits. The cockroaches are able to acquire all the
moisture they need from these juicy fruits. I do my best to offer them a variety, because
as you know, your pets are what their food eats, and any nutrients the cockroaches take
in through their diet, ultimately ends up in the bellies of our ants, so gut-loading
the cockroaches using a varied diet is a must. Now, one of the annoying things, we here in
the tropics need to deal with though, are wild ants mooching off the cockroaches’ food
supplies. If you look carefully you will see wild ghost
ants drinking from this orange slice. Hmmm… And here you’ll find a wild black crazy ant. Perhaps I should try applying baby powder
on the outside of these cockroach enclosures. Check out the pattern and colours of the undersides
of these Dubia roaches! I find they’re actually quite attractive up
close. I love watching them eat. If you look carefully at their faces, you’ll
notice that their eyes actually wrap around the entire side of their head. This helps them avoid predators. As a lover of all insects, it is always hard
for me to feed these guys to the ants, but I do know the ants do acquire some great protein
from them. I just make sure to crush them swiftly prior
to feeding to lessen their suffering. Some of you who have seen our previous videos
involving feedings may notice that the cockroaches still move despite being pre-crushed and this
is because nervous cells called ganglia run along the center of their body, which is why
even if you completely decapitate a roach, they are still capable of movement. I usually feed these adults to the Fire Nation,
as the fire ants are able to benefit from their high meat content, as well as penetrate
their exoskeletons effectively. The Fire Nation can fully consume the meat
of 1 adult Dubia roach in a matter of a few hours. One of the most viewed videos on this channel
involved the Fire Nation consuming an adult female cockroach that gave birth while it
was being devoured. In that video you see the babies being born,
and they’re stark white in colour. Newborn Dubia roaches are white, like these
nymphs here. These must have just been born a few hours
ago. Aren’t they cute? What’s interesting about Dubia roaches is
that they are live bearers. A female Dubia roach will give birth to an
egg sack and then pull this egg sack back inside herself and incubate the eggs until
babies emerge, a process called ovoviviparity. A female can give birth to 20-40 live young
at a time. These young shed their skin 7 times, growing
25% each time before reaching adulthood. This sub-adult here is whitish in colour because
it had just molted. As the exoskeleton hardens, it will darken
to its normal brownish cryptic colour. What’s amazing is these roaches can live up
to 2 yrs! They actually make interesting pets, but I
do my best not to get too attached, because after all, they are our ant colonies’ beef! Guys, should we name them? Leave your suggestions in the comments section! Or would giving them an official name make
them harder to feed to our ants. Haha! Now while these large Dubia roaches here are
live bearing cockroaches, and don’t lay eggs, our next colony of roaches actually do lay
egg sacs. Meet Blatta lateralis, Turkistan Cockroaches,
often called red runners due to their quick speed. In the pet trade, they are simply known as
“lats”. These are a smaller species of cockroach. Adult males have wings, just like the Dubias,
but unlike the Dubias, the males are known to actively fly. The females are wingless and are a gorgeous
crimson brown colour. Females lay an egg sac known as an ootheca. Look at these Oothecae laying here. From these will hatch little tiny cockroach
nymphs. I was lucky enough to catch one female in
the process of birthing an ootheca. Check it out! You can actually see her as she contracts
her abdomen muscles to lay the eggs into the open end of the ootheca. This process of depositing eggs into the ootheca
will continue over several hours and she will continue to carry this ootheca with her for
awhile afterwards, until she zips up the open end and drops it. I find the ootheca to look kind of like a
purse. Soon when the babies are ready to emerge,
the ootheca much like a purse will open up from the top and the baby lats will be born. I feed these lats to the Golden Empire, the
Dark Knights, and our new trap-jaw ant colony, the Jawbreakers. Their exoskeletons are a bit softer and are
easier to get into than the Dubias. So what do you say? What should we name this roach colony? Leave your answer in the comments section! Now the only thing I don’t like about this
species of cockroach is they expel a very pungent and gross defensive odour when alarmed
and at times it can be pretty strong. I just hold my breath every time I have to
reach into their enclosure to feed them to our ants. As far as housing goes for both species, I
keep them in a plastic bin full of egg cartons and toilet paper rolls. The environments must be kept relatively dry
to keep mold from growing. I feed them a mix of veggies and fruit and
also offer them dog kibble. Their enclosures must be kept clean at all
times because they can get messy especially when the droppings collect. I feel cockroaches are pretty fantastic creatures
and the more you get to know them, the less disgusting they seem, and the more fascinating
they become. Some people keep these, as well as other cockroach
species as pets. So what do you think? Do you think keeping cockroaches are as cool
as keeping pet ants? If you decide to keep pet ants, perhaps you
might consider feeder roaches, too, as an alternative to crickets, mealworms, and superworms? They also happen to be more nutritious for
ants than those aforementioned. Hope you enjoyed this week’s video AC Family! It’s ant love, and just for this week, roach
love forever! AC Family, were you grossed out or did you
find these cockroaches to be cool? For you AC Inner Colony members, I’ve placed
a hidden cookie for you here, if you would just like to watch the cockroaches in this
video doing their thing with less narration. And now it’s time for the AC Question of the
week. In last week’s AC Question of the Week, we
asked: What does “pantropical” mean? Congratulations to Omar Salloum who correctly
answered: pantropical means: distributed throughout
the tropics Congratulations Omar you just won a free ebook
handbook from our shop! For this week’s AC Question of the Week, we
ask: What is the technical term
for a cockroach’s egg sac? Leave your answer in the comments section
and you could win a free ant t-shirt from our shop! Hope you can subscribe to the channel, give
it a thumbs up, share, and leave me a comment if you liked this video. Remember that we release a new ant video every
single Saturday at 8 AM EST. So what do you say? Join our growing AC Family and hit that SUBSCRIBE
button. Why? ‘Cause it’s ant love forever!