Hogyan nevelj hangyakolóniát? – 1. rész


AntsHungary presents: How to raise an ant colony? the ant colony’s raising starts with a test tube. fill the clean test tube with some water theen put a piece of wool in it not too tight and not too loosely pull down the wool with a hooked wire expressly. only until the water level not along! than put the ant queen in this test tube. this test tube will guarantee the humidity for a long time the end of the test tube also close with a piece of wool it let through the air so gives the optimal breeze for the hatching test tube. the queen feels safe herself in this tight, closed test tube and the humidity imitate the underground conditions most of the claustral ant species don’t claim feeding at the first time, but we recommend to feeding every species from the beginning, to helps their successfull colony founding. most species needs to feed with honey and insects only some harvester species deflect from it. put a small honey at the side of the test tube with a hooked wire put only a few from it, less than a drop. we should think how big our ant, and how big her stomach possibly if we think this, we won’t make that mistake to give too much honey them and they stick in it. recommend to cut half the insects for the ants they will easily access to the soft parts in it. then put the test tube in warm, dark, calm and vibration-free place when the queen can laying eggs leisurely. can guarantee the darkness if package the test tube in a piece of cellophane. some days later the queen is laying down her first eggs. this time we don’t have much work, just to take care for the feeding and keep the test tube clean. give them half-cutted insect pieces 2 times a week and 1 or 2 days later clear off them before they deteriorate after a few weeks the eggs develop.. …first for larva, ..after for puppae. larvae eats protein already, so this time important the feeding regularly. first workers will hatch from the puppae. with the small and mediom sized ants it needs 4-6 weeks from egg to worker but with some big sized spices this time could be 2 and half months even. If the test tube became dirty during the hatching we have to move the queen and the brood into a new, clean test tube. it’s much easier now, than when have workers if the surface of the cotton covered by mould, or the water discoloured, it could be a dangerous habitat for the ants, so have to move them for a new tube. we need the following tools for the transfer: first top up the new test tube with the earlier mentioned method, then put the queen into the new one. finally have to move the brood carefully. need a small drop of water. watering a bit the hair of the brush, so the brood will stick to it and we can move them carefully to the new test tube. the brush has soft hairs wich don’t damage the brood. try to move all of the eggs. don’t have to put them for the same place, the queen will put them to a heap. 🐜 Subscribe! 🐜 – and check the next episode. 🙂

Élet 5 centiméteren! – Temnothoraxok gondozása FormiKIT micro hangyafarmban


If you don’t know Temnothorax species, you should know they are tiny species and found small colonies. They can live lifelong in the FormiKIT micro formicarium. Here can see the queen. The moister spoinge is a bit dirty in this formicarium, i should replace it to a new one. But how can we do this, to avoid their escape? Check this, here is the first trick! We will replace the sponge and the colony will stay in the formicarium during. The FormiKIT Micro include 6 screws we will get out 5 from these. We will leave only the roofing’s screw. The formicarium won’t come aparts, but we can slide carefully the nest’s top layer. Take out the old sponge, and put the new one into. Then slip back the top layer. We have some deserters of course. Don’t afraid, just put them back with a brush. Finally close and assemble the formicarium. You can see the new sponge is much cleaner! This sponge is really thin, as can see before. This is important. Don’t forget: it can store only a few water, so really important to moister it regularly, at least 1-2 times a week. Temnothorax species don’t need high humidity, but they also drink sometimes. Put a piece of tape on the moister hole, to slow down the evaporating. I raised up them a bit. They are trying to hide in the pole and guarding the queen. We can clean up the dirty arena with a humid cotton wool. I show you a mature colony too. The winged male ants this year appeared in this colony. You can see they have massive brood. This is how looks a mature colony in the Temnothorax species. But they are still no more than 5 centimeter. I show you the 2nd trick with this colony. Need a small piece of wool, and a hooked tweezer. When all ants in the nest-part, close the entrance with the wool. Take out the 4 screws from the arena. If you take apart the arena like this you can wiping and cleaning it, just how you want. Don’t have to worry about the escapes during the cleaning. The two screws still keeps in gross the nest-part. If we finished with the cleaning assemble it again and give food for the ants. You can see a new-born worker in this scene. They has this bright color after born, during the first day. She looks just like a “ghost-ant” 🙂 This colony get honey, … …cockroach pieces, … …and shattered nut pieces for food. It seems they like the cockroach mostly now. You can put the formicarium in different ways, but don’t forget: the water in the sponge will always goes downwards. Thanks for watching! You can find the own-designed FormiKIT Micro formicarium on our ant-site! If you enjoyed, don’t forget to subscribe to the AntsHungary’s YouTube channel! 🙂

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)

Elképesztő hangyaváros szövőhangyákkal! (Polyrhachis dives)


Hello everyone, this is a new antsite video In this episode we are going to rebuild an ant city. Keep watching until the end – i promise it will be super exciting… This is an old formicarium A thriving weaver ant colony lived in it before. You can saw this colony in some previous videos, or even personally on terraristic exhibitions. This colony lived 2, 2 and half year long in this formicarium. So the goal is to populate again this formicarium with a thriving ant colony. We have chance now to rebuild this system, so why don’t we upgrade a bit this whole formicarium to be more spectacular? You know i have plenty of creativity, so i find out a cylinder shape instead of the previous brick. This is more elegant and even more spectacular. Then I want something more in my mind.. If the weaver ants can get an own tower, why don’t they get an own city instead? This is the story how comes the idea to build an ant city. The structure build up from three different towers, with three outside gallery between them. There are three escape-prevent edge, and three openable ventilation grid on the top of the towers. There are more ventilation grids on two place at the sides, for the better breezing. There are many carcase laying on the floor of the old formicarium. Also can find tainted, unhatched larvae somewhere. The diameter of the biggest cylinder was planned for the size of the old bonsai tree. Meanwhile we get a big family of weaver ants so they will move into the new place. You can see what a massive nest they built in their previous home. They weaved almost everything for nest in the left formicarium, and there are many of workers in the left formicarium also. The ant city looks much amazing after the furnish. The old bonsai tree also looks epic in it, and i put another, smaller bonsai tree inside. Ants can hide between it’s roots. The ant city looks like a real metropolis after the ants have moved in. Every ants working on it’s own task busily. Some of them are building new home and others throwing out the garbage from the old nest. Every ants run fast to their work on the busy trails. After the settlement the ants moved in the old nest at the top of the tree immediately, and they start to throwing out the old larvaes and garbage from it. I didn’t record video from the settlement, because I have put them through almost one by one during an afternoon. It wasn’t too interesting for a video you can believe. An now let’s see the freshly building new nest. One day after the settlement some ants gathered spectacularly between the roots. At that time we could guess what they planning, and a few times later the first strings just appear. The ants just start to weaving their new nest. Catch their larvae in their mouth and working busy on the building operations, so they pass so much with the building on the first day! A few days later the new nest starts to equal to it’s final form. The walls became more stronger as the ants wave more and more layers on it. They use every kind of building material, this reason there are black and green threads in the walls which comes from the fake grass which covers the floor. Meanwhile they start to renew the old nest at the top of the tree. They have repaired the entrances, and they start to build together the nest with the wall of the cylinder. Can see well the fresh silks with brighter color than the old weaves. We can see inside the nest through the formicarium wall. There are many of workers and larvae working hard inside. That workers who don’t work, they guarding in a typical position on the most important strategy places. Sometimes we can notice winged males (drones) in the colony. The smallest, sloping tower still empty, because I give them food and water here. I put a test tube with full of water here, and they start to use it ardently. Hopefully they won’t drown in the open water, if this happens i have to find out another method for watering. There is a build in thermometer at the side of the formicarium. The back of the thermometer have to cover with grid, to avoid them to move inside it. Those areas where the ants feel the ventilation of the air, they try to discover new places. They stick out their antennae often through the dish to find out what is at the other side. A few workers waiting standby on the only door where no any escape-prevent oil around. But don’t worry, i never open this door. If they thirsty or hungry many workers start to raiding in their territory to find food or water. But of course their activity depends from the temperature and light also, in cooler temperature they goes inside the nest instead. And it seems they try to reach the lighter places – i think this could be some escaping instinct. It is such a catching sight, as these tiny insects organizing their society and living their everyday. We can admire them for hours, and can observe more and more interesting ant-things, but unfortunately our video is ending now, hope see you again next time! Don’t forget to like, subscribe and hit the 🔔 icon to get notifications for our new videos! 🙂

Pheidole megacephala en Formica cinerea: lekker smullen

Pheidole megacephala en Formica cinerea: lekker smullen


Hi antlovers Today my Formica cinerea and my Pheidole megacephala colony get something they never had before. meal-worms and crickets. The cinerea colony starts munching quickly from the meal-worms, wile others are still hunting down some fruit flies. The Pheidole got some small crickets, and the start eating them with pleasure. In any case, i would hate to be a cricket right now. There is one cricket that has not been captured yet, and he jumped away just in time,…. …straight in the jaws of one of the other ants This ant is going to wrestle a bit with the cricket, but with some reinforcement the cricket has no chanse. The cinerea’s don’t care about all that fuzz, and keep on enjoying their meal-worms. That’s it for this movie. did you enjoy it? Like, comment and subscribe. see you next time 😉

Sugar Ants | Tandem Running Their Way to Victory

Sugar Ants | Tandem Running Their Way to Victory


Hi, my name’s Jordan Dean, and in this episode,
we’re going to be looking at one of the most widely distributed and diverse ants on
the planet. They’re known as Sugar Ants… Sugar Ants cover the genus “Camponotus”,
a large genus, comprised of around a thousand-different species, and they can be found worldwide,
within forests, grasslands, mountains, and even deserts too.
Like most ants, Sugar ants typically nest underground, with some species living in rotting
wood, and others, up in the trees, within hollow branches, or clusters of leaves which
have been stitched together to form a shelter, much like green tree ants do.
Because they’re so globally ubiquitous and varied, they go by many common names. Often
called “Carpenter Ants” after the wood dwelling species. Which can carve out nesting
chambers with the use of their powerful mandibles. Here in Australia, they’re mostly referred
to as “Sugar Ants” for their love of sweet foods, like tree sap, nectar and honeydew
excreted from sap sucking insects, like these little leafhoppers here. The two have a mutualistic
relationship. The leafhoppers offer the ants nutritious honeydew, and in return, the ants
provide these little bugs protection from predators. Sugar ants can often be quite distinctive for their large polymorphic appearance. The
workers vary in size and shape, often to fulfil a certain role within their colony. Minors
workers are small and slender and are usually the ones doing the foraging, tending of the
brood and caring of the queen. While the majors are often much larger and
stockier. See how they have bigger heads in proportion to their bodies? These large heads
are full of muscle, allowing them to deliver powerful bites. Great for crushing up and
carrying food back to the nest, and defending the colony from predators. Typically, they’re
seen sitting by the entrances of their nests acting like doorkeepers. Only moving to let
fellow colony members pass by. On top of their powerful bites, many Sugar
ants possess another lethal ability. When dealing with predators or prey, the ants will
grip onto them and start curling up their bodies, as if they’re trying to sting them
like a Bull ant would. But these ants don’t have stingers. What they do instead, is excrete
a deadly liquid. See that little white blob coming out of this ant’s abdomen? This stuff
is a kind of formic acid. They use this chemical weapon as
a means of stunning and subduing their prey and predators alike. In this case, they target
the vulnerable leg joints of this helpless Bull ant. Sugar ants navigate as most do, by following pheromone trails laid down by their fellow
colony members. But there’re some species that can perform a rather unique trait among
ants. Native to Australia, and one of the most widely distributed, is the Banded Sugar
ant. When foraging, these ants use social techniques
which often make them the first ants to a source of food. See how these two ants run
along together, almost like they’re playing follow the leader? Well they are. This process
is known as tandem running, which involves teaching and social learning.
The leader ants are usually the most skilled of foragers, often having prior knowledge
of the best sites to explore. Think of them as the old wise ants educating the youngers
on how things are done. The leader runs rapidly in a short burst, and then pauses, waiting
until she feels a tap from her follower, and then she continues on. Stopping and starting
frequently to make sure her follower is still on her trail. These tandem runs, usually consist of a couple of ants, but on occasion, there can be several
workers following along, each stopping and waiting for their trailers to catch up.
This unique process of communication greatly benefits the ants’ foraging capabilities.
During a tandem run, the followers can discover food much faster compared to just foraging
on their own. And the added presence of these ants will ensure that their colony is the one controlling the site. Occasionally, some ants can be a little stubborn
in being recruited. So occasionally, the leaders will attempt to pull others along for encouragement. Sometimes even resorting to completely picking them up and carrying them if they continue
to resist. In times of plenty, Sugar ants will stock
up on food and water by filling the stomachs of certain colony members. These ants become
known as repletes and are used as living storage vessels. When there’s little food to be
found above ground, due to times of drought or cold weather, to get a feed, the workers
simply stroke the antennae of the repletes, causing them to regurgitate some of their
stores. Some Sugar ants are more specialised in this
method than others. These arid dwelling species are nicknamed, “Honeypot ants” for their
ability to distend their gasters to an enormous size. So large in fact, that they become unable
to move on their own. Often just hanging motionlessly from the ceilings deep within their nests. Many Sugar Ants are highly competitive for territory and resources. Often seen plugging
the nest entrances of other ant colonies And raiding them if given the chance. Even Bull ants have to be wary of these guys. They’re larger and more deadly, but fear
the smaller ants for their chemical weaponry, and oft times, their superior numbers too. So, regularly, they’ll commit several ants to guard their nest entrances in order keep
these dangerous intruders at bay. There are some ants that can rival them, however.
Meat ants are equally as competitive. Their colonies can reach massive scales, with hundreds
of thousands of individuals, and they often live right alongside Sugar ants. Despite this,
the two are usually able coexist as most Sugar Ants are nocturnal, whilst Meat ants are diurnal.
Although, in their active hours, they’ll constantly plug each other’s nest entrances
to try and gain an edge on their competition. Because of their large size, Sugar ants are
easily spotted by predators and make for a temping snack. Regularly, they’re targeted
by birds… spiders… and other insects too. Like this hungry praying mantis. Other ants
will willingly take on the weak or injured too. Here you can see just how large Sugar
ants can be in comparison to the more common sized species. Nuptial flights are especially perilous for Sugar ants as the female alates are often
huge and cumbersome. Making them easy prey. Birds, like this magpie, will often sit by
the entrances of their nests and pick them off as soon as they emerge. If the female alates are lucky enough to survives
predation and find a mate, they’ll then dig themselves out a new home. A small chamber
in which they’ll lay their eggs and tend to them until they develop into workers. Here’s a look inside the nests of some young queens who’ve just recently made it to this
stage. Their first workers are very small and skittish, and highly protective of them
and their developing brood. You may notice them tending to these little
brown casings here. These are known as cocoons. They’re comprised of silk which the larvae
expel from special glands near their mouths. So the larvae spin themselves up in this silk,
much like a caterpillar does when its ready to metamorphose into its pupal stage. Some other ants spin cocoons too, like Bull ants… and Green Headed ants. However, most
leave their brood bare. Like Big-headed ants… Rainbow ants… and Argentine Ants too. The purpose
of spinning cocoons is still not fully known. It’s suggested that they assist in keeping
the developing brood within clean, and protect them harmful bugs, bacteria, fungi and pathogens. Once the brood inside has fully developed, they’ll then begin emerging. They’re cable
of escaping the cocoons on their own, but it can be a little tricky at times, so the
workers will often try and help out. Most of these emerging ants will be workers, which are all female. But, this particular
ant looks a little different from your typical worker. It’s oddly shaped and it even has
wings. This is actually a male, known as a drone. Drones don’t do anything for their
colony, other than use up their resources. Their only purpose in life is to mate with
winged females during nuptial flights. Shortly after which, they die. These ants are produced
from unfertilised eggs, usually when a colony reaches a mature size. A typical Sugar ant colony only contains a single queen, the only ant of which can lay
fertile eggs. So, what happens to a colony if this queen were to die? Well, here we have
a queenless colony of Banded Sugar Ants. The queen died around 6 months ago, leaving behind
a hundred or so workers. Despite having no queen around, these ants continue to cooperate
with one another and function as a normal colony would. But, with the absence of their
queen, there aren’t any new workers emerging to replace the old and dying. So slowly, but
surely, the colony will die off. Remarkably, the ants can actually sense that
their colony’s coming to an end. So occasionally, what the remaining workers will do is begin
laying their own eggs. Sugar ant workers are sterile, so all these eggs you see here are
unfertilised, and will develop into drones. It’s like a last-ditch effort to spread
their genes and help ensure the survival of their species. And that really sums up Sugar Ants. They’re incredibly determined little creatures. Highly
efficient in the way they both find food and subdue their prey… Extremely competitive
with other ants, raiding and sabotaging at will… And amazingly resourceful for the way
in which they adapt to their environment, with desert dwelling species utilizing workers
as living storage jars…and some tropical species weaving leaves together to act as
shelters…and many ground dwellers, heightening their nest entrances into towers when they
sense rain coming, to prevent water rushing in and flooding their homes. It’s pretty
safe to say, these ants will be around for a long time to come. Hey guys, hope you enjoyed the video. So far we’ve looked at Bull ants, Argentine ants
and now Sugar ants. So, which ants should we cover next? I’d love to hear your thoughts
so leave a suggestion below. Next video will be another ant keeping tutorial.
This time on how to build your own ant nest. So look forward to that, and as always, thanks
for watching.

Catching So Many Queen Ants

Catching So Many Queen Ants


In times of despair Hope often comes knocking on your door in the most unexpected ways It’s been a little tough for us these past few days here in the AC ant diverse With an ant colony that had died our Jawbreakers A young Trap-jaw, ant Colony which was massacred by some wild black crazy ant savages And as we saw in last week’s video Our cherished Titans seemed to not be doing so well in their new terrarium they to seem to be dying do to mysterious force or condition But it isn’t all bad news here on this channel for today I. Your ant man come bearing good news Ac family Trust me keep on watching until the end Welcome to the Ants Canada Ant channel Please subscibe to my channel And hit the bell icon Welcome to AC family Enjoy ! What’s up, AC family welcome to the Ants Canada Ant channel now, I wanted to take a break from our ordinary ant videos to create a video That’s more in line with the tutorial videos that I used to upload on this channel I wanted to create a video on catching a new queen ant to start your ant colony. Now I’ve always said on this channel that the most fulfilling part about ant keeping is starting your colony from just a single caught queen ant So I’m here actually in Toronto Canada Where this channel started actually it’s the reason why it’s called Ants Canada a lot of you have been asking why the channels called Ants Canada when I’m living in the Philippines Well I moved to the Philippines In 2011 But the Ants Canada channel started here in Toronto Canada when I was living here now. I’m here in My favorite place to look for queen ants if I can’t find queen ants in my neighborhood I’ll usually find one here in this nature trail a Lot of people have been asking me You know where should I go to find queen ants and I always tell them look for a place that has a lot of Greenery Perhaps a body of water nearby Here there is actually a river just not too far from here, please excuse the airplanes guys This is more of a blog style Ants Canada video now what I’m looking for are Queen ants that have Just engaged in their nuptial flight So for those of you who are new to the world of ants every year and have a nuptial flight where the Reproductive young Virgin Queens and males who have been waiting around the nest all year Take to the air and that’s when they mate and the male’s die, but the females now impregnated with The male sperm drop to the ground and break their wings off and They go and seek other places to start their and Their nests And so we as the ant keeper we go out during the seasons of nuptial flights and we look for these queen ants that are kind of walking around having just mated and Looking for areas to start their new nests So what you have to do is you got to keep your eyes peeled essentially and keep them to the ground to look for Queens? We have tutorials on how to Distinguish Queens from other workers and Major workers because it can be tricky if you’re not used to seeing what Queens look like So check out those tutorials on this channel another tip is ants are more likely to fly after a rainstorm So yesterday here in Toronto. There was a big thunderstorm So today, we should be able to find some queen late Walking around Now it’s the beginning of august so species that I’m looking for right now are Those that belong to Formica Glacia S– and Kempen audits they should be around so those are what I’m looking for at the moment? For those of you who are in North America, and in Europe as well as Northern Asia We are well into our nuptial flight season, so this video is for you guys. I’m going to Scour the ground here Looking for any kind of movement When looking for ants you have to really be patient You can’t be frustrated if you don’t find Queens right away Because sometimes they’re quite elusive Mmm, not finding any yet here a lot of people write to us saying oh We can’t find queens anywhere where I live well to that. I say unless you’re living in Iceland or the antarctic where? There are no ants Then sure you won’t find any any queens, but if you live in any other part of the world There should be an surround you just have to know where to look and when to look and believe me It’s a rewarding experience when you finally catch one and Place her in a test Tube setup and Realize she’s laying eggs for you and the eggs eventually develop into her first scientific workers and then watching young colony feed for the first time and you know transfer that food mouth-to-mouth to the queen who had Fasted for over a month raising her nana tics. It’s really such an awesome and really moving Experience that Ant Keepers really love and I hope you guys get to also experience that kind of Joy and fulfillment of watching your ant colony start and for those of you who don’t want to keep ants And you’re just subscribed here to simply watch and videos that’s fine too. Thank you for watching this and bearing with us We will definitely keep you updated on the colonies back home in Manila okay, so I’m going to turn around and Go back on my tracks to see if I am missing or queen ant scurrying by oh What is this? We just found a queen ant guys see that? Patience pays off this here is a Camponotus queen she still has her wings But if you’ve been following the channel for a while, it doesn’t mean she hasn’t made it Sometimes we keep their wings And sometimes not mated queens break off their wings, so wing retention is not the best and most reliable indicator of Fertilization Alright, so I’m going to put this queen into my container. This is great We caught one Another thing you have to be aware of it people will often pass by so you kind of have to have no shame sometimes Catching a queen for me is worth it If you’ve seen my speedos video you know that I don’t have shamed Oh the queen drop and she’s now trying to break off her wings now this species here. I believe is Camponotus Pensylvanicus It’s completely jet wat but sometimes we can have red markings All right So now we’re off to look for More Queens Now Camponotus ants like that queen that we just call it is a great starter speakings They’re great because they’re large so you can really see them in a for material you can see they’re young They’re also very active and avid feeders. They love their sweets. They love their insects They don’t sting which is great, but the only thing about Camponotus is that they do take a long time to grow you usually see them get to an impressive size by Year, two or three Aaaand Sometimes that can be quite a long wait for ant keepers be sure to check out our Camponotus Tutorial on this channel if you are planning on Keeping Camponotus or if you caught a camponotus queen this year But otherwise Camponotus is a great genius to get started on now one of the tips that I give people is You really need to be able to see properly Like if you oh, wait, I found another queen you see this here this here Is a Formica Alright this here’s a formica Queen okay, so this is I believe Formica Fusca very common Formica Species now, I’m going to catch her, but we found this great Also, love them, they’re so fast in Act events All right, easy family. We caught her sorry I don’t have any snap cap piles with me, so I’m just kind of improvising with stuff I have right now But I will be transferring them to test tubes later on so anyways as I was saying It’s good to wear proper eyewear You need glasses if you need glasses wear your contacts because that can make all the difference in the world Before I ever got lasik surgery I used to sometimes go Looking for clean hands, and I would forget to wear my glasses and Lo and behold those were the days. I couldn’t find any queens Another thing you should keep in mind Is that a lot of places require a permit to collect insects so it’s best to really check the Out of your area, and of course if you’re on public property you must get permission first all right and so now While I’m going to continue looking for Queens here we have a special announcement Ac family that I think you guys will be very pleased to hear And here it is all right while I continue looking for Queen Ants in Toronto We’ve got some great news for those of you who have been lucky enough to catch Queen ants this year real quick We totally improved our Ac test Tube’s check out some of the awesome changes We’ve made to them to help you better care for your queen ants while they are raising their nana ticks their first set of workers First our Ac test tubes are now longer so you can fill them up with more water than most ordinary test tubes Which help make your water reservoir of your queens test Tube last longer our ac test tubes now also come with a little notch to Help guide you with filling the water and pushing your cotton in but what’s also cool is The Ac test Tube even comes with a small blue sponge that can be pushed all the way to that knotch One of the coolest new features are these little teeth ever hate how test Tubes roll around in a drawer These teeth hold your test tube still so your queen doesn’t get jostled around all the time which is important during this key period When? The queen should be as at ease and stress-free as possible Finally the coolest part about our improved Ac test tubes is this you can now get them with these three Transparent adapter pieces which fit onto the test Tube openings Check out this piece here we found that leaving the test Tube open in a set up sometimes causes queen ants and young colonies to feel too exposed Usually the ants end up dragging their garbage or Debris to clog up the end of their test Tube in Attempts to constrict the opening to minimize micro drafts which can endanger and dry out an ant colony and the Brood But now with this piece here you can constrict the opening of the test tube so the inside of the test Tube isn’t so exposed To the air if you’ve raised young and colonies before you know that this feature is super helpful The hole is approximately four millimeters in size which allows for most species magnetic workers to fit through with this adapter piece you can then attach the entire test Tube to any of our hybrid nests or Ac test Tube portals and as for the other adapter pieces this one allows you to connect the test-Tube to our hybrid nest or Ac test to portal with a Larger opening and this adapter piece to our large ac vinyl tubing for links to all these items Described plus more info I placed them in the description box So an keepers do check them out and so the very first ant in the entire world to enjoy this setup is The big Surprise I’ve been itching to tell you about a couple of weeks ago shortly after the titans moved into the terrarium Something caught my eye in my condo building Ac family. I am happy to introduce to you our newest Queen Ant Behold our new Trap-Jaw, Queen ant and addons of Maca species She is a beauty although I won’t be able to bring the queen s that I catch in Toronto back with me to manila This new queen ant which is currently in the dark in my drawer of my ant room is Ours to care for and nurtured let’s hope she’s fertilized and gives us a column I also hope you don’t mind me making this executive Decision to call her future colony should they arise? the Jawbreakers and now back to Toronto Canada All right, easy family surprise I am super excited to raise that queen so guys be sure to leave in the comment section What do you think we should call this queen? I hope you guys are okay with us calling them the Jawbreakers once they turn into a colony and hopefully they do oh And I found another queen right here. Awesome. They are just popping out of everywhere Got it, and what’s cool is while I was telling you the news I was able to catch More queen ants look at how many look at that Normally, it’s best. Oh no. Oh, no They’re fighting see this is why it’s best to not mix them, but I have no choice I don’t have oh, no let it go okay. I don’t have another container So they’ll just have to be together for now This is dangerous because they can formic acid spray each other even though they don’t sting they could just formic acid each other and then Really hurt each other, but I’m going to separate them as soon as I get home. Oh, no leave her alone And I absolutely will not keep different general of ants together in one container So I have the formica Queen here and the Camponotus Queens here So all right I would consider today on and collecting success Now what I’m going to do is I’m going to put each of these in their own test tube setup And then hopefully one of them will successfully gain a colony, and that does it Ac family Thank you so much for watching another episode of the ants Canada and channel by next weekend I should be back in Manila Philippines And we’ll be updating you on the status of our ant colonies remember guys. It’s ant love forever Thank you for watching Ac family Did you manage to catch a queen ant yet for this nuptial flight season tell me about it in the comments section guys If you haven’t yet? Don’t worry There is still plenty of time to catch queen ants if you are in the Northern hemisphere Be sure to watch our various tutorials on this channel If you need help catching a queen ant by the way as Mentioned I will not be bringing the beautiful queen ants home with me back to the philippines But I will be keeping them here in Toronto and put them up for sale through the gam project for prospective and keepers in Toronto Once they have their first set of workers So just a reminder to check out the gap project if you are looking to buy queen ants from your area Wherever in the world you may be linked in the description box Asean our colony. I’ve left a hidden cookie for you here If you would just like to see a step by step tutorial video of these queen ants being placed in test-Tube And now it’s time for the Ac question of the week in last week’s Ac question of the week we asked What is the name of Mark Moffitt’s best-selling book? Congratulations to Jesse Morgan who correctly answered Adventures among eggs Congratulations, jesse you just won a free ap test to portal from our shop in this week’s Ac question of the week we asked what? Is one reason why carpenter ants would make a great species for beginner and keepers? Leave your answer in the comment section and you could win our Deluxe Ac test Tube pack I’ve seen in this video from awesome Hope you can subscribe to the channel as we upload a new ant video every Saturday at 8 a.m. Eastern Standard time Please remember to like comment share and subscribe if you enjoyed this video so we can keep thinking you ethic and videos like this It’s ant love forever

#1 How to move a queen ant into a test tube? / Királynő kémcsőbe költöztetése – ENGLISH SUB

#1 How to move a queen ant into a test tube? / Királynő kémcsőbe költöztetése – ENGLISH SUB


Let’s see how can we moving a queen ant into a test tube! Here are the ingredients. Here’s the queen, the empty test tube, the hooked wire, and two pieces of cotton wool. Load up the test tube about this level, as you can see, or maybe a little more. Then put one of the cotton wool into the the test tube. It has to close so tightly. Then with the hooked wire – carefully but with smoothly moves push down to the water level. Don’t make any bubbles if it’s possible. This wool will close the water from the queen. And finally you can move in the queen. This is her new home. And with the other wool we can close the tube. It breath a little, so the queen will have enough air inside.

WHEN TO CATCH A QUEEN ANT | Schedule, species and how to identify them!(Europe)

WHEN TO CATCH A QUEEN ANT | Schedule, species and how to identify them!(Europe)


hi guys just for you ant nerds out there
I want to mention that some photos may not belong to the exact same species as maybe
claimed but they do belong to the same genus and will almost look exactly
identical so hi again I want to introduce you to this first tutorial on
the channel of Nordic Ants and it’s going to be about when to catch your Queen ant
and I will explain how to catch your queen ant and when to catch your queen
ant so stay tuned and it’s about how to catch them seasonally in Europe so don’t
worry if you don’t live there most of the information is also relevant
for most countries with corresponding species and climates and I will also
introduce you guys to every species I talk about and have a small information
slide like such about how they found their colony and without further ado
here’s the first schedule and we will start with the messor genus this is a very cool and popular genus –
the two main species in Europe messor structor that flies from April until May
and the messor barbarus that flies from September until October are both called
harvester ants because their main food source is obviously grains and they
collect loads of them and carry them back to their nest and in the nest their
gargantuan major workers with huge mandibles cut the grain into something
called antbread that can later be consumed by the rest of the colony
members a pretty interesting and if you ask me I absolutely love their
polymorphism with this huge majors and small minors working together next up is
the famous camponotus genus they fly from May until August that care they can
have different slides earlier around April and dependent if you live in a
warmer part of Europe they may live even earlier so personally I have in
possession two different species first I Hercule Alice call me with only one
Queen and second a two year old lick the Curtis colony I also like these this
genus there are huge huge and in fact the color right here in front of you is
the biggest ant species you can find in whole Europe the Queen is huge the only
downside is that it takes time for them to grow into a major call me it takes
about three years or more but for me that’s insignificant because eventually
this specie may be after a year or two if given the right amount of protein
starting to produce measures and this is an ad cast that is super cool and I
don’t know so rewarding to observe and so majestic these and often tend to live
in the woods and we tend to dig in it so please take note that if you live in a
wooden house don’t let the Queen escape next office
tetra Mauryan also known as the pavement and they fly from June until August a
super-nice genus for all beginners out there they grow in some major colony
pretty fast and does not need so much maintenance actually knowing if there
are tens Amorian colonies near you is also pretty easy
there’s during spring neighboring colonies of this genus goes to war with
one another you can see masses of ants fighting for this territory but don’t
worry eventually they will stop and produce queens for you to catch and during May until June during this
summer we had the Formica buffa over the collection appealing Queens flying these
are the wouldn’t and they’re actually positive so what you need to do is to
introduce them to workers or to give them coop that they can open to get some
starting workers to help them found their colony and I will explain it that
in a future video so please ask in the comments if you have questions or look
at the video I may have done and before you keep these species you need to know
that this is a very aggressive species and use formic acid or them right away
after the wouldn’t fly you can see other fermitas PD sky there are very different
schedules but the book of them flies from July until August we need to talk
about fur media we also tend to refer to the black slaver like Formica pushka
this specie is pretty easy to keep of care these guys are fast but included
are also the paralytic Formica species they have often read textures on their
store acts like wouldn’t and as a parasitic species you need to provide
the queen with some starting workers or cocoons
when founding the colony a harder variant to keep in the Formica genus and the most popular and genius to keep
the lastest genius flight from June into the September but the big majority of
them flies during July and August this is a very easy if not the easiest genus
to keep this is what a normal starting last year’s colony would look like with
black am standing brood and coup creams but as showing before this colony has a
parasitic queen and the other ants are just host workers for her eventually how
to different side close role as his queen from a parasitic is not as hard
than other Venus’s here’s the standard cluster of clashes queen with a big gas
turn a kind of undersized head here you got a parasitic queen and she has a
bigger head and a smaller gaster which makes her more agile and deadly the
owner salary clothes routine almost never stands ashamed o-tama thorax and let the thorax are the
second smallest genesis that i will introduce you guys in this video these
guys also called acorn and fly from July until September these are very easy
geniuses to keep they cannot stand very low temperatures and if the specie that
can survive the farthest north of the goal and general a real Nordic ants
these guys are said are tiny therefore the queen is super tiny for a queen ant
and may be hard to catch my method is to catch the cold by picking up an icon
with a hole in it that I see is traffic aided by small
and if I’m lucky a queen may be in it because they literally live in acorns
after that you can transfer them into a more observable for me carry that’s what
I did at last is the Europeans vibrant scientifically known as Monica rubra
this genus slightly that some species may fight earlier but most of them fly
during August and September the Queen’s are semi claustro which makes them a bit
challenging to keep as a beginner they also have a pretty painful thing and
that’s it for the first short you may take a screen shot and now we proceed
with this special and so here’s the second chart so this first
special and Dec this saloon of states fugax also known as 50 fact these guys
have their natural flights in September and it’s a very cool pretty cool species
big Queens and small workers and they actually live up to their name feet and
by doing such and the next is crematogaster these guys
buy very late you can find crematogaster screens flying from June until October
you can easily recognize the workers by their heart-shaped casters and by
picking them up they posture takes like rested posture with their gaster
pointing upwards the Queen’s also looks like they’re
dragging their asses to the ground when they are walking if that helped to eased
identification of your Queen and Monica rabida the bigger equivalent of the
Monica they fly from June until September the Queen’s are like the
miracle genus semi classroom and need to be fed during the forming stage how to
defer them from the merica is by washing for two spikes on the back of the ant
thorax Marika has two but the money gap does not polyergus this is a remarkable specie
and we are lucky to have them in Europe they fly from August until September the
Queen is a social parasite and need from starting cocoons from the Fermi
cattiness even the workers from the Queen can’t care for the job their sole
purpose is to read other ant nests and steal their brute this brood will
eventually be closed in their nests and will care for the brood thinking that it
is theirs I think that this PC may be the most peculiar of all your PMS they
are are recalled which means they are adapted to live in good they have their
neutral flight during July and August what is bizarre with this species that
the Queen and the majors of the colony has a flat front end which they use to
block their nest entrance like such and now the Argentine and the invasive
Lynn epidemic you Millie I think it’s pronounced like that specie flight from
May until July this is a very invasive specie and have out competed other
native species in Europe their success is because of their unique collaboration
between colonies all nests are dr. nests from a single colony that has achieved
to because of human activity reproduce in Europe eventually you have a super
colony that stretches super far recently there has been another colony that has
managed to colonize Barcelona and later reproduce the consequence is two super
colonies competing for terrain reminds me of the human colonization but this
time Europe is the victim take that Europe Oh dolly showed errors quadrate
tortoise is forgetting the extremely complicated name a fairly easy species
to keep the fly during August and September and are recognizable by their
four dots on their thorax and finally tapi Noma they fly from June until
August also very easy genus to keep they are very small though so consider fight
escape prevention that’s it for Nordic ants today if needed take a screenshot
and I will see you guys soon and if you have any questions watch my other videos
that may explain or comment below and I will answer

7 Unbelievably Hardcore Ants

7 Unbelievably Hardcore Ants


[♪ INTRO] Skull-gathering hunters. Exploding,
toxic defenders. Inflictors of pain. These aren’t characters from a movie:
They’re ants! Normally, we see ants streaming
from cracks in the sidewalk, or coming to forage through our kitchens,
and they’re nothing out of the ordinary. At most, they’re kind of annoying. But some ants are actually amazing, and are a lot cooler and more resourceful
than you might give them credit for. Here are seven of the most extreme species
from around the world. Some people use tapestries and fun knick-knacks
to decorate their homes. But Florida’s skull-collecting ant adorns
its abode with, skulls. Well, more specifically, heads and other dismembered
body parts from other ant species. Which is… a mood, I guess. Scientists discovered this in the 1950s, and
noticed that most of the victims seemed to be trap-jaw ants, which was equally impressive
and alarming, because trap-jaws aren’t easy prey. They’re known for their exceptionally strong
mandibules, which they use to crush their victims and even fling themselves
away from danger. Meanwhile, skull-collecting ants look far
less fearsome. They’re pretty small, and they definitely
don’t have super strong jaws. Researchers were intrigued by how these ants
were adorning their homes with trap-jaw body parts. They weren’t sure if they were actually
killing them, or just inheriting old trap-jaw nests. But recently, they started to figure it out. In November 2018, one researcher published
new findings in the journal of the IUSSI, an organization that studies social insects. By analyzing the chemicals on their bodies
and filming their interactions with trap-jaws, he found that skull-collecting ants chemically
mimic their trap-jaw prey. The difference between their odors is almost
indistinguishable, and that allows the skull collectors to get in close enough to attack. Once they’re in close range, they spray
the trap-jaws with formic acid and paralyze them. Then, they drag their limp bodies back to
their nests, dismember them, and put their exoskeletons on display
like hunting trophies. Researchers aren’t sure why they do this,
but it could be a warning to other ants. And let’s be real: If I were an ant, I wouldn’t
go near that. The Rasberry crazy ant, sometimes called the
tawny crazy ant, originated in South America, but over the last decade, it’s been infiltrating
the U.S. Gulf Coast. These ants are just a few millimeters long,
with long legs and antennas. They’re not known for being aggressive,
and they don’t seem to sting, but they do move around in a really
irregular way when they’re disturbed, which is where their name comes from. It’s not totally clear why they run like
this, but it might be a form of protection. After all, ants scurrying around in a zig-zagging
or looping pattern are harder to smush. Besides their movement, these ants are also
strange because they appear to be drawn to the cooling vents of electrical equipment. So much so that they’ve been known to short out appliances, computers, and even entire chemical plants. Some people believe these insects
are attracted to electricity, but so far, there’s no real
science to support that. Instead, this behavior probably has to do
with chemistry. These ants have been shown to be highly
attracted to each other’s pheromones, or the chemicals their bodies release. So it seems more likely that, when one of
them gets shocked by electrical equipment, probably while looking for a place to nest, they release pheromones that
tell the other ants they’re in danger. Then, thousands of them swarm in the area
to come to the rescue. It’s a much less sci-fi scenario, although
probably no less terrifying for the people who discover a massive ant infestation crawling
around their electronics. They’re not an immediate threat to humans,
but rasberry crazy ants can actually cause major issues for other animals, mainly bees. The ants have been observed destroying hives
and eating bee larvae, which isn’t great when you think about all the other problems
bees are dealing with these days. But at least they’re not stealing body parts. The exploding ant is named after its ability
to explode. At least, in a sense. There are actually a bunch of species that
demonstrate this behavior, but a significant one is called, appropriately, C. explodens. It was identified in a 2018 paper and can
be found throughout Southeast Asia. It may look harmless, with no stinger and
a normal-sized jaw, but don’t be fooled. When some of these exploding ants feel threatened,
you don’t want to be around. First, the ant raises its backside as a warning
to a predator. Then, if the predator is undeterred, the ant,
or a few of them, turns its backside at the predator. They begin to flex as hard as they can until
their abdomens tear open, releasing a bright yellow, sticky toxin that kills the intruder. It sounds kind of horrifying, but it does
protect their colonies. Also, the ants who explode are sterile females,
so this behavior makes a bit more evolutionary sense. If these ants can’t pass along their genes,
at least they’re defending their homes. This research is still pretty recent, and
there are plenty of mysteries surrounding this species, like what that yellow toxin
is made out of, and how the ants optimize their attacks to inflict the most damage. But one thing’s for sure: if an exploding
ant shows you its butt, get outta there. There are over a dozen species in the genus
Polyergus, also called Amazon ants or slave-raiding ants. But they all have similar behavior: They’re
parasites that capture other ant species and put them to work. These ants are spread throughout the world,
but many are found in the U.S. and are known to prey on colonies in the Formica genus. First, an Amazon ant queen will infiltrate
a Formica nest and kill the native queen. But before she can complete her takeover,
she has to be accepted by the colony’s workers. Because, apparently, ants have rules about
this kind of thing. It’s not entirely clear how this acceptance
happens, but it might have something to do with the Amazon ant picking up the old queen’s
scent. Either way, once the Formica ants
have approved their new ruler, the Amazon ants will put them to work. They make the other ants do everything for
them, from cleaning to raising their young. Then, once those babies are grown up, the
Amazon ants move on to the next Formica colony to start the cycle over again. It’s not clear if the Formica ants get
anything out of this relationship, but the Amazon ants definitely do. They even appear to have lost the ability
to take care of their own young altogether, possibly after thousands of years of making
other species do it for them. Bullet ants are known for being the ultimate
pain inducers, and their sting is ranked among the most excruciating of all insect stings. At least, based on something called the Schmidt
Sting Pain Index. It was first published in the
1980s by Justin Schmidt, who actually stung himself
with every species he could find. Which I’m sure sounded like a great idea
at the time. Bullet ants are ranked the highest: a 4-plus. They’re native to the rainforests of Central
and South America, and their bodies are almost creepily long, sometimes approaching three
centimeters in length. Thankfully, they aren’t known for being
aggressive unless you get close to their nests. But once you’ve infringed on their territory,
prepare yourself for a world of pain. What makes their sting so incredibly painful
is a peptide called poneratoxin. It was first described in the early 1990s, and it causes painfully long-lasting
contractions in smooth muscles. Bullet ant encounters are rarely deadly for
humans, but enough stings can cause paralysis and trembling, and the pain can persist for
up to 24 hours. Although these ants are mainly known for the
pain they cause, indigenous peoples have found good uses for them, too, like for closing
wounds. They’ll hold a bullet ant close to the wound
and then, when the ant bites down, twist off its body so that only its pincers remain. It’s not a good time for the ant, but the
venom causes the person’s skin to swell and begins the healing process, making it
easier to keep the wound closed. Resourceful, considering my reaction to bullet
ants would be to run as fast possible in the opposite direction. There are around 40 species of leafcutter
ant spread throughout Central and South America, as well as the U.S. And while they won’t poison you or tear
themselves apart, they are pretty crafty. You might think of ants as stealing crumbs
off your floor, or collecting nectar from plants. But leafcutter ants are farmers. They’re known to slice up pieces of plant
material and carry it back to their nests. Then, they’ll partially digest it and leave
it out to grow their real food: fungus. The fungus can break down compounds in plants
that the ants can’t otherwise digest, and it’s the insects’ main source of nutrients. This fungus is so important that if a queen
starts a new colony, she’ll even take a starter culture to the new home. Leafcutter ants have also been likened to
the pharmacists of the insect world, since they use the antibiotics produced by bacteria
to keep unwanted parasitic fungi from growing. Scientists aren’t sure how that relationship
started, but they know that the bacteria hitches a ride on the outside of the ant, then secretes antibiotics that protect
the health of their precious fungus. All of which seems pretty
complex for a little insect. Finally, speaking of ways ants get their food,
we have honeypot ants. They belong to several genuses and are found
around the world in dry climates like deserts. For the most part, these ants seem pretty
normal, until a drought hits. Among honeypot ants, there’s a special class
of workers called repletes. They feed on things like flower nectar and
dead insects, and their abdomens can swell to enormous sizes, sometimes eight times the
weight of the rest of their bodies. This gives them the appearance of a honeypot,
and you might be able to guess where this is going. During a drought, these ants actually use
this abdominal liquid to keep their fellow colony members alive. To get this sweet substance, another worker
ant will stroke a replete’s antenna, giving them the signal that it’s time to eat. Then, the replete will regurgitate the liquid. Which is amazing, and also kind of horrifying? What makes this even weirder is that honeypot
ants are so bloated with liquid that all they can do is hang from the roofs of nests, waiting
to provide nutrients for their buddies. Like little hanging honey pots, I guess. Unfortunately for the honeypot ants, other
colonies and species of ants have also caught on to this, meaning repletes are easy prey. And in Australia, some indigenous peoples
use them in their diets. But for other ants, they’re basically living
vending machines. Which is so creepy. To most people, ants are nothing special. But like a lot of things in the universe,
you just have to look a little more closely. The ant world is an incredible, dangerous,
and downright bizarre place. And it’s all happening right under your
feet. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow,
especially to our patrons on Patreon! If you want to support science education online
and help keep us exploring this weird, amazing world we live in, you can go to patreon.com/scishow. [♪ OUTRO]