Fight the Obesity Epidemic with SlimGenics

Fight the Obesity Epidemic with SlimGenics


Obesity has become an epidemic. Nearly two-thirds of American adults are
overweight or obese. 55% do not get enough
physical activity. 26% are completely inactive. Only 25% eat the recommended
amounts of fruits and vegetables. Over the last twenty years, here’s what
has happened with our food consumption. Hamburgers are
23% larger, soft drinks have increased in size by 52%. Snack portions have grown by 60%. Standard dinner plate
sizes have increased by two inches. As food portions and plates
have grown, so have our waistlines. The yearly medical costs of obesity are
estimated at over 147 billion dollars. This figure has
ballooned by more than 80% over a five-year period.
75% of health care costs stem from preventable chronic conditions. Overweight and obese men have
significantly more medical expenses per year than those at a healthy weight. This figure is even larger for women. 3% of the US workforce is morbidly obese but accounts for 21% of obesity costs. Employers may try cost-sharing, managed
care plans, or cash based rebates, but these methods
merely shift costs. Only workplace wellness programs can get
employees healthy in the first place. It’s time to lift the
weight that is bringing down your bottom line. Now is the time to
invest in wellness.

What Causes Cats To Get Urinary Tract Infections

What Causes Cats To Get Urinary Tract Infections


hi Madelaine innocent here. Understanding what causes cats to get urinary tract infections will get you well on the way to both preventing this distressing disease as well as to heal it completely so it never returns Understanding the cause of disease is not in mainstream or even veterinary thinking. Everyone is more concerned about treating the effects of disease so it does take a quantum leap in your mindset to start thinking about causes. There’s no point in treating the effects of disease in any chronic treatment even though it can help in an emergency.For real deep reversal of any ill health the only way is to find out the cause of the problem and then take proactive action. Appreciation when dealing with causes doesn’t make anyone financially rich this is why it’s not in mainstream thinking. Currently the focus is all about material wealth not natural health. As a natural health consultant I’m very much aware that every cause of disease depletes the immune system. So it’s imperative to discover the cause of any disease to return your cat to the great health that is their natural right. When you don’t it’s the start of a slippery slope. The less healthy the immune system is the more diseases WILL occur. Not might. WILL It may be slow but it is guaranteed. Cats are very susceptible to all manner of renal health issues from urinary tract infections all the way to kidney failure and everything in between. The renal area is their weak link. It may start out by increased thirst, something few people would be concerned about. But it is to start of problems as cats are not natural drinkers. They should be able to get most of their liquid needs from their food. This can’t happen with dry food and despite loud protestations from the manufacturers (who are unregulated) and vets (who are bought) to the contrary, dry food is the number one cause of renal health issues in cats. From the poor quality ‘food’ if you can call it that (despite the price or the retailer), to the unnatural ingredients for cats, to the chemical content, all the way to the lack of moisture. It isn’t the only cause but it is a major contributo.r Simply stopping the feeding of this food can give your a cat many more years of life as well as saving you quite a few dollars. But good robust cat health isn’t as simple as swapping a dry food for a wet food. Yes it can make a huge difference for your ca’st renal health, which is why you’re here. But there are problems with commercial wet cat foods too. Appreciating what causes cats to get urinary tract infections is a great start to your awareness of naturally healthy cats. But to continue on this journey, to get more information on this very important, subject please feel free to check out my website www.NaturalCatHealth.com/renal

Day 4: Giant Water Bug, Rhino Beetle, Sago Worm, Crickets – 5 Days of Bug Eating

Day 4: Giant Water Bug, Rhino Beetle, Sago Worm, Crickets – 5 Days of Bug Eating


Greetings, my Lovelies! Welcome back to the Fourth Day of Bug-Eating… …and it’s — this! And this is a special mix. It’s called “The Special Mixed Bugs.” If you missed the fifth day of bug-eating, I’ll put that link down below, and it was for Earthworm Jerky. Yes…check it out. This is a special mix of bugs: it contains two giant water bugs, one female rhino beetle, some big crickets, and some sago worms. It comes in this really nice packaging. It’s double-bagged. Oh, boy… Look at that. So, here we go! Wooooow… Woooow…. Oh, my gosh… Will you look at the size of that. Holy smokes. That is huge. Look at the size of this thing! Oh, my gosh! Here are our beautiful sago worms. And there should be eight of those. Okay, two rhino beetles. Beautiful rhino beetles. And just some, you know, crickets. So the practice of eating bugs is called “entomophagy,” and I’ve eating a few things in the past, including silk worm larva and some mealworms — if you missed those, I’ll put the links down below. And those didn’t really bother me. But, seeing a bug this size, I have to say is a bit disconcerting. Let’s start with a cricket! Here we go — “itadakimasu!” “Crunch, crunch, crunch.” Hmm! That’s pretty good! They have a crispy texture. They kind of just crunch up in your mouth. Nicely seasoned. In terms of flavor, it tastes a little bit nutty. And kind of reminds me a little bit of seaweed. Nutty, and that kind of savoriness that comes with seaweed. But not bad at all. Let’s go to the next one — and look at that! This would be the sago worm. And it’s been dehydrated, so it’s not so gushy. I think eating this raw would be a whole-nother deal. All right, let’s give that a taste, here we go. “Crunch.” Hm! Wow, I just ate the head — It tasted a little bit oily. And — tiny bit livery. Not too bad, nice and crunchy in texture, nicely salted. Wow! Mmhmm… And a little bit sweet. Not too bad at all, actually. Definitely a different texture than the crickets. It’s got a crunch, but much kind of, softer, crumbly crunch. and a little bit oily, and that probably has to do with how these were prepared. In terms of flavor — not bad! A little bit more flavorful than the cricket. Next, let’s try this rhino beetle. Will you really look at that? So they definitely have — all six legs are intact… and there are little feelers on the end of this, and, yep, I can see some eyes. And that carapace is definitely crunchy. and hard. But yeah, I will chew this really well, because it looks quite tough. All right, let’s give that taste! Here we go! “Itadakimasu!” *loud crunching* *CRUNCH CRUNCH CRUNCH…* Hm! And I think the most unpleasant thing is when you bite into it pieces of exoskeleton fly off! Yeah! It doesn’t taste bad, it actually doesn’t have much of a flavor. Again, nutty, very similar to the cricket. I think the most off-putting part is the texture. It’s quite crunchy, but besides being crunchy, it’s very tough and resilient, so you really have to chew it. It’s a bit like chewing, um, yeah, the exoskeleton of an insect! I’m trying to think of what else it’s like. Uh, it’s very, very tough. So, yeah, the wing, as you saw, flew off. There’s some more wing. Let’s give it another bite. *crunch* Hm. That tastes nuttier than either the cricket or the sago worm — nuttier, and drier in texture. And yeah, you definitely feel like you need a beverage because it’s really dry. But the flavor isn’t bad! Again, there’s not much flavor to it, really — salty, and kinda nutty, that’s all I can really describe it as…and flour-y. It doesn’t have a strong flavor about it at all. Mostly it’s a textural, crunchy, leathery, carapace, mandible kind of experience. Okay, so, lastly we’re going to try this bad boy! Oh, my goodness! Look at this thing! It’s a Giant Water Beetle. Oh, my gosh! And they are not kidding when they say giant. So, yeah, I guess I’m just going to bite it and eat it. I’m not going to worry about it too much. I’m just going to eat it! *high-pitched* All right! Here we go! Itadakimasu! *CRUNCH* HMMM! That’s not so bad at all! It’s quite tough. You really have to work through it! But, in terms of flavor: very, very benign actually. Quite salty, and actually reminds me a lot of fish fins! If you have ever had deep-fried fish and then the fins and the tail get really crispy — I love that part of the fish. All of you Asians probably know what I’m talking about! Very similar to that, it has a similar kind of crispness that comes with like a deep-frying of cartilage, or something like that. It sounds awful, but it’s not bad! The crunch of this is actually — I found more pleasant than the rhino beetle. It’s not as tough — it’s more of a crispness. It’s very nicely seasoned — quite salty. And in terms of flavor, again, quite benign. Ergh! Wow! That was a piece of wing in my mouth! Mmhm. Mhmm. Hm! It’s pretty good! Except it gets stuck in your teeth. This one tastes a little bit more meaty… and very, very similar to, like I said, crispy fins you’d find on a fish. Pretty good! Not bad at all! I think if I was accustomed to eating this as a snack, just no problem! It would be just, like, “Oh, yeah! Natural Doritos.” Boom. All right, I hope you guys enjoyed the fourth day of bug-eating. Tune in tomorrow for day three and see what I eat tomorrow. All right, let me know in the comments below — what would you do if this giant water bug showed up on your doorstep. Would you eat it? Let me know in the comments below. All right! Happy Holidays! I hope you guys enjoyed that! I hope you guys learned something! I shall see you in my next video! Toodaloo! Take care! Bye!

7. Insect digestive and excretory systems

7. Insect digestive and excretory systems


Although all insects have common
structures in their digestive systems, these structures can be highly variable
between species based on the diversity of foods that insects eat. We will use
the grasshopper to illustrate the basic principle for these common structures. the insect digestive system is divided into three main sections: the foregut, the midgut and the hind gut. The foregut is comprised of the mouth
for ingesting food, the pharynx and esophagus for transporting food and the crop where food is stored prior to digestion and absorption. If the food is
solid it moves from the crop into a muscular proventriculus where it may be
further ground before passing through the stomadeal valve into the midgut. The midgut is the region for the digestion of food and the absorption of nutrients. Finger-like projections called gastric caeca occur at the junction of
the midgut and proventriculis and serve as major structures for nutrient
absorption. Unabsorbed food particles pass through the proctodeal valve into the hindgut. At the junction of the midgut and hindgut are a group of long, thread-like tubules that flex about in the hemolymph. These tubules are called Malpighian tubules, and they are the insect excretory system. Malpighian tubules filter the hemolymph and form a urine containing water, salts,
small metabolites, the nitrogenous waste products and any toxic chemicals that are present. Undigested food from the midgut along with the Malpighian tubule urine are passed into the hindgut. Special cells in the rectum selectively
re-absorb the water, salts and small metabolites, and the remaining waste
products are excreted. By selectively taking all water, salts, and small molecules into the Malpighian tubules, then selectively re-absorbing the
water, salts and metabolites in the hindgut, the insect can rid its body of waste and any unanticipated toxic chemicals, while maintaining a normal metabolite and water balance.

One Too Many Chefs | The Ant and the Aardvark | Pink Panther and Pals

One Too Many Chefs | The Ant and the Aardvark | Pink Panther and Pals


AARDIE, YOU KNOW
WHAT I DON’T GET? WHY ARE YOU… SO OBSESSED… WITH EATING ME? THAT’S WHAT
I DON’T GET. BECAUSE I’M
AN AARDVARK. AND ANTS IS WHAT
AARDVARKS EAT. “ARE.” HUH? I’M JUST SAYIN’,
IT’S, “ANTS ARE WHAT
AARDVARKS EAT.” EXACTLY. AND THAT’S JUST
WHAT I’M GONNA DO
RIGHT NOW. THIS ANT’S
OUT OF HERE. YOU CAN’T GO.
I HAVEN’T
EATEN YOU YET. OF ALL THE ANTS
IN ALL THE ANTHILLS
IN THE WORLD, WHY DID I HAVE
TO PICK THIS ONE? LISTEN TO ME NOW,
AARDVARK. YOU DON’T EVEN KNOW
WHAT I TASTE LIKE. I COULD BE ALL
GRISTLY AND CHEWY. YOU–YOU EVER
THOUGHT OF EATING
SOMETHING ELSE? WHAT ELSE
IS THERE? I THOUGHT
HE’D NEVER ASK. LOOKY HERE.
I’VE GOT EDIBLES
FROM “A” TO “Z.” AND NOT ONE
OF ‘EM IS ME. THERE’S APPLES. OH! BROCCOLI, ALL GREEN
AND FULL OF VITAMINS. OH. COCONUT. DILL PICKLES. EGGPLANTS. FIDDLEHEADS. GHERKINS.
HOT TAMALES. ICEBERG LETTUCE,
STILL IN THE ICE. HEARTS OF PALMS,
JALAPEOS, KALE, LEGUMES, MANGOS,
NIBLETS, ORGAN OREGANO… ORGAN OREGANO–
WHAT IS THAT? PUMPKIN, RADISHES,
TANGERINES… AND “Z.” THAT’S FOR ZABAGLIONE. BUT ALL I KNOW
HOW TO EAT IS ANTS, RAW. RAW? BUT YOU DON’T KNOW
WHAT YOU’RE MISSING. WHAT AM I
MISSING? COOKED STUFF. I DON’T KNOW
HOW TO COOK. YOU DON’T KNOW
HOW TO COOK? WELL, WE GOT
TO GET YOU
A COOKING LESSON. THAT’S WHAT
WE GOT TO DO. WHAT’S TO LEARN?
YOU CATCH THE ANT,
YOU CHEW THE ANT, YOU SWALLOW THE ANT. OOF.
END OF MEAL. WE’LL FIND YOU
A COOKING CLASS. YOU CAN FIND
EVERYTHING ON
THE INTERNET. WE’RE IN LUCK. THEY’RE SHOOTING
A NEW EPISODE
OF JUNGLE CHEF. AND THEY’RE LOOKING
FOR VOLUNTEERS. AARDIE? WHERE’D HE GO? THE TIME HAS COME… TO BRING TOGETHER THE BEST OF THE BEST IN JUNGLE CUISINE. THE BATTLE IS ABOUT
TO BEGIN ON… THE JUNGLE CHEF! I’M YOUR NIMBLE HOST,
MOCKINGBIRD MIKE, AND HERE ARE
TODAY’S COMBATANTS. FROM UNDER A ROCK ON THE BANKS
OF THE RIVER, IT’S CHEF
CUCKOO CROC! (cheers and applause) AND FROM THE DEPTHS
OF HIS ANTHILL SOMEWHERE IN THE JUNGLE, CHEF ANT! (cheers and applause) LOOK OUT, CROC. THIS ANT IS
STEAMIN’, BABY.
STEAMIN’! STEAMED ANT. THIS COOKING LESSON’S
SOUNDING BETTER
ALL THE TIME. YEAH, YOU’RE TOAST, ANT! TOASTED ANT? NOW, THAT’S
SOMETHING I COULD GET
MY TRUNK AROUND. AND TO TELL US
WHAT TODAY’S SECRET
INGREDIENT IS, HERE’S AARDVARK! (cheers and applause) OKAY, WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE
TODAY’S SECRET
INGREDIENT TO BE? UH, ANYTHING
THAT HAS ANT IN IT. NOW, SOMEONE TELL ME
WHO DIDN’T SEE
THAT COMING. HOW ABOUT POMEGR-ANT? THAT’S POMEGRANATE. CLOSE ENOUGH. THE CHALLENGE IS
TO MAKE THE MOST
DELICIOUS DISHES USING THE POMEGRANATE. THE CLOCK STARTS NOW! WATCH AND LEARN, AARDIE.
WATCH AND LEARN. OH, I’M LEARNING,
ALL RIGHT. WHILE YOU’RE
BUSY COOKING, I’LL FINALLY GET
TO EAT MY OWN
SECRET INGREDIENT. YOU KNOW, I GOT TO
GET THIS DROOLING THING
UNDER CONTROL. JUNGLE CHEF ANT
IS STARTING OFF WITH A SPECIAL
50-FRUIT SMOOTHIE. WHAT MAKES
THIS RECIPE
SO SPECIAL? WELL, IT’S ALL ABOUT
PICKING THE RIGHT
INGREDIENTS, MIKE. OH, ALWAYS REMEMBER
TO MAKE SURE THE LID IS ON
NICE AND TIGHT. MEANWHILE,
CHEF CUCKOO CROC IS PREPARING
HIS WORLD-FAMOUS
POMEGRANATE SOUFFLE. WHAT’S THE SECRET
TO YOUR RECIPE,
CUCKOO? THERE’S NOTHING THAT A LITTLE
GRATED BLUE CHEESE
CAN’T HELP, MIKE. WHILE THEY’RE
COOKING UP A STORM, I’VE COOKED UP
A PLAN OF MY OWN. FROM THIS
HIDING SPOT, I’LL CATCH THAT ANT
USING THE ELEMENT
OF SURPRISE. TIME IS RUNNING OUT, ANT. WHAT’S NEXT? WELL, MIKE, MY HOT,
HOT, HOT AND SPICY
POMEGRANATE STEW… WITH HOT
CHILI PEPPERS AND HOT,
HOT JALAPEOS. (bell ringing) AND HOT, HOT,
HOT CAYENNE PEPPER. AH…AH…
AH-CHOO! TO TENDERIZE
THE MEAT, YOU GOT TO GIVE IT
A GOOD POUNDING. (Aardvark groaning) TO MAKE MY POMEGRANATE PUFFS
EXTRA PUFFY, I ROLL THE DOUGH
OUT EXTRA THIN. OH, AND TIME IS UP
FOR OUR JUNGLE CHEFS. NOW, AARDVARK, ONLY YOU WILL DECIDE
WHO WINS THE TITLE OF KING OF
THE JUNGLE CHEFS! I DON’T KNOW
WHERE TO START. THE POMEGR-ANT SMOOTHIE, THE POMEGR-ANT PUFFS, THE POMEGR-ANT STEW. THEY ALL LOOK
DELICIOUS. BUT WHAT LOOKS
THE YUMMIEST IS ANT! SOUP’S ON! (groaning) (laughs) WHOA! WHOO! (gasps) EW. I STILL SAY
THE BEST ANT
IS RAW ANT. MM! (whistle blows) (whistle blows, dog barking) (dog whimpers) (barking) (baby crying) (child laughing) (whistle blows) (whistle blowing) (motor whirring) WHA– (whistle blowing) (laughing nervously) (barking) (whistle blows) HMM? (birds chirping) (whistle blowing) (barking) (alarm rings) (siren wailing) AAH! AAH! AAH! AAH! (whistle blows) (laughs) (door opens, closes) (barking) (whistles)

Bugs, drugs and guts | Pratik Shah | TEDxBeaconStreet

Bugs, drugs and guts | Pratik Shah | TEDxBeaconStreet


Translator: Ilze Garda
Reviewer: Denise RQ I’m going to talk
about something we cannot see, and we’re going to visualize it
today together. So let me start
with a very simple question about who we are. As a microbiologist
and as a geneticist, as a biologist, when I look at all of you right now, I see one human,
with 30 trillion bacteria inside you. That’s right, at this very moment, all of us are carrying
30 trillion bacteria. They are invisible, they are amazing,
they do stupendous things for us. They help us digest our food, they help us act as sentinels
of our immune system, but we never see them. Ladies and gentlemen,
meet your microbio. What we know about bacteria
and infectious diseases is the dark side of this interaction
we have with them, which is commonly known as disease, and we all are familiar with
epidemics of plague, cholera, and right now
the ongoing pandemic of Ebola that’s going on in Africa,
and in our country a little bit, too. So how do these relationship shift from being 30 trillion harmless [bacteria]
to making us sick? And what can we do? Throughout [history] we have been combating
bugs in different ways, and in the 20th century we discovered
something called antibiotics. Antibiotics are
these small molecules of drugs that you take, you eat, or you inject
to kill the bacteria in your body. Unfortunately, they end up
killing both the good and the bad, and that’s a problem. While we were innovating,
bacteria were innovating too. They were like, “Oh, OK…”
(Laughter) So what they did is they became resistant to almost all the antibiotics
that we have. I had a shoulder surgery five years back, and when I talked to my physician
after coming out of surgery, the list of antibiotics I was put on
was crazy; I was like, “Wow!” Then he, or she, at that point,
they both told me that this is the current state
where many bugs that we have now are not treated
with these antibiotics that we have. And the numbers are staggering: every year, 6.9 million kids die
before they reach their fifth birthday. Out of these children,
approximately 2 million kids die due to pneumonia and diarrhea,
and these are infectious diseases. If you see, there is
no Ebola on this slide. We need to start a conversation
about managing infectious diseases better in our world that we live in. President Barack Obama in September
of this year issued an executive order, and the order states that scientists,
innovators, community members like you, all of us should come together
and brainstorm for a better way
to manage infectious diseases because our current arsenal of drugs which can treat [infections]
has been depleted. To solve these things, there are
a couple of things we need to know. The first thing we need to know is that we will have access
to a patient whom we will call John. John consistently falls ill
because he drinks contaminated water, and gets diarrhea. And before we leave this room,
we’re going to make sure John gets better. That’s the task for today. Diarrhea is a serious disease. It kills approximately
2,000 kids every day. Let’s simulate a quick diarrheal infection
in this room, quickly. If you were in John’s body right now, and these were the walls
of John’s intestines, and all of you were bacteria, there were two things you did
when you entered John’s body. The first thing you did
is you grabbed a seat; that’s what you did when you entered
this room. (Laughter) The second thing you did as soon as
you entered is you looked for food. And that’s exactly
what infectious agents do: they get into our body, they find a place
to park themselves, and they start eating. These are usually called
dietary requirements of infectious agents. As a microbiologist, I am passionate
to not kill bacteria first, before we understand what they do to us. Till now, we have been killing them
without understanding what they do, so let’s change
the approach a little bit here. So this is John, drinking
contaminated water, and this is you in John’s guts, coming in (Laughter) you grab a seat, and John’s body provides you
with this amazing food that you love. The bugs eat these food molecules
that John’s body naturally provides them, and they become virulent, pathogenic,
and they [cause] John diarrhea, obviously. I decided to intersect
into this problem in a different way, I wanted to understand what other food sources
our body provides to bacteria when they cause infection. The technology I used to understand that
is called metabolomics. What metabolomics does is [that it] basically allows you to take any biological sample, infected sample,
from a patient, from an animal, and lets you understand, get a peek
or eavesdrop into the conversation that’s happening
between a patient and a bacterium, and understand what are the food sources that the body is producing
when we are sick. These food sources
are usually called metabolites. These are the food sources
that the bugs get when we get infected. With this information,
I was able to build a Google map of all the metabolites you get
when you are sick, – in the context of diarrhea and a couple
of other infectious diseases – and these are the metabolites
your body produces once you get sick. Apparently, humans
had been dealing with bacteria before we invented antibiotics, right? Antibiotics in the 20th century. It turns out when you’re sick, your body produces
two different kinds of metabolites. The first metabolite your body produces are these blue ones
which are called pathogenic metabolites. These pathogenic metabolites,
when the bugs eat them, produce millions of molecules of toxins, and these are the toxin molecules
that the bugs produce, and you get sick. On the other hand, your body
also produces millions of molecules – small amounts or trace amounts,
depending on the infection – and these are the green metabolites
– just colored here for understanding – that the bugs have evolved not to eat, they’ve learned to ignore
and not eat them, or learned to circumvent themselves
from these metabolites. So I did an experiment in the lab: what if we make these bugs eat these non-pathogenic
or these other metabolites which they usually don’t eat? The answer was:
when they eat those metabolites, they basically become
avirulent or nonpathogenic. In other words, they turn
their toxin production down. More toxin, disease;
less toxin, less disease. So what we have is that nature has programmed us
and bugs to have this conversation, and the conversation basically is: what do bacteria eat
when they cause disease? Usually they eat the foods which make them pathogenic
and make toxins. Sometimes, we can change
these interactions by making the bugs eat things
which sometimes make them nonpathogenic. So this is the handle we have on John.
Now let’s try and cure John, OK? So, John has diarrhea, and we’re going to see
what we can do to help John. This is the second experiment
I did in the lab. I reasoned if all of you
are bacteria in John’s body, you come inside this room,
you are expecting pathogenic metabolites, and this is what you’ve been eating,
let’s assume that’s called steak. What if, when you walked into John’s body, we make John give you the other green,
nonpathogenic metabolites? Let’s call them salad. So I said: “OK, let’s see
what happens to John.” These are not steaks and salads,
this is for the purpose of the talk, these are organic molecules. (Laughter) You guys are smarter than me,
so I’m assuming you got that. So you did that, and basically
what happens is – I was surprised – I failed miserably. The bugs wouldn’t eat them,
they would not like them. It’s like training a pet:
they’re like, “No… No…” (Laughter) So finally, after a lot of screening,
a lot of screening, I identified a few metabolites
which I thought would work. If those would work,
then let’s see what happens to John. Does he get better?
Does he get ill? What happens? Here’s John, again drinking
contaminated water, this is you guys eating steak, and we flush it, and we give them
these new metabolites. The bugs don’t know, they’re eating them, they don’t like them, in the real sense
they become nonpathogenic, they turn the toxin production down, and they start exiting John’s body
in noninfectious state, and John is happy. There are a couple of things
I hope you took from it. A: we did not kill them.
We did not kill them. Up till now, we have been killing them, and this is a concept
that we need to think about, that infectious agents usually
can be trained, can be modulated, their diets can be changed. What I’m thinking,
and what we all should think, is there a way we can intersect
into this problem of infectious diseases by providing bugs, or training them
for the new generation of food sources? These food sources will make
the bugs avirulent or nonpathogenic versus killing them, and after they’ve become
avirulent or nonpathogenic, they are trained to exit our bodies in a way that is safe
for us to pass them out. Let’s assume that in the future
we design a system which I’m calling at this point
‘on demand food service for bugs’. (Laughter) The science behind this
is really interesting. The science is that basically,
when you’ve got an infectious disease instead of coming back
with an antibiotic and killing the bugs, the first or the front-line therapy
in the future should be and could be
understanding and managing the infection by training the bugs,
by giving them food sources which, instead of making them pathogenic, first make them
nonpathogenic, noninfectious, and then, if required,
come back with antibiotics. This concept allows us to use
the antibiotics in a more rational way. It buys us time, basically to look for better antibiotics
which we are not able to find, and this allows us not to go back
and start killing them all over again, because we did that 50 years ago,
and right now they are resistant. As the drawing board has been wiped
clean all over the world with scientists, and business and industry people
looking for more drugs, this is a new approach
where basically we have an opportunity to fix this problem the right way
for once and hopefully for a long time. Because once we’d discovered penicillin,
we stopped looking. And the bugs discovered
penicillin too, after 50 years, and they were like,
“Hang on… I got a problem.” Then a couple of take-home messages
I want you to think about: First one, that dietary needs
of an infectious agent can be used to design
novel antimicrobials. Second, a large scale deployment
of these things is possible. We humans already have a network in place. Do you eat fortified wheat at home? Yes. Do you eat salt with iodine in it? Yes. So we already have
a huge network of fortified foods rolling out in our communities, but up till now, these fortified foods
only helped our health. You drink vitamin water,
you get vitamins in your body, but the bugs have largely been ignored. The other thing I’m working on is the next generation
of oral rehydration salt solution. This is given to patients
who have diarrhea like John. But all that oral
rehydration salt solution does is replenish the salts
and the metabolites in your body that you loose while you have diarrhea, it does nothing to the bugs. The bugs are just using
John’s body as a vehicle. The next generation
of oral rehydration salt solutions will hopefully include
these nonpathogenic metabolites that can be incorporated
as a front-line therapy before you get antibiotics. I want all of you to think
about these things and discuss them, and see if there are novel ways we can intersect into this problem
of antibiotic resistance because if not now,
in the next 50 years, you’re going to face it. Thank you. (Applause)

Adam Ruins Everything – We Should All Eat Bugs (and You Already Are!) | truTV

Adam Ruins Everything – We Should All Eat Bugs (and You Already Are!) | truTV


Crunchy, tasty, buggy. Today’s chefs have
to cook up the best bug dish and avoid
getting squished. (splat) Hello, chefs.
Today, you must use the everyday ingredients
in your baskets to prove to Miranda
that even though she doesn’t realize it, she actually eats bugs
all the time. If your dish doesn’t cut it,
you will get squished. Okay, open ’em up. ♪♪ And our contestants
have bugs, bugs, and more bugs. (woman)
My strategy is
to tell the truth. If you’ve ever eaten
a lobster or crayfish, you’ve eaten a bug. They’re both arthropods. Hmm, that’s very smart. Lobsters are essentially
spiders of the sea. I’m never eatin’
a lobster again. A bug’s head shall never
pass these lips. Oh, the truth is bugs
are already in most of our foods,
and there’s nothing unsafe or even unhealthy about it. Our produce and canned foods
are full of little bug bits. Broccoli, spinach,
and canned tomatoes can contain heads,
legs, thoraxes, and even entire insects. How is that allowed? Until I become
a chef full-time, I still have my day job
at the FDA. And we allow these bugs
in there because eating them is totally safe. In fact, the only reason
the FDA puts limits on bug parts in food at all is so people
don’t notice them. Generally, our policy
is if people don’t notice, they won’t care. (Arana)
Oh, now I like what I’m seeing
here with the chocolate. Chocolate is full of bugs. Yes, great move. In fact, if you eat
100 pounds of chocolate, you’ll have eaten
one entire pound of bugs. There are even bugs
in certain drinks. Up to five percent
of the hops in each batch of beer is bugs. (chuckling)
I love a hoppy beer. I do not.
I think we’re done here. Yes, we are,
with the dishes that contain bugs
unintentionally. But our chefs were also asked to
prepare a dish of common foods that contain bugs
on purpose. Chefs, please step back. ♪♪ Mmm. Nice choice by
Chef Mei Ling here. Yes, the red dye found
in milkshakes, yogurt, and sausages is often made
from scale insects. (Mei Ling)
I’ve created dishes that really represent me. And the bugs. (Aaron)
So I look over at
chef Tony’s dish, and I realize we both went
for the lac bugs. Lac bugs are used
in the coating for jelly beans,
and other candies, and cake fondant. I’m still confident in my dish. I… just hope the judges
feel the same way. For me, it was
just disgusting. I didn’t even try it. I say more. If you’re gonna put
the bugs in, put the bugs in! Well, do we have
a decision? ♪♪ Chef Aaron, I’m afraid
you’ve been squished. (Arana)
Chef Aaron, you did demonstrate
why humans unknowingly ingest around
one to two pounds of flies, maggots,
and other bugs hidden in their food
each year. But at the end of the day, the execution
just wasn’t there. Yeah… Be well. ♪♪ (Miranda)
Wait a minute! Are you telling me
I could be eating up to two pounds
of bugs a year without even knowing it? I’m gonna have
my jaw wired shut. My friend Joyce had it done,
she looks divine. Or you could just accept it. And for the sake of humanity,
you should. Because bugs might be the best way to feed
our growing population. Worldwide demand for
meat-based protein is rising at
an alarming rate. But if that trend continues and everyone starts eating
as much meat as Americans do, raising that amount
of livestock would require more land area
than even exists on the planet. But if we replaced just half the world’s meat consumption
with bugs, we’d use one-third less land
for agriculture. Plus, eating bugs
is a lot less wasteful. 80% of a cricket’s body
is edible, compared to just
40% of a cow’s. And not only could we feed
way more people, it would be more
environmentally efficient. Farming crickets requires
far less water than farming lean meat. And bugs are straight up
safer to consume. Unlike traditional meat,
bugs are genetically different enough
from humans that diseases don’t jump to us
when we eat them.