9 Extreme Bug Mating Rituals

9 Extreme Bug Mating Rituals


Romance, dance dates, fancy gifts, and chastity
belts… Murderous femme fatales, jealous dudes, extortion,
and mind-control… Game of Thrones may be back on the air, but
there’s another world filled with even more violence, treachery, and plot-twists than
your average Lannister party… The sex lives of insects and spiders. It’s kind of a free-for-all. [INTRO] [1. Praying Mantis ] Perhaps no other insect is more associated
with their bad mating behavior than the female praying mantis, who’s known for her tendency
to decapitate and then devour male suitors. And okay, yeah, the rumors are based in truth.
Kind of. A lot of mantis ladies do this. But mantis sexual cannibalism is actually
less common than you might think — it happens in about 25 percent of matings in the wild.
And it isn’t typically required for successful fertilization. That said, eating your mate comes with a couple
of nice perks. For one, it’s a free meal. Female mantises are bigger than their partners,
and if they’re really hungry, a uh, preoccupied male is an easy target. Generally, a starving
or malnourished female is much more likely to chow down on her date than a well-fed one. Beheading their partner in mid-copulation
may also offer females an advantage that’s a little more macabre. You’d think severing a brain mid-hump would
end the mating, but it turns out that disconnecting the male’s brain and his body actually sparks
more spasms — and more sperm. And though I’m sure any male would prefer
to keep his life and wander off to mate another day, those who do wind up as dinner may keep
females better fed, increasing their chances of passing along their genes. [2. Honey Bee] Scientists still aren’t sure whether some
male mantises deliberately offer themselves up as a snack, but they’re not the only
insects who engage in sexual suicide… In the caste system of a honey bee hive, every
bee knows its role, and male drones aren’t much more than sperm donors. They don’t gather pollen, or help maintain
larvae or the hive’s architecture. They don’t fight off intruders. Really, their only job is to find queens from
other hives, mate with them in mid-flight, and go out in a blaze of glory. See, when a successful drone uncouples from
his queen, his penis and some abdominal tissues are ripped out of him, and, well, he dies. His passion literally rips his guts out. Take
that, poets! Ms. Queen Bee, on the other hand, can potentially
mate with dozens of drones over several mating flights, tucking their sperm away for future
use over the next few years of egg-laying within the safety of her hive. But don’t think unsuccessful drones have
it any better — because come autumn, those freeloaders get kicked out of the hive by
their sisters, and are left to freeze to death. Then there are the more — can we call them
romantic? — bugs. The ones who sing and dance and put on shows, or woo their loves with
special gifts. [3. Fireflies] When it comes to impressive visual displays,
it’s hard to compete with a firefly’s flashy light show. These flying beetles have special light organs
in their abdomens that contain a compound called luciferin, which reacts with incoming
oxygen to create that classic firefly glow. The animals regulate this inflow of oxygen
to create blinking patterns, and each species uses its own individual flash code to attract
mates, almost like a visual morse code. A hopeful male flies around in the dark, blinking
his little heart out, and if his lightshow is good enough to catch a choosy female’s
eye, she’ll start signalling back at him. A flashy display is important, but a hopeful
male also has to bring gifts if he hopes to retain his lady friend’s interest. Researchers from Tufts University recently
found that female Photinus fireflies ultimately selected their mates based on the size of
their so-called nuptial gifts, not their light display. And by “gift,” I mean “packet of sperm.” During copulation, a male passes along a pile
of sperm wrapped up in a nutritious, coil-shaped protein packet called a spermatophore that
increases female fertility by providing her developing oocytes with extra energy. The larger the gift, the more likely she’ll
accept her suitor and make him a father. Researchers haven’t yet figured out how
the female can tell which males can offer them a bigger packet. But to a female firefly, size does matter. [4. Dung Beetle] Other animals woo with simpler gifts, and
nothing wins the fair heart of a lady dung beetle like a nice round ball of poo. Poop is everything to a dung beetle. They
collect it, eat it, and even raise their children in it. There’s a reason why we call them dung beetles. After bumping into each other at, say, a fresh
elephant or cow patty, some dung beetles form a pair bond, rolling their own giant dung
ball off into the sunset together. Once they find a nice soft piece of land,
they’ll bury their precious poo-ball, and start mating, sometimes in tunnels through
the dung itself. The female lays her eggs in smaller brood
balls, which will be a nice snack for her grubs once they hatch. In many species, one or both parents stick
around and continue to care for their offspring as they mature — a rare behavior in the insect
world. Real salt-of-the-Earth, those dung beetles. But not everyone is impressed with poop. Some
ladies prefer more conventional displays, like sweet dance moves. [5. Peacock Spider] At just a few millimeters long, furry Australian
peacock spiders are tiny. But they’ve still got style — I’m talking the wardrobe of
Elton John and the dance skills of Channing Tatum. To attract female attention, a male starts
out by vibrating his abdomen and waving one pair of legs around like he’s directing
traffic. Once he’s got an audience, he pulls out
the big guns, extending his colorful, iridescent abdominal flaps and excitedly flipping them
up behind his head like a peacock’s tail. Then he shimmies around, giddily shaking his
legs in the air, bouncing from side to side, drumming the ground and shaking what his mama
gave him. It’s all very adorable. If the object of his affection is suitably
impressed, she’ll allow him to mate with her. If she isn’t… he’d better pack
up and get out of dodge quick, or he’ll end up as her dinner. [6. Mayfly] For some insect species, like the mayfly,
there is no life at all after mating. After spending a couple of years in freshwater
in their aquatic nymph stage, mayflies finally complete their lifecycle when they hatch into
delicate winged adults. Often entire local populations hatch at the
same time, in a winged frenzy of sometimes millions of insects. One Mississippi River population hatches in
hordes of around 18 trillion animals! This synchronicity lowers the chance of any
one mayfly getting eaten, while the general orgy environment increases their chances of
getting laid… which is literally their sole mission in life. Seriously, they can’t even eat. They don’t
have functional mouthparts or a working digestive system. And once they hatch, the party doesn’t last
long. Most species don’t live as adults for more
than 24 hours, and one species only lasts five minutes — a record in the insect world. No wonder the mayfly is classified under the
order Ephemeroptera [eff-em-er-OP-ti-ruh], from the word ephemeral, or fleeting. Mayflies mate in mid-air, above the water,
and the female then lays her eggs on the water’s surface before collapsing. The dying females provide a smorgasbord for
local fish, the males go off to die on land, and their fertilized eggs sink to the bottom
of the water where they’ll eventually hatch into nymphs, destined to spend only a single,
glorious day in the air. While short-lived insects like mayflies need
to mate fast, other species like to take their sweet time. [7. Soapberry Bug ] Meet the long and colorful soapberry bug. In certain climates, female soapberry bugs
face higher mortality rates than males, which leads to a skewed sex ratio and a whole lot
of dudes competing for relatively few females. Not only that, but like many insect species,
females often mate with a number of males, and it’s usually the sperm of the last male
in the lineup that actually fertilizes her eggs. This means that male soapberry bugs have to
fight to /find/ females — and then fight again to be the last guy on her dance card. One way they do this is by prolonging copulation,
even after insemination is long over. Males can hang on for hours, days, or even
more than a week, withdrawing only long enough for the female to lay eggs. This type of mating guarding can get so intense
that some males will keep clutching their mates even after the females have died. Luckily, matings tend to be a lot quicker
when populations are more balanced since competition isn’t as high. [8. Fruit fly ] On the other hand, if you’re a male Drosophila
melanogaster [meh-luh-no-GAS-ter] fruitfly, it may pay to be the first in line, not the
last. Why? Because their seminal fluid contains
special mind-controlling proteins that affect the female’s behavior. Some of these proteins spark cause egg production,
while others seem to have an almost hypnotic effect, making her less interested in sex
with other males. Presumably both of those things give her mate
a reproductive edge over his competitors. One study out of University of Washington
suggests that the more seminal fluid a female takes in, the greater the influence her mate
has on her reproductive behavior. That seems maybe a little messed up, but when
it comes to skeezy mating tactics, one bug really takes the lowdown prize. [9. Waterstrider] Perhaps you’ve see a long-legged waterstrider,
gliding over the surface of a pond with all the grace of an Olympic skater. Don’t be fooled — when it comes to mating,
the tactics these guys use are harsh. When a male is in the mood to mate, he just
jumps on the nearest female without bothering to court her first. If she’s not into it, she can actually block
her vagina with a hard genital shield — sort of like a chastity belt — and hope he moves
on. If he doesn’t move on, though, she might
be in trouble. He’ll start using his legs to tap out a
specific rhythm on the water, attracting underwater predators like fish and backswimmer bugs. Because those predators attack from below,
a pinned female waterstrider knows she’s the one most likely to get snatched and eaten. So she’ll lower her shield and give in to
stop her mate from tapping. Stay classy, waterstriders. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow,
which was brought to you by our patrons on Patreon. If you want to help support this
show, just go to patreon.com/scishow. And don’t forget to go to youtube.com/scishow
and subscribe!

PITTSBURGH DAD: CATCHING LIGHTNING BUGS


[ Children screaming ] DAD:
Now, yinz ain’t catching them
’cause you’re doing it wrong. You got to get low
and see them against the sky. Now, quit whacking the lightning
bugs with that wiffle ball bat. That’s cruel. Yeah, of course Jeffy’s dad
lets him do that. His dad’s an idiot. Buy his DVDs
down at Barnes & Noble. Hey, where’d yinz get
all them jars at?! You’re telling me all them
were empty, right? Well, I’ll tell you right now,
I go to our house and find a sink full of jelly,
pickles, and Miracle Whip, we got problems. Aw, Deb, what do you mean
it’s animal cruelty? Well, that’s what
lightning bugs are for. They’re born,
they light up a few times, then — then poof! —
their butts becomes kids’ rings. No, don’t chase the lightning
bugs over to Tom’s yard. The only thing you’ll catch
over there is disease. I don’t want to see what the
lightning bugs look over there. They probably shoot
real lightning out of them. Now, no, we aren’t putting the
lightning bugs in the ant farm. What are they gonna do in there,
light up all the dead ants? That thing — that ant farm
been sitting up in the attic. Stinkbugs took it over. Yeah, I got one.
I think he’s gonna take off. Go ahead. There it goes.
See? I let him fly away. I don’t bash his head in
with a — with a baseball bat. What are yinz doing
with the baby pool out? I turn my back
for two seconds — boom! — out comes
the baby pool. [ Whiny voice ]
Always something — “I want a real pool.
We need a real pool.” Build them a real pool,
they’re in the baby pool. Every day seeing you down
with — with the baby pool, rolling it down the street like it’s one of them
old-timey wheels and stick! No, we ain’t putting them
lightning bugs in the freezer. I swear, when you kids don’t
know what to do with something, your first thought
is put it in the freezer. Glow sticks from last Halloween, color changer action figures, snowballs from last winter. I half expect to go in there
and find the demolition man. It’s a freezer,
not a cryogenic chamber. Same thing happened
to Walt Disney. His kids didn’t know what to do. Put him in the freezer. Talk about a small world. [ Children screaming ] Them batteries are still good. Hey, Deb,
put them in the freezer. Hey, guys, it’s getting dark.
Watch your mom’s clothesline. You run into that,
take your head right off, like them speeder bike guys
in “Return of the Jedi.” Ewoks didn’t set it up.
Mom did. Hey, Deb, let’s get these kids
out of here. I’ll give them five more minutes before we start
getting the sleepover requests. Hey, why is Bobby Dallas
over here? Ain’t got no lightning bugs
in his yard? Just like I told you
10 minutes ago when you asked if Danny could sleep over
that we’ll see. Well, I ain’t done seeing yet,
so quit bugging me. You ask me one more time and
I’m canceling lightning bugs. I’ll put the bug zapper up. All right, Brandon,
get up in the bath. No, swimming today don’t count. ‘Cause you’re covered
in glowing guts like you was fighting
the Predator. — Captions by VITAC —
www.vitac.com

The Insect Song for Preschoolers I Bug Songs I Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs I The Teolets

The Insect Song for Preschoolers I Bug Songs I Nursery Rhymes and Kids Songs I The Teolets


Learning Objectives: Animal Kingdom-Bugs and Insects Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! The ants go marching, marching for food One by one in the grass The ants go marching, marching for food All day long! Busy bees around the flowers buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Busy bees around the flowers buzz All around the flowers! Crawling spiders spin their web Spin their web Crawling spiders spin their web Crawling and spinning their web! Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves Chomp on the leaves Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves On the yummy leaves! The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink Blink, Blink, Blink The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink All around the trees! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere! The ants go marching, marching for food One by one in the grass The ants go marching, marching for food All day long! Busy bees around the flowers buzz Buzz, Buzz, Buzz Busy bees around the flowers buzz All around the flowers! Crawling spiders spin their web Spin their web Crawling spiders spin their web Crawling and spinning their web! Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves Chomp on the leaves Hungry caterpillars chomp on the leaves On the yummy leaves! The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink Blink, Blink, Blink The fireflies at night go blink, blink, blink All around the trees! Dum Diddy Dodo Dum Dum Dum Funny little bugs everywhere Everywhere!

Top 10 Insects with Amazing Superpowers — TopTenzNet

Top 10 Insects with Amazing Superpowers — TopTenzNet


10 Insects with Amazing Superpowers 10. Cockroaches Cockroaches are perhaps the most disliked
creatures in the whole world. Despite that, they’re also the most powerful. Just the
mere presence of a single cockroach can make the strongest, most powerful men jump, run,
and scream like a girl. What most people don’t know is that cockroaches
have significant value to the medical world. A number of researchers nowadays are studying
cockroaches for their potential in curing some of man’s most dreaded diseases. Scientists
have discovered that the brains of cockroaches contain “nine antibiotic molecules … that
protect them from voracious, lethal bacteria”. So, what does this have to do with modern
day medicine? Well, the antibacterial molecules found in the brains of cockroaches are more
powerful than the antibiotics we use today. In fact, the antibacterial properties of these
disgusting insects are far more effective than some of our modern medicine that they
make “prescription drugs look like sugar pills”. Laboratory tests show that the antibacterial
molecules found in cockroaches can easily cure MRSA—a bacterial infection more deadly
than AIDS—and E. coli. Aside from their amazing healing power, cockroaches
also have the incredible ability to survive nuclear explosions. When Hiroshima and Nagasaki
were annihilated by atomic bombs, the only sole survivors were cockroaches. However,
it’s important to note that this amazing ability has its limitations. When exposed
to 100,000 radon units, cockroaches will die. 9. Bees Bees are one of the most intelligent insects
in the animal world. Not only do they have their own sophisticated means of communication,
they also have extraordinary navigation skills despite the fact that their eyesight is limited. It’s common knowledge that honey bees can
communicate with each other. They perform a series of movements called a “waggle dance”
to tell each other where food is located or which spot is best for building a new colony.
However, what many people don’t know is that the dance is extremely advanced. Honey
bees know that the Earth is round, and they take this fact into consideration when they’re
learning the location of a certain food source. Aside from that, they can also calculate angles
very easily just by reading their waggle dances. For example, if a bee dances from a 12 to
6 o’clock direction, that means food or home is located directly away from the sun.
In contrast, a 6 to 12 o’clock movement signifies that bees are to “fly straight
forward towards the sun”. A 7 to 1 o’clock movement means that the bees are to fly “to
the right of the sun”. Aside from communicating with each other,
honey bees also navigate their surroundings through other means like remembering visual
landmarks, taking the sun’s position into consideration, and using the Earth’s electromagnetic
field. 8. Locusts Locusts are one of the most efficient pilots
in the insect world. These winged creatures, which many people consider to be menaces,
can fly great distances without using too much energy. For many years now, scientists
have been studying them, and they found out that even though these insects don’t produce
great amounts of thrust and lift, they’re capable of sustaining a steady flight rate.
Their ability to maintain a steady flight rate doesn’t change even if the winds and
temperature become unfavorable. This amazing ability enables them to travel vast distances
without wasting much energy. What’s more amazing is that locusts have
the capacity to twist their wings during flights. By doing so, they can preserve and even control
the quantity of lift they generate. This, in turn, helps in keeping their flight at
a consistent rate. This additional feature enables them to fly up to 80 kilometers in
one day without requiring a rest. 7. Fireflies Fireflies‘ amazing ability to produce their
own light is a wonder in the animal kingdom, and a source of inspiration and joy for many
of us. As a child, you’ve probably experienced that magical feeling that comes upon seeing
the twilight flickering of these amazing creatures for the first time. One thing that we, as humans, can learn from
fireflies is how to use energy efficiently. Fireflies were designed by Nature to use energy
without wasting much of it through heat. The light bulbs we have in our homes only use
10% of their total energy in producing light. The remaining 90% becomes wasted heat energy.
On the other hand, the amazing bodies of fireflies were designed to use 100% of the energy to
produce light. If fireflies were like light bulbs, in that they use only 10% to make light
and the remaining 90% is released as heat energy, they would almost certainly burn to
death. Moreover, just like bees, fireflies can talk
with each other too. Fireflies use their ability to produce light to signal each other that
they are available for mating. Male fireflies give off distinct flash patterns (each species
has their own unique patterns) that signal the female fireflies that they are “single”.
On the other hand, if the female fireflies are interested in mating, they too would reply
by flickering. 6. Fleas Fleas are harmful not only to your pets, but
also to you and your family. Despite that, they have something in them that deserves
human admiration: these insects are capable of jumping 150 times their own height! Now,
this might not sound really amazing if you view it in insect terms, but if you look at
it in a human perspective, then you’ll find that the fleas plaguing your pets are indeed
incredible creatures. Consider this. A certain person, let’s call
him Bill, is 5’9” tall. If he were a flea, then he would be able to jump 862.5 feet into
the air, which would be defying gravity to the highest extent. Just imagine how different
our world would be if we possessed this amazing flea ability. There would be fewer cars, less
pollution, less expenses, etc. So, the next time you crush a flea, think of what it can
do. 5. Dung Beetles There are two reasons why dung beetles are
included in this list: poop and astronomy. This might surprise you, but these two seemingly-unrelated
subjects have been connected by these incredible creatures. Dung beetles live a very disgusting lifestyle.
They collect animal wastes, roll it up into a ball, and use it for several purposes. They
can use the ball as their homes, lay their eggs on it, or if they’re hungry, snack
on it. Now, what’s amazing is that dung beetles have the incredible ability to roll
their “dung balls” in a straight line even at night! Intrigued by this fascinating
ability, Marie Dacke, a biologist from Lund University in Sweden, conducted an experiment.
She placed the dung beetles in a planetarium, and watched as the insects were able to successfully
roll their dung ball in a straight line by using the “entire starry sky”. To make the experiment more interesting, Dacke
decided to show only the Milky Way Galaxy. Surprisingly, the dung beetles were still
capable of rolling their precious dung balls in a straight line. The conclusion: dung beetles
are great recyclers and incredible astronomers. 4. Dragonflies We humans have the amazing ability of selective
attention. Right now, you’re using this power to eliminate various distractions and
focus on reading and understanding this list. For many years, scientists have believed that
only primates possess this amazing ability. However, a new research shows that a specific
winged creature in the insect world is also capable of selective attention—dragonflies. Dragonflies have very small brains and yet,
when hunting for food, they rely on selective attention. If a dragonfly sees a swarm of
tiny insects, it’s going to lock its attention on one prey alone. Through selective attention,
it eliminates other potential prey within the swarm and focuses solely on its target.
Dragonflies are very accurate when it comes to catching their prey. Their success rate
is very high – 97 percent! 3. Ants Ants have the amazing ability of always finding
their way back home even if they’ve wandered far away in search for food. Scientists have
long known that ants employ various visual cues to remind them of where their colony
is. However, in some places, like deserts, where there are no distinct landmarks, how
do ants manage to find their way back home? This is the same question that Dr. Markus
Knaden, Dr. Kathrin Steck, and Prof. Bill Hanson of the Max-Planck Institute for Chemical
Ecology in Germany tried to answer with a very simple experiment. For their experiment, the scientists used
Tunisian desert ants. They placed four different odors around the entrance of the ants’ nest,
and made sure that the entrance was barely visible. After letting the ants associate
the odors with their nest, they were then removed and then placed in a different location,
one with no nest and no entrance. Only the four odors used previously in the first location
were present. Surprisingly, the ants went to the area where
the odors were located (the same spot where the nest entrance should have been)! This
experiment proved that ants can smell in stereo, which means that they can sense two different
odors at the same time from two unique directions. Moreover, it also proved that in places, like
deserts, ants don’t rely on visual cues. They create an “odor map” of their environment
by relying on their “stereo sense of smell”. As long as the odor is there, they will always
find their way back home. 2. Voodoo Wasps Voodoo wasps are called such because of their
“magical” ability to turn their prey or enemies into “zombies”. This might sound
like something you’d see in a sci-fi flick, but scientists have proven that voodoo wasps
are indeed capable of inducing other insects into a zombie-like state. What’s more eerie
is that, once the insects become zombies, voodoo wasps can control them. Voodoo wasps lay their eggs inside the bodies
of young geometrid caterpillars. The larvae inside the caterpillars survive by feeding
on the bodily fluids of their host. Once the larvae achieve full development, they find
their way out of the caterpillar’s body by eating its skin. Then, they create a cocoon
and attach themselves into a leaf or a branch. Here comes the slightly terrifying, yet equally
fascinating part. The host the caterpillar doesn’t leave the cocoon — instead of
doing its usual business, the caterpillar acts as the cocoon’s bodyguard, protecting
it from various predators. Researchers conducted an experiment which
showed that infected caterpillars do become the “zombie bodyguards” of voodoo wasps
by introducing stinkbugs. Caterpillars which were not infected didn’t do anything to
stop the stinkbug from going near the cocoon. On the other hand, infected caterpillars protected
the cocoon by knocking the bug off the branch. Scientists don’t know why the infected caterpillars
protect the cocoon. However, they did find out that this incredible ability of voodoo
wasps is crucial for their survival. 1. Bombardier Beetle When it comes to defensive strategies in the
insect world, nothing beats the Bombardier beetle. This creature has the incredible ability
to fire a hot mixture of chemical solution strong enough to injure its enemies. The toxic
solution sprayed by the beetle can reach an impressive temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit,
or 100 degrees Celsius. But what’s even more fascinating is the
intricate design of the Bombardier beetle’s body. You see, the two chemicals, hydrogen
peroxide and hydroquinone, which this insect uses to injure its enemies are dangerous and
fatal. If not stored and combined properly, these chemicals would cause the Bombardier
beetle to explode! Were it not for their well-designed bodies, Bombardier beetles would have never
existed. At the end of this insect’s abdomen are two glands. These two glands separate
the hydrogen peroxide from the hydroquinone. If the Bombardier beetle feels threatened,
its sphincter muscles will squeeze the right amount of chemicals into a certain body part
where they are mixed together with other toxic substances. The result is a hot mixture of
toxic chemicals capable of hurting the Bombardier beetle’s enemies.

So … Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies | Deep Look

So … Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies | Deep Look


If you think there’s something romantic
about fireflies glowing on a warm summer night… You’d be right. But what you don’t see, is the dark side
of this luminous display. Firefly flashes are a secret code, a language
of light. The light comes from a masterful bit of chemistry. A bioluminescent reaction that generates light
but no heat. So what are they saying? Well, males on the wing are advertising themselves
to females with a bit of sexy skywriting. Take the common Eastern firefly. His signature move? A fishhook-shaped maneuver. Which is why his species is sometimes called
the “Big Dipper.” Her reply is more subtle: a single, slow pulse
from her heart-shaped lantern. Our “Big Dipper” comes bearing a “nuptial
gift,” a present of more than 200 assorted nutrients… kind of like a box of chocolates. Here’s the handoff. Some are lucibufagins — defensive chemicals
fireflies secrete to ward off predators like spiders and birds. These defensive chemicals may help protect
her. Firefly codes are so reliable that anyone
can speak the language. But we’re not the only codebreakers listening
in. Meet Photuris. She’s also a firefly — a larger, stronger
one than the Big Dippers. But she has a weakness. Her species can’t make its own lucibufagins. They have fewer defenses against predators. So she sets a trap to get some. She mimics the glow of other firefly females
— luring in the males of that species. When Mr. Big Dipper shows up with his chemical
gift, she moves in… sucks up those defensive chemicals that she
desperately needs… …then makes a meal of the rest of him. Most fireflies don’t even eat during the
few weeks they spend as adults. But he’s not totally defenseless. If she’s not quick enough, he can secrete
a gooey compound that sticks in her jaw and lets him escape. Another gift from the master chemist. Hey there, it’s Lauren. I know you see that ‘Subscribe’ button there. Here’s what it’ll get you. New Deep Look episodes every two weeks. Keep up with all the weird, gross, and wonderful
things we’re working on. Thanks, and see you soon.