STUNG by a VELVET ANT!

STUNG by a VELVET ANT!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (dramatic music) (yelling) (dramatic music) There’s no question about it, the Wild West is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain laced with spine-covered plants, or its animals, most of which are armed with
fags and stingers, Arizona Sonoran Desert is an
adventure-lover’s playground. Sure, we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail, or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run up my pant leg. But in actuality the good news is that each and every
one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in, and when you do, a bite or
sting can be incredibly painful. Yeah, he got me, he bit me? – [Mark] Are you sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to my line of work the goal is to
have an interaction so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings and
why it’s always best to admire animals
from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! – [Mark] Got one? – Yeah, yeah, he’s right there on the other side of that log. I get my pack off. Yes! Hold on, no, he’s
underneath the log. I just started to tip
it, I saw he ran back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked — again. (dramatic music) – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get ‘im, get
‘im, don’t lose ‘im. – Ah! Yes, yes, look at that! – [Mark] Whoo! (laughing) – Oh, he almost got into
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our
velvet ant, there it is. Okay, cool, well
tomorrow morning I’m gonna get stung by
that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species of ground wasp and
not an ant at all, claims a famous
nickname, the cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth most painful
sting in the insect kingdom. Rumor has it that the pain is
so intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this thinking to yourself, “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes, and the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me
stung by the bullet? Kinda feel like I
have to get stung by everything else
leading up to that. I am not looking
forward to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna
come from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to alligator
bites, crab pinches, or blood-sucking leaches,
I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings, the males do have wings, but what’s interesting is that the males do not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger. That’s right, the females, and
that who we have here today. Now one of the most impressive
things about this insect is the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about as long as the entire length
of the abdomen. What I wanna do now is use
these little entomology forceps to pick the velvet ant
up and show you guys just how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Yeah,
are they delicate? – They are not. The velvet ant actually has a very, very
durable exoskeleton, one of the toughest exoskeletons
in the insect kingdom so me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or damage. Come ‘ere. Oh. – [Mark] Gettin’
away, gettin’ away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] Got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot and you step on one of these
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under, and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture it is time to for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell ya what, I sure was. Now they say that this sting is painful enough to kill a cow, however there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that matter, ever dying from a
velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better but you never know how your
body will react to venom so we always have an
Epinephrine Pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. Alright, Mark signaling me
that it is time, here we go. I’m about to be stung by
the velvet ant, here we go. – [Mark] Alright, Coyote,
well it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have, camera-wise,
we have a GoPro, small camera right next to me. Oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the game
plan for this sting? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end, and then place it
down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin and I’m hoping that, as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now, if that doesn’t work, I also have my pair
of entomology forceps and I’m actually going
to pick up, hold the ant, place it on my arm,
and let it sting me. One way or another,
I am definitely going to be stung
by the velvet ant. Here we go, okay. Now the first thing
I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going to spin
this over on my forearm, and with any luck the
ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do
it, here comes the– – I’m Coyote Peterson, and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Oh boy, I can its
abdomen kinda pumpin’. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. (heavy breathing) Ooh, ooh, ohh, ow, ow, ow, ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin! It’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. And that stinger’s gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. (heavy breathing) This is intense. The glass was actually
starting to get a little foggy from
the heat of my skin so at this point I think we
are going to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant
with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point, it’s been in there
for about two minutes and so far no sting, it’s
just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay. – [Mark] Whoo. – Ahhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Ahh, extremely nervous
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cutting GoPro. Okay, alright, the
only way to actually move forward with this is for me to hold the ant with
the entomology forceps up against my skin
and let it sting me. – [Mark] It seems this
is gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah. Hold on, I need a second. My heart’s like, oh, getting
dizzy, yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps is a guaranteed way
to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this, that stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can do
this, you can do this, okay. – [Mark] So that
stinger is gonna go all the way under your skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Yeah, I’m ready. (dramatic music) Oh boy. (dramatic music) Alright, here we go. – You ready? Alright, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson and I’m
about to enter the sting zone with the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? Get your shot, I’m gonna
place it right down on my arm. – [Mark] Got it. – Here we go, with my arm shakin’. And, go. (dramatic music) Ow! (grunting) Okay, let me get back here. – [Mark] You alright? What’re you feelin’? – Oh wow, oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh! – [Mark] You alright? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a second,
give me a second. (heavy breathing) Oh my gosh, guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. (yelling) (heavy breathing) Hold on, I gotta try to
control my heart rate. Try to get a tight shot of it right there where
the stinger went it, you need to see there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot
’cause I can get up and like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like you could feel it go all
the way under the skin, all the way in. I could feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be alright? – Okay, now they say that
the sting of the velvet ant will last for about 30 minutes and I can tell
you guys right now this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken, there’s no question about it. It’s worse than a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You could see the welt
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
there’s a welt, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – The pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you
know if you get a charlie horse in your
muscle and it like seizes up, and then it’s like– Oh, that is powerful. I can see why they
call ’em cow killers. Oh, that is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been, about? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – Seven minutes? Now they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30, I have about 23 minutes to
go, guys, 23 minutes to go. (yelling) Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was willing to
take a sting from this insect was so that we could all see
the effects of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by,
my arm is still on fire, and what’s crazy is that
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There’s the stinger
insertion point right there and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you could see how red the
entire radius is of the sting. And I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is that all around the sting is tingling like these little, tiny
pin cushion needles going– And as you can see there’s all
these little red dots forming and I’m assuming that is where the venom is
spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I
would say that this was definitely one
very intense sting. The cow killer has earned
its reputation as being one of the most powerful
stings in the insect kingdom. (yelling and grunting) And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me at this point, it’s
definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by the
bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna have to go up
against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild. We’ll see you on
the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are
nomadic ground dwellers that feed primarily on nectar so there’s absolutely no reason
you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet
and you’ll be just fine. If you missed the painfully
entertaining conclusion to my climb up the
insect sting pain index make sure to go back and watch, Stung by an Executioner Wasp. And don’t forget, subscribe
and click the notification bell so you can join me and the crew
on our next wild adventure. (coyote howling)

The Billion Ant Mega Colony and the Biggest War on Earth

The Billion Ant Mega Colony and the Biggest War on Earth


In nearly every corner of the earth, ants wage war against each other. Their weapons are what nature gave them. Some have strong armor, deathly stingers, or sharp mandibles. And then there’s this
tiny and not very impressive ant, but it rules the biggest empire any ant has ever built. A colony spanning continents and fighting wars that leave millions of casualties. Let’s take a look at this unlikely warrioress, “Linepithema humile”
the Argentine ant. ♫ Kurzgesagt intro music ♫ This story begins in the floodplains
around the Paraná River, in South America, It’s a crowded ant megalopolis where dozens of ant species fight for dominance, including fire ants, army ants and the rather unimpressive Argentine ant. It measures only 2 to 3 millimeters in length and with its small mandibles, it’s surprising that it survived among its buff competitors. Their homes are equally unremarkable. Their colonies range from fairly small to very large
and could be found anywhere: Under logs, in loose leaf litter
or the former colonies of other ants. Here, Argentine ants prepare their most
effective weapon against their competitors: bodies. Most ant species have
only one queen to produce ants, while Argentine ants went all-in on numbers. For every 120 workers there’s one queen, laying up to 60 eggs a day. So their colonies grow fast and have millions or billions of individuals. Teams of queens and workers frequently branch out and found new colonies. But this strategy has a downside:
As colonies grow and produce a lot of offspring, mutations occur and new colonies adapt to new environments. Their DNA slowly changes from generation to generation and differences accumulate. So after a while the ants that left the colony will become more like distant cousins and start to compete with their mother colony. In their native South American range, this is how Argentine ants behave. Within their colonies they are very cooperative
and well-organized, but they fight vicious wars against other Argentine ant colonies and other ant species With equally strong opponents on every side, the Argentine ant became extremely
aggressive, fighting for every inch of ground. But it could never dominate its neighbours…
until humans showed up. We did what humans do and transported things around the world by ship. On one of them, a few Argentine ant queens hitched a ride as stowaways from South America to Madeira and New Orleans. The Argentine ants suddenly found themselves in a strange world. Instead of being surrounded by deadly enemies, they found only victims ⁠—
nobody could fight them effectively. Because only a few Argentine ant queens
were introduced to the outside world, the resulting colonies had very low genetic diversity. On top of that, the introduced Argentine ants kill up to 90% of their queens every year. Fewer queens, less genetic variation. So, as these colonies spread across the landscape, ants that left the colony were no longer
considered distant cousins. As a result, the new colonies form not opposing but cooperating parties called “supercolonies”. This is a very uncommon
strategy in the ant kingdom, only a few of the 16,000 ant species have evolved supercolonies. A supercolony was established on the
West coast of the USA and became a base for the tiny ants’ global conquest. Today, the Argentine ant inhabits the Mediterranean zones of six continents and many islands. This one supercolony was especially successful, establishing sister locations in California, Europe, Japan, New Zealand and Australia, forming one massive intercontinental megacolony of Argentine ants. This makes them the largest society on Earth,
more numerous than even the human one. But their success has changed the ecosystems they invaded. California is a perfect example of this. In their greed for more territory, the invading Argentine ants have overrun and replaced 90% of the native ant species, including several species of Californian carpenter ants. Although carpenter ant workers are giants, their colonies have only between 3,000 and 6,000 individuals and stand no chance against an expanding supercolony of billions of Argentine ants. Argentine ant workers attack by wiping toxic chemicals on their victims which irritates the enemy and marks them as a target for other Argentine ants. When they attack, the Argentine ants wash over their victims, clinging on to their opponents in groups
and pulling apart their limbs. It doesn’t matter how many of them die ⁠—
there are always more. Once the colony is overrun and exterminated, the Argentine ants feed on their victims brood and take over their home and territory. The Argentine ants’ numbers allow them to hunt down and devour such an excessive mass of different insects that over time some species disappear
from the ants’ territory completely. Argentine ants don’t care about working
with the local flora and fauna, they consume them and move on. And, if their next stop happens to be human property, they will rudely make themselves at home there too. They forage in dumpsters, bowls of pet food and sneak into kitchens to claim leftovers. Not just our homes: our gardens and
fields are also impacted by Argentine ants, since they tend to hordes of aphids as their cattle. The aphids feed from plants and produce a sweet honeydew, which they trade with the ants for protection. Since the ants have no major enemy to fear in their new homes, the aphids thrive and ultimately kill the plants they live on. So, on top of being a major disruption
for the ecosystems they invade, they are also a huge pest for agriculture. But the rule of the Argentine ant is being challenged. Parts of the super colonies have broken off and become their own empires. A merciless civil war has broken out. For example, the Lake Hodges Supercolony has been fighting against the Very Large Colony for years in San Diego County. A massive war is going on over a dynamic front line stretching over kilometers, an estimated 30 million ants die here each
year. On other fronts, an old acquaintance from the Parana River has risen from the shadows Red imported fire ants, which were accidentally introduced from their
old home to the coast of Alabama, Not only are the red fire ants fierce fighters
and more than able to deal with the Argentine ant, they are also able to form
super colonies themselves. Now the old wars from their distant home have been
taken to a foreign battleground. In the southeastern US the super colonies
clashed fiercely. The Argentine ants found themselves outgunned by the fire ants. The fire ants major workers are more than twice the size of the
Argentine ants and wield venom-injecting stingers, even though the Argentine ants
fought fiercely, the fire ants were too much for them. After countless lost
battles the red imported fire ant exterminated the Argentine ants super
colony from much of the southeastern US. This is one territory lost but the
Argentine ants will fight on. This amazing network of cooperating super
colonies is the biggest success in their history. And they’ll not give it up because of a small defeat. They will stand their
ground against any enemy that might arise. No matter if it’s on the Paraná River or on one of the large battlefields across the world. ♫ Background music winds up ♫ These videos were developed with the support of ‘Curiosity Stream’, a subscription
streaming service with thousands of documentaries and non-fiction titles. Kurzgesagt viewers can visit curiositystream.com/kurzgesagt to get a free 31-day trial to watch films like “Big World in a Small Garden”, a
documentary that takes a close look at the world of insects around us or other
documentaries by the likes of Stephen Hawking, David Attenborough, and many more, all available for offline viewing. Once your trial is over, the subscription
is only 2 dollars 99 a month. Curiosity Stream was founded by the same people
who started the Discovery Channel, with documentaries, spanning science, nature,
history, technology and lifestyle. It’s a great way to binge watch fun videos while accidentally learning things. Thank you so much to our friends at Curiosity Stream for supporting our ant’s obsession and making ant-bitious projects like this
possible, stay tuned for part three and visit curiositystream.com/kurzgesagt for your free trial. *Kurtzgesagt duck quacks while floating through space*
♫ Outro music ♫

STUNG by a COW KILLER!

STUNG by a COW KILLER!


– I’m Coyote Peterson. Now you’ve seen me
stung by harvester ants, fire ants, and scorpions. But today, I’m moving a rung up on the insect sting pain index, and I’m going to be
stung by the cow killer. I have a feeling that
this one is going to hurt. Oh boy. (scream) (intense percussion music) There’s no question about it. The wild west is
rough and rugged. And whether you’re talking
about the rocky terrain, laced with spine covered
plants, or its animals, most of which are armed
with fangs and stingers, Arizona’s Sonoran Desert is an
adventure lover’s playground. Sure we all have our
fears of being bitten by a rattlesnake when
venturing off trail. Or in my case, having a
giant desert centipede run on my pant leg. But in actuality, the
good news is that each and every one of these creatures does its best to avoid
human interaction. However, sometimes you
have an accidental run-in. And when you do,
a bite or a sting can be incredibly painful. (gasping) Yeah, he got me. He bit me. – [Mark] You sure? – [Coyote] Yeah, he
definitely bit me. When it comes to
my line of work, the goal is to have
an interaction, so that I can show you the
effects of these encounters. This way we can all
learn why it’s important to be in tune with
our surroundings, and why it’s always
best to admire animals from a safe distance. Velvet ant, velvet ant! (mumbling) I can pick off, yes, hold on, he’s underneath the
log, I just started to tip and so I ran
back, hold on a second. – [Mark] I saw him. – [Coyote] Did you see it? – [Mark] He ducked out
and ducked back in. – [Coyote] There
it is, there it is. – [Mark] Get him,
get him to go in it. – Aagh! Yes, yes! Look at that. Whoo! Oh, you almost got me with
the crevice of that log. Wow, that is a
good sized one too. Ah, but we got our velvet ant. There it is. Okay, cool, well,
tomorrow morning, I’m gonna get stung. By that little ornery bugger. Cool. The velvet ant, which
is actually a species
of ground wasp, and not an ant at all,
claims a famous nickname. The cow killer. Ranked on the insect
sting pain index as being the fourth
most painful sting in the insect
kingdom, rumor has it that the pain is so
intense it can kill a cow. You may be looking at
this, thinking to yourself “Coyote, are you
gonna get stung?” Yeah, I am, I’m gonna
get stung by this today. Now the insect sting
pain index says that the intense pain will
last for about 30 minutes. And the reason that
I’m doing it is to work my way up
to the bullet ant. You wanna see me stung
by the bullet ant? Kind of feel like I have to
get stung by everything else leading up to that. I am not looking forward
to 30 minutes of pain that’s gonna come
from this insect. I know, right? Here we go again. Coyote is about to
enter the strike zone. But this one’s a
little different. When it comes to
alligator bites, crab pinches, or
blood sucking leeches, I’m fine with that. When it comes to
stingers and venom, that’s where even I get nervous. Now, the females
do not have wings. The males do have wings,
but what’s interesting is that the males do
not have stingers. Guess who does have a stinger? That’s right, the females. And that’s what we
have here today. Now one of the most
impressive things about this insect is
the size of its stinger. In fact, it’s about
as long as the entire length of the abdomen. What I want to do now
is use these little entomology forceps to
pick the velvet ant up, and show you guys just
how big that stinger is. You ready for this? – [Mark] Are they delicate? – Um, they are not. The velvet ant
actually has a very, very durable exoskeleton,
one of the toughest exoskeletons in
the insect kingdom. So me picking her
up with the forceps is not going to cause her
any sort of pain or danger. Oh! – [Mark] Oh, getting
away, getting away. – [Coyote] I got it, I got it. – [Mark] You got it? – [Coyote] Got it. – [Mark] Got it, awesome. – Now they can be
found in the grass, so if you’re out there
walking around barefoot, and you step on one of these,
you’re not gonna squish it. What’s gonna happen is
it’s gonna spin around, and then it’s gonna
tuck its abdomen under and boom, you’re gonna get
nailed with that giant stinger. Well, I think at this juncture, it is time for me to
actually take a sting. Are you guys getting nervous? I’ll tell you what, I sure was. Now they say that this
sting is painful enough to kill a cow. However, there are no
reported cases of cows, or humans for that
matter, ever dying from a velvet ant sting. This makes me feel a bit better, but you never know how your
body will react to venom, so we always have an
Epidendrum pen on location, just in case I have an
allergic reaction to the sting. All right, Mark’s signaling me that it is time, here we go. I am about to be stung
by the velvet ant. Hoo, here we go. Hoo. – [Mark] All right Coyote,
well, it’s about that time. – Yeah. – [Mark] How are we
gonna pull this off? I see we have a, you
know, camera wise we have a GoPro, a small
camera right next to me, oh hey, there’s Chance. Chance over there. What’s the gameplan
for the sting in here? What’s the idea? – Well, this is gonna
go down one of two ways. What I’m gonna try
first is to actually take this little glass,
flip it upside down, get the ant to this end,
and then place it down on top of my arm. This will isolate
the ant on my skin, and I’m hoping that as
it tries to get away, it’s just going to sting me. Now if that doesn’t
work, I also have my pair of entomology forceps,
and I’m actually going to pick, hold the
ant, place it on my arm, and let it sting me. One way or another, I am
definitely going to be stung by the velvet ant. Haaah, here we go. Okay, now the first
thing I’m gonna do is get the ant up into
that part of the glass, and then I’m going
to spin this over onto my forearm
and with any luck, the ant is going to sting me. Here we go, ready? – [Mark] Let’s do it,
here comes number four. – I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone
with the velvet ant. One, two, here we go, three. Oh boy. Oh, my heart’s racing right now. Aah boy, I can see its
abdomen kind of pumping. My heart is going now. – [Mark] Any second
it could happen. – Yeah, any second
it could sting me. Oh boy, ooh ooh ooh, ow ow ow, ow, it’s biting at my skin, it’s biting at the edge of the
container trying to get out. Ooh. Oh, and that stinger is gonna be like a little hypodermic
needle going into my skin. This is intense. The glass is actually
starting to get a little foggy from the heat of my
skin, so at this point I think we are going
to move to plan B, which is holding the velvet ant with the entomology forceps. I don’t think it’s going
to sting me at this point. It’s been in there
for about two minutes, and so far no sting. It’s just trying to get out. So I’m gonna flip
my arm upside down, and get the ant
back under control. Okay, here we go, ready? – [Mark] Okay. – One, two, three. Okay, whoo. Ahhhh. – [Mark] How do you feel? – Aahh, extremely nervous,
and my heart is racing. I actually think I do
have to take a second just to get my heart
rate to calm back down. Okay, cut and GoPro. Okay. All right, the only
way to actually move forward with this
is for me to hold the ant with the entomology forceps. Up against my skin,
and let it sting me. – [Mark] This seems, this
gonna do it, isn’t it? – Yeah, hold on, I need
a second, heart’s like, – [Mark] You all right? – Ooh, getting dizzy,
yeah, getting dizzy. In the world of
entomology, when it comes to milking the venom of
insects and arachnids, holding them with forceps
is a guaranteed way to induce a sting. So I think we all know
what’s going to happen next. This is crazy,
guys, this is crazy. My nerves are going this
much for the velvet ant, I can’t imagine what
the tarantula hawk and the bullet ant
are gonna be like. Okay. – [Mark] I can’t believe
you’re about to do this. That stinger is enormous. – Yeah, yeah, okay, you can
do this, you can do this. – [Mark] So is that stinger gonna go all the
way under you skin? – Yeah, it’s gonna go
right into my skin. – [Mark] Okay, I’m ready. Oh boy. All right, here we go. – Here we go, ready? All right, let’s do this again one more time for good measure. I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the sting zone with
the cow killer. Are you ready? – [Mark] Are you ready? – No, I’m never ready. One, two, three. You good? – [Mark] Yeah. – Get your shot,
I’m gonna place it right down on my arm. Here we go. With my arm shaking. And go. Ahh! (pained gasps) Okay, I’m gonna get back here. – [Mark] You all right? What are you feeling? – Gaah! Oh, wow. Oh wow, okay. (heavy breathing) Give me a second. Oh my gosh. – [Mark] You all right? – Oh yeah. – [Mark] What are you feeling,
what does it feel like? – Give me a sec, give me a sec. (rapid panting) Oh my gosh guys,
this is super bad. Move this out of the way. Gah! Gah! Oh my gosh, I gotta try
to control my heart rate. Try to get a tight
shot of it right there with the stinger, we need to
see to see if there’s blood. Okay, try to get a shot,
because if I can get it we’ll like walk
around for a second. Right there. – [Mark] Right there
is where it stung you? – Right where it stung me. I could feel it, it was like, you could feel it go all
the way under the skin. All the way in. I can feel it
insert into my arm. (grunting) – [Mark] You gonna be all right? – Okay. Now they say that the
sting of the velvet ant, will last for about 30 minutes. And I can tell you
guys right now, this is the worst
sting I’ve ever taken. There’s no question about it. It is worse than
a harvester ant, it is worse than a fire ant. It feels like I’m getting
stung over and over again. You can see the welts
starting to form on my arm. – [Mark] Oh man, yeah,
those are welts, big time. Describe the pain, is it
like a pulsating pain, a stabbing pain? – If it pain, it’s
radiating, it is radiating. It feels like, you know
if you get a charlie horse in your muscle, and
it like seizes up, and it’s like doomph, doomph. Ah, that is powerful. Ah, I can see why they
call them cow killers. (chuckle) That is some intense
pain right there. How long has it been? – [Mark] About seven minutes. – About seven minutes? Well they say the pain from
this lasts for about 30. I have about 23
minutes to go, guys. 23 minutes to go. Aah! Now aside from working my
way up to the bullet ant, the reason I was
willing to take a sting from this insect
was so that we could all see the effects
of the venom. 25 minutes has gone by. My arm is still on fire. And what’s crazy is that,
look at all the red blotching that’s formed around the sting. There is the stinger
insertion point right there, and it is swollen,
and it is very tender, and you can see how red
the entire radius is, of the sting. I’m sweating. My goal was to do
the best I could to describe the
pain I was feeling. And it still hurts, it
definitely still hurts, but not as bad as the initial
impact of the stinger. But what’s interesting is
that all around the sting is tingling, like these little
tiny pin cushion needles going tsk tsk tsk. And as you can see there’s
all these little red dots forming, and I’m assuming
that is where the venom is spreading into my arm. Oh wow, well I would say
that this was definitely one very intense sting. The cow killer has
earned its reputation as being one of the
most powerful stings in the insect kingdom Gaaggh! Arrrgghh! Ergh! And while it may
be ranked as a four on the insect sting pain index, for me, at this point,
it’s definitely number one. I’d say I’m one step closer to being stung by
the bullet ant, but first, I’m gonna
have to go up against the tarantula hawk. I have a feeling that that
one is going to be bad. I’m Coyote Peterson. Be brave, stay wild, we’ll
see you on the next adventure. Whoo, let’s get
out of the desert. Velvet ants are nomadic
ground dwellers, that feed primarily on nectar. So there is absolutely no reason you should ever fear them. If you live or are hiking
in velvet ant territory, you’ll want to avoid
a possible sting. Keep your boots on your feet,
and you will be just fine. If you thought that
sting was intense, make sure to check
out the compilation of all my worst bites,
pinches, and stings, as we work our way up to
the bullet ant challenge. And don’t forget, subscribe, so you can join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail. (animal howl)

Rainbow Ant Colony (Part 2)

Rainbow Ant Colony (Part 2)


Hi, this is Jordan updating you on my Iridomyrmex
bicknelli colony. Despite the increasing cold weather here in
Melbourne, this colony has been expanding quite rapidly thanks to that heating mat I
set up for them a few months back. You can see the nest is fairly crowded now.
Here’s the queen right in the middle of the screen. I’m finding it quite difficult to
actually locate the queen now, which shows just how much the colony has grown. I had some good lighting on this shot here,
you can really see the colours of the ants become nicely pronounced. I never realized
until now just how orangey red this species head section is. It’s rather neat noticing
new features on a species I’ve been keeping for almost 3 years now. This colony has actually been a little challenging
to keep recently. I’ve been having a fair amount of ants escaping the out world. At
first I thought it was because they weren’t being fed sufficiently and they were escaping
in order to forage for food. But later I realized this wasn’t the case. I saw the ants actually
carrying brood into the outworld. So what I suspect was happening
was they were scouting for a new nesting space, which makes sense given how cramped they were. After seeing this behavior, I decided to attach
a new addition nesting space, which they quickly discovered and made use of. The new space
is quite dry and warm so most of the space has been used to store their pupae which does
quite well in these conditions. I’ve also added a new out world which is slightly
larger than the last one I had set up. I’ve got a layer or two of fluon around the edges,
which hasn’t been doing the best job in keeping the ants in. So I might have to modify it
a bit to make it more escape proof. But since I added the new nest they seem to be less
interested in leaving, although, occasionally I do still find ants walking around my room
which is a little frustrating. And that’s all the footage I have for now.
I hope you enjoyed this video. Thanks for watching and let me know if you’d like to
see more of these videos.

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 4)

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 4)


Hi, this is Jordan updating you on my Pheidole
colony. The setup has changed a bit since my last
video. I moved the colony out of the old habitat nest and into this brick nest here. This nest if you remember was the nest which I used
to house my Iridomyrmex bicknelli colony before I released them. In order to get the colony to move out of
the old habitat nest what I did was attach up the new nest, and I watered it well and
covered it from any light. While I stopped watering the old nest and exposed it to light and the ants immediately started relocating. It’s important to cycle your colonies nests
like this as it prevents harmful mold and bacteria from taking over your nests, which
can really endanger the health of your colonies. Eventually, after giving it a good clean, I connected up the old nest again.
I cleaned it by removing the glass, soaking it in vinegar, using the garden hose to rinse
it off and after it was dry I glued the glass back on and attached it up. You can see they haven’t made great use
of it, only really using it for some of their pupae here. I watered both nests quite evenly
but, they much preferred the brick nest, I think it was due to the brick nest being more
water retentive so they prefer that moist environment. Here’s 2 of the 3 queens of the colony.
I find the queens are often bunched up together like this, although I rarely ever see all
3 together for some reason. The ants were in this setup for a couple of
months and were doing really well before I decided to alter their setup again. For some
time I had been considering creating a more naturalistic setup for my ants, that not only
my ants would appreciate but would look really nice too. After some research and planning
I began building a terrarium. So this is what I came up with. I wanted to
go with a desert theme, I’ve got some succulents and a few cacti in there at the moment. And
I’m likely going to be altering it later on, adding more plants, rocks and pebbles
and maybe a layer of sand too. Something that will contrast the colour of the plants well
and also the colour of the ants too, just to help them stand out a little more. So after I was satisfied with the terrarium,
I then introduced the ants. What I did was move the whole colony into this single nest
and then just placed it inside the terrarium. I just allowed for one exit point through
this tube here. That way I could channel the ants out in one direction and influence where
they would construct their first nesting site. I wanted it to be close to the front of the
terrarium that way I could observe them more easily and perhaps might even see them create
chambers up against the glass. The colony started digging straight away,
several locations at first but eventually they all converged on one site, this one right
at the end of the tube. And after only an hour or so of digging they began moving brood
in. Since then I’ve been watering their new nest entrance to encourage them to move
the remainder of their brood in. I’ve been keeping the brick nest covered
up from the light for now. I wanted to give the colony a
chance to dig out some decent sized chambers before exposing them to light and encouraging
them to move entirely. I plan on removing the brick nest eventually.
I’ll probably just leave it there for as long as they’re still making use of it. With this new setup, I obviously won’t be
able to see what’s going on in the nest anymore. I won’t be able to see what the
queens are up to, how much brood there is and new workers enclosing and whatnot. But
honestly I’m quite content with just watching the ants forage and build upon their new nest.
I actually did even get a glimpse of one of their underground chambers here which they’ve
filled with some pupae. They soon abandoned this chamber though. I suspect they built
it overnight and didn’t realize it would be exposed to light during the day, when sunlight
came they moved elsewhere. This glass tank is quite big, it’s almost
1m long and half a meter wide so the ants have plenty room to explore. It’s really
quite cool watching them forage around, climbing plants to drink honey off their leaves, creating
foraging trails which weave in and around the plants, rocks and watching them form new
nest entrances. I was observing this soldier ant here for
quite some time and it was being super productive, slicing off pretty much every limb off this
cockroach here. I’ve noticed the soldiers in general are more active in this new setup,
I guess it’s because they now have more roles to play. They’ve been helping dig
tunnels, slicing food up and hauling food back to the nest, guarding nest entrances.
Whereas before they rarely left the nest and mainly just acted as repletes and when they
did leave the nest, they were extremely shy, fleeing back to the safety of the nest at
the first hint of danger. I’ve been trying to feed the colony as often
as I can. I used to buy mealworms from a local pet store, but recently they’ve closed down.
So instead I’ve been searching the garden for insects to feed them. Which is good in
a way, they get whatever it is I find, and so, consume a variety of different foods,
which is far better for them than just have the same meal over and over again. It is more
time consuming for me to go out and search for food for them, but it’s not too much
of a hassle as this is now my last ant colony so I don’t need to worry about feeding multiple
colonies like I did in the past. Given this is my last colony I’m really
hoping they do well in this new environment. So far they look to be quite happy with the
new space, I’ve hardly ever seen any of the ants climbing the glass which is a good
sign they’re content with the environment. So if you’re into ant keeping I highly recommend
giving a naturalistic setup like this a go. They’re relatively cheap, easy to make,
maintain and look great. So that’s the end of the video, thanks for
watching and hope you got something out of this.

Q&A – Are ants harmful in a vegetable garden?

Q&A – Are ants harmful in a vegetable garden?


♪♪♪ Are ants harmful in
a vegetable garden? As he takes off his glasses. There are a couple
of schools of thought. You know, earlier we were
looking at some aphids on tomatoes. And ants like aphids. Aphids secrete honeydew. It’s kind of a
sweet, sticky substance. And ants will actually
kind of protect those aphids. And ants are omnivorous, which
means they can be carnivorous but they’re omnivorous. They eat both
plant material and, uh, other insects. So, if they’re eating an insect,
they’re beneficial and you’re probably okay to
leave them there. If they’re eating on plant
material like okra, tomatoes.. Fire ants are maybe an
example that can be beneficial. But if there are so many out
there that they’re bothering you when you’re
picking peas, you know, then they’re not beneficial. So, there are some products that
you can use some of the baits. If they’re bothering you and you
want to get rid of them — yes, you can kill them and there are
products that are labeled for use in home gardens. But I would wait and try to
determine whether or not they’re doing you more harm than good. They may be doing you
more good than harm. And if that’s the
case, leave them be.

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 3)

Big-headed Ant Colony (Part 3)


Hi, this is Jordan updating you on my Pheidole sp. colony. It’s been several months since my last update video. Since then the colony hasn’t grown too much. We’ve just come out of winter here in Australia, so the ants have
been in a state of hibernation the last couple of months. It’s starting to heat up
again though, and they’re becoming more active and demanding of food. Last summer this colony grew quite rapidly so hopefully this coming summer will be the
same and I end up with a fairly sizable colony. You can see there’s plenty of brood around. See this
massive pile of larvae here and plenty of eggs and pupae too. You can see there’s quite a lot of soldier ants walking around here. There’s around 40 of them in the colony now. The soldiers just tend to hang around the
nest and hardly ever venture off into the outworld. I think it’s because I normally provide this colony with soft cut up foods, which doesn’t need the
power of a soldier ant to slice up or haul back to the nest. They’re mostly just used
as a sort of living walking food/water reservoir. I can often see the workers
feeding from them or filling them up through the process of trophallaxis. You can
see their gasters are really swollen here. Sometimes even as big as their heads. A couple of months ago I went on a trip
overseas. I spent just over a month in Canada, and if you remember from my last
update, the colony had raised up quite a number of female alates. They ended up
producing around 15 to 20 and total. Anyway, when I returned from my trip all
the alates had gone. So what I suspect happened was they flew of for their nuptial flights. So they would have made their way into the outworld and flown out through the lid which has these little
ventilation gaps. Before I left for my trip I left this window open which is right next to
the outworld. So hopefully the alates made it outside and they underwent
their nuptial flights and started founding new colonies of their own. I’ve never had a colony undergo their nuptial flights like this before. Unfortunately I was away miss out on
witnessing the process, but it’s still really cool nonetheless. So that’s it for the update.
I’ll probably do another one for my Iridomyrmex bicknelli colony next. So look look forward to that and thanks for watching.

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!

Can PEE Cure Ant Stings?!


– I’m Coyote Peterson,
and I’m about to enter the strike
zone with the fire ant. You guys ready? Your shot good? – [Camerman] Yup. – One, two, three. Holy cow. Ow, ow! Holy cow that’s a lot
of stings already! Okay, I’m gonna have
take my hands out pretty quickly guys. – [Cameraman] You can do it man! – [Coyote] So much worse
than the harvester ants. – [Cameraman] You
got it, 30 seconds! – I can’t, I can’t, I
gotta stop, I gotta stop! (buzzer) – [Cameraman] You alright? Tell me what you’re feeling. – A lot of pain, ah! They’re still on me! (intense drumbeat) Nine, ten, 11, 12,
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20,
21, 22, 23, 24, 25, oh hey, what’s up? 26, 27, 28, 29. – [Cameraman] Too many to count? – It’s too many to count. I’m about 30 just on my
hand here, I’m guessing I probably took somewhere
in the vicinity of 100 to 150 ant stings
can you see that? – [Cameraman] Yeah your
skin is like all tight. – My skin is tight,
swollen, and it itches and burns right now. Okay, so if you are
ever out in the wild, let’s say you’re out
there for a picnic, put your picnic
blanket right down on a mound of fire
ants, worse thing that could possibly happen, and you don’t have a
first aid kit with you, there’s a little simple
remedy that you can use. It’s kind of gross, but it’s
also kind of interesting. You can actually pee
on fire ant stings, to neutralize the sting. – [Cameraman] Wait what? – Yeah, you can actually pee. The ammonia in the pee will
actually the neutralize the stings and neutralize
some of the swelling. – [Cameraman] Okay, hold
on, wait, we can’t… I mean how are we gonna
have shots of this? – Well, I’m not gonna just
pee on my hands for you guys right here, I actually
brought with me, an entire bottle of Coyote pee. – [Cameraman] No you did not. – Yes I did. – [Cameraman] That is
colored water guys. – That is not colored
water, you wanna smell it? – [Cameraman] Mario! I need you to smell this. – [Cameraman] He says
he’s got a bottle of pee and I don’t believe him. – No I’m not gonna
make Mario smell it, I’ll smell it though. Yup that’s my pee, 100%. – [Cameraman] See now I
really don’t believe you. – Just smell it, you guys
can smell it at home. – [Cameraman] Ugh! – Yeah, gross right? I know, totally gross. It is a bottle of Coyote
pee, but believe it or not, the ammonia that is in
your pee will actually help to reduce the swelling
and neutralize the venom. So what I’m gonna do right now, as gross as it seems, is I’m going to
dump my own urine all over my arms and on
my hands, to try to reduce the swelling and the burning
from these fire ant stings. You ready? – [Cameraman] Not really. – Here we go… – [Cameraman] Hold on, I’m
gonna back up a couple steps. – I’m not gonna
splash you, come on! Alright you ready? – [Cameraman] Yeah, go for it. – [Coyote] Oh yeah that’s pee. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day, and I know this seems
incredibly gross, right, and it is, it’s super gross, I am literally rubbing
pee into my hands, and into my arms. But this is going to help keep
down the swelling from all of the stings. – [Cameraman] Do not pull my
leg, that wasn’t just a bottle of colored water? – Nope, that is pee,
that is pee 100%. That is pee. That is pee 100%. And I left this bottle of pee
sitting in the sun all day. Look at that, my hands have
actually totally cooled down, and I think that the urine, it’s brought out the bumps
in a little more definition, but I think that the swelling
is actually going down at this point. And it’s only been
a couple of seconds. I can tell you this
much, my arms are not burning at the moment. They still itch, but I
definitely feel like the urine is doing the trick. That’s pretty cool. – [Cameraman]
That’s pretty gross. – It is, I agree, that
was completely gross. Probably one of the grossest
things you guys have ever seen me do, but
hopefully this serves as a great example of
what to do if you ever find yourself in
this worst case scenario. I’m Coyote Peterson, be brave! Stay wild! We’ll see you next week. Now while the urine did
act as a temporary relief to my anguish, unfortunately
it did not completely stop the effects
of the ant venom. In total we counted
over 300 stings, and within 12 hours
of the fire ant swarm, my hands have swollen to
nearly double in size, and were covered in
unsightly white postulates. Moral of the story, do whatever you can
to avoid fire ants. If you thought this behind
the adventure was wild, make sure to go back and
watch the full episode. And don’t forget, subscribe,
to join me and the crew on this season of
Breaking Trail.

Why Fire ants move into yard –Fire ant Control

Why Fire ants move into yard –Fire ant Control


Here we have an example of a fire ant
colony that’s moved in underneath the roots of this plant the homeowner keeps this plant and this whole
bed more moist then the yard generally speaking to the wants to keep the plants
alive in the flowers blooming problem is that really attracts fire ants from many different locations around the home they’re all throughout this area the soil is very loose and allows them to set up camp in bring their
eggs to the surface so the sun will warm them if this area dries out or if the
colony splits the new colony will bud off possibly move into the house for additional moisture.