Fight the Obesity Epidemic with SlimGenics

Fight the Obesity Epidemic with SlimGenics


Obesity has become an epidemic. Nearly two-thirds of American adults are
overweight or obese. 55% do not get enough
physical activity. 26% are completely inactive. Only 25% eat the recommended
amounts of fruits and vegetables. Over the last twenty years, here’s what
has happened with our food consumption. Hamburgers are
23% larger, soft drinks have increased in size by 52%. Snack portions have grown by 60%. Standard dinner plate
sizes have increased by two inches. As food portions and plates
have grown, so have our waistlines. The yearly medical costs of obesity are
estimated at over 147 billion dollars. This figure has
ballooned by more than 80% over a five-year period.
75% of health care costs stem from preventable chronic conditions. Overweight and obese men have
significantly more medical expenses per year than those at a healthy weight. This figure is even larger for women. 3% of the US workforce is morbidly obese but accounts for 21% of obesity costs. Employers may try cost-sharing, managed
care plans, or cash based rebates, but these methods
merely shift costs. Only workplace wellness programs can get
employees healthy in the first place. It’s time to lift the
weight that is bringing down your bottom line. Now is the time to
invest in wellness.

The Typhus Epidemic That Saved A Polish City From The Nazis


Dr. Eugene Lazowski was born in Poland in
1913. He was a Polish doctor and soldier during
World War II. He had been a prisoner of war in a German
Prisoner Of War camp for three years. Providence shone on Dr Eugene Lazowski one
night in 1942 when he saw a means of escape and took it. When Lazowski returned to Rozwadów, he went
to work for the Polish Red Cross – and the Underground. Eugene had a home next to the ghetto in Rozwadow. In fact, his fence bordered the ghetto, which
was filled with his fellow countrymen, many of them Jews. The ‘residents’ of the ghetto were sadly
undernourished and some of them were very ill. Despite the fact that the Germans had declared
it a crime to help these people, a crime that was punishable by death, Dr. Eugene Lazowski
came up with a way to treat the sick in the Rozwadow ghetto. He would have them come to his fence, under
cover of night, and tie a white cloth to it. When he saw the cloth, he would come out to
the fence and treat whoever was there. Dr. Eugene Lazowski was given the opportunity
to assist these people more, when his colleague, Dr. Stanislaw Matulewicz, made an amazing
discovery. If he injected healthy patients with the same
dead bacteria that was used to test for typhus, their tests would come back positive for the
disease, with no harm done to them. The Germans were terrified of contracting
the disease, so if a patient was found to have it, that would make them exempt from
transfer to labor and concentration camps. There was one problem, however. During the time of the Nazi occupation of
Poland, Jews who were discovered to have deadly communicable diseases were killed and their
homes burnt to the ground. If Dr. Eugene Lazowski and Dr. Matulewicz
were going to help, they would only be able to use the bacteria on non-Jewish patients. They first tested it on a man who was home
on leave from a labor camp. It worked. The test came back positive and the man did
not have to return. The doctors began slowly ‘spreading’ the
disease throughout Rozwadow and the surrounding villages. They were very careful not to ‘infect’
Jews and they made sure that some of the ‘infected’ were referred to other doctors, who did not
know of the deception, for testing. This way, all of the tests were not coming
from them. That would have been too obvious. Once there were enough cases of the disease,
which is transmitted through the bite of infected lice, the Germans quarantined the area. No more people were taken out of the area
and placed in camps. Dr. Eugene Lazowski was allowed to continue
‘treating’ the ‘epidemic’ and so, he was able to perpetuate it for nearly three
years. During that time, the Germans only came to
inspect the area once. Their fear of the disease prevented them from
doing a thorough job of it and so the deception was not discovered. Close to the end of World War II, a soldier
whom he had secretly treated for a venereal disease warned Eugene Lazowski that the Gestapo
was after him. He grabbed his wife and daughter and fled
the city. He moved to the United States in 1958 and
became a professor at the University of Illinois Medical Center. Dr. Eugene Lazowski passed away in Oregon
in December of 2006.

Epidemic Does: VidCon 2018 by Henbu

Epidemic Does: VidCon 2018 by Henbu


‘Sup guys! I made it to VidCon. Surprise! So Epidemic Sound hit me up and asked If I wanted to come out to VidCon to check out their pre-party event. Heck yes, I do! But let me introduce myself. My name is Henbu and I make filmmaking and photography related content on YouTube. This was going to be super exciting, because not only was it my first time at VidCon, but I was also able to see and meet a tone of huge creators! Just saw David Dobrik! My name’s Chat! This is Chat from Epidemic Sound. And what’s your name? My name is Charlotta. I’m also from Epidemic Sound! Alright guys, I just met the team over at Epidemic, they’re super friendly and really nice. I actually would not be out here without Epidemic, they actually hit me up and asked if I wanted to come out here and hang out, have fun, and kind of just vlog around! And so far it’s pretty nuts. I’ve seen so many creators that I watch on YouTube. I saw Philly D, I just saw David Dobrik. It’s just really exciting to be surrounded by so many creators. So we are on our way to see Casey Neistat, but we are a bit late. And I just got word from the Epidemic Team that the line is very long and they’re not even sure that we can get in still, so… Quickly, Jasmine! Oh, dang! What I really like about this new Gimble, is that the back of this is actually lowered now, So you can actually see your screen, and have a mic on top. I think it’s really cool and a big improvement! I plan to pick this up very soon. The dream drone right there! The camera on the Phantom 4 is so much bigger than on the Mavic Pro it’s insane. This thing is hefty! I just want to say a huge thanks to Epidemic Sound for inviting me out to their Pre-Party. You guys are extremely hard working and know how to throw an awesome party! I had a ton of fun and I hope we can meet again!

Artist Spotlight: Hallman

Artist Spotlight: Hallman


I’ll always be most happy when I produce
music. I instantly feel like, “Okay this is super happy, like super tropical” I first started playing when I was around 12. I had a friend who showed me a few things on his piano and I noticed I could learn what he played really quickly, so I instantly fell in love with it. So I asked my parents to buy me a beginner’s keyboard and I just started playing all the time I could get. I feel it like, just an urge to create something. And then when I was 15, I think, I found a program called FL studio and I just began to mess around with it. I was really inspired by the whole like Swedish house scene. Early Swedish House Mafia, early Alesso and all that, Avicii, of course. I just want to create music that makes
people feel good. My name is Victor Hallman and I’m a music producer. I grew up here in Gothenburg with my mom, dad and my sister. So yeah, I start with the chord progression. I play around on my piano and try to find a good progression that has the vibe I’m looking for. Maybe it’s sad, maybe it’s happy. It depends on what I want. So after I find a good chord progression that I think is nice, I try to come up with a good melody. It’s kind of, my mind just kind of telling me like, yeah, put this note here and that there and I know what it will sound like. I already have the whole melody from like 8 bars down in my head and then I just draw it in. Yeah and then the drums and percussions, sometimes it could be just like a little snap or clap, it can make a huge difference in the
track. And you slowly build up from there. I always try to add some vocal shots or
some vocals in some way, just to give that extra human touch. And then after that, it’s done. Send it to Epidemic, hope they like it. So the dream would, of course, be to tour the world and see people react to my music. But in the end I just want to make music.

アフリカ密造酒「ワラジ」 – Africa’s Moonshine Epidemic

アフリカ密造酒「ワラジ」 – Africa’s Moonshine Epidemic


We’re in Uganda. Uganda’s had a pretty good spell the last 25 years. No major civil wars, a little bit of an ebola outbreak every so often, including right now, and they are the alcoholism capital of Africa. One favorite type of booze the locals make is called “waragi.” We’re gonna go make some, drink some and hopefully not go blind. [FRINGES] [WAR GIN] [KAMPALA, UGANDA] [WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION]
In 2004, the World Health Organization released its Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health, finding Uganda as the top contender for per capita alcohol consumption in the world. Since 2011, the numbers have only increased, basically making Uganda the drunkest place on Earth. So when Vice heard about Uganda’s country-wide production of a type of moonshine called waragi, we were interested. But after we discovered that people were going blind and dying from drinking Waragi cut with industrial chemicals, we knew this was something we needed to taste for ourselves. It’s making its way through my system. I can feel it kind of spreading out. Following the release of the World Health Organization’s Report, the administration of President Yoweri Museveni, acting through Uganda’s Parliament, ordered a commission to be formed to fact check the Report’s findings. If you’re wondering what prompted a reaction that seems like the geopolitical equivalent of an angry work e-mail, here’s some context. [HISTORY LESSON] Museveni has been President of Uganda for 27 years. He came to power after fighting a six-year bush war against this guy, [MILTON OBOTE
PRESIDENT OF UGANDA
1966-1971]
Who had been President from 1966 to 1971, before being ousted in a coup by this guy, [IDI AMIN
PRESIDENT OF UGANDA
1971-1979]
who was a sociopath. This guy gave himself lots of medals, royal titles, and ruled with an iron fist [MILTON OBOTE
PRESIDENT OF UGANDA
1979-1986]
until he was deposed by this guy, who was then President again, until he lost a civil war against the National Resistance Movement, [YOWERI MUSEVINI
PRESIDENT OF UGANDA
1986-PRESENT]
led by our old pal, Musevini. Running up to Uganda’s 2006 election, Musevini and the now-political National Resistance Movement abolished presidential term limits. On top of that, Musevini’s been lying about his age for five to six odd years, in order to avoid the maximum age for the presidency stipulated in the country’s constitution. [THOMAS MORTON
VICE]
So when the commission, put in place by Uganda’s Parliament to investigate just how drunk they were at the international office party, mad the decision to appoint Dr. Kabann Kabananukye, professor at Makerere University [KABANN KABANANUKYE
PROFESSOR, MAKERERE UNIVERSITY]
and director of the Victory Rehabilitation Center, to head up the commission, it struck us as uncharacteristically sober. What is Uganda’s relationship with alcohol like? Do a lot of people drink here? Oh yes! A lot of people drink alcohol, because, in most of our communities, it is part of the culture. A student, a head teacher, a village chief, a community leader, they are all meeting and drinking in the various groups. The more we talked to people about the subject, the more we began to understand not only the extent of Uganda’s issue with libations, but also just how different the problem manifested itself in different parts of the country. So we headed out of the city, 40 kilometers up into the hills above Kampala, to a village in the rural Kaliro district. [ROBERT
DRIVER] [JAMES MBIRI
FIXER] [2:00 PM] We are very happy. that you have come here with us. [“BLUE”
KALIRO RESIDENT]
In our area. In our village. [GIORDI
KALIRO RESIDENT] Where do you guys make the waragi here? The waragi is made from across there. So, is this somebody’s house? This is the lady’s house, where we usually meet and drink. [MISTRESS KALIRO
LOCAL WARAGI MAKER]
This is the waragi hut, huh? And you’re the one who makes it? Could you explain what’s happening here? [WARAGI MAKING 101] I get bananas and cover them four days to ripen. When they ripen, I peel them and put them all in a drum. I then squeeze the juice out by treading and leave them in for 2 days. So, it’s your basic still. You’ve got the mash in there;
it’s boiling and fermenting. The vapor from it comes up through these copper tubes. It condenses. You cool it off there, and it drips into this gas tank. [Of] alcohol consumed in Uganda, you find about 70 per cent they are drinking only local brews. One would not say that, indeed, the local stuff, it definitely has some impurities. It’s not like gin. And here is the alcohol. And there’s your finished waragi. It seems like it might be strong. Yeah. That tastes like… That tastes like liquor. It’s actually pretty smooth. Like this tastes really clean and fresh. How long does it take to make? The whole process right from the bananas takes a whole month. I get four jerry cans (gas cans) of waragi, which is 80 liters. I am going to get you a sample of a cold one and you can taste it. Oh, do you mind if I kill this real quick? Thank you. A native language corruption of the English phrase “war gin,” waragi was originally contrived to embolden Ugandan soldiers in the King’s East African Rifles during World Wars One and Two, with what the English cheekily referred to as “Dutch courage.” Much to the colonial governor’s chagrin, the beverage later became the drink of choice for those resisting the Crown during the drive for independence in the late 1950s and the early 1960s. It’s up from the store house. That’s great! Thank you. That’s even better. So you can even taste the banana better with that one, when it’s cooled down. Is there some reason that women make waragi more than men? The main reason why it’s mostly us women in this business is because we have families and children to look after. Personally, I have many children in school. So, I have to work very hard to pay fees for their bright future. The teacher?
– Yes. You gave him an extra 10,000 shillings after the other 50,000? Yes, I did, totaling 60,000 shillings. That was a mistake.
You should’ve consulted me first. You should have consulted me! In selected districts, you find their livelihood is significantly dependent on the alcohol itself. More than even 60 per cent of their income. People have gone to school. They have even graduated from university out of selling alcohol. Does the Government care that you make waragi? Do you ever get interfered with? You have to get a license from the government, and also pay a tax. You said that some people come up from Kampala to buy… to buy your waragi. Why would people travel this far? My waragi tastes nice and is organic. Because I use bananas. Most people in the city use factory rejects of sugar cane. That sounds way worse! Bananas are a lot better than factory-reject sugar cane. It’s kinda like the African version of Sorry. You roll the dice, and then you move your little colored pieces and try to bump the other guys off the board. Who’s winning here? You’re winning. No, not anymore. The ladies are all over there. They’re kinda segregated, middle school dance-style. [4:00 pm] Addiction is addiction. Because the moment you are addicted, the symptoms are the same. Whether you have been taking Ugandan waragi or what… there’s no difference. [“JOJO”
KALIRO RESIDENT]
So, do people only drink like waragi here, or do you drink like beer and other things too? The difference is that drinking two bottles of beer is like drinking water. Yet just a half liter or waragi will get you drunk then and there. That’s my… my brother. That’s my uncle. What’s the hangover like? We’re drinking all this, so how bad’s it gonna be in the morning? Well, it depends. Waragi weakens the old people easily. But the youth can take it and go about our daily activities without much effect. When a child is born, sometimes in some communities, he is given some alcohol. Did you say they give the child alcohol? Yes, in some communities, yes. Even as soon as he is born, as part of initiation and the rituals. It is part of our culture. For you. – For you.
– Yeah, is that OK? Yeah, I’d love some. There I go.
Perfect. Good, right? Making a friend. There we go. You’re me! OK, now look at me. It’s African Thomas. With the day wearing on and the festivities beginning to take a toll on our hosts, we realized it was time to get these folks some dinner. [6:00 pm] So, we’re gonna go get some food for the party. I get the feeling this man’s… we’re gonna get something that isn’t yet food. Probably something we’re gonna have to watch die before it becomes food. There’s like a whole dragoon of kids behind us now. Is this dinner? I see. Oh lord. Kind of a… It kind of isn’t a Vice party until something dies. We’re gonna eat that. Yeah, OK, that’s what I thought. I kind of feel bad about saying this about a goat that’s about to die, but that thing’s balls are enormous. This went from some weird Bruegel’s village life scene into some perverse take on the old Judaic scapegoat ritual. Salaam alaikum! Grand father, salaam alaikum! Don’t let go of it! Way to go, old man! Where’s the knife? Do you think he will feel the axe’s effect? He is still kicking. See that? Look, look! There’s still more blood. There’s a lodge at my place for all drunkards. Whoever gets drunk, I can take them there, but I don’t know if they’ll be able to eat. This was in the goat about 20 minutes ago. Given another 20 minutes, it will be inside me. Hopefully tempering the kinda booze-fueled Bruegelian pandemonium we just witnessed. This cooking operation is a little haphazard. And loud. Everybody is just kind of jockeying for position on the flame. I don’t know. We’ve been doing this for 30 minutes, too. I have no clue when it’s going to be done. Where’s my money at? My friends? So, I’m just here getting my head rubbed and trying to eat some goat that’s way too hot. It’s about seven o’clock in the evening. This is how you party in Uganda, out in the country. I’ve gotta wait a second.
This thing’s way too hot for me. This is good goat. As our new friends began to hit the deck, one by one, we noticed that beside out initial sip during our interview, Mistress Kaliro was the only one who hadn’t touched a drop of the waragi during the party. Is waragi something that people drink here every day, or is it just kinda more for special occasions, for parties? Yes, they drink waragi here every day. There are those who can’t go a day without it. What would happen if they stopped drinking it? I’m not quite sure, but it’s just how some people feel when they don’t eat food. It’s the same feeling. It’s like their medicine. Wait a bit, make him stand. He says they are raping him. Make him stand. In that condition, he won’t be able to stand. He drank a lot and understands nothing at the moment. There he goes. You must really love drinking. This one is a lost cause. Everybody gets out of work, everybody lets their worries wash away in a stream of waragi, somebody kills a goat, the day’s over, and you start anew the next day. What happens in the city, though, is another story. We’re gonna go check that out. [THOMAS MORTON
VICE] Our visit to the very traditional waragi operation in Kaliro had ended with a lot of older men on the ground before sunset. It seemed like we were watching people drink for the first time. But based on what we observed, that was probably just the everyday norm. Curious about how moonshining worked in the rest of the country, we visited the Kataza suburb of Kampala to explore a much larger and much, much prettier setup. This is a far cry. Hello. Hi, how are you. All the kids came with us. That’s… cute and distressing, because this looks like… some sort of creepy, industrial slag yard, filled with bubbling vats of half-buried booze. This [waragi] is prepared in the house. Inside there. Could I see? I can smell it. It’s bubbling. There’s so many drums. And how much does each of these, like a whole barrel, how much waragi comes out of that? This one is 20 liters. Wow, so 40 liters a day then basically. This is a big operation. How many people work here? We are 10 people. Some of them work in the morning, others in the daytime, others in the evening. Why do women make waragi? It feels like everybody we’ve met who makes waragi is a woman. [JOSEPH
KATAZA RESIDENT]
It’s the only way the can make money is to employ themselves. It’s the only job a woman can give herself. We need to work very hard for everything, but earn very little. So even when you go to these urban areas, depending on one’s income, income status and the community, the poor, the majority that lives in the slums, they depend on the locally brewed waragi. How much do you sell a liter for? [MISTRESS KATAZA
LOCAL WARAGI MAKER]
A litre is 10,000 shillings ($5 USD). A lot of times they use these. This one is 600 shillings. OK, that’s 600, and that’s one too? In 1965, the Ugandan Parliament enacted the Enguli Act, requiring a license for brewing and distillation of all locally produced alcohol. But, for really obvious reasons, the Enguli Act has never been successfully enforced as unlicensed production of waragi rampantly persists across the country. Could we buy some bottles? I’d like to buy a couple bottles, if possible. Whatever she puts in there is gonna kill a lot more germs than water. Is this ours? Yes, that’s ours. This is Robert, our driver. As you can tell by his ability to gulp down bootleg liquor. Can we go over and see the drinkers? In Uganda, the people who are underemployed, the poor, because of the limited funds, limited money they have, there is a lot of binge drinking. White boy, white boy! White boy, white boy! Very glad, indeed. You have come to the place of your brothers and sisters. We could not believe that an American young man would come here. But, really, god bless you for the fact that you honor all the Ugandans as your brothers. Thank you. I’m glad that me showing up and drinking is an honor to you. So, this is a place where people come to have a drink. It helps to pass the time. Yeah, it’s nice, when the day is done, the work is over, quitting time. It’s just like a neighborhood bar. [JAMES
KATAZA RESIDENT]
It’s great to meet you, James. – You too, Thomas.
– Oh, just Thomas. – Thomas.
– Thomas? Oh, Thomas Morton. My last name? Morton. You better tell me what that means. It’s a kiss. Wow, that is. – It’s good?
– Yeah, it’s great. You like it? It’s nice and strong. Your other brother, he should come and taste. Who, which one? Oh him? [JOE STRAMOWSKI
VICE] They call it “sulfuric acid flavored with magnesium.” I can see why you gave it the name. Here, very good, then… That stuff is great on the tongue, and then… It does sting going down. You should’ve tasted the stuff I was drinking out of the gas cap. That was insanely, intensely strong. In April 2010, more than 80 people died after drinking waragi contaminated with high amounts of methanol over a three-week period in the Kampala district. They think they are drinking the alcohol, when it is actually adulterated. It’s like when drug dealers stamp out their supply, and they put filler in it. You taste? Wow, that’s a lot stronger than yesterday. I may need a second after that. You guys are taking a video, and we don’t know if you’re going to sell it in Africa or… We don’t know. But, everyone believes that you are going to sell it here. That’s our local mentality, that you are going to sell it here. All the way from America to Uganda, East Africa. How do you benefit? How do I benefit? I get to come to Africa and hang out with you guys. – This is fun, man!
– Fuck you! (Laughing.) No, no, this is fun! This is my reward! It’s a lot less bucolic than the place we were at yesterday. It kind of looks like an industrial slag heap. There’s these half-buried drums in the ground, a general caking of grime all over the place. It’s like stepping into the very early day s of the industrial revolution, from like the Arcadian shepherd days. But, it makes a lot more money and it’s a lot, lot, lot stronger, for better and probably a lot worse. So after you’ve got your waragi and got a little buzz going, everybody comes down here. This is Kalagal. It’s kind of the red light district of Kampala it basically is a sunday night. It kind of looks like Cardiff or Glasgow or something on a friday. Tons of people out, everybody’s staggering, picking fights and hugging. There’s a lot of women out who look like they’re charging. This is sort of like Britain’s last legacy here. Instead of rum, sodomy and a lash, Ugandans opted for gin, no sodomy and hookers. What the fuck? It’s alright, they are drunks!

The Skinny on Obesity (Ep. 1): An Epidemic for Every Body

The Skinny on Obesity (Ep. 1): An Epidemic for Every Body


[ Music ]>>How did the entire world
get this fat this fast? Did everyone just become a
bunch of gluttons and sloths? [ Music ] Obesity’s been around
since there were people. It’s been around for
50,000 years easy and it was around before McDonald’s,
Burger King, Wendy’s, it was around before Coca-Cola. Obesity’s part of
the human condition and there are evolutionary
reasons why obesity has been selected for in individual
populations because people who store energy are
more likely to be able to survive periods of famine. So there is a selection process
that goes on all the time but none of those things explain
how in 30 years we have gone from being svelt, if you will, to basically being
unbelievably sick. That’s what an epidemic
or a pandemic, in this case, looks like. That’s what plague,
influenza looked like and the question is what
would be the exposure that could account for this
and if it was just gluttons and sloths, how do you
explain the obese 6-month-old? We have an epidemic of obese
6-month-olds in this country. They don’t diet and
exercise, you’re going to call them a bunch
of gluttons and sloths? This goes way beyond
the question of personal responsibility.>>We have felt like it’s the
individual’s responsibility to keep their energy balance,
to eat the right amount and stay the right weight. But when something goes
wrong like the majority of the population becoming
overweight, we have to question that model and we have to
look at the forces outside of ourself this huge
societal environmental forces that are shaping obesity.>>The reason we’re in
this epidemic can be summed up with one statement, one idea
that has become so pervasive that it’s become sacrosanct,
that it has become dogma and that statement is “A
calorie is a calorie.” It’s the first thing dieticians
learned in dietary school. If you eat more than you
burn you will gain weight. If you eat less than you
burn, you will lose weight. And it doesn’t matter if those
calories come from carrots or cheesecake, the bottom line
is a calorie is a calorie, you eat too much, you
exercise too little and that’s the mantra
and guess what? It doesn’t work. And the reason it
doesn’t work is because a calorie
is not a calorie. The only dogma is there is none.>>Choose your favorite
hypothesis, there’s so many. Well you know what is
it in our environment? Is it just the excess of food? Is it the high fructose
corn syrup? Is it the antibiotics we’re
taking, the estrogens, different hormones and
hormone mimic hers? Is it the intrauterine
environment? All of these factors
play a role, so it is not just one thing. I mean if there’s one big thing, it’s of course it is
our food environment.>>Fast foods, fast
preparing, fast eating, and fast-causing disease, too. And we in our 2 parent
working, 2-hour commuting, 2 job life do not
have time for food. This is the biggest issue
that we currently face. It is the reason that the
industrial global diet has taken over the world is because with
all of our labor-saving devices, with the cars and the computers
and lawn mowers that you sit on instead of push,
et cetera, et cetera. All of those things have
actually reduced our time not created it. So this is a function of the
changes that we have made in our society extensively
for our benefit. The question is are they?>>Well there’s been a number
of changes in the last 30 years in how we interact with
food, with our food supply. There’s over 24,000
different foods that enter the marketplace
every year and there’s the issue of sleep patterning, stress,
how we feed our animals, the nutrients in the soil. There’s a number of
different issues at play. All of these converge on, I
think, adding to something to the obesity epidemic.>>The Western diet, our diet,
that we prize and export all over the globe has now become
the industrial global diet because it’s cheap,
it’s portable, it has no depreciation,
witness the 10-year old Twinkie and it was designed
to taste really good to keep people eating. This is now everywhere. This is the exposure. This is what has changed.>>I think we have
had a perfect storm. We have had the confluence of
this change food environment, the restricted activity like
no PE in schools, and chemicals that we’re not quite sure
what we’re being exposed to and they’re working together. [ Music ]>>Boy does that look good but honey what’ll these
calories do to my waistline?>>Relax, it’s diet [inaudible].>>There was a big war in the
food field back in the sixties and seventies and the
war was fat or sugar. And so we were remanded,
as a country, to reduce our consumption
of fat from 40% to 30%. Well guess what? We did it, we are there. But the total consumption
of calories and specifically carbohydrates
and especially sugar has gone through the roof, so
it was that directive, that edict of the late 1970s
that started the obesity and metabolic syndrome
ball rolling.>>It is almost impossible
to buy those packaged foods without getting a lot of extra
sugars that are just going to be toxic for your metabolism. I’m suspicious of anything
that says low fat or diet because you know that that means
that they’ve had to compensate with a lot of these
added sugars.>>A perfect example,
SnackWell’s. So what’s a SnackWell? Two grams of fat down, 13 grams
of carbohydrate increased 4 of which are sugar,
no fewer calories, same number of calories and
if fat’s not the problem and the sugar is, you can
see where we’re going here.>>And there’s also the
change in this food supply so that those highly
palatable foods are more easily accessible, so we can
reach for that comfort food at any street corner, at
any time during the day and have a few extra calories. [ Music ]>>When we talk about
the diseases of obesity, we’re talking about type
2 diabetes, hypertension, lipid problems, so blood fats,
if you will, heart disease. Those are sort of the
Big 4, if you will, that constitute what we
classically called the metabolic syndrome. However, we now know that there
are several other diseases that fall within the scope
as well, for instance, nonalcoholic fatty
liver disease, which now affects
one-third of all Americans, polycystic ovarian syndrome,
which affects 10% of all women, cancer and also dementia. Now here’s the key. Everyone thinks that those
downstream diseases are because of the obesity and
that could not be further from the truth. The obesity travels
with those diseases but the obesity is a marker for
those diseases Twenty percent of obese people have a
completely normal cellular metabolism and they will
live to a normal age. Forty percent of thin people, normal weight people have those
same chronic metabolic diseases and will die of them. Nobody dies of the obesity per
se; they die of the diseases that come from the
metabolic dysfunction. So when you do the math that
accounts for 60% of America. We are not talking
about a minority; we are talking about
the majority. So when you add up the medical
costs for those 8 diseases, that is 75% of healthcare
expenditures, not just ours, not just America but all over
the world so much so that in September of 2011, the
United Nations secretary general announced that non-communicable
disease, that is chronic metabolic
disease, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hypertension,
cancer, dementia now posed a bigger
threat to the developing world, not the developed world,
the developing world than did acute infectious
disease and that includes HIV. This is enormous. This is mind boggling. This is absolutely staggering that developing countries have
a bigger problem with obesity and diabetes than they do with
cholera and other infections. When you think about that,
that really has to stop and give you pause,
something is going on here. [ Music ]

Laughter Epidemic (Social Psychology)

Laughter Epidemic (Social Psychology)


Hello! This is your smart entertainment
host, Amelia, and today we are going down to Africa to talk about a strange social
phenomenon called the laughter epidemic Hello, Africa In 1962 in a small village school from Eastern Africa some kids tell a joke and everybody starts laughing. No, I mean literally everybody. Apparently the joke was pretty good so the laughter has spread leading to an authentic epidemic. The whole Tanzania was contaminated quickly and even the neighboring Uganda was affected. The epidemic lasted for a few weeks. Today’s adults who at the time were just a bunch of joyful kids. Remember the fun they had. Profoundly associated to the gregariousness of our species Contagion is a feature of human emotions and a result of evolution itself. Through contagion our species strengthened its adaptive and survival resources When we answer to and resonate with our fellow men not only recall to Veit relationships with them But we also make sure that, by virtue of the universal principle of reciprocity, they will answer similarly when we need them Either to partyer to receive help in times of hardship. A short French movie known under the name of “Mercy” tries to replicate the tanzanian laughter epidemic in the Parisian Metro. The script was simple: an actor starts laughing, without an obvious reason. Maybe it was a joke that he remembered or funny situation that he lived and in a short amount of time all the passengers followed him in a small laughter epidemic. But here’s a random moment in a Bulgarian Metro. The laughter is healthy even a meaningless laughter. Besides this function of social bonding while laughing at a microbiological level we release hormones, which have a beneficial impact on the emotional state. Types of therapy bye laughter promise you a much needed improvement in emotional state and a change of the dramatic set of perceptions that keep you under stress.

String Theory (Hex One of Epidemic + BBZ Darney) “Reminisce” Music Video

String Theory (Hex One of Epidemic + BBZ Darney) “Reminisce” Music Video


Chorus
Yo I’m just fina let this flow set it step out the realm of the poetic
This game is trying to box me in but I wont let it
So watch me give myself to ya’ll raw with no edits
Cause if there’s something that you want yo you go get it Verse 1
I still feel like I’m on my first year This thought alone could make me burst tears
Not making it’s the realization of my worst fears
Yo why did God put us on earth if it hurts here
And elders just advise yo ass to go to church yea
Right man I’ve been running all my life Since a youngin I’ve been ducking all my plights
I’m exhausted now somewhere along the line I lost this ground and all my force and drive
I tossed it out Fuck the cars and crowns cause yo regardless
of what brauds I astonish It’ll always be their flaws I acknowledge
was born honest Yet I’m supposed to be that smart guy in college
But I’m a diamond in the rough I ain’t polished Shit no one is we take no shits yet no one
gives An eye for an eye and no one lives
So what’s the basis this baited game is just confusion for the basic
Who’s blinded by illusions of oases they look twice
That’s why they perpetrate the crook life to lead your soul astray
Cause now a days it’s selling for a good price yea today it’s on but later on regret it
Yo the minute that I play this song forget it Chorus
Yo I’m just fina let this flow set it step out the realm of the poetic
This game is trying to box me in but I wont let it
So watch me give myself to ya’ll raw with no edits
Cause if there’s something that you want yo you go get it Verse 2
So what is life a small phrase containing so much but what’s the whole fuss
I mean what was the trait that made it so rough
Why we do we hold such importance for nothing important
Thugging extorting to drugging and snorting Our leaders are nothing more than exceptional
schemers Less than achievers when we should be professional
dreamers And our own schools teach us how to be clones
with no tools So we’re either immature drones or just grown
fools Believing nothing with meaning or substance
just deconstruction With the youngsters looking up to the thieves
and the hustlers Eager discussions about major league teams
in abundance But never ’bout no politics we must be out
of it It’s counterfeit society is blinded and we’re
proud of it Regardless yo I gotta vent I mean this shit
is absurd They speak like being ignorant is superb
Then call you nerd like intellectual niggas is herbs
Saying we’re in decline when the actual figures is blurred
So when I spit I’m pulling triggers with words yo
But ain’t shit changed still the same script today gets praised
That’s why this game’s fit for dazed kids that ain’t been raised but they’ve been
Molded for prison yet they think that they’re rouges in the system
Scolded the wisdom but they chose to put holes in a victim
Yea today it’s on but later on regret it Shit the minute that I play this song forget
it Chorus
Yo I’m just fina let this flow set it step out the realm of the poetic
This game is trying to box me in but I wont let it
So watch me give myself to ya’ll raw with no edits
Cause if there’s something that you want yo you go get it